Education

Taming the High Cost of College! : Financial Aid | FAFSA | Student Loans | Scholarships | Tax | Saving | Investing | Grants

Brad Baldridge, CFP : College Financial Planner

If you are the parent of a college bound high school student then this podcast is for you. Our goal is to give you the information you need to SAVE TIME, SAVE MONEY, and reduce stress in the college process. We will cover all aspects of planning and paying for college including things like: What to do if you do not qualify for financial aid, student loans, FAFSA and CSS profile, merit aid, scholarships, college tax breaks, visits, ACT and SAT, college fairs, the application process, and good college planning websites. Essentially all things college.

Episodes

THCC118 – Understanding College Tax Deductions Interview with Craig Cody, Certified Tax Coach and Author “Secrets of a Tax Free Life”
36:46
2017-10-06 04:15:21 UTC 36:46
THCC118 – Understanding College Tax Deductions Interview with Craig Cody, Certified Tax Coach and Author “Secrets of a Tax Free Life”

Understanding College Tax Deductions

What is a certified tax coach? “We help our clients keep more of what they make by lowering their tax liability through legal means,” describes our guest Craig Cody. He is a best selling author and certified tax coach that works in all 50 states with his average client saving over $20,000 a year in taxes. Filling out the forms properly is very different from planning your life to get the most back from completing those boxes. Listen to this short episode for all of the tax secrets you can’t miss!

Questions Answered Today:

Are there tax benefits for paying for college?

Yes! Some of the top ones include:

  • Lifetime Learning credit
  • New Opportunity credit

People with children in school sometimes make too much money and they miss out on these. They didn’t plan and these credits phase out.

Some simple planning to perhaps move more money towards retirement can lower you back into the threshold.

Most people that file on their own or typical tax accountants would just say, “Sorry, you don’t get the credit,” instead of working to find a way to get the credit.

Financial aid is based on your income and assets.

There are legal strategies to lower your income by writing off expenses, or maybe restructuring a business/changing your entity, that can be very beneficial to business owners.

That’s where Craig Cody comes in- his company is filled with experts to help you with your unique situation to figure out if the benefit is worth the effort.

Bottom line: It is complicated and you really need to work with someone that understands both the college side as well as the tax side.

Communication is the key!

Can I hire my child?

Be sure to consult with your advisor to be certain you are doing everything correctly!

You can legally hire your child as young as 7 years old (Craig recommends 11 years old) to work on rental properties and start paying them a reasonable compensation.

Everything has to be well documented with excellent records (including how much you are going to be paying your child supported with comparable invoices of what a fair market price is), but then the money can be transferred into their own account (again, with documentation) and they can pay for college from there.

As long as they are under 21, their income is not subject to self-employment tax.

If you aren’t going to claim them as a dependent, they can file their own tax return and then you are eligible for some of those education credits.

Education Assistance Plan: Where you pay your nondependent $5,250 a year which is tax free to the student, but tax deductible to the business.

What else should I know?

Check with your professional on what is available in your state.

It is never too late to start a 529 plan if you are going to have a child in college eventually. Most people just aren’t aware of who or how much they can put into it.

Cody also wrote “10 Most Expensive Tax Mistakes that Cost Business Owners Thousands” which includes:

  • Failing to plan
  • Choosing the wrong entity
  • Missing family employment
  • Missing medical benefit plans
  • Home office
  • Retirement plan
  • Missing Craig’s help

Our listeners can have a FREE copy of this book! Check out the Links And Resources for yours!

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

Core Area- Scholarships

All families have to talk about scholarships, but not all will pursue or win them.

Beginning in the sophomore or junior year of high school, start figuring out how scholarships work and if you are going to pursue them.

There are two broad types of scholarships:

  • Directly from the college you are attending
    • EVERYONE should look at these and go for them!
  • Private scholarships
    • From outside companies or other sources, including local

Some families will not be very successful at winning these because their child is relatively average and participates with activities/sports at a basic level.

Other families could win quite a bit if their child is a great communicator, has strong grades, is very talented in an area/gifted, or deeply involved with something.

If your student is going to fill out 40 scholarship applications, first they have to find 40 they qualify for and then do all the application processes. It is a lot of work!

The most successful families have mom and dad as part of the process with regularly scheduled meetings where they help keep their child organized and focused.

You will have to figure out if this is worth your time. Time might be better spent getting a job and working to earn money and putting that towards college expenses instead.

Decide: a lot of scholarships, a handful we are very qualified for, or no scholarships at all.

Check out the scholarship guide in the links for great information!

Episode 43: How to Help Your Student Win Scholarships!

Episode 87: Win Scholarships Even With a Low GPA and Test Scores

Episode 96: Using LinkedIn and Other Social Media to Find Scholarships

Episode 112: How Kristina Ellis Won Over $500,000 in Free College Money

Optional Area- Getting Involved in the Military

There are a few ways the military can be part of the college process including:

  • ROTC (Reserve Officer Training Corp) while in college
  • GI Bill
    • For after the child has served or parents can possibly transfer theirs
  • Military Academy
    • If it is a right fit for you

 

Episode 46: Benefits of the GI Bill to Pay for College

Episode 42: ROTC Scholarships and Careers

Episode 101: Joining Forces with the Military to Cover the Cost of College

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Share

The post THCC118 – Understanding College Tax Deductions Interview with Craig Cody, Certified Tax Coach and Author “Secrets of a Tax Free Life” appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC117 – Choosing a Winning Career Path Interview with Casey Stanton, CMO of Tech Guys Who Get Marketing and Author “Functional Marketing”
55:26
2017-10-06 04:15:21 UTC 55:26
THCC117 – Choosing a Winning Career Path Interview with Casey Stanton, CMO of Tech Guys Who Get Marketing and Author “Functional Marketing”

Choosing a Winning Career Path

Speaking today is Chief Marketing Officer Casey Stanton. After the recession of 2008 hit, Stanton was stuck without a job. Using some creativity, salesmanship, and a little luck he was able to find his passion in life through the success of marketing. Using his career achievements, he was even able to land as a professor of marketing at Tulane University where he created and taught several courses. Want to stand out in a sea of homogeneity at a job interview? Stanton has the secrets you need right now!  

Questions Answered Today:

How can students stand out?

“I think the difference between students that do well and don’t do well comes down to a certain sense of flexibility,” describes Stanton.

The students that did the best considered:

  • What they were interested in
  • Implications of what will happen in the next 10 or 20 years
  • How the industry could change
  • Being creative

“Don’t shoot with a shotgun (for a job), but use a sniper rifle,” notes Stanton.

Find the specific job you are interested in and tailor everything you can to get there. Appeal to people who have that job by presenting your value and even sending actual mail.

Stanton also suggests, “You don’t need a cover letter until you have the job,” because you will be working on building a relationship with people from that company and proving how hard you work.

What can parents do if children aren’t really motivated?

“You either have results, or you have excuses,” says Stanton. If your student isn’t driven to figure out what their perfect job is, you can’t really help them. You might be able to set up a job for them through your own connections, but if a student has to figure it out for themselves they will work very hard.

“There are more 4.0 students in India than America has total students. The competition has never been greater and the odds have never been worse for us,” warns Stanton.

Hard work is the only way to separate yourself.

It is also very difficult to choose something if you haven’t seen anything. Students need to be exposed to job possibilities that are out there.

There is a new phenomena where jobs can disappear very quickly and be replaced by an app. Millennials are acutely aware that longevity is rare.

“Confidence is at an all-time low,” notes Stanton. There is an understandable lack of confidence amongst young people that might need some building up.

Young people today need to have their own “personal brand” based on what they can deliver. This should include the referability habits:

  • Show up on time
  • Do what you say you are going to do
  • Finish what you start
  • Say “please” and “thank you”
  • Develop a level of expertise in something
    • Follow your passion or don’t, but what is the potential you are going to be an expert, make an impact, get paid, and stay employed?

 

“Have the commitment and courage to stick through and do something and in getting to that result, you develop a sense of confidence from it and a capability that you can then charge for,” stresses Stanton.

The most successful of his friends from college put their heads down and did the work to get to the top of wherever they went.

You don’t have to choose your path early, while that can certainly help, it just only matters that you stick with it to gain confidence within that profession.

What is the Kolbe test?

There are 3 major pillars of psychology including mental (IQ), affective (strengths finder or what motivates you), and the way you go about doing things.

According to “Managing Oneself”, there are 2 types of people:

  • listeners (someone who can listen to information and respond)
  • readers (need more time to prepare)

Visit Rocketfuel for a free test on being an innovator or an integrator.

Stanton’s favorite test costs $50 and can be found at Kolbe. This will help you learn your cognitive abilities to help know your own strengths, weaknesses, and how to better manage and delegate responsibilities.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

Core Area- Family Discussions

These can be either informal (in the car or just out of the blue) or formal.

The first big conversation should be between mom and dad discussing in detail:

  • How college should go/you’d like it to go
  • How much you can pay
  • Who is helping the kids
    • Applications
    • Essays
    • Planning visits
    • Choosing careers
  • Hiring outside help
    • ACT Prep, college admission counselors, someone to help plan finding college money, etc.

Figure this out between the two of you so you don’t give conflicting information to your child.

There will also need to be a sit-down/formal meeting in the beginning. This might have to be broken up over more than one day, depending on your student. It is your chance to set clear expectations, who is responsible for what, how you will help, and what you will do on your own.

Be careful of how much you promise to spend- finance is an issue and you might not be able to pay everything at a very expensive school.

It’s also good to make sure students are responsible for pieces themselves. You’ll know it when you see it when your student is ready to have this talk.

Optional Area- Study Abroad

This is a viable option for students. It could be just a summer, 1 semester, a whole school year, or more.

There are many programs available that differ from college to college. Some have partnerships already set up, and others have certain unique opportunities.

Mom and dad should also talk about this first, explore the cost, and decide if it is something you want to encourage.

Ultimately there is a lot to gain from study abroad and it could be quite beneficial for a student if the right fit is found.

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Share

The post THCC117 – Choosing a Winning Career Path Interview with Casey Stanton, CMO of Tech Guys Who Get Marketing and Author “Functional Marketing” appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC116 – Making College Finance Decisions Interview with Debbi King, Author “The ABC’s of Personal Finance”
40:26
2017-10-06 04:15:21 UTC 40:26
THCC116 – Making College Finance Decisions Interview with Debbi King, Author “The ABC’s of Personal Finance”

Making College Finance Decisions

“Personal finance is about 10% math and 90% emotion,” describes our guest today and money expert Debbi King. After ending up in bankruptcy, she finally got debt-free and decided nobody else should ever have to go through what happened to her. Using her accounting degree and education degree she became a coach and author to help everyone succeed financially.

Questions Answered Today:

What is your perspective on parents planning for college?

“Sadly I see a lot of stress and non-preparation,” laments King.
Parents often have their own struggles and aren’t able to just write a check to pay for college.
College should not be a given! Children need to find out what their passion is and then decide if college is the right path to reach that dream.
To a certain generation, college seems mandatory. It really isn’t anymore.
King suggests asking, “What would I do if I could do it for free?” Use job shadowing and other ways for kids to explore what they think they are interested in. Once they find what their passion is, they need to plan how to achieve it.

What is your recommendation when parents feel like they are coming up short?

“A lot of parents feel guilty and that it is their job to send their kids to college. It isn’t,” says King. It is very important that you don’t ruin your own financial future. Students have a lot more financial options.
Together, you can both work and pay for as much as you can of their educational expenses.
Consider going to community college for the first 2 years and then transferring.
Scholarships are critical if you need to attend a university. Even awards of $100 will add up quickly. Be sure to let your adult student take responsibility and lead the charge for tackling their college expenses.
 

How can you pay down debt?

It has to be your #1 goal to pay down debt quickly. King recommends:

  • Do not wait! Pay it down even while you are still in school
    • Get a summer job and put that towards your loan
  • Make it a priority to pay it off
    • Pay this off before buying a car or any other large expense
    • Lower every budget item you can and get rid of that loan
      • Live with parents, get a roommate, anything you can do
    • Interest accumulates fast, so be sure to pay off that debt as quickly as possible to avoid having to pay more in the long run

“You don’t want that debt looming over you,” stresses King. If you only pay minimum payments, you could have that debt for 20 years.

What does the financial conversation with your child look like?

King has a few tips on how to have that awkward financial conversation about college with your child:

    • Just casually drop pieces of the conversation in relaxed settings such as driving in the car, at the mall, or on vacation.
    • Whoever can get through without the child putting their guard up is the one to start the conversation. You have to know your family dynamic.
    • Be honest and upfront. Know what you can do and be frank.
      • Be certain you and your spouse are clear with each other first about what you can do while still taking care of your own financial future.
    • Kids don’t really understand money until they have their own experience.
      • King’s daughter got a job at 16 and could figure out how many hours she would have to work in order to buy something and that made money make more sense.

 

  • Senior year of high school is too late! “You can start as early as sophomore, but really ramp it up during junior year,” notes King.

 
Money is an area that is still very taboo and private for most people. King’s book “The ABC’s of Personal Finance” is very user friendly and explains everything you need to know to be in command of your own finances from A-Z.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

Core Area- True Price of College
In order to estimate how much college will actually cost, families have to figure out:

  • Need-based aid
  • Merit-based aid
  • Scholarships/awards at the college
  • Outside scholarships/awards

This will give you what college might actually cost. From there, you have to create a budget of how much to save and what you will need to spend.
Optional Area- Rental Property
A rental property is generally considered an asset.
For example: If you have a 4 family rental worth $400,000 and a mortgage for $300,000 you will use the net value ($100,000) on your financial aid forms.
You can also deduct fix-up costs, realtor fees, and taxes to determine the actual check you would get at closing then use this number (say, $40,000) on your financial aid form.
A rental property is also something you can use to employ your children. If you have your child go and help clean the place every once and awhile, parents can claim that deduction as an expense and students can claim that as income. They might not make enough money to pay taxes and can then save that for college.

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.
If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!
The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Share

The post THCC116 – Making College Finance Decisions Interview with Debbi King, Author “The ABC’s of Personal Finance” appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC115- Getting Additional Support Beyond Your High School- Outside Agencies That Provide College Support Interview with Dr. Toinette McClellan Gunn, VP of Programs at Chicago Scholars
48:04
2017-10-06 04:15:21 UTC 48:04
THCC115- Getting Additional Support Beyond Your High School- Outside Agencies That Provide College Support Interview with Dr. Toinette McClellan Gunn, VP of Programs at Chicago Scholars

Getting Additional Support Beyond Your High School

Chicago Scholars has the goal of finding students in the Chicago area that want to go to college, but might need some additional support. Even if you are not in Chicago, tune in to this episode with Dr. Toinette Gunn to understand how these programs work! There is support out there ready and waiting to help you guide your student through the college process.

Questions Answered Today:

What is Chicago Scholars?

“I’ve been in the college access or readiness space for over 15 years,” shares Dr. Gunn. She is a first-generation college student that didn’t have a lot of guidance or family support.
Education broke the poverty cycle of her family and she is very passionate about working to help other students to change their own futures.
Chicago Scholars began in 1996. It is a nonprofit organization with the largest college access and success program in Chicago. “We help students get to and through college. It is about helping these young people transition into careers and roles of leadership,” notes Dr. Gunn.
Some examples of the types of things they do include:

  • Working with students and parents
    • Parents are involved from the very beginning establishing a partnership to achieve the common goal of the student earning their degree.
  • College access
    • Lecture lab about the college process
  • Individual counseling about college
  • Workshops
  • Mentors
    • Help through the application process

The programs begin June of the summer before the senior year of high school. Beginning in October of their senior year, these students have already applied to about 5 colleges on average.
Once a student is enrolled in college, there is a college success team available to offer multiple types of support as well as workshops around careers, leadership, and identity/self-advocacy for resources on campus. “Students have to be proactive and initiate,” describes Dr. Gunn.
Students are also strongly encouraged to get involved with campus life. Research suggests that a student who feels more connected and is involved with their campuses, or feels part of the community at a college, is more likely to persist and graduate.

How do I find something similar in my town?

There are over 30 organizations that are partnered with Chicago Scholars in Chicagoland.
If you don’t live in Chicago, you should ask your high school counselor or look on the internet for:

Dr. Gunn also suggests to start with an individual education counselor if you can afford the fee.

What are the important factors students and parents need to consider when applying to a college?

“First and foremost do your research,” warns Dr. Gunn. This includes:

    • Complete an academic profile (SAT/ACT test scores and GPA) and make sure it helps guide the institutions you are applying to.

 

  • Even if you are a little under the average of a school, if you really want to go there you should still apply and highlight your compelling story via the essays/personal statement.

 

  • College selectivity rating
    • Colleges that are more selective have higher graduation rates.
  • Graduation rates
    • Especially if you are an underrepresented minority.
  • Supportive services available on campus
  • Area of study
    • If your major is available or not
  • Financial Aid
    • Average awarded
  • FIT!
    • Does this college fit for this student?
    • You have to visit the campus in order to properly be informed about the fit of a school.
    • Parents and ultimately students will craft their personal definition of what a “just right fit” will be.
  • Financial
  • Socio-emotional
  • Culturally
  • Geographically

“Colleges have personalities and students have personalities,” advises Dr. Gunn. So be sure to check out your finalist campuses you want to apply to in order to confirm your student can see themselves spending the next 4 or 5 years there.
Begin with your local state schools or nearby community schools. Visits look different for freshmen/sophomore or junior/senior. Upperclassmen can:

  • Sit in on lectures
  • Meet with professors or advisors
  • Student shadowing

There are lots of good fit schools out there for students. If one doesn’t work out, there is another one that is still a good path. Dr. Gunn adds, “That is why you need to apply to multiple schools, so you aren’t putting all your eggs in one basket.”

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

Core Area- Career Planning
Career planning means: What does your student want to be when they grow up?
There are a few ways to help your student pick a direction if you do not want them to go off to college undecided:

  • Local High School
  • Tech College
  • Community College
  • Job Shadowing
  • Volunteering
  • Websites
    • Career assessments
    • Before you pay for anything, check with your high school to see what they already have a subscription to.

Career planning is something that students, and/or parents, will have to work on to help make choosing a college easier.
Optional Area- Athletics
Check out these episodes:
111: The Reality of Athletic Recruiting, A Talk with NCSA with Lisa Strasman
76: Get Recruited! Understanding College Athletics with Jon Fugler
If your student is interested in playing sports in college, that is an additional challenge you will need to prepare for.
You will have to find a college where the coach is interested in your student.
Will you attend a school even if you can’t play your sport there?
You will have to start earlier, perhaps your freshman year of high school, talking to coaches, setting up visits, creating film, and attending camps.

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.
If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!
The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Share

The post THCC115- Getting Additional Support Beyond Your High School- Outside Agencies That Provide College Support Interview with Dr. Toinette McClellan Gunn, VP of Programs at Chicago Scholars appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC114 – Learn How Entrepreneurship is Becoming a Major in College Interview with Eric Liguori, Entrepreneurship Expert and Author “The Startup Student”
47:39
2017-10-06 04:15:21 UTC 47:39
THCC114 – Learn How Entrepreneurship is Becoming a Major in College Interview with Eric Liguori, Entrepreneurship Expert and Author “The Startup Student”

Learn How Entrepreneurship is Becoming a Major in College

“Entrepreneurship is one of the fastest growing majors on college campuses around the country,” shares our guest today Eric Liguori. He is the author of “The Startup Student” and an expert in the growing field of entrepreneurship. Hear what he has to say about building a better business and controlling your own destiny in this episode.

Questions Answered Today:

What is college entrepreneurship?

“On any campus you visit right now you are going to see students starting and running their own businesses,” states Liguori. Luckily, there are now resources in place to support this at most universities.
These are usually small to medium sized businesses already turning a profit.
It is NOT just high-tech/high-growth. Students are doing everything from producing their own juices to laser engraved lacrosse balls.
Universities are approaching this in 2 ways:

  • Incubation Model
    • Lends itself to faculty research where they want to slowly take something through the market and commercialize it.
  • Accelerator Model
    • Geared towards bundling resources around students to help them launch their own companies.

 

What should parents know?

Parents need to challenge students to research and choose a college with resources to support that dream. It will be an up and down ride for parents.
Entrepreneurship is a major that is usually under the Business college.
“Some campuses are much more focused on interdisciplinary education, and other campuses are focused on entrepreneurship as its own discipline and major,” notes Liguori.
The final series of courses usually allows for students to work on their own or to work as a team.
College entrepreneurs learn 3 major categories:

  • Business basics
    • Setting up the books, hiring of staff, entity creation, cash flow management, pricing the product, advertising, cost analysis, intellectual property protection, and all other basics of business
  • Entrepreneurial basics
    • Different types of entrepreneurships, characteristics of entrepreneurs, understanding the process, nature of an opportunity, taxonomy of infrastructure in place, knowing how to start and launch leads, entrepreneurial orientation and how to position your company, seed and venture capital
  • Mindset and Competency of an Entrepreneur
    • Opportunity alertness, passion, persistence, tenacity, gorilla behavior, learning from failure, resilience, creative problem solving, building and using networks

 
“We give them the guidance they need to navigate that choppy water of uncertainty at the beginning,” describes Liguori.
Students usually fall into one of two categories:

  • Have been hustling and working since a very young age
  • Like the idea of starting something or creating something, but aren’t sure how to go about it

Classes focus on tool-building and help students understand if it is worth it or not to just take a market wage.
Credibility challenges are the toughest, so students are matched with experts and mentors. These connections can help introduce them to more partners and get access to capital. Instructors also help students to set up plans for beyond college.
Investment pitches and competitions are other ways students can gain capital without losing equity.
Sometimes parents are worried and prefer students to get job training.
“My experience has been that students who are really passionate about it find resources,” says Liguori.
Every university will have something different offered ranging from a certificate program all the way up to graduate degrees.

How do you pursue entrepreneurship?

There are a few steps high school juniors should do:

  • Check state schools in your area for entrepreneurship centers
  • Email the faculty and directors of these centers to ask about the programs
    • If you are polite and professional you should get a response
  • Check the U.S. Association for Small Business and Entrepreneurship
  • US News and World Report
  • Princeton Review

 
Don’t be afraid to pick up the phone and ask the admissions office of any college you are interested in.
Entrepreneurship is generally in the Business school, which might have minimum requirements above and beyond the major itself.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

 

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

Core Area- Building a Budget
Start by looking up what it might cost to attend your local state school.
There are two ways to build your budget:

  1. Figure out how much money you need and create a plan to get there.
  2. Define your budget and base your school choice on what you can afford.

In the end, just because you can only afford a certain amount a month, does not mean that is enough. You might need to recalculate what you can afford, take a job for additional income, or consider borrowing.
Begin freshmen year of high school to figure out what college will probably cost.
Then you will know what you might have to save or invest.
This will not be necessarily easy, but it IS necessary!
Optional Area- Divorce Planning
This impacts:

  • Need-based aid
    • Based on income and assets of the family
    • Usually just one parent is considered for financial aid, but their new spouse might also be included
  • Family politics
    • Parents could be cooperative to solve the college dilemma, or one parent feels responsible

This can get complicated, so do your research!
Episode 39: Divorce and College Planning
Episode 11: College Planning and Divorce

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.
If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!
The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Share

The post THCC114 – Learn How Entrepreneurship is Becoming a Major in College Interview with Eric Liguori, Entrepreneurship Expert and Author “The Startup Student” appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC113 – Health Care on Campus and How It Works Interview with Dr. Sarah Van Orman, Executive Director of Health Services at the University of Wisconsin- Madison
37:39
2017-10-06 04:15:22 UTC 37:39
THCC113 – Health Care on Campus and How It Works Interview with Dr. Sarah Van Orman, Executive Director of Health Services at the University of Wisconsin- Madison

Health Care on Campus and How It Works

Healthcare, insurance, and everything health related that you need to understand when you send your student to college are what we cover in our episode today with expert Dr. Sarah Van Orman. She is a former President of the American College Health Association and a primary care physician with a focus on keeping students healthy and successful in college. “This is the opportunity to be teaching your student about being a health care consumer,” shares Dr. Van Orman.

Questions Answered Today:

What are health services at a typical university and how do they work?

Factors that impact services available include size of school and the needs of students.
Campuses that have residential students provide some sort of health services that include:

  • Primary medical care
    • Sprained ankle, sore throat, screenings, check-ups, or anything like that
    • Typically has a lower co-pay
  • Mental Health services/Counseling services
    • Crisis counseling and short-term counseling are generally provided
    • Psychiatric services are not as common
    • Services are growing rapidly
    • Can help refer to a professional in the community to make sure all needs are met
  • Public Health
    • How do we keep and maintain a healthy community?
    • Promote education and safety around campus that most students don’t realize are part of the health services

If the college specializes in something unique, such as travel care, you will find that more readily accessible on that campus.
“Most students will be covered by their parent’s insurance in network,” notes Van Orman. It is important to consider what is provided by the student health services that might cover outside of their regular insurance. This varies by the health service and by the insurance.
Dr. Van Orman strongly recommends that parents of seniors in high school understand what coverage their child has and to see what options will be available where they will be going to school. Talk to your provider and ask about medical scenarios to see if your child must come home for treatment or not.
Some ideas to research include: A student health insurance plan, looking through your employer for the option to select a PPO so there is better coverage out of network, supplemental plans available, does the university provide an insurance policy, etc.
These are great questions to ask during your college visit before selecting a school- especially if your child has a pre-existing condition!
Some campuses require a verified policy in place, but some don’t.
Some extra advice from Dr. Van Orman:

  • Stop by the student health services building during your campus tour
  • Make sure you know all services that are available and that your student can access them
    • Also includes what your campus is doing for wellness, recreation, and nutrition
  • Help your student become more independent
    • Turning in and picking up prescriptions, understanding co pays, etc.
  • Be sure your student has their insurance card and prescription card because it is likely possible your child with have a health or mental health crisis
  • Don’t be afraid to call the health services, but be aware of privacy laws
    • Talk to your student about release of information and when you want them to contact you

In most states, the next of kin has power of attorney if a student becomes incapacitated. If you have someone you specifically want as having power of attorney due to a complex family situation, you would want to legally file for power of attorney.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

Core Area- Tax Planning
You need to understand how college and taxes work together. Most families don’t realize they could, or should, be doing this!
American Opportunity Tax credit:

  • Married couples under $160,000 of income and singles under $80,000 of income
  • Phases out between $160,000 – $180,000 for married couples and $80,000 – $90,000 if you are single
  • Can claim a tax credit up to $2500, as long as you pay $4,000 in tuition expenses. If your income is near the limit of phasing out, you might want to plan in order to get the maximum credit where possible.

Also, the 529 plan usually has a deduction available when contributing for most states.
Optional Area- Special Needs
This covers everything that might be unique to your student if they need additional help for any reason. It will impact your college search so that you find the right school that is the right fit.
Episode 8: Helping Students with Learning Disabilities Prepare for College

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.
If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!
The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

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The post THCC113 – Health Care on Campus and How It Works Interview with Dr. Sarah Van Orman, Executive Director of Health Services at the University of Wisconsin- Madison appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC112 – How Kristina Ellis Won Over $500,000 in Free College Money. Interview with Kristina Ellis, author of How to Graduate Debt Free and Confessions of a Scholarship Winner.
43:55
2017-10-06 04:15:22 UTC 43:55
THCC112 – How Kristina Ellis Won Over $500,000 in Free College Money. Interview with Kristina Ellis, author of How to Graduate Debt Free and Confessions of a Scholarship Winner.

Free College Money

Get the ball rolling on college planning right now with scholarship expert Kristina Ellis. She swings by the show to share her secrets of how she won over $500,000 in free money for college. She started researching her junior year, but really put the pedal to the medal during her senior year. “I often recommend to students to not get too stressed about filling out the applications their sophomore and junior year,” says Ellis. Get the rest of her can’t miss tips in this episode!

Questions Answered Today:

What was your scholarship experience like?

“For about 6 months I sat in a library with my mom and worked, worked, worked on filling out those applications,” describes Ellis. She strongly recommends waiting until your senior year and spending your time during your sophomore and junior year building your resume and having experiences.
Freshmen year is when Ellis started looking at applications to plan what she wanted to do during high school to tailor herself to future scholarship and application essays. This made her intentional in committing to activities she loved doing, but that would be great to write about.

What should parents do (and when) to make the scholarship process work successfully for them?

“I definitely encourage parents to start early,” notes Ellis, with early financial conversations starting freshmen year. You can start as early as possible, such as kindergarten, to get involved in community service and start offering those experiences to build that character in your child.
Show your student what loans look like financially and how paying that debt off will impact their life. The better they understand what debt is, the better off they will be.
Set up a “scholarship night” where once a week you sit down and look at scholarship applications and fill out a few.
“It is a numbers game,” warns Ellis, “You have to keep trying, you have to keep applying; it might take multiple attempts and multiple rejections before you win a really great award.”
On your scholarship night each week you should:

  • Start with scholarship databases and create a targeted list of 25-50 scholarships to pursue that match your student well.
  • Look into programs to figure out the “why” in the who. Why are they giving away this award? What do they value? What kind of person are they looking for? Get to know these programs that are giving away money to tailor make your responses.
  • Once you have a few tight essays, you can recycle the foundation and take the time to customize the details to each program. Find the balance.

College ROI (Return On Investment) means, “looking beyond the prestige of a school and their rank, but also looking at what school will profit you the most in the long run based on your projected earnings,” states Ellis.
This includes:

  • Net price
  • 4 year completion rate
  • Earning potential
  • Opportunity cost

It is important to figure out from a financial perspective what school will really be the best for you and to go there, no matter where else you might have been accepted.
Just getting accepted is half the battle, you have to look at the finances as well, which is where scholarships come into play.
Example: Getting into an ivy league school with $0 in financial aid is not as great as getting into a state school on a full academic scholarship.
Ellis understands that sitting and filling out scholarship applications doesn’t sound very fun to a lot of students, but she is an example of how it is totally worth it. Her book “Confessions of a Scholarship Winner: The Secrets That Helped Me Win $500,000 in Free Money for College” was written in a way to communicate with high schoolers, but it also helps parents by describing exactly what you should do to support your student through this process.
“How to Graduate Debt Free: The Best Strategies to Pay For College #NotGoingBroke” was written for students again, but really goes into depth on the best way for parents to start financially saving. It also includes some pre-college action of how to plan high school and a great financial aid breakdown for everyone, even those that think they would never qualify for any extra dollars.
Bottom line: Get involved and spend some time learning about the world of college finances as soon as possible.
“If you are a junior or senior that thinks they missed the boat on scholarships, I want to encourage you to still go through the process. There are tons of scholarships given out senior year and throughout college,” suggests Ellis. There are scholarships out there for everybody!

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

Core Area- Saving and Investing

Lots of families have saved something for college already, but there are lots of opportunities to start saving now.
Three things to consider while saving and investing for college are:

  • Impact on Financial Aid
  • Tax Benefits
  • Rules and Restrictions

For example, having money in a bank account will count against your ability to get financial aid, you pay a little bit of taxes on the interest, but you have few rules and regulations about spending that money on whatever you want whenever you want.
529 plans still count against you for financial aid, but there are numerous state and federal tax benefits. There are also rules and regulations about how and when this money is spent.
Saving and investing can be done at any time by parents and doesn’t really need the involvement of the student.
Figure out what you can save starting right now- even if your student is just a few weeks away or year away.
Loans for college come with loan payments. So, if you can afford to pay that monthly payment, theoretically you should be able to save that same amount each month which will prevent you from having to take the loan out at all.

Optional Area- Family Funding

If you have grandparents or other family members that say they want to help give towards college expenses, from a financial aid standpoint it is sometimes good and sometimes bad.
You don’t report this on the FAFSA, but once the money comes to the individual to pay for college it DOES go on the FAFSA as income to the student.
With good planning, you can time when this money is provided (maybe, say, the junior year). Plan how to maximize this money so it won’t impact financial aid and other resources in a negative way.
Key factors to consider are:

  • Will you qualify for any financial aid without this money?
  • Are you being provided with a large sum?

Being given $1,000 doesn’t have the same impact as $100,000 on future requests for financial aid. Try to work this opportunity in a smart way for the most benefit.

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.
If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!
The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Share

The post THCC112 – How Kristina Ellis Won Over $500,000 in Free College Money. Interview with Kristina Ellis, author of How to Graduate Debt Free and Confessions of a Scholarship Winner. appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC111- The Reality of Athletic Recruiting, a talk with NCSA Interview with Lisa Strasman, President of Next College Student Athlete
46:11
2017-10-06 04:15:22 UTC 46:11
THCC111- The Reality of Athletic Recruiting, a talk with NCSA Interview with Lisa Strasman, President of Next College Student Athlete

The Reality of Athletic Recruiting

Meet Lisa Strasman, the President of the premier college athletics recruiting organization Next College Student Athlete. She is here on our show today to give you the secrets needed to be recruited for college sports at any level. These days, coaches are going to games to look only at specific players. “Of course there are examples of coaches finding kids, but it is really not the norm,” says Strasman. How do you get onto a coach’s list? Tune in here to find out what you can do to separate your student from the pack and get recruited for athletics!

Questions Answered Today:

How does NCSA help families?

“Our goal is to help student athletes play the sport they love at the college of their dreams,” describes Strasman.
NCSA has a team of over 550 former college athletes, coaches, and professional athletes to help student athletes find the right fit.
They help students create an athletic resume, edit videos, and provide specific advice tailored to each college program so students can be aware of where they have the highest likelihood of being accepted.
They also support students and parents through each key milestone of the recruiting journey for 31 different sports across men and women divisions.
“We work with most NCAA sanctioned sports, but there a few smaller or emerging sports we don’t have a big enough volume in,” notes Strasman. They help to place students at all levels, not just Division 1.

What steps does a student need to take to play their sport in college?

The first step is to take action! “When you have that realization that your student athlete is serious about playing their sport at the next level, don’t wait! Start putting together your game plan,” warns Strasman.
Freshman year is the time to start because sooner is better.
What you need to do includes:

  • Create your recruiting profile and plan.
    • You can do it right on the NCSA website and get a third party evaluation to help you find the perfect program out there for you
  • Reach out and communicate with college coaches to build those relationships
  • Go to different camps as they are available for skill development and to get noticed
  • Create a highlight reel
    • You can use your phone to put together clips
    • There are guidelines available at the NCSA website and the experts there can help to break it down into the 3-5 minutes a coach will want
    • It does NOT have to be fancy- the coach just wants to see what the athlete can do
    • Update it as you progress through high school
  • Take academics seriously; if you don’t meet the minimums to make it into the school, you can’t get in on athletics alone
    • Standardized tests are important just like for anyone else going to college
    • Athletic budgets are very tight for college coaches, but they might be able to give you some academic merit aid based on your grades
  • Research schools to think about what type of school you are interested in (geographic location, rural or urban, best scholarship money, highest academics, etc.)
  • Visit campuses and decide what level you want to play at
  • Find an expert to help you think through all these key questions

“Leveraging athletics might help you get into a school you might not get admitted to based only on your academics or even earn more money through financial aid,” shares Strasman. If your child is passionate, then athletics need to be part of your game plan early.
Athletics should not be an afterthought, so start communicating with college coaches early on to make it part of the process.
“Everything should be rooted in what your kid wants to do,” reminds Strasman. Sometimes travel teams and camps are important, but it doesn’t guarantee you a scholarship or roster spot.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

Core Area: Parents vs. Student Responsibilities
The reality for most families is that mom and dad are very involved and the student is just along for the ride. Every family needs to come up with who is responsible for what pieces.
It needs to be clear who is in charge of important college areas such as:

  • Research
  • Funding
  • Communication
    • Whose email do they have? Who is staying on top of the programs and opportunities the college is offering?
  • Visits
  • Scholarships
  • Applications/Essays
    • Parents might need to help by being on top of deadlines and the overall process

Have a monthly meeting where everyone can check in on how things stand.
Optional Area- Transfer Programs
This is where you attend a particular school and then transfer to a different school to finish your degree.
3 reasons you might be interested in a transfer program include:

  • Admissions
    • If the school is really tough to get into, you can transfer which might be easier
  • Cost savings
    • Get your basic classes done to save on tuition, then transfer to the program you really want to finish your degree in
  • Stepping stones
    • Not quite ready to go away to a big university, so you get a year or two under your belt and work your way up

It is important to understand there are some formal programs where two colleges have gotten together and have a set list of classes that will 100% transfer to a different university. Otherwise you won’t know for sure the courses you are taking will allow you to transfer and you might have to start over or take similar classes again.

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.
If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!
The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Share

The post THCC111- The Reality of Athletic Recruiting, a talk with NCSA Interview with Lisa Strasman, President of Next College Student Athlete appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC110 – Understanding College Rankings Interview with Farran Powell, Writer with U.S. News and World Report
42:56
2017-10-06 04:15:22 UTC 42:56
THCC110 – Understanding College Rankings Interview with Farran Powell, Writer with U.S. News and World Report

Understanding College Rankings

Choosing from ranked schools can be tricky. Is one school really that much better than another? We invited Farran Powell on the show to help clear up what this ranking thing is all about. She is the “Paying for College” writer for the publication that started the ranking craze, U.S. News and World Report. Having written somewhere near 100 articles on the topic, Farran has a wealth of knowledge she shares in this great interview.

Questions Answered Today:

What is a school that claims to meet full need?

“Different schools have different ways of determining what your need is,” says Powell. While some schools rely on FAFSA, others will ask you to provide a CSS profile as well. If you are looking for federal financial aid, you will need to complete the FAFSA.
Each school has a different formula for determining that they have met your full need. The schools that offer this feature are usually private schools with only two public schools on the current list.
These schools tend to be highly ranked and use a need blind admissions policy. These are generally intensely competitive.
Powell recommends if you are considering this type of school, “You want to look at the fit financially, and does it have what you want to study at this school?”
There might be a cheaper school out there that is great and has a perfect program for your desired major.

How are colleges doing things differently to adjust to the new FAFSA?

Some schools have moved up their deadlines to as early as December. The Department of Education has also released the Pell Grant schedule earlier.
FAFSA is no longer based on an estimated value, you are using taxes from two years back.
This makes the colleges more comfortable in packaging their awards because the numbers are more verifiable. These are now being released 6-8 weeks earlier than before.
This current year is the only year where there might be discrepancies. “It is a one year issue that could happen to current students,” notes Powell.
If something has drastically happened since your FAFSA application or the tax return you use for it, such as death in the family or large medical expense, you can apply for a reconciliation of your award at the financial aid office of your school since your circumstances have changed.

What advice do you have for parents?

Visiting schools out of state will cost money, but you can always go locally. See the different types of schools to see what will be a good fit for you.
This will help you to narrow down your shortlist so you don’t take unnecessary and expensive road trips.
Also, consider visiting schools during the non tourist season to save money on airfare and hotels. Maybe go during the winter.
The USNews.com website has lots of information available that is put together by both a data team and reporters so you can search based on what is important to you.
Some things you can check out on the website include:

  • Short-lists
    • Different ways you can pay for school, what it’s like living on campus, and many more.
  • College navigator
  • Best value schools
    • Even if they might have a high sticker price, they try to help out students the most.
  • A+ schools for B students
  • Studying abroad
    • Powell herself studied abroad and notes that schools oversea have a lot more emphasis on test results and AP courses in high school. Programs are also only three years long, so you need to be sure of the area you want to study and if it will transfer well back to the states.
  • Paying for grad school information
  • Online education

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

 

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

Core Area #6 Merit-Aid
Merit-aid is aid that is offered to families where the student has achieved some success, either academically or athletically, and they are able to receive additional funds on top of other aid they may be receiving.
It is not tied to the family finances.
A typical private school might offer a scholarship such that if your test scores and grade point average meet a certain requirement, they can offer you a set amount of money. This can be tiered where different thresholds offer differing amounts of money.
In addition to academics, scholarships might be based on:

  • Athletics
  • Music or other unique abilities
  • Extra-curricular activities
  • Science fairs

If you are just barely accepted to a certain college, you probably won’t earn very much merit aid and will have to probably pay full price. Conversely, if you are accepted somewhere else that is less competitive, you might be able to win more.
Episode 2: Need-Based Financial Aid Part 1
Episode 3: Need-Based Financial Aid Part 2

Optional Area- Performing Arts

You could qualify for merit-aid with performing arts, but there will usually be some type of audition required. Many schools offer these on campus, but some occasionally offer satellite auditions around the country.
Episode 38: Insights Into Majoring in the Performing Arts

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.
If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!
The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Share

The post THCC110 – Understanding College Rankings Interview with Farran Powell, Writer with U.S. News and World Report appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC109 – InviteEducation.com: Helping Families Plan and Pay for College at Any Age Interview with John Hupalo, Founder and CEO of InviteEducation.com
38:52
2017-10-06 04:15:22 UTC 38:52
THCC109 – InviteEducation.com: Helping Families Plan and Pay for College at Any Age Interview with John Hupalo, Founder and CEO of InviteEducation.com

InviteEducation.com

Most families find it challenging to jump in and learn the college process, but we have John Hupalo here today to share all his great resources to make this simple! After his personal and professional experience with the issue of college financing and planning, John recognized that there were not too many resources available. He and his partner decided, “There has got to be a better way to help families plan and pay for college.” So InviteEducation.com was founded.

Questions Answered Today:

How can InviteEducation.com help me?

Hupalo set out with his partner to create some simplified steps for both planning and financing college. Each family and situation is unique, but the purchase decisions and shopping for college are exactly the same as shopping for a car.
InviteEducation.com is set up to assist with 3 very specific points:

  1. You might have more than one child, so you will need grade specific guidance for each child.
  2. Finding that just right college. You have to figure out if your student can get in AND if you can afford it. Don’t buy now, and pay later!
  3. Interact with your student to make sure they are taking care of what they need to do and you are managing what you also should be doing.

Students can go onto the site as well to get tons of fantastic resources and clear information.
“When parents see there is an actual process involved, and they don’t have to worry about it all at once, it makes it a little bit easier,” notes Hupalo.

What should I know about scholarships?

“I believe there is an affordable school for every student and every family,” shares Hupalo. You know how much you have saved by junior or senior year, and now you have to find the free money.
Beware when schools give you federal loans, because you have to repay that, and also work study, because you have to earn that.
Grants are usually need-based aid given through filing the FAFSA.
Merit-based aid is usually from the school itself or you can get scholarships from third parties. Check out Petersons.com for their scholarship search engine. It is also linked to InviteEducation to help you find and apply for free money.
Hupalo cautions, “If you are awarded a third party scholarship and you are getting need-based aid, the school will reduce that amount of grant aid by the amount of that third party scholarship.” Go talk to your financial aid officer at your college because they can help you get creative to possibly keep it all.
Put your general gross income into the engine at InviteEducation to find out how much a particular school awarded to those with similar finances.

Do you have any advice for parents?

According to Hupalo:

    • It is really important to save some kind of money towards college. If your child is young, you are so much better off saving just a little bit now (such as with the 529 college savings program). InviteEducation has a calculator to show you the cost of delaying and how much more you will have to contribute to reach your goal.
      • Most students take more than 4 years to graduate, so if your child is in high school already it isn’t too late.
  • “Saving a dollar for college today is better than borrowing one tomorrow,” suggests Hupalo.
  • Take a breath! Just like potty-training, you never think it will happen, but it comes!
    • Almost all students borrow the appropriate amount of money and come out of college in a career where they can pay that back without a problem.
  • Beware of how much time it will take to get this done.
    • Pay attention along the way! Starts looking at ideas and visit the website during 9th grade.
    • Time is also dependent on how involved parents will be and how motivated the student is.
    • It doesn’t hurt to start early and always watch out for deadlines.

“There is no mystery to this,” says Hupalo, “You just need to be aware of it.”
LINKS AND RESOURCES:

 

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

Core Area #5 Extra-Curricular Activities
These are critical to some families to getting to where you want to go, but don’t matter at all for others.
Understand what you are doing for extra curriculars and if it is appropriate for where you want to go.
Some higher end schools require a more competitive level of extra-curricular activities, such as not just being on the football team, but being the captain on a champion football team.
These will also be helpful for scholarships.
If you have above average grades/test scores, then these probably won’t be as helpful. On the flipside, if you have lower grades/test scores, then these could make the difference and get you the benefit of doubt.
Episode 72: Science Competitions and Robotics Scholarships

Optional Area- College Fairs

Great for when you are just starting out to get some basic information from a lot of different possible colleges.
These are usually provided by NACAC (National Association of College and Admissions Counselors) or other organizations at the state and local level.
Episode 90: The Untapped Gold Mine of College Fairs
If there is a college fair in your area, or within driving distance, get that on your calendar! Get on the internet and search college fairs to find out when and where they are.
Fairs are additionally helpful when you have narrowed it down to the last few colleges you might want to pursue because there are representatives right there to answer your questions and give you more information.

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.
If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!
The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Share

The post THCC109 – InviteEducation.com: Helping Families Plan and Pay for College at Any Age Interview with John Hupalo, Founder and CEO of InviteEducation.com appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC108 – Interview with Mark Kantrowitz, College Planning Guru Founder of FinAid.org and many others!
44:42
2017-10-06 04:15:22 UTC 44:42
THCC108 – Interview with Mark Kantrowitz, College Planning Guru Founder of FinAid.org and many others!

Interview with Mark Kantrowitz

Meet Scholarship Jedi, Mark Kantrowitz. Mark is a mathematician, author, speaker, and expert on scholarships with over 20 years of higher education experience. We invited Mark on the show today to share his incredible knowledge about scholarships and help you learn the lingo. “Financial aid is like a different language, the more you learn about it the easier your process will be,” says Kantrowitz. This episode is chock full of great information!

Questions Answered Today:

What types of scholarships are out there?

“There are about six billion dollars worth of scholarships awarded each year to just about under two million students,” shares Kantrowitz.
Those include:

  • Academic
  • Unusual talents
    • such as artistic or athletic talents
  • Need-based grants
  • Institutional aid
  • Pell grants

This does NOT include federal money- it is strictly private scholarships from nonfederal/noninstitutional sources.
“Most of the money coming from a college is in the form of a discount,” describes Kantrowitz. This means that the price you actually pay might be a little less than half of the sticker price.
About 1 in 8 students receive private scholarship money they then use to help pay for college, with the average amount being just under $4,000.
“Winning a scholarship is part of your plan for paying for college, but it’s not the entire plan,” warns Kantrowitz, “Everyone should file the FAFSA form because it is your gateway to need-based aid.”
With all of the free scholarship search databases available, there aren’t any scholarships that go without applicants. It is much more likely that a scholarship goes unclaimed due to requirements not being met. The one that generally is missed the most is the Pell Grant.
You can figure out the total return on investment for attending a college by visiting payscale.com
Kantrowitz strongly recommends that all students include in their college search their in-state public college.
There are six dozen very competitive colleges that have no loan financial aid policies that substitute grants for loans. These or the in-state college will be your cheapest options.

What should we expect in the near future of college?

“Free college isn’t entirely free-it is just free tuition,” notes Kantrowitz, who has published a paper advocating for free tuition and free textbooks for public colleges which includes how to reallocate existing money spent on financial aid and not raising any taxes.
At this time, it does not appear this will be a priority of the incoming presidential administration, but it remains to be seen what will be enacted.
While online courses are becoming popular, colleges will still need a professor to work with students and meet their individual needs. “The reality right now on the ground is that most students don’t benefit from online education,” explains Kantrowitz.
Online courses required students to be very strong self-starters. The most successful students of online courses have already earned a college degree.
The cost of a college education increases by a factor of three over any 17 year period, but don’t worry because you only need to be saving about one-third of the price of future college tuition, or what college currently costs.
Kantrowitz gives a strategy for this as, “From birth you should save about $250 a month for an in-state public college, $400 a month for an out-of-state public college, and $500 a month for a private nonprofit college.”
It will be easier to increase the amount you save if you start now! As your child grows out of expenses, like diapers, allocate those funds towards their college savings plan.
Whatever age your child is, you have to start looking for scholarships now. There are many available to all age groups.
With the new prior, prior year for FAFSA, parents will need to start planning sooner than the junior year of high school for financial aid.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

 

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

Core Area #4 College Visits
This is probably one of the first things you will be doing to create your college plan. There are five types of visits:

  • Stealth Visit
    • Drive-by and get out of the car to just check out some buildings or the general campus. You are just looking around because you are already there or it is close by. Very informal and you might not even talk to anybody from the college.
  • Open House
    • This is the college encouraging families to come and check out their campus. There might be a themed day (engineering day, nurse day, etc.) or it is just a general organized event, but it is a good way to get a feel for what a tour is going to be like. Check out an open house at your local college, even if it isn’t one you are planning to attend. These are usually on a weekend, but there are a lot of people there and not very much individual attention.
  • Scheduled Visit and Tour
    • More one-on-one, or one-on-a-few, where you can call and schedule ahead of time. This can have appointments with professors and it is a personalized tour of the college. Important to do this the junior year of high school to all prospective colleges you will apply to.
  • Accepted Senior Visits
    • This is more detailed and usually only offered to those students that have already been accepted.
  • Overnight
    • Opportunity to really get a feel for the college. You might be paired with a student and stay in their dorm overnight or attend classes for the day.

Families need to work on a visit plan if college options are including out of state schools. Parents need to plan vacation time around school off-times to take advantage of scheduling your visits.
Optional Area- Direct Admit
As an incoming freshman, you can sometimes be directly admitted to a department or program. This isn’t available at all schools or for all majors. The medical field, engineering, and business courses of study are popular to have direct admit at some schools. Other majors are more competitive and you can not even apply to that major or program until after completing some prerequisites.

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.
If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!
The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

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The post THCC108 – Interview with Mark Kantrowitz, College Planning Guru Founder of FinAid.org and many others! appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC107- Majoring in Hospitality- A Case Study with Lisa Sturgeon, Adjunct Professor at Husson University and Communications & Resource Manager at Geaghan Brothers Brewing Company
41:03
2017-10-06 04:15:22 UTC 41:03
THCC107- Majoring in Hospitality- A Case Study with Lisa Sturgeon, Adjunct Professor at Husson University and Communications & Resource Manager at Geaghan Brothers Brewing Company

Majoring in Hospitality

Majoring in hospitality can open many different doors to amazing jobs. ”It’s not just managers or hotel operators. It is all-encompassing of other industries and professions,” notes today’s guest Lisa Sturgeon. She is now the communications and resource manager at Geaghan Brothers Brewing Company and has returned to her alma mater Husson University in Maine as a professor. In this episode, Lisa shares her personal journey through undergraduate and graduate school to tailor her experience to achieve her dream career.

Questions Answered Today:

What was Lisa’s experience like?

Lisa was able to participate in several internships, even though they were outside of her comfort zone, such as a four month experience at an airport working in marketing. She wasn’t sure how it fit with her degree, but she kept an open mind and went with it.
Some schools have internship programs available and will even assign them as part of your curriculum. It is also possible to solicit your own internship.
Some internships are paid, and others are not. If you are an employer, be aware of the tax laws applicable to your situation.
Also available are job shadow experiences where you can spend the day with someone in your chosen profession to do what Lisa describes as, “See what a day in the life is like.” It can be as simple as calling a professional in your field and seeing if they would be interested in allowing you to shadow them for a day.
Before Lisa began applying to colleges, she started by applying to scholarships. During her study hall period of her junior year in high school, she spent the entire time filling out scholarship applications instead of talking or sleeping like some of her classmates.
She won an academic based scholarship from Husson and an additional five other scholarships to cover the costs of her first two years of undergraduate study in full.
Lisa recommends checking all the possible scholarships that do not have an application fee. Your counselor can help you pinpoint specific and unique ones to apply to.

What should parents of high school students be aware of?

“Time management is huge and the transition from life in high school to life in college is completely different,” says Sturgeon.
This is something many freshmen college students will struggle with.
Lisa recommends breaking down the hours over the course of a week, hour by hour and day by day, to budget your time appropriately.
This will help students have some breathing room.
“You can either pay now and play later, or play now and pay later,” warns Sturgeon. Time management is crucial because there isn’t extra credit in real life.
You do not want to fail classes and have to pay for the same class again! This puts a stop on your educational process because you can’t move forward without certain prerequisites complete.
“You get what you put into it,” Sturgeon describes about a college degree, “it should be more than just a piece of paper.”

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

Core Area #3 Building a team
Every family is going to have to build a team. Who will be on this team? Will you add a professional or two? Your team could include:

  • Parents
  • Student
  • Coaches
  • Teachers
  • Other Family
  • School Counselor
  • Financial Planner/Tax or Investment Advisor
  • Specialist
    • College Funding Advisor
  • College Admissions Counselors
  • Test Prep Experts
  • Athletic Recruiting Experts

Some things they might help with are finding scholarships, maybe help with athletic recruiting, and those with financial qualifications can guide you through finding financial aid, the tax process, and student loans.
Episode 21: Is Your Financial Advisor Ready For College
https://www.higherscorestestprep.com/
Episode 33: Test Prep for High Scores
Episode 85: Should Your Student Test Again As a Senior?
Episode 79: What is Your Test Strategy?
Episode 78: 3 Ways to Make the Most of Your College Visit
Episode 66: Tips on How Undecided Students Can Choose a Major
“Put College to Work” by Kat Clowes
Episode 20: The Write Stuff- Acing The College Essay
Episode 40: How to Get Into and Afford Ivy League Schools
Episode 24: Game Plan: Athletic Scholarships

Optional Area- Pre Med

There are many families out there with students considering a profession in the medical field, which requires an advanced degree.
A lot of these majors are on a path where you need to really understand what you are getting into. What you do in late high school will lead into what you do in college, which will lead you to medical school.
Episode 52: Successful Planning for Pre-Med and Medical School Students

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.
If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!
The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

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The post THCC107- Majoring in Hospitality- A Case Study with Lisa Sturgeon, Adjunct Professor at Husson University and Communications & Resource Manager at Geaghan Brothers Brewing Company appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC106 – Charting a Path through College For Every Student Interview with Amy Greene, Program Supervisor of Continuing Education at the University of New Mexico
46:59
2017-10-06 04:15:22 UTC 46:59
THCC106 – Charting a Path through College For Every Student Interview with Amy Greene, Program Supervisor of Continuing Education at the University of New Mexico

Charting a Path through College For Every Student

Not everyone is a high-flyer that has been dreaming of college. “The thing I wish I had known,” described Green about her own experience, “was that there were so many options out there.” What’s the secret to a successful college experience? According to our expert guest today Amy Greene, you have to take advantage of the relationships and network building. Listen in today to hear exactly how to do that- no matter what college you go to or what GPA you have.

Questions Answered Today:

What can parents do to help pick the perfect college and major?

If your child isn’t sure yet of what college or major they want to pursue, don’t worry. “I’d tell parents that it’s ok,” says Greene. There are so many schools out there and there will be a right fit that matches the unique talents of your child.
Being undecided is NOT a bad thing!
Greene encourages families to consider the range of options such as state schools, private institutions, and community college. “The sticker price you see right off the bat isn’t what you are going to pay out of pocket,” warns Greene. You have to research and see what kind of financial aid is available.
All schools are working on enrollment goals and not every school has the same target market.
Something to look for at a university is the community service office. This usually has community-based work study jobs available which offer great experience. The personnel are also generally quite good at matching students to help their career development and help their community.
To find this “match-maker”, you should start by looking for the academic coordinator or with student activities. This person is there to help YOU!
These experiences often lead students to discovering a true passion and can begin as early as freshmen year.

What is out there to help kids decide if they should go to college and what major to select?

“If you are really unsure about your major or type of institution you want to pursue, there are tons of programs out there,” notes Greene.
She recommends to get onto the internet and look for ‘outreach’, ‘pre-college’, or ‘college experience camp’. Check local schools first.
These are usually offered by the actual college and take place on campus. It is a great way to sample the major you are considering and to find out if it is really the right path for you.
If you have your heart set on a big brand name ivy league school, they offer these as well which can look pretty good on your resume and college applications.
These generally have a tuition from a few hundred dollars to a few thousand dollars depending on length and if you get to stay on campus.
You can also apply for free, low-cost, or targeted programs based on your income and interests.
“I do still think those are a great investment considering what you are going to save from making a four year investment that maybe isn’t a good fit,” adds Greene.
Also available are other pathways, such as certificate programs. These are short-term and a fraction of the cost of full-time tuition, but keep students engaged and working towards a goal. There are also quite a few options available online.
Some such topics include:

  • Personal training
  • Paralegal
  • Leadership
    • Beneficial to all students and particularly those ‘B’ students.
  • Social Science
  • Business
  • Architecture
  • Entrepreneurship
  • International Travel/Study Abroad
    • Some are organized around service where you can travel and teach English, for example.

Green strongly recommends these opportunities, especially for those ‘B’ or undecided students, to help find that passion to carry through into their college experience.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

Core Area #3 Essays
Essays are usually required as part of the application process. They can be short, just 4 or 5 sentences, or they can require much more.
You will also see these required for scholarships.
Students pursuing different schools and scholarships will possibly need to write upwards of 5 or 6 different essays.
Essays are something families will need to really focus on, potentially. You must understand how many essays are going to be required and what it will take to get those essays done, and done well.
You can seek assistance from family members or from the counselor at your high school
Episode 65: Writing Quality Essays
Episode 60: How to Stand Out When Writing Your College Essay
Episode 20: The Write Stuff- Acing The College Essay
Episode 16: Es(say) It Right! College Essay Writing Tips
Episode 19: Surviving the College Application Process
Episode 63: Understanding the Admissions Process

Optional Area- Internships

These are a great way to pay for college and get experience in your field! There are colleges out there that advertise internships that not only give you coursework credit, but provide the actual opportunities and connections for internships.
You have to understand how they work and if they are applicable to your field. If it is something you are interested in, will you pursue an internship independent of your college or will you choose a college that requires internships?
Episode 71: How to Find a College Internship to Supercharge Your Career
Episode 77: Why College Students Should Work

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.
If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!
The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Share

The post THCC106 – Charting a Path through College For Every Student Interview with Amy Greene, Program Supervisor of Continuing Education at the University of New Mexico appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC105 – What Walt Disney Can Teach Us About College Planning Interview with Dr. Jeffrey Barnes, Professor and Author
2017-10-06 04:15:22 UTC
THCC105 – What Walt Disney Can Teach Us About College Planning Interview with Dr. Jeffrey Barnes, Professor and Author

What Walt Disney Can Teach Us About College Planning

“Every great story has conflict,” says author, public speaker, professor, and our guest today Dr. Jeff Barnes. He has created a unique class “The History of Disneyland” at California Baptist University in Riverside, California. Once he studied the history of Walt Disney, he discovered a multitude of life lessons and leadership skills that you could use yourself!

Questions Answered Today:

What can I learn from Walt about college?

The first lesson is to take a really deep breath. “We usually want it all figured out yesterday!” states Barnes. Walt Disney dropped out of school and never got past 9th grade. He tried lots of different jobs and careers before discovering what he truly loved.
“At some level we are all living our life undeclared,” describes Barnes, because we are learning to adapt and be flexible with change.
70% of college students end up changing their major at least once, if not more than once, before graduating.
Barnes notes that students have a little bit more time than you might think because there are so many core classes that have to be completed before they have to get into their major coursework.
“Use that time valuably not to just get those general education courses out of the way, but to explore where they are genuinely gifted,” explains Barnes. When you take those classes, pay attention to what sparks your curiosity or confidence and then start asking questions to find out what that might be like as a career path.
Barnes shares one of his favorite quotes to help those parents that have a very focused and driven student: “It is easier to tame a zealot than it is to pump life into a cadaver.”
That deep dedication needs to be protected and is very rare!
There will be difficulties and obstacles, but it is important to learn how to use them instead of giving up or no longer pushing forward. “Every great story has conflict,” notes Barnes.

What do parents do once kids leave the nest?

The key to this leap to college will be balance. The first semester will be all about transitioning. “When you check in with your student,” warns Barnes, “it is all about the details.” If your student is struggling, they will probably give bland and undescriptive details.
If you discover your child is struggling with something at school, be it personal or academic, Barnes encourages parents to find out the resources available on campus to help. Struggling could be any definition. Every college will have a resource center or other help readily available on campus.
For example, if you know math will be a problem, then set up a tutor before classes even begins.
“Get the help that is needed and the help that will help them succeed,” reveals Barnes.
You should also find someone on campus directly that you can reach out to who can help check in on your son or daughter, if you feel they are beginning to have difficulty with something.
If your child is interested in studying abroad or doing an internship, Barnes recommends Disney World in Florida as a wonderful place to apply to. Having “Disney Cast Member” on your resume is also quite impressive to future employers.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

Core Area #2 College Research
Research is key to determining what college will be the right fit for you and your family. There are lots of ways you can do this such as visiting web sites, buying books, etc.
Brad has some ways to help you here!
Sign up for our newsletter and get the top 10 college web sites
Episode 18: Virtual Campus Tours, Real Benefits!
Episode 90: The Untapped Gold Mine of College Fairs
Optional Area- Gap Year
Can be at the beginning of college for a full year or could be in the middle as just a semester, summer, or other break of some kind. This might be done for religious activities, work experience, a chance to travel, or whatever might be best for your family.
Episode 28: Taking a Gap Year
Episode 37: My Daughter’s Gap Year

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.
If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!
The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

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The post THCC105 – What Walt Disney Can Teach Us About College Planning Interview with Dr. Jeffrey Barnes, Professor and Author appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC104 – How To Use Freelancing to Help Pay For College Interview with Laura Pennington, Freelance Writer and Coach
39:32
2017-10-06 04:15:22 UTC 39:32
THCC104 – How To Use Freelancing to Help Pay For College Interview with Laura Pennington, Freelance Writer and Coach

How To Use Freelancing to Help Pay For College

If you have ever thought about earning some extra income on the side, parents or students, here is a great introduction to freelancing by Laura Pennington. We give some examples here of how to use freelancing to help pay for college plus how it can help students acquire some great skills and resume building experience. It’s easy and you can start today!

Questions Answered Today:

What do I need to do freelance work?

The characteristics needed to work in freelance include:

  • Self-discipline
  • Organization/time-management skills
  • Ability to put yourself out there to ask for the business
  • Confidence

 
“Freelance is becoming more and more popular in the marketplace today because we live in an online world,” describes Pennington.
You work on your own time and that is what makes it such a great fit for so many people.
Some of the biggest job areas include:

  • Graphic design
  • Virtual assistant
  • Web developer
  • Web designer
  • Voice over work
  • Comic book artist
  • Transcription
  • Translation

 
“I was earning the same amount of money freelancing as I was at my day job in a little less than 3 months after getting started,” notes Pennington.

How do you start?

Begin by taking an inventory of your skills so the learning curve is as easy as possible. Pick something you think you are good at and feel some confidence in. It should be something you have a background in and enjoy doing.
Check UpWork to find jobs to apply to. You bid for a job and the employer then chooses. The web site also acts as an intermediary to manage conflicts and payments to ensure you get paid for your work. You do have to pay to be a member, but it is minimal.
Be sure to have work samples and testimonials available for clients to show your skill level and quality of work. This also helps to prevent the client not liking what you do since they have already seen your style.
Most clients have a deadline, but do not require you to be at your computer during specific hours. “That’s why it is such a good fit for college students and parents,” says Pennington, “because they can determine how many hours they have free a week.”
When people are first starting out, Pennington recommends charging hourly and estimating how long it will take you to do the job. Your first couple jobs will help you learn how much time it will take you to actually complete an assignment. Be up front with the client when you estimate how long it might take you. Employers generally do not like being told something should take 3 hours and then are charged for much more than that.
Once you become accustomed to certain tasks you can then move towards a flat rate per project.
Try various tasks that interest you, then choose where you feel strongest and become a specialist in an industry. Check out Upwork to familiarize yourself with what is available out there and what you might like to do. “Don’t wait!” states Pennington, “You could be banking some money already!”

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

 

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

Core Area #1 Need-Based Aid
Every family will have to deal with need-based aid. It is based on the income and assets of parents and also of the student. This is one of two types of financial aid available and you will have to determine if you qualify for it.
Applications are completed by filling out the FAFSA, or sometimes the CSS profile, and begins at the start of senior year. You do NOT have to accept it all! There are multiple factors that determine how much of what kind of aid you will be offered and it will not be the same for everyone.
You can then accept scholarships and grants (which you do not repay), but decline loans with less than desirable interest rates, or be offered work-study on campus- whatever meets the needs of your unique situation.
Episode 2: Need-Based Aid Part 1
Episode 3: Need-Based Aid Part 2
EFC calculator and training videos

Optional Area- Homeschool

Most families get extra support from their high school in transitioning to college. Guidance counselors help students choose majors, careers, and help guide students towards a college. Without a counselor, this is left up to parents or you can hire an independent counselor for a fee.
Colleges also like to see a transcript with a GPA. If you are homeschooled, this won’t look the same. You will have to document the classes, coursework, and other opportunities that the child has had.
Episode 26: Right At Home, In School

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.
If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!
The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Share

The post THCC104 – How To Use Freelancing to Help Pay For College Interview with Laura Pennington, Freelance Writer and Coach appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC103 – The Ugly Truth About Debt Interview with Travis Jennings, Founder of Debt Reduction Inc.
25:14
2017-10-06 04:15:22 UTC 25:14
THCC103 – The Ugly Truth About Debt Interview with Travis Jennings, Founder of Debt Reduction Inc.

The Ugly Truth About Debt

“Debt is a bad thing and your personal finances have to be in order,” states our guest today and creator of Debt Reduction Inc. Travis Jennings. In this episode, we learn about the problems that come along with chaining yourself to your lifestyle, which often starts late in high school. Don’t let your student fall down this slippery slope! Set them off on the right foot and make sure your own finances are clear in the process with the great advice here- Win, win!

Questions Answered Today:

What does the typical person with debt look like?

Travis helps everyone that can’t necessarily afford a wealth manager. “What we try to do is focus on the debt aspect because I don’t see a lot of people out running around teaching how to get out of those issues,” says Jennings.
There is technology available now to help you restructure your debt and properly pay it down as quickly as possible.
Most people are doing okay covering their payments, but can’t quite squeeze college in as well.
“I think it is important to look back and analyze how we got into this mess,” Jennings notes when describing how people get into debt. Paying for college requires excess income.
Assets show up on the financial aid forms, but debts do not. You have to get your debt in order to be eligible for more financial aid.
Options for student loans include:

  • Mom and dad can borrow to help pay for college (Jennings does NOT recommend this!)
    • Formal student loan
    • Home equity
    • Credit card
  • Students can get their own loans to “have skin in the game”

The solutions that Jennings recommends the most are educationally based. These include:

  • Get a written plan
  • Understand the effect of the interest you are paying or receiving
  • Transfer from a position of debt to a position of wealth

Where can you learn more?

Jennings recommends the following:

Seek help from professionals, such as this podcast, to better plan your finances or to figure out how to get rid of your debt if nothing else works.
When it comes to bankruptcy or debt consolidation Jennings warns, “I’m not a big fan. It is not fixing the behavioral finance aspect.”
The problem is that most people don’t understand finance and people don’t apply education to their own lives.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

Consolidating debt
It may make sense early on in the college process to use other assets to pay off debt. For a family that has both assets and debt, it might make sense to use those assets to help pay down the debt so you can qualify for more financial aid. You can also redirect the cash flow that will be freed up from paying off these debts towards paying for college.
Rolling debt into your mortgage
Brad also suggests refinancing a mortgage to help pay off any outstanding debts, if it makes sense for your family. This is also advantageous because it helps prevent new debts in the form of student loans where the interest rate is substantially higher than if you had stretched your mortgage to a 15 or 30 year.
You have to be disciplined! Don’t pay off your credit cards and then run them right back up again and put yourself back into debt.

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.
If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!
The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Share

The post THCC103 – The Ugly Truth About Debt Interview with Travis Jennings, Founder of Debt Reduction Inc. appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC102 – Naturopathic Medicine – An Up and Coming Career Interview with Dr. Kimberly Sanders, Naturopathic Doctor
31:31
2017-10-06 04:15:22 UTC 31:31
THCC102 – Naturopathic Medicine – An Up and Coming Career Interview with Dr. Kimberly Sanders, Naturopathic Doctor

Naturopathic Medicine

Pssst. Have you heard of naturopathic medicine? Dr. Kimberly Sanders is on the show to share how she decided to follow her dream and become this specific kind of primary care doctor. Natural solutions are very popular, but people are searching for experts in the field. “Just because something is natural doesn’t make it safe,” notes Dr. Sanders. Today you will learn about this little known medical profession that might be the right path for you!

Questions Answered Today:

What is naturopathic medicine?

These doctors are primary care physicians with a strong focus on prevention and treating the underlying causes of disease. They can write prescriptions in most states, but try to use mostly natural medicine to address a condition.
Students still follow the path of medicine through undergraduate studies, such as pre-med, and this is a specific focus in medical school.
There are a number of paths that naturopathic doctors can take. This is a very exciting time to be in this field with lots of opportunities out there.
Options for what you can do after graduating include:

  • Private practice as a primary care doctor (open your own or join one)
  • Teaching opportunities
  • Consult at laboratories
  • Research
  • Develop natural products
  • Lecturing>
  • Writing

This type of medicine is covered in many states by insurance and is considered primary care. Other states consider it a specialty. Be sure to check where you live.

How do you become a naturopathic physician?

“The training is mostly the same,” says Dr. Sanders. Most of the incoming students have completed a bachelor’s degree in some kind of science, pre-med, or have otherwise met the prerequisites to get accepted to a naturopathic medical school.
Some examples of classes that are required as an undergraduate are:

  • 2 Biology classes
  • 4 Chemistry classes
    • 2 of general chemistry and organic chemistry
  • 1 Physics class
  • 1 Psychology type class
    • Counseling, introduction to psychology, or similar
  • Variations on what is needed in Humanities, English, and Writing depend on which particular college you are applying to

Students go through the application and interview process to one of 8 naturopathic colleges that is very similar to going to any other medical school. Admissions look strongly at GPA, extracurricular activities, and essays.
Financial aid is available and naturopathic doctors are eligible for income-based loan repayment. This means you pay no more than 10-15% of your income back towards your loans, which makes it easier to start a practice or get into a residency.
There is NO requirement for the MCAT or GRE at the time of this episode.
It is a 4 year program with the first 2 years heavy in basic sciences and the last 2 years focused on the specialty.
Naturopathic doctors are not required to complete a residency, but there are some available. After 4 years of undergraduate studies and 4 years of medical school you will be ready to open a practice and begin your career.
There is also the opportunity for a sub-specialty post-graduate to specialize in pediatrics, cancer, diabetes, or something else.
The starting salary is usually $80,000. “A lot of that salary is in your own control,” states Dr. Sanders. It will depend on usual factors that every doctor faces such as opening your own practice, joining a hospital, or what field you pursue. Naturopathic medicine is a growing specialty where doctors are found on staff in most practices and hospitals.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

Episode 17: College 100: Helping the Undecided Find a Career
Episode 44: How To Reduce Stress During the College Process
Episode 52: Successful Planning for Pre-Med and Medical School Students
Episode 58: Interview with Roger Dooley, Co-Founder of CollegeConfidential.com
Episode 86: I Think My Student Likes the Sciences, Now What?

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.
If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!
The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Share

The post THCC102 – Naturopathic Medicine – An Up and Coming Career Interview with Dr. Kimberly Sanders, Naturopathic Doctor appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC101 – Joining Forces with the Military to Cover the Cost of College Interview with Rob Aeschbach, Retired Marine and Financial Planner
26:47
2017-10-06 04:15:22 UTC 26:47
THCC101 – Joining Forces with the Military to Cover the Cost of College Interview with Rob Aeschbach, Retired Marine and Financial Planner

joining forces with military to cover the cost of college

Looking for another college option? Rob Aeschbach swings by our show to share his personal military experience and how that impacts financial planning and paying for college. “Although it is a dangerous job in a lot of ways, it isn’t like that all the time,” notes Aeschbach. His father was in the Navy, and that inspired him to pursue attending a military academy after high school. By enlisting after graduation, he was able to attend a prestigious college with a fantastic education FOR FREE!

Questions Answered Today:

How can the military help pay for college?

Most officers are going to be college graduates. There are some military academies that only service members can attend. You will graduate with no tuition bill or any student loans, but have a commitment to serve in the military for five more years. These are very competitive to get into and will usually require a nomination from your congressman or senator.
Another way to pay for college is toearn ROTC scholarships. You can join the college group and then serve in the military for 5 years after graduation.
Additionally, students can enlist in the military right out of high school and serve 4 years, then be eligible for the G.I. Bill to go to college for free.
“I definitely would not say to join the military just to have college paid for,” states Aeschbach. Make sure to ask advice from people you know and trust that have experience with the military. It is also critical to consider what it is you would like to get out of this experience and what branch of the military might suit you the best. What is it that attracts you to it? How does the military lifestyle fit you?

How do you work on getting into a military academy?

This is the same timeframe as applying to any other college and should begin in the junior year of high school. It requires good test scores and everything else needed in order to apply to college.
Senators and congressmen usually advertise when they are accepting applications for recommendations to these academies. They will then take and refer the top 10 or so applicants to the academies and the academies themselves decide from there.
The military is usually looking for:

  • Good test scores/grades
  • Physically fit people
  • Leadership experiences
    • Team captains, group leaders, etc.

You can leave during the first two years of the military academy WITHOUT a commitment to serving later.
ROTC scholarships are generally very competitive.

What is the difference between an officer and being enlisted?

“The leadership, for the most part, are the officers that are coming in after college and are trained in a particular skill (like a pilot),” describes Aeschbach.
Enlisted ranks are usually very young and are on their first tour. The average age is under 25.
Most service members are in their 20’s or early 30’s and aren’t used to having a steady paycheck yet. This impacts saving for retirement and big ticket items like buying a car or house. Once you are commissioned as an officer, you get a pay increase. Be sure to visit Rob Aeschbach’s web site and the links to get advice on military member finances if you are considering joining the military.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

Episode 42: ROTC Scholarships and Careers
Episode 46: Benefits of the GI Bill to Pay for College
Episode 90: The Untapped Goldmine of College Fairs
Episode 95: How to be More Successful in College

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.
If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!
The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

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The post THCC101 – Joining Forces with the Military to Cover the Cost of College Interview with Rob Aeschbach, Retired Marine and Financial Planner appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC100 – What Parents of Juniors Need to Be Doing Now! Interview with Brad Baldridge
32:31
2017-10-06 04:15:22 UTC 32:31
THCC100 – What Parents of Juniors Need to Be Doing Now! Interview with Brad Baldridge

What Parents of Juniors Need to Be Doing Now

We have our host Brad Baldridge leading the show today and giving you the tips he usually charges money for! Want this free advice? Of course you do! In our 100th episode, Brad breaks down a quick outline of what parents must be doing in order to prepare for college. The college planning process starts, at a minimum, early in the junior year of high school. You will need a test plan, scholarship plan, visit plan, and a financial plan in order to have the best strategy to get your student off to college successfully. What are these key areas all about? Brad has the knowledge and know-how right here!

Questions Answered Today:

What is a test plan?

This is all about planning for the ACT/SAT test that will be needed to get into college. Test prep usually leads to better scores. “The reality, of course, is that everyone is looking for that edge,” explains Baldridge. These better scores can lead to more opportunities.
Some important questions to consider include:

  • Should we take the ACT or the SAT?
  • When can we schedule and take the test?
    • Make sure it doesn’t conflict with other activities and that you have plenty of time to prepare.
  • How many times will you be taking it?
  • What kind of prep will you be doing for that?

The test plan ties into your school selection and visit plan.
If you are planning to apply to a more competitive school or follow athletic dreams, then you will need the best scores you can get. “Better scores are always better,” notes Baldridge.
Test prep is 100% on the student. Parents can’t study for them! If a student is dragging their feet that might dictate how much time and money parents spend on test prep.
By the end of the junior year, your goal is to have a test score you are proud of.

What is the visit plan?

There are multiple types of visits on a college campus. There is the stealth visit, where you just surprise show up on a campus (such as when you are on vacation) and check out the buildings and keep it simple. This is great for freshmen and sophomores.
There is also a more in-depth visit plan that considers:

  • How many schools do you need to visit?
  • Are they local or far away?
  • How can we get there?
    • Airfare, traveling plans, scheduling, etc.
  • Where do we start?

If you aren’t sure where to begin, start with the local schools as test visits. Some people complain they don’t know what schools to visit because they don’t know what they are looking for. Brad suggests seeing nearby schools to start, so you can pinpoint things you like and things you don’t like in order to figure out what is important to you. This also gives you a chance to practice what questions you want to ask and think about what you really want to see.
Once you understand what is important to your student that will help you to start customizing your visits.
If you have a junior, pull out your calendar for school and your calendar for work in order to plan visit days now. You might not know where you are visiting yet, but schedule those days or weekends now and you can choose later.
Some colleges offer open houses, only schedule appointments, or can give you a tour anytime. You will need to call and scout out what information is available at the colleges you are interested in.
On a college visit, it is important to find out:

  • What it takes to be admitted
  • What test type or score is ideal
  • The price of the school
  • Scholarships and financial aid available

This is where you get your first layer of information about the school. It is best to visit while classes are in session to get an idea of what the school is like when in full swing.

How do I create a scholarship plan?

Of course everyone wants scholarships, but you need to think about how you will win them. “A lot of families talk about scholarships, but in the end, only a few families pursue and win scholarships because it takes a lot of work, effort, and it has a learning curve,” says Baldridge.
Check out “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents” in the resources. It contains 4 quick videos to help teach you about scholarships and help you decide how much time and effort you would like to put into chasing them.
Scholarships should be done during the junior and senior years. Depending how many you will be applying to, you should be sure to schedule those in your calendar because they do take time.

How am I going to pay for college and create a financial plan?

This is the last plan, but it is revised as you visit schools and figure out where you want to go and what you can afford.
You don’t want to get to the end of the process and realize that all of the colleges you are considering are very expensive!
Things to be working on for the financial plan include:

  • Figuring out if you qualify for need-based aid
  • Determining how much money parents will be paying towards college and how much students will be contributing
  • Savings and cash flow availability
  • Loan options

The financial plan is the last plan to come together because you have to know which schools you are going to be applying to in order to consider how much they will cost as well as how much financial aid you will be pursuing.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

Episode 90: The Untapped Gold Mine of College Fairs
Episode 85: Should Your Student Test Again As a Senior?
Episode 81: Four Fatal Errors Families Make When Planning For College
Episode 33: Test Prep For a Higher Score
Episode 18: Virtual Campus Tours, Real Benefits!
Episode 13: 8 Components of College Planning & Test Case

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.
If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!
The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

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The post THCC100 – What Parents of Juniors Need to Be Doing Now! Interview with Brad Baldridge appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC99- How Choosing the Right College Can Save You Big Money! Interview with Sam Feeney, Author “Choose the Perfect College…For You”
44:33
2017-10-06 04:15:22 UTC 44:33
THCC99- How Choosing the Right College Can Save You Big Money! Interview with Sam Feeney, Author “Choose the Perfect College…For You”

How Choosing The Right College Can Save You Big Money!

Your family is starting to plan for after high school, but don’t skip this critical first question- “Why are you going to college? We have college admissions coach Sam Feeney here to help you figure out how to choose the right college… for you! Parents- here is the advice you can’t afford (literally) to miss.

Questions Answered Today:

What do you recommend for parents?

Feeney made some of the classic college mistakes himself such as looking at schools by rankings to get in the “best possible school” and he should have been personalizing the college search by academics, campus life, opportunities, and finances.

You have to figure out why you are going to college before where and how you will be going to college.

Feeney suggests having students and parents write out a request for proposal to clarify why this particular path is the one they should take to get to the destination. He calls this the “True North College Program”. Create a vision of what your student wants their life to look like, a mission statement, and then you will know what you are hiring the college to do for you. It will put in perspective how to choose a school and getting as much value out of it as possible.

Feeney recommends parents start out as being honest that they don’t really know the best path. Have an open dialogue and figure it out together. Ask, “What do you want to do next?”

How do I be a coach for my child and not a dictator?

Feeney’s next book is called, “College Level Confidence” which means if a student really owns what they are good at, they are ready, as opposed to circumstantial confidence.

“The things that a kid does (like videogames) springs from what they believe in,” describes Feeney. Parents should come up with 20 things they think their kid is good at now and 20 things their kid enjoyed when they were 5 years old.

Take the time to tell your kid exactly what you think they are good at.

Feeney always recommends to find an outside coach such as an aunt, a brother, or a friend that has multiple children who have found success. “Once you commit to listening to somebody,” warns Feeney, “shut everybody else off because there is so much noise about this topic.”

What are the 5 warning signs that your child is applying to the wrong college?

  • Your child doesn’t have a plan of how to use a school’s unique resources.
  • Your child is basing their college choices solely on national rankings.
  • A girlfriend, a boyfriend, or a best friend is going there.
  • Your child delays applying.
    • Take a step back and don’t nag. Maybe they have just changed their mind so talk to your child.
  • Your child chooses the college with the simplest application.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

The Five Facets of College Finances

Episode 95: How To Be More Successful In College

Episode 6: 9 Ways To Reduce College Costs If You Don’t Qualify For Financial Aid

Episode 17: Career 100- Helping the Undecided Find a Career

Episode 29: 6 Types of Colleges and How They Impact Pricing

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with My College Life Coach.

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The post THCC99- How Choosing the Right College Can Save You Big Money! Interview with Sam Feeney, Author “Choose the Perfect College…For You” appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC98 – Helping Teens Succeed Through Adversity Interview with Marc Hoberman, Author “Search and Seizure: Overcoming Illness and Adversity”
27:24
2017-10-06 04:15:22 UTC 27:24
THCC98 – Helping Teens Succeed Through Adversity Interview with Marc Hoberman, Author “Search and Seizure: Overcoming Illness and Adversity”

Helping Teens Succeed Through Adversity

“Don’t let your struggles define you, you define them,” shares our speaker today Marc Hoberman. He is the author of “Search and Seizure: Overcoming Illness and Adversity.” After suddenly moving from New York to Florida during high school, Marc suffered a grand mal seizure while driving and was diagnosed with epilepsy. Hoberman tells us his story and how he came to terms with this diagnosis while still planning for college. “I am not who I am in spite of my illness, I am who I am because of my illness,” declares Hoberman.

Questions Answered Today:

If I’m a parent of a struggling teen, what can I do to help?

Children will not deal with their parents the same way they work with other adults. It will probably be helpful to look for a qualified outside tutor. “If you are too emotionally involved, you have to take a step back,” says Hoberman.  

He also strongly advocates against comparing one child to another.  

Students often suffer test anxiety as a result of poor study skills. These skills can be taught! If you study wrong and take notes incorrectly, it can create a vicious cycle. “You have to meet your children at their reality,” states Hoberman.

Everyone has adversity, and it makes it difficult to focus on academics when other things are going on such as bullying, stress, illness, or anxiety. There are ways to help handle these stressors such as deep breathing, talking to someone, or finding a support group in person or on the internet.

Marc wants everyone to know that they are not alone- whatever the problem is.

He has also noticed an increase in the number of students not graduating from college in recent years because parents are not helping their children get organized or preparing them for the independence of going away to college. “Every school I know of has places you can go on campus for assistance,” notes Hoberman. Parents have to be open and honest about the adversity students will face in college and they have to be there to listen and support their child as needed.

There is help available everywhere through the internet, groups, or books. You can find it if you research and seek it out, depending on what the particular issue is. Marc also cautions against keeping whatever the problem is a complete secret. “If people don’t want to be friends with you because of your struggles,” Hoberman explains, “those aren’t people you want as friends anyways.”

“Search and Seizure: Overcoming Illness and Adversity” is a short read that will be helpful for parents, students, and teachers that experience adversity in their life.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

The Six R’s For Stress Management

Episode 92: Don’t Let Student Anxiety or Depression Derail Your College Plans

Episode 70: Impact of Grief on Planning For College

Episode 80: Online Course- What You Need to Know, Even For Traditional Students

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with Marc Hoberman.

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The post THCC98 – Helping Teens Succeed Through Adversity Interview with Marc Hoberman, Author “Search and Seizure: Overcoming Illness and Adversity” appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC97 – College Planning with a Family Business Interview with Matt Miller, Owner of School Spirit Vending
32:16
2017-10-06 04:15:22 UTC 32:16
THCC97 – College Planning with a Family Business Interview with Matt Miller, Owner of School Spirit Vending

College Planning with a Family Business

Before you know it, your child will be an adult. “There is so much opportunity out there today, so I challenge you to get your kids involved and give them more responsibility than you ever thought you could,” shares our speaker today Matt Miller, who owns a small family business. He shares his perspective today on how starting a side business, that eventually grew into a full time company, has exponentially benefitted his family. It gave him the chance to involve his children and to teach them hands on life lessons all from within their home. Kids are very capable if they want to be and are allowed to be, so what’s stopping you from empowering your student?

Questions Answered Today:

How does responsibility benefit kids?

By running a business and employing your children, kids can earn an income. Their tax rate is much lower because what they earn is so little. This gives children the chance to manage their income.

“They begin to see that tie between work and income,” describes Miller.  

A lot of kids are ill prepared for the transition from mom and dad’s home to being on their own.

Students particularly have trouble because:

  • They don’t go to school with a goal in mind
    • Just feel that they are supposed to go
  • Debt taken on to pay for a degree
  • The real learning happens after college
  • Students usually either go to college for job training (nurse, teacher, lawyer, etc.) or a liberal arts focus, but each family has different expectations

Many future careers aren’t even invented yet!

Skills about how to work, communicating effectively and managing your time and money will be applicable to any future career. It is up to parents to empower their children with responsibilities around the home, or in the family business, to learn these skills before they go out on their own.

What should parents know about starting a side business?

“It’s not as big of a deal as you might make it out to be,” notes Miller. He recommends using professionals for certain tasks so you don’t have to worry about unnecessary things.

Start small, and learn along the way. There will be mistakes and risks that you can’t recover from quickly, but you will be ok. “Be empowered,” says Miller, “and know that you can do it!”

Be willing to get started, even if you feel unsure of what you are doing. Don’t suffer from “knowledge constipation”- nothing will ever line up 100% perfectly. You have to just get started and learn by doing. Failure is ok, as long as you learn from it.

Miller warns, “Your business won’t grow as fast as you think, it will cost more than you think, and it will take longer than you think, so plan on that.”

Also, be aware of the technology that is out there to help you so you can balance your full-time job and keep food on the table while starting your side business.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

Episode 68: How to Help Your College Student Build Their Credit

Episode 59: Starting a Business in College

Episode 77: Why College Students Should Work

Episode 34: Financial Advice for Teens, By a Teen

Episode 83: Raise “Money Smart” Kids; Allowance, Budget, and Financial Responsibility

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with School Spirit Vending.

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THCC96- Using LinkedIn and Other Social Media to Find Scholarships Interview with Ellen Reaves, Co-Host College Money Maze Podcast
37:23
2017-10-06 04:15:22 UTC 37:23
THCC96- Using LinkedIn and Other Social Media to Find Scholarships Interview with Ellen Reaves, Co-Host College Money Maze Podcast

Just try to keep secret from your friends and family everything that you learn today! With Ellen Reaves on the show, you won’t believe how easy winning scholarships can be. She also gives us the leg up on how using LinkedIn will make your child’s hunt for a career so much easier. There is no doubt about it, you need to get on this #1 business platform and social media site. Parents, you can help launch your student into the career of their dreams AND help them win free money for college. So what are you waiting for? Get started now!

Questions Answered Today:

How can social media help find scholarships?

Social media can be used to your benefit, specifically LinkedIn. By creating a dynamic profile, you can interact with brands and companies. Everyone should create a free profile–average students, athletes, or anyone planning to go to college.

Ellen Reaves says this is the best way to find internships and to network with brands and professional organizations your child is specifically interested in.

This is also a place to be recommended for your various skills and services or to find volunteer opportunities.

How can parents help?

LinkedIn isn’t about just posting your resume. It is a way to showcase yourself as being something more than a GPA.

Some easy things that parents can do to help their child set up a great profile include:

  • Be sure to use a professional image and not just any old selfie
  • Include information about your child’s background
  • Describe activities and organizations they are involved with
  • Post examples of artwork, creative writing, or whatever they excel at

It is also important to teach your child about finances and how spending works. A lot of families don’t have the money conversation early enough or even at all. Help your child and have this conversation!

If your student is thinking about a gap year, be aware of the limitations on state aid or other financial aid options. Do the necessary research.

What should you be doing and when?

“If you don’t ask, you don’t get,” states Reaves. Remove your preconceived notions about financial aid. Believe it is possible for your family.

Parents also need to be honest about finances and what you can afford. If their dream school is outside your budget, then your student needs to be responsible for finding a way to cover the cost and to hopefully not use student loans.

The most successful families have these things in common:

  • Start looking for scholarships early, even in freshmen year
  • Be organized to keep track of deadlines and application pieces
  • Recognize they have a unique story to tell and can use that information to repurpose essays for both applications and scholarships
  • Seek local scholarships and don’t only focus on the large and competitive choices
  • Have a great relationship with your high school counselor

Be sure to research the price of potential colleges so you can foresee upcoming costs and plan accordingly. Community college is also a fantastic way to start and then you can transfer.

What is the college money maze podcast about?

“We are focusing on a lot of the hot topics,” describes Reaves. One of the newest topics is on the adjusted FAFSA deadline that has been moved to October so you can submit it earlier.

The podcast also breaks down common terms and acronyms into plain language for people so they don’t need to feel overwhelmed.

The main audience of this show includes the parents of juniors and seniors in high school. There is a lot of information available, but a particular focus in on scholarships.

Understanding the college process will take time and the best way to understand all the technical jargon you will have to know would be to listen to podcasts, read, and to start learning how this process works. You can’t leave it up to your child! Be sure to share some sources you found helpful with your friends.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

 

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

Network Like a Billionaire

Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents

Episode 25: Get Your Student LinkedIn to College Success

Episode 14: What Is a Scholarship

Episode 43: How to Help Your Student Win Scholarships

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with College Money Maze.

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The post THCC96- Using LinkedIn and Other Social Media to Find Scholarships Interview with Ellen Reaves, Co-Host College Money Maze Podcast appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC95 – How to Be More Successful in College Interview with Brian Robben, Founder of www.TakeYourSuccess.com and Author “How To College”
22:31
2017-10-06 04:15:22 UTC 22:31
THCC95 – How to Be More Successful in College Interview with Brian Robben, Founder of www.TakeYourSuccess.com and Author “How To College”

Congratulations! Your college manual is now available.

Yes, Brian Robben has written the college manual you need. “It’s for any college student before they are entering or already in college,” describes Robben. He took everything he himself learned in college, and advice he was constantly asked for by his friends, and then compiled it into an 80 page manual.

“The reason I wrote the book is because I felt a ton of college students had this misconception that they have to choose between having fun or locking themselves in the library trying to ensure their future success,” says Robben. This manual teaches you how to have the best of both worlds!

Questions Answered Today:

Who is this book for?

“My advice applies to all college students,” notes Robben. He also has a blog available with great articles that touch on topics for all kinds of college students, even quiet and less motivated students.

“How to College” covers important life skills, such as time management, that will be useful for everyone.

Are there any misconceptions out there?

Ambitious students will latch onto their grades and social students will focus on activities. You do not have to choose! You can have a better, more balanced life and it doesn’t have to be one or the other.

Scholarships also don’t stop once you enter college. You can continue to apply for more each and every year.

How is the book organized?

There are a few chapters in “How to College”, but some topics included are:

  • When to do laundry
  • Dorm life, including how to handle roommate relationships
  • Class hacks
  • Study strategies
  • How to write papers
  • Scheduling freetime
  • Stress relief
  • Career advice

What is on your blog?

There is a lot that coordinates between the book and the blog. Check out the articles, advice, and fun activities for both students and parents on http://www.takeyoursuccess.com

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

Episode 34: Financial Advice for Teens

Episode 14: What is a Scholarship?

Episode 5: Scholarships: Tips, Timelines, and Where You Can Find Them

Episode 3: Need Based Financial Aid Part 2

Episode 2: Need Based Financial Aid Part 1

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with Brian Robben.

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The post THCC95 – How to Be More Successful in College Interview with Brian Robben, Founder of www.TakeYourSuccess.com and Author “How To College” appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC94 – Five College Myths to Avoid Interview with Dr. Christopher Lewis, Author of “The Ultimate College Preparation Blueprint”
36:29
2017-10-06 04:15:22 UTC 36:29
THCC94 – Five College Myths to Avoid Interview with Dr. Christopher Lewis, Author of “The Ultimate College Preparation Blueprint”

College graduates earn an average of 74% more money compared to high school graduates.

You can’t get far without a degree these days. Dr. Lewis has been in the college admissions and student affairs fields for almost 20 years. He knows it inside and out and is happy to share what he has experienced with us today. In all his various roles with higher education, Dr. Lewis kept encountering these 5 myths from both students and parents. He is the author of the fantastic book, “The Ultimate College Preparation Blueprint” that is short, but very effective, to help jumpstart the college planning process for anyone.

Questions Answered Today:

What are the five college myths?

Myth 1: There is only one true and perfect college. “There are so many colleges that you do not even know about,” describes Lewis, “To say there is only one out there that is a right fit is a misnomer.”

Students need to be the ones to decide which college will be right for them- do not let other people make this big decision.

Myth 2: A career or major has to be chosen before picking a college. Paths change frequently in college. The current national average shows that college students will change their major at least 3 times. The Department of Labor predicts that people entering the workforce will have between 12-15 jobs, including 4 different career changes.

The first year of college, no matter where you go, will usually be general education courses. It is important to take the time to find where you will be happy.

Before picking a major or certain program track you should:

  • Check with Career Services
  • Talk to people with that major
  • Find what careers your major will lead to
  • Imagine yourself in one of those careers to be certain it is what you want for your life

 

There is nothing wrong with starting at a community college first if your student is undecided. This could be especially beneficial because class sizes are smaller and professors are just as qualified. These are also much cheaper compared to a four-year university.

If you are planning on a university no matter what, look for a college that has a broad choice of academic areas. A liberal arts focus is also a good choice for undecided students. Going on to graduate school can provide better training after that in a specific field.

Myth 3: You can only afford low-priced colleges. Dr. Lewis recommends having a list of colleges that would be a good fit. Apply to them all and see what financial aid packages might be available.

Myth 4: I have never heard of this college, so it can’t be any good. There are over 3,300 colleges and universities just in the United States. “You have to go in with an open mind,” notes Lewis. College visits and quality questions are critical. Students must really envision if they can be there for the next four or five years. It can’t be based on where friends are going or what someone is telling them to do.

Myth 5: Maybe I will think about college someday, but I don’t really need it. If you don’t have a college education, then you will need technical training. Dr. Lewis also strongly recommends that undergraduate students volunteer, do internships, and do things in the career area of interest. This will provide connections for networking and possible options for the future.

People that do not go to college right away usually have life get in the way. Going abroad for a year or doing something else for a year is ok, but it’s difficult to be able to go back.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

 

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

Episode 71: How to Find a College Internship to Supercharge Your Career Interview with Sharise Kent

Episode 63: Understanding the Admissions Process with Lydia Fayal

Episode 37: My Daughter’s Gap Year with Kurt and Audrey Jacobsen

Episode 31: Grant Baldwin, Major Decisions, Career Choices

Episode 18: Virtual Campus , Real Benefits! Interview with Chris Carson

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with Dr. Lewis.

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The post THCC94 – Five College Myths to Avoid Interview with Dr. Christopher Lewis, Author of “The Ultimate College Preparation Blueprint” appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC93- From High School to Law School – The Info You Need Interview with Adam Almaraz, Director of JD Admissions at Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at Arizona State University
42:48
2017-10-06 04:15:22 UTC 42:48
THCC93- From High School to Law School – The Info You Need Interview with Adam Almaraz, Director of JD Admissions at Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at Arizona State University

“I get to help students and applicants that dream of being lawyers be successful in the application process,” says our guest Adam Almaraz, who is the director of JD admissions at the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at Arizona State University.

He is one of the people that makes the decisions about who gets to be admitted to this competitive program. Each year there are 1,500-2,000 applications, but only 500-600 students are admitted. That equals only about 230 law students for each incoming class.

You need these tips today on how to improve your child’s chances of being admitted!

Questions Answered Today:

What kind of coursework is required in law school?

In the first year, or 1L year, students are assigned a standardized curriculum. Students do not really pick their schedules. Once students get past this, they can then focus in on particular areas of interest.

“After the first year, it is largely self-driven by the student and what it is they want to accomplish,” describes Almaraz.

Some practice areas that a student might build their curriculum around include:

  • High interest, but non-typical areas, such as Space law
  • Criminal
  • Business
  • Environmental
  • Patent and intellectual
  • International
  • Family

These are standard practice areas of what attorneys usually do.

How do students set themselves apart in their application?

The two most important elements of a law school application are LSAT scores and undergraduate GPA.

The other pieces that help with subjective measuring of an applicant include:

  • Letters of recommendation
  • Resume
  • Personal statement
    • This lets the committee get to know you and helps explain why they should let you into this program.
  • Full file review
    • Includes transcripts, academic trend analysis, difficulty of coursework, major, and university of undergraduate studies.

Almaraz stresses that students must complete these pieces in a very genuine way.

“Applicants who really approach the application process from a genuine place end up faring much better than the applicant who is trying to do things just because they think it might give them a little bit more leverage in the application process,” warns Almaraz.

Always reach out to law schools! Never hesitate to pick up the phone or email the colleges you are interested in. Admission counselors are there to help you and to make sure you have everything you need for success.

When should I start the application process?

Potential applicants should begin collecting information as early as possible to be sure you are ready when it comes time to actually apply to law school. Some great ways to start include:

  • Shadow local attorneys
  • Visit law school campuses
    • There might be pipeline programs or other educational opportunities for high school aged students.
  • Contact a pre-law advisor at a law school you are interested in

Junior year of college is when applicants should start thinking about taking the LSAT and planning out their application to get all the pieces together that are required if they want to go straight into law school after graduation.

The summer before senior year, students should have all the parts of the application planned out so they do not feel rushed for the hard application deadlines that following Spring.

Some students choose to take a gap year after undergraduate graduation. The average age of entry at the Sandra Day O’Connor School of Law is between 24-26 years old.

“I don’t think doing a pre-law major, if the school offers one, is necessarily the best option,” notes Almaraz. There is no required major to apply to law school, so be sure to choose one that you are genuinely interested in and will enjoy doing your undergraduate studies in. This usually helps with having a higher GPA.

According to Almaraz, the national average applicant applies to between 6-10 schools. It is an important decision. If you are accepted at more than one institution, it is very important to do campus visits. Another great resource is to talk to current students. They will usually be very candid.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

Investigate: Law schools cutting back

Episode 89: Help Your Child Get Into Law School

We have a great video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents.” It is 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are interested in learning more about scholarships please visit:

www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with Sandra Day O’Connor Law School.

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The post THCC93- From High School to Law School – The Info You Need Interview with Adam Almaraz, Director of JD Admissions at Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at Arizona State University appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC92 – Don’t Let Student Anxiety or Depression Derail Your College Plans Interview with Jillian Arany, Graduate Student Studying Biology
31:41
2017-10-06 04:15:22 UTC 31:41
THCC92 – Don’t Let Student Anxiety or Depression Derail Your College Plans Interview with Jillian Arany, Graduate Student Studying Biology

Depression and anxiety can be a struggle for many college students. It happened to Jill Arany. Now she is about to graduate with her masters degree and has already landed her dream job after overcoming these hurdles personally.

“There is a difference between being sad and being depressed,” explains Arany. She shares her story today how the death of her grandmother during her senior year of high school impacted her academics and college experience. Free help is available on campus if your child is struggling with depression, anxiety, or any other mental health issues.

“Don’t let having a mental illness deter you from going to a university because it is manageable and there are ways around it,” stresses Arany.

Questions Answered Today:

What can a school do to help?

High schools and universities can always help provide accommodations for testing. There is a lot of free support and many resources available to students that feel they are struggling with depression, anxiety, a learning disability, or any other mental illness.

Where Arany attended college, there was a department of Accessibility Services that helped to grant her extended time on course exams and also spaced them apart more during the week with at least one day between tests.

“I think the stigma of mental health is shifting, these resources are becoming a lot more evident and students are using them more,” says Arany.

Some other accommodations that can be available include:

  • Extended time on exams
  • Having a test read aloud to you
  • Small group testing
  • Scribes that can help circle answers
  • Computerized testing
  • Note-takers for your classes
  • Free counseling

Arany was unaware of all the resources available to her until she sought these options through her school.

How do you learn about what services are available?

“The ones I was involved with were called Disability Services or Disability and Access Services,” states Arany.  

The department responsible for providing accommodations can usually be found with other services provided on campus, but you can always ask the registrar for more information.

Smaller universities are better able to accommodate students than larger scale campuses. A smaller population at the university makes assistance easier.

Arany found that, in her situation, the professors were always willing to help and were very understanding. She had some slight trouble with her peers and the stigma attached to mental illness. As more people found out about her accommodations, they themselves were able to seek resources for themselves because they were unaware of the services available.

Who determines if you can get accommodations?

For Arany, she simply needed a doctor’s note. She sat down with her doctor and discussed what might help her and what she would feel comfortable with. Each university has a different protocol and separate requirements.

“They do make accommodations for all various levels of education,” shares Arany.

Accommodations do not go onto your permanent record, so you must speak up for yourself. If you know that your child struggles, you have to go into the registrar and look into what is available on campus. Arany suggests browsing the university’s website and seeing what is available.

Are there outside resources available?

Arany enjoys sharing her story to help break down the stigma associated with mental illness. There are lots of books and support groups out there online or on campus. Counselors are a great resource and medication can be prescribed by a doctor if they feel it meets your needs.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

 

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

Episode 70: Impact of Grief on Planning for College Interview with Natalia Volz

Episode 39: Divorce and College Planning Interview with Sandy Durst

Episode 11: College Planning and Divorce

Episode 8: Helping Students With Learning Disabilities Prepare for College

ARTICLE ON STRESS/RELAXATION TECHNIQUES

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with Jillian Arany.

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The post THCC92 – Don’t Let Student Anxiety or Depression Derail Your College Plans Interview with Jillian Arany, Graduate Student Studying Biology appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC91- How to Leverage Your Career Services Office Long Before You Graduate Interview with Dr. Tricia Zelaya-Leon, Director of Career Development at Rollins College
38:48
2017-10-06 04:15:22 UTC 38:48
THCC91- How to Leverage Your Career Services Office Long Before You Graduate Interview with Dr. Tricia Zelaya-Leon, Director of Career Development at Rollins College

Every college has a career office, but what do you do with it? Take a listen to Dr. Tricia Zelaya-Leon as she explains who is there and how it works. So many students are missing out on this free resource! Is your student one of them?

Still in high school? Be sure to use this information on your college visits so you can have some great questions ready. Already in college? This is great information just for you because most families aren’t taking full advantage of this superb resource!

The career services at your college will do so much for you! It is so much more than just help building a resume. As Dr. Zelaya-Leon notes, “It’s about exploration and finding what fits.”

Questions Answered Today:

What is typically provided by career services?

Some things that every career services department will generally offer:

  • Put together a resume
  • Creating cover letters
  • Mock interviews
  • Information about jobs and internships
  • Network with alumni

These are just the basics that are usually offered. Dr. Zelaya-Leon explains how she can help students, even before they declare a major, to find where their place might be in the world after college.

Students should be visiting the career services department at their college during their first year to better plan their college track of courses.

There are also multiple inventories/assessments that can be taken to help a student better understand themselves and what they might enjoy doing professionally. It is important to then discuss these results with your career counselor to figure out the next steps BEFORE your senior year.

Services are still available to alumni as well.

Do we have to declare a major right away?

“I wish every student would come into our institution undecided,” states Zelaya-Leon.

Courses in the first and second year are designed to help expose students to different disciplines and expand their breadth of knowledge. Nationally, over 40% of students that enter college with a decided major will change that major by the end of their first year. Even more students change majors after that with changing up to 6 times.

In different majors, there are different courses. By changing your major, you will probably delay graduation.

How can parents help?

First and second year students don’t often take advantage of career services, but really need to.

“The transition from high school to college is not easy,” warns Zelaya-Leon.

There are a few issues that arise with being in college now that students have the freedom of no curfew and being away from home. It is easy to get off-track.

Be sure to discuss with your student what you expect of them now that they are more on their own, but allow them to make mistakes and to learn from them.

Also, ensure your student can do basic things for themselves before they leave for college such as washing and drying laundry, making a bed, and managing their schedule.

It is helpful to have your child participate in some community service activities in high school with a focus on the experience as opposed to the number of hours completed. This can help them practice public speaking and communication skills, both of which are critical to the modern workplace.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

 

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

Use this information to create an action step for your family! How will you take advantage of these services?

Episode 90: The Untapped Gold Mine of College Fairs

http://www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/college-fairs/

Episode 66: Tips on How Undecided Students Can Choose A Major

http://www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/tips-on-how-undecided-students-can-choose-a-major/

Episode 47: Habits of “A” Students and Preparing For College

http://www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/habits-of-a-students-and-preparing-for-college/

Episode 41: Finding the Right Roommate! Textbooks: Buy or Rent?

http://www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/finding-the-right-roommate/

Episode 8: Helping Students With Learning Disabilities Prepare for College

http://www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/008/

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with Rollins College.

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The post THCC91- How to Leverage Your Career Services Office Long Before You Graduate Interview with Dr. Tricia Zelaya-Leon, Director of Career Development at Rollins College appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC90– The Untapped Gold Mine of College Fairs Interview with Marie Bigham, Board Member of National Association of College Admission Counseling
43:08
2017-10-06 04:15:22 UTC 43:08
THCC90– The Untapped Gold Mine of College Fairs Interview with Marie Bigham, Board Member of National Association of College Admission Counseling

If you are interested in learning more about college (and who isn’t?!), then you need to listen to this episode with Marie Bigham. She shares all the amazing details you need to know about college fairs.

High school is a singular experience that lets students find their authentic self. Parents should enjoy this time of growth with their child. When done right, planning for college is a tremendous personal development opportunity where students can think about their skills, talents, and goals for the future.

You can’t miss these FREE opportunities with your student! Find your local college fair and put it on your calendar today.

Questions Answered Today:

What is a college fair?

NACAC (National Association of College Admission Counseling) sponsors college fairs all over the country and in Canada. Bigham defines the goal of a college fair as, “To share as much one on one information with college bound people about the opportunities in this country.”

These can be big and slightly overwhelming, but definitely worth it. You can and should attend these starting your freshman year of high school.

What to expect at a college fair:

  • Around 300 colleges from around the world
  • Informational sessions in more than one language
  • Advice on paying for college
  • How to apply
  • Essay writing tips
  • Student athlete information
  • Counseling services
  • Scholarship sponsors
  • GI Bill information for veterans

These are usually held in metropolitan areas, but not always, and cost nothing (aside from potential parking fees).

How do we prepare for a college fair?

Step one is to find a fair near you. These can easily be found in the newspaper, through a high school counselor, or on the NACAC website.

Online is where students will pre-register, find a list of colleges presenting at the fair, and a map of the event. Don’t forget about the presentations! Be sure to check some of those out for more great information on specific topics.

“For every college you go see that you know of already, go see two more you have never heard of,” suggests Bigham. She also recommends to split up with family members to get as much information as possible from as many colleges as you can.

Do some research on the colleges you are most interested in and prepare a list of quality questions to ask. The person at the table is usually involved in admissions in some way, so introduce yourself and have one or two of those questions ready to go.

Also, check out what campuses are nearby the event and take a college tour- even if you aren’t interested in that particular college, just go for the experience.

What kind of college fairs are there?

In addition to a standard college fair, there are specialized fairs for visual and performing arts. These provide amazing opportunities for people in the arts to have their portfolios looked at and to get more details about auditions.

If your student is even a little bit interested in visual or performing arts, be sure to check out this specialized fair early during the freshman or sophomore year to get the appropriate timeline for applications to college. It is different from a regular college.

STEM fairs are just starting to roll out. They will include tables of professionals that will share how these opportunities extend into careers in addition to all the other great things to expect at a standard college fair.

What other resources does NACAC have?

Some other resources that are available on the NACAC website includes information:

  • Broken down by age and topic
  • For transferring
  • Undocumented students
  • Financial aid
  • Born abroad
  • How to utilize college rankings
    • Look at rankings and find what is useful for a specific individual

Parents absolutely need to have an honest financial conversation with their child including what they expect their child to contribute to college costs.

“The biggest mistake parents and families make in this process is not being open and honest and realistic about cost and affordability,” warns Bigham.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

All NACAC Resources

Episode 74: How to Get Started In College Planning

http://www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/how-to-get-started-in-college-planning/

Episode 66: Tips On How Undecided Students Can Choose a Major

http://www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/tips-on-how-undecided-students-can-choose-a-major/

Episode 30: Joe Saul-Sehy, College Planner, College Parent

http://www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/30/

Episode 19: Surviving the College Application Process

http://www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/19/

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with NACAC.

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The post THCC90– The Untapped Gold Mine of College Fairs Interview with Marie Bigham, Board Member of National Association of College Admission Counseling appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC89 – Help Your Child Get into Law School High School Undergrad and the LSAT Interview with Nathan Fox, LSAT expert
40:29
2017-10-06 04:15:22 UTC 40:29
THCC89 – Help Your Child Get into Law School High School Undergrad and the LSAT Interview with Nathan Fox, LSAT expert

Is your child a hard worker or high achiever? Do they like to argue? Maybe law school is the right graduate school path for them. Nathan Fox is the author of “Cheating the LSAT” and four other LSAT books. He shares his wisdom here for any family even remotely considering the idea of taking the LSAT and going on to law school.

“It’s the most expensive thing you are ever going to buy, except for maybe a house,” warns Fox.

Is your child dreaming of being a lawyer? Nathan has the answers, and the help you need, if your answer is “Yes!” Get all the info here before making this very important decision.

Questions Answered Today:

What is the LSAT?

This stands for the Law School Admission Test. It is the test taken before going to law school and helps determine where you get in as well as how much scholarship money that school will offer. It is NOT the Bar exam.

It is a test of:

  • English language abilities
  • Logic
  • How hard you can work
  • NO math section

There are over 80 practice tests available to help students to prepare for this test. It is scored from 120-180 with the average score at 145. “Almost every school cares about your highest score and will ignore your lower scores,” notes Fox.

What is a typical timeline for going to law school?

Going straight into law school after graduating with your undergraduate degree requires prepping for the LSAT to begin in the sophomore or junior year. Law schools admit one year in advance, so if you are planning to go straight into law school after completing an undergraduate degree it is important to plan accordingly.

“You can go to law school with any undergraduate major,” states Fox. Good grades are one of the 2 primary determinants of where you get into law school (along with the LSAT).

The test is offered four times a year: February, June, September OR October (depending upon the year), and December. You may take the test 3 times in any 2 year period.

What is the best way to prepare for the LSAT?

Fox recommends to begin preparation at least 3 months before taking the LSAT. Generally, students who enjoy reading and read a lot will do better.

The best thing to do is to take as many of the available practice tests as possible. There are no specific topics to study in particular. What is included on the LSAT are:

  • Logic Games
    • Very easy to train for, you just have to practice.
  • Reading Comprehension
    • Gives long passages and then asks basic questions about what you read.
  • Logical Reasoning
    • This is 2 of the 4 sections on the test.
    • Presents short arguments that are flawed or incomplete in some way and you are asked to do something to that argument.

An average student will improve their LSAT score by 10 points or more with studying.

How expensive is law school?

“Law school costs $50,000 a year or more,” shares Fox. This can change depending upon the scholarships offered to your student and which school you choose to attend. Parent information is no longer required for financial aid, it is now up to the student. There is quite a bit of loan opportunity available.

Just because loans are available does not mean you should take them.

Seek all available scholarships and try to pay for it yourself before borrowing money and incurring debt. Also apply to a wide range of schools to see what scholarship opportunities they can provide you.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

Episode 38 with Alexis Amarante

http://www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/38/

Episode 52 with Ryan Gray, MD

http://www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/successful-planning-for-medical-school/

Episode 55 with Ryan Parker

http://www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/culinary-school-and-the-food-industry/

Free Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents

www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with FoxLSAT.

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The post THCC89 – Help Your Child Get into Law School High School Undergrad and the LSAT Interview with Nathan Fox, LSAT expert appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC88 – Bitcoin and Blockchain Technology. Is Your Child Ready For This New Frontier ? Interview with Trace Mayer, editor “Bitcoins for Kids”
35:51
2017-10-06 04:15:22 UTC 35:51
THCC88 – Bitcoin and Blockchain Technology. Is Your Child Ready For This New Frontier ? Interview with Trace Mayer, editor “Bitcoins for Kids”

Imagine being one of the first people to create the internet. Can you picture it? Right now your child could be working on the new digital frontier that is trending up. It is so new, there are hardly even any classes available. Tweens and teenagers all over the world are earning revenue through the internet this way. What is it? Super smart Trace Mayer shares today how the hottest new technology is impacting the world and what it means for the future.

“It’s important for parents to understand what their kids are involved in,” notes Mayer.

It’s also important to encourage entrepreneurialism with kids. In today’s world that is happening almost exclusively on the internet. Don’t miss this easy opportunity to get a leg up on some high-paying jobs. Listen to Trace and get the scoop before anyone else!

Questions Answered Today:

What is bitcoin and blockchain technology?

“The easiest way to understand it is that we can send money over the internet,” defines Mayer. Bitcoin is one application of blockchain technology where you can use money (or value) around the world via the internet. There is an international exchange called Kraken, and even wallet software to protect your bitcoins from hackers.

Blockchain technology is like metal, and bitcoin is like gold.

This establishes trust that is mathematically provable with cryptography. Mayer describes it as being like a ledger that cannot be erased or tampered with because it must be proven through math. It will bring increased transparency and other forms of stability to the financial systems, supply chains, health care services, and other areas.

It is so new there aren’t very many college courses or any degrees available on it yet.

Is there a future in this technology?

Yes! Some current and future uses of this technology include:

  • Anywhere you need to establish trust.
    • For example, your bank account.
  • Payment for work around the world.
  • Remittances.
  • Robotics and artificial intelligence.
  • Settling stock trades.
  • Managing health records.
  • Smart contracts.

Many of the jobs that use this technology have not been created yet, similar to when cell phones first came out there weren’t the jobs of creating apps or designing smartphone software.

How and why would kids use bitcoin?

The world economy is changing so much, and in this day and age you almost have to use bitcoin to be an entrepreneur on the internet. Credit cards require a merchant account, but bitcoins can be used by just about anyone anywhere.

“Some of the really cool innovations in the bitcoin space have been done by kids,” says Mayer. Even as young as 9 years old.

If a major company is looking to hire someone with blockchain technology experience, nobody really has any. “It means if your kid has been tinkering around on bitcoin for a couple years, they will have a leg up on a lot of these jobs,” shares Mayer. These will most likely be 6 figure income jobs with prestigious companies.

How do I introduce Bitcoin to my child?

There are some great websites dedicated to teaching the fundamentals of Bitcoin linked in the resources below. The best way is to try it! Go get comfortable with the technology by doing it. Mayer suggests getting $5 of Bitcoins and try trading them around.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

BRAD RECOMMENDS

Episode 72 with Michael Vawter on the Robot Academy

http://www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/science-competitions-and-robotics-scholarships/

Episode 25 with Nile Nickel on LinkedIn

http://www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/25/

LINKEDIN TUTORIAL

http://www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/blog/

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are interested in learning more about scholarships please visit:
www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.
Contact Us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with bitcoins or Trace Mayer.

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The post THCC88 – Bitcoin and Blockchain Technology. Is Your Child Ready For This New Frontier ? Interview with Trace Mayer, editor “Bitcoins for Kids” appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC87– Win Scholarships Even with a Low GPA and Test Scores Interview with Felecia Hatcher, Author “The C Students Guide to Scholarships”
39:21
2017-10-06 04:15:22 UTC 39:21
THCC87– Win Scholarships Even with a Low GPA and Test Scores Interview with Felecia Hatcher, Author “The C Students Guide to Scholarships”

What an inspiring story with Felecia Hatcher. Wow. Even though her GPA never touched a 3.0 in high school she was able to win over $130,000 in scholarships and grants. “Whether you have a 2.0 or a 5.0, you can get creative with your limited resources, get creative with your approach, and get the scholarship committees excited about what you’re doing,” describes Hatcher who went from a C student to a White House Award winning CEO.

Your student can do it too!
Thankfully, Felecia stops by our show today to tell us what she did to take control of her future during the beginning of her senior year of high school. Your child can enjoy this same success if they work hard at the smart things shared here today. Senior year is the biggest opportunity for scholarship and grant money, so don’t leave any on the table!

Questions Answered Today:

How do you take attention away from lacking grades?

What looks good to a scholarship committee?

How do you pick which scholarships to apply to?

Is there a great essay strategy?

Are local scholarships better to apply to?

Are scholarships good for everyone?

How can parents help?

What should a parent’s role be in helping with scholarships?

When is the best time to start getting prepared for scholarship applications?

What do I highlight in my application if I have a low GPA?

 

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are interested in learning more about scholarships please visit:
www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.
Contact Us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with Felecia Hatcher.

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The post THCC87– Win Scholarships Even with a Low GPA and Test Scores Interview with Felecia Hatcher, Author “The C Students Guide to Scholarships” appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC86 – I Think My Student Likes the Sciences, Now What? Interview with Marie McNeely, PhD in Neuroscience and Professor at Washington University
29:51
2017-10-06 04:15:22 UTC 29:51
THCC86 – I Think My Student Likes the Sciences, Now What? Interview with Marie McNeely, PhD in Neuroscience and Professor at Washington University

Professor Marie McNeely stops by today to share how she turned her high school love of science into a profession. “There are lots of career opportunities out there that parents might not be aware of,” says McNeely. Figuring out how to turn something your child is passionate about, like science, into a paying job can be tricky. So how do you do it?

Marie knows! She is living proof that people can grow up to do exactly what they love every single day and make money at it.

Are you the parent of a high school student that is even just a tiny bit interested in any of the sciences? Listen now to Marie McNeely break down EXACTLY how to get prepared for college and what to expect through graduate school and beyond.

Check out this great advice from a very knowledgeable expert on how to help your child turn their dreams into a reality.

Questions Answered Today:

What science jobs and opportunities are available?

How does my student get into the science community?

What questions should I ask when considering colleges?

What is shadowing?

Can my student earn money while working in a lab?

How can my child prepare for a job that doesn’t exist yet?

What is it like to work in the science field?

What is graduate school like?

If my student is interested in science in high school, what do we do now?

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are interested in learning more about scholarships please visit:
www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.
Contact Us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with Washington University or Marie McNeely.

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The post THCC86 – I Think My Student Likes the Sciences, Now What? Interview with Marie McNeely, PhD in Neuroscience and Professor at Washington University appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC85– Should Your Student Test Again as a Senior? Interview with Lauren Gaggioli, Founder of Higher Scores Test Prep
46:32
2017-10-06 04:15:22 UTC 46:32
THCC85– Should Your Student Test Again as a Senior? Interview with Lauren Gaggioli, Founder of Higher Scores Test Prep

Meet Lauren Gaggioli, expert tutor and founder of Higher Scores Test Prep. We’ve invited her back today to help figure out if seniors need to test again on the SAT. This is a huge investment that ripples across the future of a future college student. Is your senior the one that needs to take the test again?

Lauren sits for these standardized tests all the time to stay current on how the questions and formats are changing. She is also able to customize her prep plans with her insider knowledge. Lucky for us, she just came out of taking the newest SAT version! Her analysis breaks down some of the changes and how that impacts if a senior should take the test again.

She also has some great advice for families to get the most out of your motivated (or sometimes not) student. Listen up parents; Lauren has some really important tips just for you! You CAN help your child successfully get past this major hurdle with a smile on their face. If you have your sights set on a certain school or if you want the most scholarship money you can possibly have, you’ve got to hear what Lauren has to say.

Special thanks to Lauren Gaggioli for chatting with us again!

Questions Answered Today:

  • How can parents help with standardized testing?
  • When do I take the SAT?
  • When do I take the ACT?
  • Should we test again as a senior?
  • What’s the best way to prepare for the SAT?
  • How has the SAT changed?
  • How involved should students be with these decisions?

Want more? Download HERE for questions to consider when thinking about testing again.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are interested in learning more about scholarships please visit:
www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.
Contact Us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with Higher Scores Test Prep.

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The post THCC85– Should Your Student Test Again as a Senior? Interview with Lauren Gaggioli, Founder of Higher Scores Test Prep appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC84 – Understanding the Psych Major Interview with Robert Wickersham, Psychology Graduate Student
32:41
2017-10-06 04:15:22 UTC 32:41
THCC84 – Understanding the Psych Major Interview with Robert Wickersham, Psychology Graduate Student

What is the college process like? What should I expect? Psychology Graduate student Robert Wickersham pulls back the curtain on a typical college experience including leading up to and through earning multiple degrees.

His Graduate and Undergraduate Journey

Wickersham switched high schools his junior year. His new school did not have a psychology class available, so he started a club.

“In terms of grades, switching definitely hurt me,” describes Wickersham. “Basically all my grades went down a level.” It was also beneficial because he switched early enough to qualify for in-state tuition and applied to all the University of California schools.

When taking the ACT/SAT, as well as the GRE for graduate coursework, Wickersham stresses that studying is key.

Invest in a quality test prep program.

There is also a licensure exam at the end of his degree to practice in his chosen profession.

“With psychology it is really important to think ahead of where you want to go with your degree because there are not a lot of options for just an undergraduate degree,” notes Wickersham.

A student will have to choose between:

  • PsyD
    • Higher degree in psychology.
    • Not a lot, or very little, research.
    • Focuses on helping people.
  • PhD
    • Still focuses on clinic work and helping people.
    • Includes more research and publishing.

If you want to go to a higher degree in psychology, you NEED research experience,” emphasizes Wickersham. You can begin as an undergraduate working with grad students or professors.

This can lead to letters of recommendation to help gain acceptance into competitive graduate schools.

When choosing an undergraduate college, Wickersham considered the profession he wanted to pursue. His major is so competitive at UCLA that students can’t declare psychology as a major until their junior year and only if they have the credits and grades for it.

One or two classes had a professor that was more research based, or they were teaching assistants, which made a difference in the style of the course. Ultimately, those are the people that will be able to help you the most with getting involved in research.

Wickersham completed his undergraduate degree in 4 years, but due to advanced high school classes with transferable credits he actually began college as a sophomore.

This allowed him to study abroad more freely and not be so concerned about academics that were exclusively focused around his major.

Advice for Parents

“A great thing to do is to get some kind of teaching experience,” recommends Wickersham. This can also be tutoring or a job helping other students. This is very useful in graduate school application essays.

Choose which degree you want to pursue and get involved with research as fast as you can.

Some possible careers that come from the psychology field are:

  • Private Practice
  • Professor
  • Hospital Setting
    • Including performing Emergency Psych evaluations
  • Integrated Health Teams
  • Research
  • Teaching

 

These can be combined in any way you like.

Be sure to choose a specialty area you really enjoy within this field.

Wickersham concludes, “Even if you have a strike against you, such as low GPA or test scores, where there is a will there is a way.” Always follow your dreams.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

  • email RWickers@UCCS.Edu

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are interested in learning more about scholarships please visit:
www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.
Contact Us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with Robert Wickersham or University of California.

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The post THCC84 – Understanding the Psych Major Interview with Robert Wickersham, Psychology Graduate Student appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC83 – Raise “Money Smart” Kids Allowance, Budget and Financial Responsibility Interview with Bret and Tracie Shroyer, AllowanceAcademy
38:29
2017-10-06 04:15:22 UTC 38:29
THCC83 – Raise “Money Smart” Kids Allowance, Budget and Financial Responsibility Interview with Bret and Tracie Shroyer, AllowanceAcademy

Finances are an important lesson to teach our children. It is especially important that students have a strong understanding about money before leaving for college. Parenting experts Bret and Tracie Shroyer share their expertise on allowance and help you get started teaching these concepts today!

Allowance Academy

The website is broken into 3 different parts:

  • Young Children
    • How to start kids with their first allowance.
    • If kids don’t really know what money is.
  • Medium Kids
    • Some experience with birthday money.
    • Maybe you are thinking of starting an allowance.
  • Big Kids
    • Teenagers or children with experience having an allowance and what to do next.
    • How to wean your child off the allowance.

A common mistake is that parents don’t give children an allowance and parents pay for all of their expenses such as clothes, activity fees, etc. “The kids are learning not to manage money or manage a budget, but they are learning to spend their entertainment budget,” explains Bret Shroyer.

“Use that same money that you are spending on them anyway and make them accountable for it,” says Tracie Shroyer.  “Then you are teaching them how to manage a budget and manage their expenses.”

Allowance is defined as the amount of the household budget that a child is allowed to spend on their own behalf.

Great beginning items to allow children to start with managing are school lunch, shoes, and then clothes.

Think about what you spend on something per year, for example shoes. Divide that total yearly amount you usually spend by 12 for a monthly budget. Children are then in charge of that money, but have to save it up for shoes at a later date.

“There are some categories that we don’t give them control of and we continue to manage,” shares Tracie. There are also some very expensive activities/sports that children should partially have control of, but not the whole price tag.

“You have to let the kid make some mistakes; it’s the only way we learn how to manage money is by making boneheaded mistakes. The responsibility of this budget is so that your kid makes mistakes and they learn from it,” states Bret Shroyer.

“It’s much better for them to make that mistake now, rather than waiting until they move out on their own,” adds Tracie Shroyer.

Allowance During and After High School

The peak of allowance is 15 years old. Once the student gets an outside job, start lessening their allowance quarterly until it is $0 just after they graduate from high school.

Parents must also have a conversation with their child about what they can and will contribute to college expenses. Also consider what debt students must take on to finance college and will be left with after graduating.

“Your number one job as a high school student is getting good grades. That doesn’t take all of your time,” indicates Bret Shroyer. It should be an expectation that students are working about 10-15 hours a week. This will go up or down depending upon activities.

“The average teenager cannot actually make enough money in a part time job to really be able to use that money and learn how to spend it responsibly. They would need to work a 40 hour a week job,” stresses Tracie.

Be sure to also include long-term saving as part of your allowance plan.

Mechanics of Allowance

“Start with the cold hard cash and then move up to a checking account,” The Shroyers recommend.

It is very important to start with cash.

A checking account is a great next step. This usually comes with a debit card. The debit card is not wise to use for everyday purchases. Try prepaid spending cards instead such as FamZoo.com

Famzoo has multiple features including loans, tracking spending, and total parental control.

There are other prepaid cards available, but the Shroyers recommend FamZoo.

 

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are interested in learning more about scholarships please visit:
www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.
Contact Us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with Allowance Academy.

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The post THCC83 – Raise “Money Smart” Kids Allowance, Budget and Financial Responsibility Interview with Bret and Tracie Shroyer, AllowanceAcademy appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC82 – Get Out of College Debt Free Interview with Jason Lum, President of ScholarEdge College Consulting
41:38
2017-10-06 04:15:22 UTC 41:38
THCC82 – Get Out of College Debt Free Interview with Jason Lum, President of ScholarEdge College Consulting

Looking for a scholarship? Jason Lum won over $250,000 in scholarship money and shares how he did it in today’s episode.

Misperceptions about Scholarships

The top misperception is that the only people out there who can win scholarships are those students with straight A’s, perfect ACT/SAT scores, or are brains with appendages,” jokes Lum.

These kinds of kids are intimidating, but these kids are generally not applying for scholarships. There ISN’T much competition out there because few students actually apply.

The students with outstandingly exceptional academics are often sought after by colleges or just don’t feel the need to apply.

“I tell families to ignore the price tag of a school. Find the right fit for a college then devise a strategy heavily built on scholarships to attack the student debt you will accrue,” explains Lum.

Lum also warns to be aware of what the total cost of college will be and plan for that so as not to leave college with incredible debt.

Getting Ready for College

Parents of juniors in high school should considering the following 3 points:

  • The number one thing a parent must do is illustrate what debt means in the real world and what it is.
    • Have family with experiences share.
      • How will it transform your life after college?
  • Get active in the community by volunteering.
    • This is critical to scholarship applications.
      • Compassion and authenticity are key to winning scholarships.
  • Don’t get overwhelmed by the amount of scholarships available.
    • Sometimes less is more. Don’t register with multiple scholarship websites and get inundated with email.
    • Look for what is available in your area specifically.
      • High school websites are starting to upload links to local scholarship opportunities.
      • These local scholarships generally have less competition.

Good Candidates for Scholarships

“As much as a parent wants to do the applications themselves, resist that temptation at all costs,” cautions Lum, “The student has got to be all in on this.”

Students must invest the time and passion into the applications or the committees will see through it.

Low GPA, poor performance on standardized tests, or absence of participation in athletics does NOT disqualify you from applying for scholarships.

The ideal candidate for a scholarship is:

  • Motivated.
  • Invested in the community.
  • Passionate.

“I think every kid has the potential to have that ‘aha’ moment,” describes Lum. Parents should push their kid, even if they are considered average.

Identify ALL of the student’s interests and find organizations out there through the internet that have memberships. Also look at what parents do and who they are, including ethnic background. Call these organizations and ask if they offer any scholarships and also ask for 2 or 3 organizations they know of that might.

“Every student has the potential to win scholarships, it is just the strategy that isn’t well-aligned to the result intended,” says Lum.

If your child is very talented in a specific area or has that something above average about them (being nationally ranked, etc.), they have increased chances of winning the larger available awards (above $5,000).

Scholarships in smaller amounts do not include an interview, but once they start to become larger amounts they will need to be articulate about their specific skills.

“For every scholarship you don’t win, do a post-game analysis,” suggests Lum. Call the organization and respectfully request what pushed the winner over the top. You can use this information to improve your application for the next year.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are interested in learning more about scholarships please visit:
www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.
Contact Us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with Scholaredge.

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The post THCC82 – Get Out of College Debt Free Interview with Jason Lum, President of ScholarEdge College Consulting appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC81 – Four Fatal Errors that Families Make When Planning for College Interview with Todd Weaver, Vice President at Strategies For College
35:18
2017-10-06 04:15:22 UTC 35:18
THCC81 – Four Fatal Errors that Families Make When Planning for College Interview with Todd Weaver, Vice President at Strategies For College

In this episode, Vice President of Strategies for College Todd Weaver shares the four fatal flaws that families make when it comes to the college planning process. Be sure you avoid these common pitfalls and set both your child and yourself up for college planning success.

Strategies for College

“We want families to take an integrated approach to finding college affordability and admissibility,” says Weaver.

They use a three-pronged approach that includes:

  • Family financial review.
  • Search for colleges.
    • Line up with target schools.
    • Be competitive for financial assistance.
  • Make sure family and student priorities are met.

The Four Fatal Flaws that Families Make

These common flaws are:

  • Families search for a college and then figure out how to pay for it later.
    • Don’t choose a college first!
    • Families often apply and get accepted then wonder, “How do I figure out how to pay for this?”
      • This is the backward way to go about it.
    • Figure out your expected family contribution around the sophomore year of high school.
      • All colleges are now doing a two year “look back” at taxes starting October of 2016.
      • The CSS will also be doing this prior prior year.
    • Use the financial aid information to pick schools that will work to your advantage.
    • Reach schools are particularly difficult to get financial aid for unless you are a very strong student with a great GPA and/or test scores.
  • Lots of scholarship money does NOT go unclaimed each year.
    • If you earn a lot of outside scholarships, the college might reduce the grants given.
    • “I think it is better for a student to focus on, rather than the small scholarships, focus on the private scholarships or campus-based scholarships at the school they are applying to,” recommends Weaver.
    • Figure out where you can best use your time and efforts.
      • College is paid for in time, money, and emotions. Plan all three of those resources.
    • Brand name paralysis.
      • “(Parents and students) feel the only way to be successful is to go to the highly visible colleges,” laments Weaver.
      • Choose a school that matches your needs as a family.
      • There are so many great collegiate options beyond the ranked top 30.
      • What you do in college is much more important than the name recognition of the school.
        • Be sure to use the career services and gain professional experiences.
      • Choosing a school should start with looking at the finances. Then go look at schools that provide the opportunities your child wants or needs.
      • Families often grossly underestimate the project management aspect of planning for college.
      • Weaver warns that families should expect to put in about 90-100 hours of work over the course of two years or more to make sure they are doing everything they need to do.
      • Waiting until fall of senior year of high school is a huge mistake.
      • Typically, junior year is when students are ready to start thinking about college.
      • Parents need to have their financial strategy in place by the middle of their student’s sophomore year of high school.
        • Take a subtle visit when on vacation and let your student, even as a freshmen, walk around and see a college campus nearby.
        • Students need to see different kinds of schools before thinking about what they want or need.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are interested in learning more about scholarships please visit:
www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.
Contact Us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with Strategies for College.

Share

The post THCC81 – Four Fatal Errors that Families Make When Planning for College Interview with Todd Weaver, Vice President at Strategies For College appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC80 – Online Courses – What You Need to Know – Even for Traditional Students Interview with Dr. Tawna Schmidt, Founder of Career Matters
31:27
2017-10-06 04:15:22 UTC 31:27
THCC80 – Online Courses – What You Need to Know – Even for Traditional Students Interview with Dr. Tawna Schmidt, Founder of Career Matters

Online Courses – What You Need to Know – Even for Traditional Students

Online courses are becoming more mainstream at college universities. These are not just for adult learners anymore! Dr. Tawna Schmidt delves into what makes online courses unique and how they could work for you.

Online Courses Explained

An online course could consist of a few different methods:

  • 100% Online.
    • Coursework can be completed anywhere at anytime.
    • Never have to be on campus.
    • Uses a specific platform where the student logs in and everything they need for the class is there.
      • Instructors interact with students requiring responses to questions and completed assignments/test.
      • Students are responsible for responding back to other students on discussion boards/posts.
    • Hybrid/Blended Courses.
      • Students are required to go to campus once or twice.
      • This blends some components of strictly online classes and traditional on campus work.
    • Satellite courses are different from online courses.
      • Requires students to log in at a specific time online.
      • Does not require commuting to campus.

“In 2014, the National Center of Educational Statistics found that in 2012 there were 5.4 million students that took at least one online course,” states Schmidt.

Attendance is taken through the platform and records what students are doing and how long they are doing it. “The daily questions are the alternative for the discussion,” explains Schmidt. There is usually a minimum number of responses required to create an online discussion board to mimic in-class conversations.

Advantages and Benefits of Online Courses

“Five or six years ago, they became popular for the nontraditional student,” describes Schmidt. However, online classes provide incredible flexibility for every type of student.

Some examples of who is taking an online class:

  • Mothers who work from home.
  • People with inflexible work schedules.
  • Students that want to get ahead or catch up in high school.
  • Student athletes.
  • Traditional students wanting to get ahead over summer school.
  • Students that go to college out of state.
  • Community college students that are planning to transfer.

Online courses are on the rise at all universities. They are no longer strictly for the nontraditional student.

Universities are offering an increasing number of courses and credits through the online platform.

While younger students have grown up with technology, older generations are still able to successfully use online courses.

Are Online Courses Right For Me?

Dr. Schmidt recommends beginning with one online course because it is not for everyone.

This type of coursework requires a lot of self-discipline and self-motivation. It is a different type of learning.

Some of the traits parents/students should consider when thinking about taking an online class:

  • Self-motivation.
  • Learning Style.
    • Are you very social? These students probably need to be in class so they don’t miss that component.
    • Visual learners might need to go to class and see the actual presentation/power point.
    • Online courses are usually more expensive because you pay for the convenience.
  • Resistance to Technology.
    • The platform the class is offered in is it. You have to be able to adapt.
  • Can you read online or do you need an actual book/paper in your hand?
    • Do you need to show up at class and explain why you didn’t do something to be motivated to get it done?
    • It is near impossible to catch up if you fall too far behind.

“When I first started with online, teaching it and as a student, I was amazed to learn you can get a lot of interactions from the online discussions, but it doesn’t feel as tangible as in person,” notes Schmidt.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are interested in learning more about scholarships please visit:
www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.
Contact Us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with Career Matters.

Share

The post THCC80 – Online Courses – What You Need to Know – Even for Traditional Students Interview with Dr. Tawna Schmidt, Founder of Career Matters appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC79 – What is Your Test Strategy? Interview with Alexis Avila, Owner of Prepped and Polished ACT/SAT Tutor and Test Preparation company
30:54
2017-10-06 04:15:22 UTC 30:54
THCC79 – What is Your Test Strategy? Interview with Alexis Avila, Owner of Prepped and Polished ACT/SAT Tutor and Test Preparation company

ACT/SAT Tutor and Test Preparation

Former guidance counselor Alexis Avila is an expert on high stakes testing and the creator of Prepped and Polished tutoring services. Are you stressed about taking the ACT or SAT? Don’t be! Get a breakdown of the new ACT/SAT tests and the secret to amazing essays in this episode.

About the New SAT/ACT Tests

“They are little more alike than they used to be,” describes Avila, including:

  • The SAT no longer has a guessing penalty for getting a question incorrect.
  • There are only 4 possible answer choices per question.
  • It has been reduced from 10 sections to 5.
    • Grammar and Reading are now combined.
  • Scored out of 1600.
  • You are allowed more time on the SAT than the ACT, but there are more inference type questions that require extended thinking.
  • The math is similar.
    • A calculator section and a non calculator section.
  • Essays are now optional.

“The new SAT better overlaps with the school curriculum,” explains Avila.

“If your student really struggles with pacing,” says Avila, “you might want to steer towards the redesigned SAT.”

Getting Ready for the Tests

Avila recommends taking practice tests of each kind to determine if your child is stronger at one test than the other.

It is not uncommon for a student to take the test 3 times. It depends on what is needed for the college you are applying to and the effort put in to raise the original score.

“Expect a 3 to 4 point jump with a solid test prep plan for ACT, or 200 point increase on the new scale of SAT,” states Avila. This can be done at home or with a test prep facility.

A typical session is 2 hours with a 3 hour homework assignment to make 5 hours a week. The average student will need 10 weeks of test prep.

“Your competition is doing it,” notes Avila. Good test scores can open the door to scholarships. Test prep does work!

Test prep choices are:

  • Self study at home.
    • Have parents use a stopwatch and watch you take the practice test.
  • Use a tutor.
    • Can be group tutoring at a building, but make sure the other students are at your level and not distracting.
    • One on one tutoring that custom designs your program to meet your individual needs.
    • Online tutoring is also available- just be sure to screen your tutor and be sure they are qualified as well as that you get along with them.

More about the Tests

Essay graders spend no more than several minutes reading and grading your essay. “They do a masterful job glancing through your essay,” says Avila, “so just take care of the basics.”

SAT is more difficult with critical thinking, particularly in the reading section.

The test companies make millions of dollars.

“The SAT and ACT, it is proven, won’t predict how successful you will be in life,” acknowledges Avila. The key is how you utilize your time in college. It is not automatically that you will do better in life because you went to that name brand school.

Both essays (one on each test) are optional and are written by hand over 3 pages, unless you have an accommodation to type it.

The ACT essay asks you to evaluate multiple perspectives over 40 minutes. The SAT essay asks you to critique an author’s persuasive piece over 50 minutes.

If you are a good writer, take the essay portion. If not, opt to not take it. Competitive schools will require it and want to see your response.

Avila describes how to create a successful essay:

  • First decide if you will defend or attack.
  • Brainstorm tangible examples for 2-3 minutes.
  • Outline a simple list of ideas for 4 minutes.
  • Spend 35 minutes writing the essay and stay neat and focused.
  • Take 5 minutes to proofread your essay.
    • Spelling does count, especially for a key word you are repeating.
    • If you are unsure of the spelling for a word, find a synonym and use that instead!

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are interested in learning more about scholarships please visit:
www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.
Contact Us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with Prepped and Polished.

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The post THCC79 – What is Your Test Strategy? Interview with Alexis Avila, Owner of Prepped and Polished ACT/SAT Tutor and Test Preparation company appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC78 – 3 Ways to Make the Most of Your College Visit Interview with Kathryn Clowes, Author “Put College to Work” and Educational/Career Consultant
44:57
2017-10-06 04:15:22 UTC 44:57
THCC78 – 3 Ways to Make the Most of Your College Visit Interview with Kathryn Clowes, Author “Put College to Work” and Educational/Career Consultant

3 Ways to Make the Most of Your College Visit

In this episode, educational and career consultant Kat Clowes shares how to figure out what you want to be when you grow up and how to get there. Use those 4 years of college to your advantage and get that career of your dreams!

Getting the Right First Job

“When you graduate, if you are not planning, that first job is just whoever will hire me,” notes Clowes. This makes it difficult to change careers in the future.

Do not pick a major for a guaranteed career that might not be the right fit.

There are quite a few careers available out there to you.

Personal branding is defined by Clowes as, “Whatever people think of you, or your company, when you aren’t in the room… What people think of you professionally.” This can be positive or negative.

Your personal brand is very important. To find out what it is, Clowes recommends to:

  • E-mail 10 family members and friends.
  • Ask them for 2 positives and 2 negatives.
  • Identify what they think of you and what you want for people to think of you.
    • If someone notes that you are often late, is that something you want potential employers to think about you? How can you change that?

Majors can be very broad and employers will want to know, “What else have you done.”

“If we can get students more thinking ahead of who they want to be because once you graduate, everyone has the same piece of paper,” says Clowes. Employers aren’t necessarily hiring the smartest person in the room, they want people that will fit on their team and they can have conversations with.

Undecided Students

“I think what is important is not to stress over the final title or major, but it’s more important to identify the skill sets that a student is strong in and what they are interested in,” states Clowes.

There is a lot of stress to choose a “label” of what students are going to be.

Clowes suggests for parents to, “Encourage your student to concentrate more on why they like the things that they like.”

This will plant a seed for students to start thinking about what it is they like about activities they do and why they avoid certain other ones. These traits can become their brand.

Tips for Families When Taking a Campus Tour

A tour is designed to market the school and will include some of the same things no matter where you visit, which won’t really help you to decide on the best choice.

Good questions that should be asked while visiting a college are about:

  • Facilities.
  • Opportunities.
  • Beyond the classroom.
    • Ask about the Alumni Network.
    • Career center.
    • What companies do graduates go on to after graduation?
    • Who recruits here?
      • Find out if a company you are interested in recruits on that campus.
  • In the classroom.
    • Are undergraduates allowed to work in the labs?
    • How close are students with their professors?
      • Do you feel close with your professors in your major?
      • Do you have a professional relationship with your professors?
      • Could you visit them during office hours?
      • Do you feel they have a lot of time for you?

“I would really like students and parents to focus on the different centers and opportunities the college offers beyond the academic,” stresses Clowes.

Use LinkedIn University and type in a university name to see what companies alumni work for and the industries they go to. Also research the professors and if they consult for an industry of interest. “That can help you rationalize if a school is worth an extra $2,000 or $3,000 a year,” adds Clowes.

LinkedIn is a great way to share your brand online and to connect with potential employers. See episode #25 for more information on LinkedIn.

See if the website domain of your name is available and get it. Build your own website and online portfolio for better networking. Put this on your business card.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are interested in learning more about scholarships please visit:
www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.
Contact Us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with Kat Clowes.

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The post THCC78 – 3 Ways to Make the Most of Your College Visit Interview with Kathryn Clowes, Author “Put College to Work” and Educational/Career Consultant appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC77 – Why College Students Should Work Interview with Robert Farrington, America’s Student Loan Debt Expert and Founder of TheCollegeInvestor.com
29:30
2017-10-06 04:15:22 UTC 29:30
THCC77 – Why College Students Should Work Interview with Robert Farrington, America’s Student Loan Debt Expert and Founder of TheCollegeInvestor.com

One of the leading causes of not investing or saving for the future is student loan debt. America’s Millennial Money Expert Robert Farrington shares the benefits of working through college in this episode with some great work ideas and the impact on your life after earning that degree.

Graduating With Debt

“Working through college is one of the best ways to minimize student loan debt. It is an amazing way to boost your skill set and get a head start for when you graduate,” states Farrington.

Some causes of having too much debt:

  • Took out too much debt for earning potential after graduation.
  • Mom and dad co-sign or borrow the money themselves.
  • Over educated and under experienced.
    • Graduate school is expensive and students can get loans on their own which can get them into more trouble.

Farrington notes some benefits of working during college as:

  • Pay for expenses.
  • Lower amount you have to borrow.
  • Gives students some things employers are looking for from college graduates.
    • Business and customer service communication skills.
    • Problem solving skills including:
      • Time management.
      • Developing creative solutions to problems.
      • Following through on action plans.

“Between the two candidates that both have the same degree, I’m probably going to look more at the one that has the job experience, worked during school, and has that skill set than the one that doesn’t,” says Farrington, concerning employers.

When Students Should Be Working

Internships are great opportunities, especially during summer. “For some students, working during school can make sense,” suggests Farrington.

Good jobs usually available during college include:

  • Working at a restaurant/fast food chain.
  • Retail.
  • Work study.
  • Any job on the actual campus.
    • Being a teacher’s assistant or research assistant.
    • Student housing.
  • The field you are pursing.
    • If you are looking at the medical field, find a job at a hospital, etc.
  • Graduate students can teach undergraduate classes.
  • Micro-entrepreneurship:
    • Start your own business at school.
    • Drive for Uber or Lift.
    • Postmate.
    • www.AgentAnything.com

“The other thing that isn’t talked about with work is that you learn things you might not want to do before you commit to a major program,” shares Farrington.

Try something different each summer until you find an area you are passionate in.

Working online is also a great solution so students can work on their own time and their own terms.

Work should be part of the conversation with parents about how to pay for college. “Working is just that important; that all families should be discussing it as part of the college experience,” stresses Farrington.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are interested in learning more about scholarships please visit:
www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.
Contact Us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with The College Investor or Robert Farrington.

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The post THCC77 – Why College Students Should Work Interview with Robert Farrington, America’s Student Loan Debt Expert and Founder of TheCollegeInvestor.com appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC76 – Get Recruited! Understanding College Athletics. Interview with Jon Fugler, Founder and CEO of Recruit-me.com
34:27
2017-10-06 04:15:22 UTC 34:27
THCC76 – Get Recruited! Understanding College Athletics. Interview with Jon Fugler, Founder and CEO of Recruit-me.com

Do you have an athletic child? Would you like them to be recruited to college for sports and earn some scholarships? In this episode, college athletics expert Jon Fugler explains some of the ins and outs of the athletic portion of college planning.  

Getting On Track

“The two biggest questions I get asked are about when and how,” describes Fugler.

Some important things to consider when pursuing an athletic scholarship:

  • Take the initiative.
    • “Coaches don’t just discover athletes,” explains Fugler. Parents have to market their child and seek out coaches.
  • Start early, but junior year is the best.
  • Apply to the college where the coach you want is at.
    • Make sure you can actually attend that college with academics and test scores.
  • Build relationships with 40-50 schools your sophomore year.
    • You have to cast your net wide.

Full-ride sports, such as football or basketball, are more competitive. There are also partial scholarships available for most of the other sports.

Some people that can help you to figure out if your child has the ability to go to “the next level” are:

  • High school coach.
  • Club coach.
    • These clubs travel and have the opportunity for your child to be seen by more people.
    • Doesn’t mean that college coaches will see them play, you still have to invite them to come and watch.
  • College coaches in the area.

“Coaches love it when athletes approach them,” states Fugler. It shows that you are interested in their program.

Fugler recommends doing the following when starting to consider college sports:

  • Make a great first impression.
    • Create an introductory package and then both mail and email this to the coaches.
    • Do NOT fill out the college contact online form first.
    • Reach out during sophomore year.
  • Remember that you are also recruiting a school.
    • There are no rules on you approaching schools or coaches.
    • The school should have other features about it that are important to you.
  • Attend camps put on by the colleges.
    • These can get expensive.
    • The coach often has athletes help to run these, so you can meet potential team mates.

Choosing a Program

“In most cases, athletic scholarship is a means to an end so that you can get your education and leverage that for your future,” says Fugler.

Think of more than just five schools. Fugler suggests to think of at least 40-50 schools and to send an intro packet to each of them.

Student athletes have strict rules. Coaches are very aware of what is allowed and the burden is on them.

Some rules to be informed about are:

  • If you call and leave a message for a coach, they can’t call you back.
    • If they are there when you call, then they can talk to you.
  • Students have unlimited visits, but coaches cannot initiate these.
  • More information is available at the NCAA website.

There are so many intangible benefits from participating in sports. Even if a student is not pursing this as a career, a lot can be gained from participating. Students might even go on to be coaches themselves, coach sports for their future children, or do something else within the sport.

Division 1 is the most demanding with a very high commitment level. After 1 or 2 years, most athletes are done.

“Go in there to enjoy it. Go in there to learn things outside the sport as well,” notes Fugler.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are interested in learning more about scholarships please visit:
www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.
Contact Us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with Recruit-me.

Share

The post THCC76 – Get Recruited! Understanding College Athletics. Interview with Jon Fugler, Founder and CEO of Recruit-me.com appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC75 – How to Use Social Media in the College Planning Process. Interview with Deborah Owen, Teen Confident Performance Coach, Parent Coach, Strategic Intervention Coach, and National Board Certified Teacher
31:30
2017-10-06 04:15:22 UTC 31:30
THCC75 – How to Use Social Media in the College Planning Process. Interview with Deborah Owen, Teen Confident Performance Coach, Parent Coach, Strategic Intervention Coach, and National Board Certified Teacher

Deborah Owen is a youth mindset trainer, parent coach, and #1 best-selling author who coaches parents through the stress of getting a teen into college.  In this episode, she has the advice you need to help your teen use social media effectively for college and to distress the application process for both parents and children.  

Social Media is Having an Impact

“Social media is a communication platform and kids are at a point where they don’t always recognize that what they put out on the internet is permanent,” says Owen.

One of the strengths of social media is that you can talk to anyone, anywhere, at anytime. A weakness is that what people put out there might not be the most positive.

Colleges are more and more checking online to see what kinds of images students portray. Owen warns, “If students have posted pictures of themselves in compromising positions, it will affect their ability to get into colleges.”

Universities are also using the more heavily used social media such as:

  • Facebook.
  • Twitter.
  • Snapchat.
  • Instagram.

Colleges are using these for marketing and to connect with potential and current students.

“When you have a younger teen, it is within your rights to say to your child that you need to know what their password is,” notes Owen.

Important skills to be sure you discuss with your child about the internet highway include:

  • Etiquette.
  • Consideration.
  • Respect for other people.

Don’t make rules that are unenforceable. If they don’t use a computer at your house, they will at a friend’s house.

Correcting Mistakes

“To the best of my knowledge, once something is on the internet, it is out there,” explains Owen who suggests the rule, “You do not put anything up on the internet that you don’t want your grandmother to see!”

If parents aren’t teaching children how to use these social media platforms, and schools aren’t, then where are they learning how to use these tools? From their friends!

Applying to College

The biggest struggle with college application is that parents become obsessed with the application itself.

Owen recommends that parents do the following to ease the stress of college applications:

  • Schedule only 2 times a week where you get to talk about college.
    • These are the only times a parent can sit down and check on their child.
    • Children are allowed to bring it up anytime they like.
  • Leave it on your child’s plate.
    • Parents can get a phone number or email for their child, but the main responsibility must be on the child themselves.
    • Offer help, but do not take large parts on yourself.
  • Be informed about deadlines, but let the kid be in charge.

It is developmentally appropriate for your child to be somewhat self-centered. You will have to be supportive and Owen suggests scheduling a tour of a college or to stop by a campus when you are on vacation.

This will help them to picture themselves at college and, despite themselves, they will work backwards to figure out how to get there.

If your child has something they are particularly interested in, find a college with a strong department and go look at it.

“There are so many options that you can major in that aren’t offered in a high school,” mentions Owen. If your child is going to begin college as an undeclared major, that is just fine.

“It is really, really important to step back and let your child live the life they have chosen, not the one you have chosen for them,” Owen stresses.

More about Owen

The book “Social Media Fascination” was created through Owen’s own frustrations as a librarian.

There are 6 skills that young people need to learn and social media is a great way to learn them:

  • Care and service.
    • Be a good person and treat others with respect.
  • Connect.
  • Communicate.
  • Collaborate.
  • Create.
  • Curate.
    • Find, evaluate, and use information efficiently and effectively.

These are life skills that everyone will need to be successful out in the work force, regardless of what profession they end up in.

Brad also suggests podcast episode 25 to learn more about LinkedIn. http://www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/25/

 

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are interested in learning more about scholarships please visit:
www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.
Contact Us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Share

The post THCC75 – How to Use Social Media in the College Planning Process. Interview with Deborah Owen, Teen Confident Performance Coach, Parent Coach, Strategic Intervention Coach, and National Board Certified Teacher appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC74 – How to Get Started in College Planning. Key Areas to Focus on First
28:11
2017-10-06 04:15:22 UTC 28:11
THCC74 – How to Get Started in College Planning. Key Areas to Focus on First

How to Get Started in College Planning

Are you just getting started with college planning? Not sure if you are on track? This show is for you! Expert Brad Baldridge helps you get organized with 4 key areas to consider for a smooth and simple planning for college process.

Organizing a Formal College Plan

The first step is to access where you are in the 4 plans to work on:

  • Visit Plan.
  • Test Plan.
  • Scholarship Plan.
  • Financial Plan.

“The whole purpose of the visit plan and test plan are to support your creating the school list,” states Baldridge. Earlier is better when it comes to having a school list, but students have to grow up and figure out what they want. It should be pretty well worked out by the end of a student’s junior year.

Each student and situation is different. When making a school list, one strategy is to make a larger list with 2 or 3 schools in the following categories:

  • Reach or dream schools that are unlikely to work out due to academic or financial reasons.
  • Target schools that are a good fit academically and financially. They would be a great opportunity for the student.
  • Safety schools which are places you are very confident you will be accepted and the financial side will also work out.

Another strategy is a shorter list with 2 or 3 local schools because you don’t want to travel too far or picking colleges that are just close to family.

Your ultimate goal is to have something to work with to move on to the other steps. “Start early so you have time to plan and it’s a little less pressure on the whole family,” stresses Baldridge.

Visit Plan

This is how you will gather information from the colleges you are interested in. Visit planning, for many families, is done during the junior year. Put it on your calendar and decide:

  • How I’m going to visit.
  • When I’m going to visit.
  • What I will do while I am there.

This coordinates with the test plan. “If you are visiting schools that require relatively high test scores, you need to work on getting the test scores required to be accepted,” explains Baldridge.

“Are you going to test and plan to get into the schools you are visiting? Or are you visiting the schools that your test scores indicate you can be accepted at?” asks Baldridge.

In addition to the actual visits, you can do college fairs and talk to college reps. There are some virtual tours available also for many colleges. See podcast Episode 18 on virtual tours: http://www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/18/

Test Plan

This goes along with visit planning. Some things to consider are:

  • How many times should I take the test?
  • Is it available at my high school?
  • Should I take the SAT, ACT, or both?
    • Find out which format works best for your student or is popular in your area.
  • Will there be prep in between?
    • Free online resources, classes, or one-on-one tutoring, etc.
    • The competition is doing it, so if you are planning for a more competitive school it might be something to consider.

Take the test in February, figure out if you need to do any prep work, then take it again in April. If you must, it’s also available in June and one more time fall of senior year.

“Understand your opportunities and what your plan is, then coordinate the test with your visits,” says Baldridge.

Scholarship Plan

See podcast episode 5  http://www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/005/  and episode 43  http://www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/how-to-help-your-student-win-scholarships/ for more resources on scholarships.

Free resource “Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents” available at http://tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

Most families just need to do a basic scholarship search with 10 or less scholarships that are closely associated with your student or family. If you are going to apply to 20 scholarships, it will most likely be a family event with help from parents to search for these scholarships and get them done, which requires more time management.

Financial Plan

This is how college can be paid for which includes:

  • Pursuing aid.
  • Loans.
  • Scholarships.
  • Attending an expensive school or low-cost school.

This is the last thing parents need to work on and can be slightly independent from the other plans. “Focus on the information you DO know relative to the family,” mentions Baldridge, such as:

  • Savings.
  • Investing.
  • Qualifying for aid.
  • Income.

This is important because when you go on college visits you can then ask the right questions and even talk to the financial aid office.

If you don’t have time, or are starting late, don’t panic! “Pick up the pieces from where you are,” encourages Baldridge.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Par-ents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are inter-ested in learning more about scholarships please visit:
www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.
Contact Us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Share

The post THCC74 – How to Get Started in College Planning. Key Areas to Focus on First appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC73 – What it Takes to Get Into the Ivy League Interview with Elizabeth Heaton, Vice President and Educational Consultant at College Coach
49:22
2017-10-06 04:15:22 UTC 49:22
THCC73 – What it Takes to Get Into the Ivy League Interview with Elizabeth Heaton, Vice President and Educational Consultant at College Coach

The admissions process for college can be intimidating, especially if you are considering an ivy league school. Former admissions officer, and current Vice President and educational consultant for College Coach, Elizabeth Heaton helps you understand the process of how to get into a school and what school to go for in this interview.

Applying to an Elite School

If you are thinking about applying to an elite school, be prepared to go elsewhere. “Make sure you have a balanced list because it is very difficult to get in,” recommends Heaton. These top tier schools are very competitive with about 5% of applicants getting in.
If you are thinking of pursuing ivy league schools, parents should take an honest look at your child’s accomplishments and consider the following:

  • Stellar academics across the board.
    • Room for a B or two, sure, but a C is really less likely to be accepted.
    • Rigor of curriculum.
      • Challenging in the most rigorous classes available.
    • Starts in 9th grade.
  • Great test scores
    • ACT 33 minimum, more like 34 or 35 out of 36.
  • Sat scores 750 or above.
    • Bare minimum is a 700 in each section of the SATs.
  • Achievement tests in different subject areas.
    • Most schools ask for 2 subject tests with a bare minimum of 700 in those sections.

“Those are just the quantitative side of things, so if you see holes in this quantitative effort that’s an indication that the most elite schools are not going to be a possibility or an option,” states Heaton stressing, “There might be exceptions whom academic expectations might be slightly less, but really the quantitative piece needs to be there.”
All applications must have these great academics. Because of this, Heaton describes the places where decisions really get made are:

  • Letters of recommendation.
  • Student essays.
  • Extracurricular activities.
    • Goes beyond average high school student activities (sports, school paper, etc.).
    • Has one area really emerged as a strength with “distinguishing excellence”.
      • Think of it as being the top in that area or passion.
      • Go above and beyond “If you’re going to be involved in something, you need to be involved with it in a lot of different ways,” explains Heaton.

Elite colleges are looking for diversity of geography, perspective, socioeconomic situations, interests, experiences, and activities.
“All of these elite schools are very different,” cautions Heaton, “Each school has a very different personality, things they are looking for, and applicant pool to stand out against.”
Being admitted to one highly selective school does not mean you will be admitted to another just as being denied at one school does not mean you will be denied at another.

Where to Apply since Ivy Schools Are Unlikely

Heaton shares, “79% of colleges accept more students than they turn away.” If your student isn’t quite measuring up to these higher ranked and name-brand schools, there are still plenty of good choices.
There is no official way to divide up schools by exclusivity.
“Find the best fit school and don’t focus just on prestige,” says Heaton. When considering what school to apply to, she suggests considering the individual student including:

  • Personal accomplishments.
  • Area of interest.
  • What they want to study.
  • The purpose of college.
    • To get an education, explore areas of interest, and get a degree for a career you love.

If you are focused on only ivy league schools, figure out why. “The idea that going to an ivy school guarantees you will go on to a career you love is a total and utter fallacy,” states Heaton. “There are other options out there.”
The best name school doesn’t necessarily equal the best experience or opportunity.

What to Consider About a College

Some things to do before applying to a college are:

  • Make a list of what is most important to a student and what they must have (programs, facilities, etc.).
  • What to possibly study.
  • Be exposed to various colleges.
    • If on vacation, go visit a campus even when children are young. Students won’t know what they like about a school if they haven’t seen anything.
    • Visit local schools.
    • It’s not about if you are really going to go to that school, it just gives you a sense of what it would be like to attend that kind of school.
  • What can you afford?
  • Make a list of schools you like equally and try not to fall in love with just one.
  • You can plan visits in advance and try to set up a meeting with someone in a department you are really interested in.
  • Check school websites.
    • Research professors.
    • See course catalogs.
    • Check activities available.
  • Do NOT wait to visit a school until after you are accepted!

“Make sure this is a place you would fit and why and be sure you can articulate that,” notes Heaton. A great name isn’t enough.
Have students really share why they are choosing a school to apply to before you apply there.
About College Coach
Everyone employed is a former admissions officer. There are blogs and lots of information on the website.
Heaton hosts a radio show on VoiceAmerica- “Getting In: A College Coach Conversation”.
Check with your company’s benefits program- lots of companies purchase this service that you could access for free.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Par-ents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are inter-ested in learning more about scholarships please visit:
www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.
Contact Us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with the College Coach or VoiceAmerica..

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The post THCC73 – What it Takes to Get Into the Ivy League Interview with Elizabeth Heaton, Vice President and Educational Consultant at College Coach appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC72 – Science Competitions and Robotics Scholarships. Leverage your Extracurricular to Help Pay for College. Interview with Michael Vawter, College Robotics Expert and Founder of Robot Academy
27:39
2017-10-06 04:15:22 UTC 27:39
THCC72 – Science Competitions and Robotics Scholarships. Leverage your Extracurricular to Help Pay for College. Interview with Michael Vawter, College Robotics Expert and Founder of Robot Academy

Science Competitions and Robotics Scholarships

Does your child have a passion? Can that passion help with college? Robotics expert Michael Vawter shares in this episode about his background with robotics, getting started with science competitions, and what impact extracurricular activities can have on scholarships and applying to college.

About Michael Vawter

Michael was home schooled all through high school and began competing in robotics competitions in middle school. This led to other extracurricular activities and scholarships.

“If your kid is into building with Legos, you have a kid that is very mechanically oriented and has a future in engineering and design,” notes Vawter.

“You have to stimulate productivity in that realm,” warns Vawter, “It’s one thing to just build with Legos, and it’s another thing to build with Legos in a structured setting and solve specific challenges.”

How Parents Can Be Involved

“The first thing I would do is Google and search for ‘Science Competitions’, because it changes now and then,” recommends Vawter.

Some competitions are easy enough for parents to coach. Vawter suggests some ways parents can help:

  • Make sure materials are created correctly.
  • Time management.
  • Moral support.
  • Don’t have to be very into science themselves.
    • Pursue excellence, don’t worry about what place you get.
    • This is to gain experience, not just to win.
  • Be engaged and help.
    • The kid is the one that has to do the technology.
  • Provide resources.
    • Check the internet.
    • Help solve problems if difficulties arise.
  • Talk to the school and get a club started.

“If the parent is too into robotics and already knows the technology, it can be tempting for the parent to have more of an active role than is actually helpful in terms of building,” says Vawter.

Vawter stresses that extracurriculars are very important for high school students.

Impact on College

Vawter earned over a half million dollars in scholarships and had many choices when it came to college.

“The better story you are able to paint, as far as your background and your competencies, the more money you end up getting,” describes Vawter. He had a resume, essays, and documentation from his competitions for his college applications.

Vawter created the Robotic Academy in high school. This now has a summer camp program, school curriculum available throughout the country, and is franchising. “The goal of the academy is to help kids learn about science technology and turn it into something fun,” states Vawter.

The prime value from this activity is, “There has to be a solution, how do we do it, and then you figure it out,” concludes Vawter.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Par-ents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are inter-ested in learning more about scholarships please visit:

www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.

Contact Us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with Robot Academy.

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The post THCC72 – Science Competitions and Robotics Scholarships. Leverage your Extracurricular to Help Pay for College. Interview with Michael Vawter, College Robotics Expert and Founder of Robot Academy appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC71 – How to Find a College Internship to Super Charge your Career Interview with Sharise Kent, College Success and Internship Expert
34:39
2017-10-06 04:15:22 UTC 34:39
THCC71 – How to Find a College Internship to Super Charge your Career Interview with Sharise Kent, College Success and Internship Expert

How to Find a College Internship to Super Charge your Career

Want to build your resume, make great connections, have real-world experiences, and leave college ready for a career? You need an internship! Sharise Kent has written the manual on internships and shares everything you need to know including how to find one, what to expect, and how to prepare.

About Sharise Kent

Author of “The Internship Manual: A Step-by-Step Guide to Getting the Internship of Your Dreams”.

This book explains why to do an internship, how to find one, and what to do once you get an internship. “It’s the manual. It’s walking you from A to Z and giving you what you need to understand in that process,” notes Kent.

Kent began her career as a college admission professional and then transitioned into a nonprofit and has helped over 400 students with internships.

Internship Defined and Explained

“An internship is supposed to be a learning experience,” expands Kent. A good internship is an opportunity to:

  • Be mentored.
  • Learn new skills.
  • Expand your network.
  • Explore a career from 8 to 12 weeks.
  • Be professional.
  • Experience an office.
    • There is a different environment in an office that usually includes bigger goals.

It is an experience that will enhance education and let a student explore what makes them a great professional. This is different from a regular job because it is a training environment and not just for a paycheck.

“When you look for a college, you want to investigate the career services department as a whole,” recommends Kent. This doesn’t need to make or break your decision about a college, but it is certainly a positive to consider.

There are some career paths that integrate field experiences such as:

  • Student Teaching
  • Medical Professions
  • Social Work
  • Counseling

This is different from an internship because there isn’t much choice or exploration. These majors usually have required amounts of hours, or work, as part of completing that degree and entering the work force.

Some internships require a portfolio or some classwork already completed, but it isn’t only for juniors and seniors! High school students can, and should, apply for internships.

“The culture is shifting and changing because employers are recognizing that if they can introduce young people to these types of careers as early as high school, they are going to introduce them to things they wouldn’t have majored in or would not have pursued careers in,” states Kent.

Kent strongly recommends looking into internships beginning as early as freshman year.

Typical Internships

Doing an internship for course credit needs to be approved by your department or career services. Academic internships can usually earn 3 credits and often require a paper or project that shows evidence of learning.

Paid internships vary. Some companies give stipends, offer paid transportation, or regular pay starting at minimum wage or more. Typically you are treated just like an employee.

“The time to look for summer internships is November for the following summer,” warns Kent.

How to Pursue an Internship

There are 5 quick ways to find an internship:

  • Ask around.
    • Talk to EVERYONE.
    • Parents can help by using their own network (where they work or through fraternity/sorority) and ask there.
  • Go to your college’s Career Services.
    • There is usually a free job/internship fair on campus.
  • Don’t ignore small businesses or nonprofits.
    • Walk in and just ask.
      • Might not be for credit or money, but it will go on your resume.
    • Online searches.
    • Internship programs.
      • You can find them online where you get paired with a company.

“If you are doing all five of those diligently, you are going to find an internship,” assures Kent.

Prepare for an internship by having a good resume, do mock interviews, dress for success, and have a LinkedIn account.

Kent acknowledges, “There might be a $10 -$40 application fee, but as a nonprofit that is just to defray the cost.” For profit companies have a different system.

Internships away from home cost money for living. If it is paid, will that cover the cost of living or moving away for the summer? Transportation also needs to be considered when applying.

Career planning starts in high school. Internships are vital for experience and resume building. Kent points out, “Everybody who graduates college has a degree. Why should an employer hire you over that other person?”

More about “The Internship Manual”

Kent authored this book based on her experience and the experiences of some of the over 400 interns she helped placed. “I thought a lot about the things that students come to me with and tried to put those into the book,” describes Kent.

 

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Par-ents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are inter-ested in learning more about scholarships please visit:

www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.

Contact Us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with Sharise Kent or The Internship Manual.

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The post THCC71 – How to Find a College Internship to Super Charge your Career Interview with Sharise Kent, College Success and Internship Expert appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC70 – Impact of Grief on Planning for College Interview with Natalia Volz, Founder of www.PassingThroughGrief.com
35:17
2017-10-06 04:15:22 UTC 35:17
THCC70 – Impact of Grief on Planning for College Interview with Natalia Volz, Founder of www.PassingThroughGrief.com

Natalia Volz uses her own experience to explain the process of grief, commonly due to death or divorce, and how to still successfully plan for college. Will you need to take a year or two off? Do you need to continue straight through into college? Ms. Volz has the information to help prepare you during the grieving process.

About Natalia

Volz’s husband was diagnosed with terminal cancer. She had children that were 11 and twins that were 13 at the time of his passing. “Life was turned upside. We don’t learn how to grieve or move through loss,” describes Volz.

It took 2 years for Volz to move through her grief and she became passionate about helping others.

“The death of a parent or spouse makes a huge impact on your life,” notes Volz, “There is no back to normal.”

Grief Facts

Volz discovered some interesting facts through her grieving process:

  • There isn’t a timetable to get through grief.
    • Our culture gives people about 6 weeks.
    • The average recovery is 4-6 years.
  • School is patient for a certain time.
    • They expect children to bounce back quickly.
  • Children grieve in 3 ways.
    • Strive for perfection.
    • Hide or become very shy/quiet.
    • Acting out.
      • This is actually the healthiest way.

Be sure to talk to the school, even if it has been multiple years after the event.

Volz defines, “Grief is the normal and natural response to a loss, or significant change, in our life.”

Applying to College While Grieving

“If you are a parent that is dealing with the loss of a spouse through death or divorce, you need to take care of yourself first,” recommends Volz.

Be sure to advocate for your children. Volz strongly suggests talking to the schools you are applying to, even if it has been a few years.

Something often impacted is finances. Be sure colleges are made aware and they will usually work with you.

“The part of your brain where you can critically think and plan ahead is not operating when you are deep in grief,” explains Volz. You have to recover from your grief first.

Healing from grief requires certain tools. Volz gives these tips:

  • Don’t judge yourself.
    • Volz’s website has great resources to help you start to move the grief.
  • Grief is not intellectual.
    • It moves through your heart/emotions and you can’t just read a book.
  • You can’t grieve alone.
    • You need to be with others and not left alone.
      • Parents must recover from their own grief before helping their children.
      • As you recover, you will be better able to plan.

Parents need to get the proper information about how to heal from grief in order to help their children. If you are choosing a therapist, ask lots of questions and be sure the person will fit your needs.

How to Know If Your Child is Ready for College

“Each situation is unique and each person is an individual,” notes Volz.

Have an honest talk and build your relationship with your child to see if they are ready. Share your financial situation. Talk about if college is something they want, what can they do in high school to help set them up for success.

Volz stresses, “It is important to have open communication and telling them what you are able to do for them and what you are not.”

Look at all your options and don’t judge yourself at where you are in the grieving process. “Friends and extended family are so crucial in both our children healing their grief and our self,” emphasizes Volz, “Turn to friends and others!”

If you have a friend that is going through the grieving process, make sure to reach out to them and offer help. You can do something as simple as filling out financial aid paperwork or visiting colleges.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Par-ents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are inter-ested in learning more about scholarships please visit:

www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.

Contact Us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with Passing Through Grief or the Grief Recovery Institute.

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The post THCC70 – Impact of Grief on Planning for College Interview with Natalia Volz, Founder of www.PassingThroughGrief.com appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC69 – Understanding Student Loans with author Jordan Goodman
27:16
2017-10-06 04:15:22 UTC 27:16
THCC69 – Understanding Student Loans with author Jordan Goodman

Student loans and financial aid are critical to pay for college. In this episode, The Money Answer Man, Jordan Goodman, explains if you should take loans in a student’s name, parent’s name, or from grandparents. If you want a high quality education, but don’t want to get into big debt, Goodman has the answers for you.

Student Loans

“It’s changing society. The average person graduates with $30,000 in undergraduate student loan debt,” says Goodman. Graduate school or special degrees cost even more.

“Financial aid is a burden, not a privilege!” states Goodman. It is imperative to begin saving as soon as possible. By junior or senior year of high school, a large portion of college tuition should already be saved.

Where people are getting money to pay for college:

  • Students themselves can save/borrow in their name.
    • The more you can put on the kid, the better.
  • Parent PLUS loans.
    • There is a certain limit on these.
  • There are some BAD ideas to pay for college that you should NOT
    • Loans against a 401K.
    • Home equity loans.
    • Life insurance loans.
    • Grandparents borrowing to pay for their grandkids.

When choosing a college, there is an emotional aspect and a financial aspect to consider.

  • Financial Part: Taking on extra debt might not pay off.
  • Emotional Part: I want my kid to go to a fancy school.

“Ultimately, the payoff should be if you would get a better job, have more income, and have a better life at the higher end college,” explains Goodman, “For some people absolutely, “Yes,” but for a lot of people the answer is, ‘No’.”

It is difficult for a high school senior to determine clearly what their career path will be. College is an investment in the future. Consider the payoff before taking on a large amount of debt.

Graduating with Student Loan Debt

Most students can take on about $30,000 of debt themselves.

“Anything after federal loans you start to get into private loans which are much more expensive,” warns Goodman.

When you get out of school, here is what you can do:

  • Consolidate all of your loans into one loan at the lowest possible interest rate.
  • Income Based Repayment.
    • Work in the public or nonprofit sector.
    • Pay the minimal amount for 10 years and then the rest is forgiven.
  • Refinance your debt.

Parents usually cannot shift the debt they take out back to the kids. Have students take as much as they can themselves. Goodman shares, “I’m unhappy with parents sacrificing their own financial futures for their kids.”

Parents Can Minimize Their Risk

Lots of options that parents can do:

  • Prepaid Tuition Plan.
    • No matter what the tuition is, it will be paid if you stay within the state.
  • Coverdell ESA.
    • Education Savings Accounts- put money aside to pay for education.
  • College Savings Bank CD.
  • Spend at the merchants connected and they put money away for you.

Scholarships

“If you can qualify for scholarships, it is money you don’t have to borrow from other places,” notes Goodman.

Schools themselves often offer scholarships. There are quite a few out there, some of them very specific, and they can sometimes be quite unique. Find these and apply to them all.

Higher end schools with lots of demand can keep their prices high. The biggest change has been foreign students coming to get a prestigious American education and they can pay these higher costs.

One thing that is changing is online education, which is a definite alternative. “You can get a perfectly good education online,” suggests Goodman, “Much cheaper than going away to school.”

Bargaining

“People don’t realize if they are accepted into a school, they have bargaining power,” describes Goodman.

You can ask for:

  • Lower tuition cost.
  • Financial aid.
  • Work study programs.
  • Many other options available.

This is especially useful to do if you have been accepted to more than one institution. Colleges are competing for students, and you can use this to your advantage!

Bargain with the admission office and financial aid office. Ask them what they can do for you. “It’s almost like bargaining for a car,” compares Goodman, “Play them off each other and get yourself the best deal!”

Common Questions

Goodman is a regular guest on many radio shows and has his own show “The Money Answers Show”. He happily answers questions via these shows and email to help families with the difficult decisions around paying for college.

“It is very easy to borrow, but the paying back part is a real problem for a lot of people,” notes Goodman. People are becoming more aware of this and are being more cautious about the debts they are taking on.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Par-ents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are inter-ested in learning more about scholarships please visit:

www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.

Contact Us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with Money Answers or Jordan Goodman.

Share

The post THCC69 – Understanding Student Loans with author Jordan Goodman appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC68 – How to Help Your College Student Build Their Credit Interview with Ty Crandall, Business Credit Expert and CEO of Credit Suite
32:12
2017-10-06 04:15:22 UTC 32:12
THCC68 – How to Help Your College Student Build Their Credit Interview with Ty Crandall, Business Credit Expert and CEO of Credit Suite

Do you understand your credit score? Does your child? Parents and students alike struggle to understand how credit works, how to build it wisely, and the severe consequences of making credit mistakes. In this episode, Ty Crandall shares his expertise on credit and financing and gives key tips on how to help your college student with building strong credit.

About Credit

“One of the frustrating things we see is that people are not taught this at a young age,” laments Crandall. A good place to start is with the FICO score to get an idea of how the credit score works.

Everybody should sit down with their children before they go to college and address this. Children need to be taught with lessons about how credit works and what it is.

The three major credit agencies populate a credit profile that is connected to your social security number, name, and address based on the credit you go out and get. This is averaged into a FICO score.

The FICO score has 5 separate components:

  • Payment History.
    • 35% of the score.
    • 30% of the score.
    • The amount that is owed in relation to the limits or original amounts on loans.
  • Length of Credit History.
    • 15% of the score.
    • How long you have had a credit profile.
  • New Credit.
    • 10% of the score.
    • Has to do with new inquiries.
  • Credit Mix.
    • It is the mix of credit that you have.
      • 2-3 loans, 1-2 mortgages, and 3 consumer credit cards is considered very good.
    • 10% of the score.

“FICO score reflects someone’s risk of going 90 days late within the next 12 months,” explains Crandall, “This will determine if you are approved or not approved and what rates you are given.”

Race, ethnicity, age, and gender are not factors into a credit score.

Companies used to call neighbors and would sell information to anyone that wanted it. Once information was put on computers, the government created the Fair Credit Reporting Act. This strictly regulates what information is allowed to be gathered and displayed.

Information is now regulated by the government and must now be 100% accurate, timely, and verifiable. Pulling a personal credit report requires written permission by you under Permissible Purpose.

Students Having Credit Cards

“Every parent needs to sit down and tell their child what is going to happen. A lot of kids are going to get into credit card problems early,” says Crandall.

Ways parents can help their child build credit:

  • Co-sign on a loan.
    • If you are buying a car for your child going to college, have them co-sign on the loan to build history.
    • Create a CD loan where you put money into a CD at your bank and get a loan against that CD which is a good way to establish credit.
  • Add your child as an authorized user to your current credit cards.
    • Your child can’t actually use the credit card, but they will get the benefit of the credit card history.
  • Start a secure credit card, NOT a regular credit card.
    • Credit card companies will raise the limit of a regular credit card the more they spend which can cause trouble.
      • A regular credit card gives a limit of what you can spend, but the limit can be raised by the credit company and you can spend more.
      • A secure credit card you give money to the credit card company and the limit is capped at whatever is given to open the card.

Parents should discuss this with their child. “The minute they go late on a credit card by more than 30 days, they start doing SERIOUS damage to that credit report and it will take at least 7 years to fall off the credit report. The worse they let it go, it can be sent to judgment and indefinitely stay on their credit report,” stresses Crandall.

You can rebuild after making a mistake by creating more positive credit choices. “It is not an easy or fast process,” cautions Crandall. The negative item will remain on your report the full 7 years and will impact what loans, rates, and types of credit will be available.

Credit scores are used on quite a few things such as insurance, on loans, property renting/buying, or anywhere that you are going to be given credit.

“Every parent should sit down and have a conversation with their child about how credit works,” Crandall reiterates.

Student Loans

Federal and private loans show up on your credit report. Deferred payments are not negative. These are not a recommended way to build credit, but they are one way.

“Student loans are tough. If you default on a student loan, you aren’t able to get any other kind of government financing,” warns Crandall, “Including an FHA mortgage.”

Final Tips

“I think it is essential that parents know that kids will not get this education on credit in school. It has to come from the parents,” emphasizes Crandall, “If you don’t educate them, NOBODY WILL!”

Crandall suggests that students really should know:

  • What the FICO score is.
  • The damage caused by negative items.
  • To be open with parents so parents can help early on if there is an issue and before damage is done.
  • If your child is looking at building a business, there is business credit that can be established to help them once they graduate and are ready to start their business.

Crandall concludes, “Helping them get started on the right foot, with positive credit, is so valuable to the rest of their life.”

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are interested in learning more about scholarships please visit:

www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.

Contact Us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with Credit Suite or Ty Crandall.

Share

The post THCC68 – How to Help Your College Student Build Their Credit Interview with Ty Crandall, Business Credit Expert and CEO of Credit Suite appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC67 – Using StatFuse to Better the Odds of Admission to College Interview with Jeet Banerjee, Co-Founder of StatFuse
25:22
2017-10-06 04:15:22 UTC 25:22
THCC67 – Using StatFuse to Better the Odds of Admission to College Interview with Jeet Banerjee, Co-Founder of StatFuse

“Statfuse is an online application that helps high school and community college students with the college admissions process,” describes Banerjee.

Students can fill out a college application and select a college of interest. The site will then give them a percentage of likelihood that they would be accepted to that university or college. Students will also be told their strengths, weaknesses, and what they can do to better their odds of acceptance.

In this episode, Jeet Banerjee shares about his experience with applying to college and his website Statfuse:

  • Jeet is an entrepreneur.
    • 22 years old.
  • Has delivered a talk for TedX.
  • Went to public high school and had a difficult experience with his co-founder figuring out how to apply to college.
  • Turned to the internet and struggled to find a credible source for helping with admissions.
  • Began serving other students immediately after graduating from high school.

Calculating the Odds of Acceptance

“We aggregate data from the universities of who was wait-listed, rejected, and accepted,” says Banerjee. The site was also in a beta testing mode for 6 months to test the algorithm and validate the software with actual students.

Other sites only use GPA and SAT/ACT scores. Statfuse has over 25 questions they ask to go in depth and really look at the whole picture and opportunity for acceptance.

Essays and personal statements required by universities cannot be measured through this program, but everything else from extracurricular activities to accolades are considered.

“We don’t directly have anything that will tell students if they will qualify for scholarships, but we are building relationships and partnerships with scholarship organizations where students can apply directly through our portal,” notes Banerjee.

The site is specifically created for students, but parents and students are both able to sign up. Users create an account and can save their information and edit it as needed.

As a parent, if you see a 15% or lower chance for your child to be accepted Banerjee suggests considering:

  • What grade is your child in?
    • As a junior or senior it is a little more alarming. The site will let you know what is weak about the application and gives you the opportunity to improve that area.
  • Be aware if it is an expensive school.
  • Create a list of colleges that include:
    • Safety schools you have a high chance of getting into.
    • Reach schools with around a 50% chance of being accepted.
    • High reach schools or dream schools with low percentages of acceptance.

“Anything above a 75% is a strong likelihood at a university and I would put them on your safety list,” recommends Banerjee.

Percentages can range from 95% at a school with less requirements and 5% at some of the top universities if a lot of things are missing from your application.

AP, Honors, and foreign language class requirements are considered.

Other Potential Features of StatFuse

“In terms of looking into the future,” says Banerjee, “We want to see other ways we can add additional value to the site.”

Some ideas for the future are:

  • 1 on 1 access with students already accepted to universities.
    • Letting them connect over a Skype call possibly and helping with their application, essays, and describing their experience.
  • Talking with previous admissions officers or consultants.
  • Offering virtual counseling.

All information collected through the site is stored in a secure database. None of the information is ever released to third parties without the user’s consent. There is an option users can choose to opt in and their information can then be given to colleges/universities or other third parties.

“It’s a great idea to go through our portal and get a realistic expectation of what colleges they might get accepted to and one’s they might not; that way they can really plan,” elaborates Banerjee.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are interested in learning more about scholarships please visit:

www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.

Contact Us to submit a question to our email
Leave us a voicemail message on the computer! (We use questions for future shows because it’s likely other people have the same question.)

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with Statfuse.

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The post THCC67 – Using StatFuse to Better the Odds of Admission to College Interview with Jeet Banerjee, Co-Founder of StatFuse appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC66 – Tips on How Undecided Students Can Choose a Major Interview with Kat Clowes, Author “Putting College to Work”
50:25
2017-10-06 04:15:22 UTC 50:25
THCC66 – Tips on How Undecided Students Can Choose a Major Interview with Kat Clowes, Author “Putting College to Work”

Tips on How Undecided Students Can Choose a Major“What I didn’t know is there is so much more to it that you should be doing during your college years that I was clueless about things like building your network, or knowing what my brand was, or taking advantage of all the resources available to me in college,” remembers Ms. Clowes, “I hoping to help students to figure what else they should be doing to be successful and not have some of the doubt and 10 years of searching afterward which is why I wrote the book.”

Kat shares why she wrote “Putting College to Work” and what can be found in the book:

  • Was a typical over-achieving student.
    • Got in an accident in high school and lost her short term memory.
  • Upon returning to school, she had to drop all her AP and honors classes.
  • Was able to graduate from high school early under the condition of starting junior college.
  • Changed her major multiple times in college.
  • Spent the next 10 years doing multiple different careers and changing her mind about her profession.

Examples from the Book

A typical problem of an undecided student is that they don’t know what schools they want to go to because they don’t know what they want to be.

If a student really doesn’t know what they want to do they should:

  • Think about who they are and what they are really good at.
    • What are you values?
    • What are your strengths?
    • What are your skills?
    • What are you looking for out of life in general?
    • There are some assessments available to help with this.
  • Try different subjects, clubs, and activities.
  • Identify what you really do not enjoy doing.
    • If you identify what you really do not like, it helps to focus on what you do like.
  • Don’t shy away from something that is a true interest.
    • Clowe’s brother made a full career out of video games. He is on the business end of the industry.
    • Investigate the industry or hobby they are already interested in.

The book helps students to step back and make a plan of action to get where they want to be and help students that don’t know what they want to do and discover that.

For parents of students that are completely unmotivated you should take them to a convention or give them a look at the business side of the company. “They are likely to be a lot more motivated if they know it is possible to turn this into a career,” says Clowes.

For parents of students that are very motivated, but can’t quite decide on one focus, have them start brainstorming what all the different areas of their interest have in common. Get them to job-shadow to help them discover if this is something they really want to do.

“I think there is a big push right now to turn majors into career training,” states Clowes. College is to provide a well-rounded experience. If you are going to be the best at something, then you will have a career path. If you are just going to be average, you have to think it through to the end. Find something connected to your big dream and you might end up on that path.

Categories of the Book

“My publisher and I tried really hard to not make it a read cover to cover kind of book,” describes Clowes. It is more of a “how-to” kind of book than an advice book.

Section 1 is called “Put Yourself to Work” and it is about:

  • Advocation for yourself, taking action, and how to take action.
  • Time management tips.
  • How to maximize your productivity.
  • Setting up goals.
  • Personal branding.

There are worksheets, areas for notes, and scripts you can use when calling people.

Section 2 is about “Succeeding in School” and it discusses:

  • How to choose a major.
  • How to plan your courses.
  • Using professors as a resource and being a student a professor might want to help.
  • Financial aid.
  • All the different resources you should be taking advantage of while at school.
  • Using your summer to the fullest.

Section 3 is “Succeeding After College” and helps set students up for getting that job:

  • How to use the career center.
  • About career counselors.
  • Job fairs and how to be successful at a job fair.
  • Resume help and guidance.
  • Alumni office.
    • The best pot of gold most people don’t take advantage of.
  • Specialty institutes.
  • Job shadowing and informational interviews.
  • Volunteering as experience.
  • Analysis on if you should be going to graduate school

Section 4 is all about “What You Need to Know to Be Successful Professionally”:

  • What networking is and how to do it efficiently.
  • Developing an elevator pitch.
  • How to research a company
  • How to network with manners
  • Finding network events
  • Being a resource to your network.
  • Crafting a resume and cover letter.
  • Acing an interview.
    • What to do before, during, and after.
  • Using social media wisely, especially LinkedIn.
  • Rocking a job fair.
  • Resources, worksheets, and a step-by-step timeline by quarter from freshman year through senior year of college. It helps map everything out by season.

This book is available on Amazon, Barnes and Noble, and anywhere that books are sold. “The price of college is so high now, you really want to make sure that your student and you are getting the most out of your money,” notes Clowes. This book will help you to make sure you are asking the right questions and choosing the best school that is the right fit for you.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are interested in learning more about scholarships please visit:

www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.

Contact Us to submit a question to our email
Leave us a voicemail message on the computer! (We use questions for future shows because it’s likely other people have the same question.)

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with Kat Clowes.

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The post THCC66 – Tips on How Undecided Students Can Choose a Major Interview with Kat Clowes, Author “Putting College to Work” appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC65 – Writing Quality Essays Interview with Ethan Sawyer, The College Essay Guy
36:29
2017-10-06 04:15:22 UTC 36:29
THCC65 – Writing Quality Essays Interview with Ethan Sawyer, The College Essay Guy

Most colleges use The Common App which allows students to apply to multiple colleges at once. This usually includes:

  • Personal information.
  • Main personal statement of about 650 words.
    • Sawyer suggests to think of this statement prompt as, “Describe the world you come from and tell us how your world has shaped your dreams and aspirations.”
  • Activities list.
  • Most colleges will request different supplemental essays.
  • This means several different essay requirements per school.

Some of these essays might be exactly the same prompt and can double, but if the topics are different then the essays will be different.

Sawyer gives the tip, “Take the different prompts you think will overlap and put them at the top of your word document. Write an essay that works for those two or three prompts. Actually writing and answering all three of those prompts at the same time will add some texture, layers, and levels to the essay and save time.”

 

Each of these essays is a chance to share a little bit more about yourself and show a variety of values. “Do these with someone else to get feedback and see how you are coming across,” notes Sawyer. The website has a “values exercise” so students can learn a few different values they have and should be sure to share through their essays.

Parents in the Process

How parents can help in the application and essay writing process varies. “It depends, but it can be useful to, as much as possible, serve in the role of cheerleader,” recommends Sawyer. It is also helpful to designate a certain day of the week as “college day”, and that is the one day of the week to discuss and work on college items.

Parents can also help by staying aware of deadlines. Be sure to follow up with your child on “college day” to remind them when certain things are due. Some parents also find it helpful to have an outside family member or consultant to be in charge of monitoring application progress. Ask your child how you can best support them.

“I like to invite students to begin the process after AP testing in the spring of their junior year,” explains Sawyer, “because we know what some of those prompts are going to be and you can gear your Summer towards that.” Supplemental essay questions are usually released in August. Get a draft of the common app done over Summer break. It is also important to have a balanced college list done by the end of Summer with 8 or 9 schools including:

  • 2 or 3 dream schools where you have a 5% chance of getting in.
  • 3 or 4 realistic schools where you will probably get in.
  • 2 or 3 really clear “likely” schools.

The Importance of Essays

While the entire package is important, Sawyer admits, “In some cases it can provide context and information to really make a difference.” You want your essay to make an admissions officer want to fight for you to get in. However, “An amazing essay isn’t going to make up for four years of slacking off,” states Sawyer.

The most importance piece is the main essay. Sawyer strongly says, “Allow a lot of time for that. Write it over a process of weeks, not just days or one day.” It will take between 6-10 drafts and revising before it will be of a high enough quality. Sawyer estimates it takes between 20-40 hours to create a fantastic essay that shows off a student’s strengths.

About the Website

There are lots of free resources available such as:

  • Sample essays.
  • Step by step guide to write an essay.
  • Advice on supplements.
  • Search bar to find anything you are looking for.
  • How to create a great college list.
  • “What should I be doing right now?” timeline.
  • Complete Guide To The College Essay.
    • A six video series where Sawyer walks you through what to do.

Sawyer also gives these quick tips:

  • Parents should encourage students to create a very balanced college list.
  • Listen through the process.
  • Check out Sawyer’s new book that will be released next year.

Brad suggests, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents” which is a video series available on our website. It teaches parents all about the different types of scholarships, how to apply to them (if you need to), and how to win them!

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are interested in learning more about scholarships please visit:

www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.

Contact Us to submit a question to our email
Leave us a voicemail message on the computer! (We use questions for future shows because it’s likely other people have the same question.)

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with CollegeEssayGuy.

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The post THCC65 – Writing Quality Essays Interview with Ethan Sawyer, The College Essay Guy appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC64 – Navigating the Admissions Process for Ivy League Schools Interview with Dr. Joie Jager-Hyman, Expert on the College Admissions Process & on American Education
27:58
2017-10-06 04:15:22 UTC 27:58
THCC64 – Navigating the Admissions Process for Ivy League Schools Interview with Dr. Joie Jager-Hyman, Expert on the College Admissions Process & on American Education

Choosing and Applying to a College

It is important to be realistic. If you are in the academic range of the college you are looking at, be sure to talk to real students.  Be careful to select colleges that your test scores fall into the accepted range of. “The grades are also very important,” explains Dr. Jager-Hyman, “Test scores are really easy- that information is front and center.”

When applying, Dr. Jager-Hyman recommends:

  • Start early.
    • Visit the campuses even in 10th grade, for example, but definitely during junior year.
    • Have a strategy to take the ACT/SAT and get it done.
    • Junior summer is also the time to get an application done. Senior fall is a very busy time. “Getting an early start is critical,” stresses Dr. Jager-Hyman.
  • Do research.
  • Have a third party help with the applications.
    • Jager-Hyman explains, “Teenagers don’t hear what you are trying to say.” Having someone such as a neighbor or other family member to help with the application process can make a difference.
  • Visit the school.
    • Go beyond the college advisor or guide when there. Talk to the actual students.

If you can’t visit, be sure to email and show interest.  Schools are specific on what they want. In 10th grade, start paying attention to what coursework you are taking and gear it towards a potential major.

Importance of Testing

“I advise students to plan for 3 test dates working back from the early decision deadline, November 1,” says Dr. Jager-Hyman, “They will take your highest composite score or super score- they want to pump them up that’s why they will give you multiple chances to take the test and even mix and match sections of the test.”

Subject tests are another option. “They are always good to demonstrate mastery of a subject,” recommends Dr. Jager-Hyman.  Some colleges have them as a requirement, so be sure to check with your choice colleges if it is needed or not to apply.

Colleges take the highest score for ACT/SAT, so take it a few times, but don’t do too many.

Deadlines

There are deadlines for applications. Dr. Jager-Hyman says, “I wouldn’t sacrifice quality to get it in early.” It is important to “sleep on it” and really work on it. “Give yourself the best shot,” Dr. Jager-Hyman suggests.

Letters of recommendations are also very important.  Colleges generally request letters from a guidance counselor and two teachers.  There are forms that go with these letters that students rarely look at that are very important. Look at the checklist and pick the teacher that will score you the best.

“It’s great if you are smart, but if you are not using your powers for good, as they say, you are not going to be as attractive to colleges,” states Dr. Jager-Hyman.

Dr. Jager-Hyman

  • Went to Dartmouth for undergraduate studies.
  • Became admissions officer there.
  • Received Doctorate degree from Harvard.

Colleges are looking for well-rounded individuals now. “Yes, academics are the most important, but beyond that they want students to make an impact,” Dr. Jager-Hyman notes.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are interested in learning more about scholarships please visit:

www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.

Contact Us to submit a question to our email
Leave us a voicemail message on the computer! (We use questions for future shows because it’s likely other people have the same question.)

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with CollegePrep360.

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The post THCC64 – Navigating the Admissions Process for Ivy League Schools Interview with Dr. Joie Jager-Hyman, Expert on the College Admissions Process & on American Education appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC63 – Understanding the Admissions Process Interview with Lydia Fayal, Co-founder of www.Admitsee.com
31:13
2017-10-06 04:15:22 UTC 31:13
THCC63 – Understanding the Admissions Process Interview with Lydia Fayal, Co-founder of www.Admitsee.com

Here’s some of the features of the website www.Admitsee.com

  • Provides a “big brother or sister” at dream school.
  • See application files of accepted students.
    • You can compare your own test scores, for example, to accepted students at different colleges.
  • Browsing is free.
  • College students get paid for posting their profile and sharing.
  • Great way to see what a student body really looks like.
  • Can sign up to have a college student mentor.
    • College students can review essays, give advice, and help guide prospective students. Essays are EXTREMELY important!

“Over the past ten years the (college) process has become that much more complicated,” explains Fayal, “But the offerings and resources haven’t improved.” This provides a way for high school students to connect to college students at their dream school.

Building Relationships

After you view profiles, you can begin a mentor/mentee relationship with actual college students. High school students get to remain anonymous and so do college students to make sure personal information is protected.

“It is students helping students,” says Fayal.

Once admitted, you can switch your profile to the “admit” side and get paid $10 up front, $2 each time your profile is viewed, and $7 for each person you answer questions to in a week. “It is usually less than an hour of responding to quick questions,” notes Fayal. There is an additional $20 fee for essay submissions by the high school student and then mentors provide notes back.

Focusing on Admissions

“Right now we have 890 different 4 year universities on the site,” states Fayal. Free access to the site is available to public and charter high school students through their guidance counselor.

This is a great way to see who was actually accepted into a particular college so high school students can custom tailor their application to meet that school’s needs. By connecting with a mentor, information about scholarships also becomes available as is guidance through that process.

$1,000 is given away each month to a new user on the web site. There are other give aways going on as well including Apple watches and iPads. “We are trying to give a lot of stuff away right now,” jokes Fayal.

26% of high achieving students hire a private consultant according to the Independent Consultant Association. A high-achieving student is defined as scoring at or above 70th percentile on standardized tests. The average price of private consultant is over $4,000. This site provides a peer to peer alternative that is affordable for students that can’t afford a consultant or in addition to those that can.

44% of students in the user base applied to 7 or more colleges. Fayal recommends to apply to at least:

  • 3 reach schools.
  • 3 target schools that you think are just right for you.
  • 1 or 2 safety schools.

Students coming from private high schools are significantly applying to more colleges. Fayal suggests, “If financial aide is a big concern for you, then it does help to apply to more schools because you can leverage a financial aide package you get from one school with another school.” You can also ask for waivers of application fees in order to apply to more schools.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are interested in learning more about scholarships please visit:

www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.

Contact Us to submit a question to our email
Leave us a voicemail message on the computer! (We use questions for future shows because it’s likely other people have the same question.)

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with Admitsee.com.

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The post THCC63 – Understanding the Admissions Process Interview with Lydia Fayal, Co-founder of www.Admitsee.com appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC62 – College Test Prep Interview with Jean Burk, SAT Instructor
28:21
2017-10-06 04:15:22 UTC 28:21
THCC62 – College Test Prep Interview with Jean Burk, SAT Instructor

About the SAT and PSAT

“The higher the score, the more money you get,” says Burk.

The PSAT (Preliminary SAT) is just as important as the SAT, but it is used for scholarships in the junior year. The SAT is offered 7 times a year, but the PSAT is only offered once a year in October. There are only a few small differences between the two tests.

“The average student starts taking tests in spring of their Junior year. They are already so maxed out it is so stressful for them to start so late,” notes Burk.

Burk strongly recommends starting as soon as possible because there is no age limit. “At the MINIMUM I would say starting in ninth grade,” urges Burk. With score choice, scores don’t need to be sent anywhere except to your own house.

Students take the PSAT the third week of October, the booklet is mailed back in November, and then scores are sent out in December. You can use the homeschool code for your state so the book is sent right to you, which is very important, so you can review test questions and how they solved the problems.

The Junior year is the ONLY year the PSAT counts for scholarships, so you should practice before then.

“This is really a critical thinking test and these questions are purposefully designed to trick the kids,” states Burk.

When taking a test:

  • Read the question carefully with a critical eye.
    • “What is this question really asking me?
  • Eliminate the wrong answers FIRST.
    • Smart kids tend to overthink and second guess themselves.

When to Start Studying

When to start begins on your child’s grades. Burk’s program is 12 lessons at 45-50 minutes each. “At least start 3 months before you are going to take the test because you are only going to retain a small percentage you hear the first time. You really want to go back and hear it again to internalize the strategies,” explains Burk.

Most students that do poorly are looking at taking the test wrong. They are trying to take the test like they do school.

“Every question can be answered in 30 seconds or less. Once students learn that, especially the ones that aren’t good test takers, the confidence level is amazing,” Burk notes.

About the ACT

The American College Test and the SAT are both used to get into college and to get scholarships. “About one-third of students do better on the ACT, one-third do better on the SAT, and one-third do about the same because it is a standardized test,” Burk points out, “Bottom line is that test taking strategies work on both tests.” Colleges accept both type of test and can convert your score from one form to the other.

Take both! Each has a downloadable version available on their web site in order to decide which is more comfortable.

How to Prepare

These tests are logic based and you can prepare for this by doing puzzles and logic games at home. These strategies work on ALL standardized tests. “Because you know standardized tests are going to be based on thinking and logic skills, that’s what you need to be putting somehow into your daily life,” suggests Burk.

Some logic skill sources can be found by using a search engine to find logic games and puzzles.

Jean Burk began her career with her own son. Burk explains, “I started teaching kids how to take the test and showing them that it really was a skill. It wasn’t about your IQ or about what you knew; it was about how to take the test.”

  • Began tutoring local students.
  • Created CollegePrepGenius.
  • Speaks at conventions.
  • FOX News contributor.

Quick Tips

Burk recommends:

  • Start early!
  • Every school weighs and calculates their grades differently, so these scores are favored more.
  • Standardized tests are a fair way for colleges to determine scholarships and entry.
  • Compare your scores on Cappex.
  • There are lots of ways to get free college. Burk’s eBook is available for free to listeners.
  • You can do it!

“I want people to realize you don’t have to be strapped with loans and debts or change your college list. There is time in the day to learn this and it can be done,” encourages Burk.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are interested in learning more about scholarships please visit:

www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.

Contact Us to submit a question to our email
Leave us a voicemail message on the computer! (We use questions for future shows because it’s likely other people have the same question.)

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with College Prep Genius.

Share

The post THCC62 – College Test Prep Interview with Jean Burk, SAT Instructor appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC61 – Being a Collegepreneur Interview with Sandra Noonan, Content Scientist/Blogger
30:42
2017-10-06 04:15:22 UTC 30:42
THCC61 – Being a Collegepreneur Interview with Sandra Noonan, Content Scientist/Blogger

Noonan suggests following James Altucher. She developed the collegepreneur idea in response to critics, such as Altucher, that say to not bother with college anymore.

Things that college students going into college should think about:

  • The cost of college has increased by 300% in the last 30 years.
  • Wages for college students are declining.

Noonan defines a collegepreneur as, “A student who manages the college experience so it doesn’t manage them.” It is important for students to use the resources available at a college to launch themselves into the life they want.

“They will have something to show for their college experience aside from a transcript,” Noonan further explains.

How Parents Can Help

Noonan would keep tabs on her child’s social media and she would also say:

  • A career doesn’t have to start after college.
    • Can be small, just something that compliments your classwork.
  • What worked in high school might not work for you in college.
    • Loosen expectations, especially freshman year, because students are finding themselves.
  • Start with questions:
    • What value can I add to the world?
    • What kind of life do I want to live?

“The relationships you nurture in college can be intensely valuable in your life,” states Noonan. It is important to step away from social media and to develop real relationships. Social media can be used to lever success with clubs or in a professional way.

“Be a collegepreneur and start things; don’t look for the college system to provide them,” stresses Noonan.

What College Success Looks Like

Noonan notes this will be a very personal answer, but some questions to consider are:

  • Did I discover something about myself that I can get economic value from?
    • Forget what it means to be prestigious and focus on what makes you happy.
  • What relationships did I establish in college?
    • These relationships provide major opportunities in the future.

Background on ThatWritingThing.co

Noonan began this blog after reading a story about a typical college student that took her life. “The website is where I take things about college that resonate with me and I write pieces of advice and, hopefully, insight that will help young college students make sense of something that is increasingly complex,” explains Noonan.

More about Noonan:

  • Graduated from Duke in 2004.
    • Had a full academic scholarship
  • Lives in New York.
    • Freelance marketing consultant.
    • Has experience in print media and broadcast journalism.

”The market for talented, strong, compelling writers is not going away,” says Noonan.

Quick Tips

“Your career doesn’t need to start after college. It means pursuing your vocations in a way that add up to a meaningful career when you graduate and doing it while still in college,” says Noonan.

Some tactical tips:

  • Get off social media and pursue real relationships.
  • Write a mission statement.
  • Limit the number of mundane decisions you have to make.
    • Simplify what you have to decide and do things like make college uniform that way it is one less thing to think about.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are interested in learning more about scholarships please visit:

www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.

Contact Us to submit a question to our email
Leave us a voicemail message on the computer! (We use questions for future shows because it’s likely other people have the same question.)

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with ThisWritingThing.co or Sandra Noonan.

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The post THCC61 – Being a Collegepreneur Interview with Sandra Noonan, Content Scientist/Blogger appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC60 – How to Stand Out When Writing Your College Essay Interview with Steve Schwartz, Professional College Admissions Counselor.
35:47
2017-10-06 04:15:22 UTC 35:47
THCC60 – How to Stand Out When Writing Your College Essay Interview with Steve Schwartz, Professional College Admissions Counselor.

Extracurricular Activities and Essays

“Simply being a member of an organization isn’t going to impress anyone,” says Schwartz. Having great scores isn’t enough anymore. A focal point of applying to college now is the essay. A great way to help with that is to have unique or exciting extracurricular activities.

Schwartz recommends for extracurricular activities:

  • Something really enjoyable. Kids won’t put in the effort if they are being forced to do it.
  • Make sure it stands out.
    • Go outside the school setting to find something unique, a passion, or what they want to pursue professionally.
  • Try online with programming, working remotely, or open source projects.
  • Create your own club.
  • Start a campaign, such as recycling.
  • Reach out to the local college or university and intern or assist a professor in the field you plan to major in.

“If you stay inside the high school world, it limits creating that superstar effect,” warns Schwartz. The top tier schools are looking for that stand out student and the best they can get. Schwartz notes, “If you can indicate one thing that shows you innovated in some way, created something, started something, or reached for some opportunity that is going to impress them,”

Letters of Recommendation

“All this stuff matters, and the most recent stuff matters most,” states Schwartz. It is ideal to get a letter of recommendation from sophomore or junior year teachers. They will know your child the greatest because they have had the most personal interactions.

Senior year teachers and guidance counselors are often not the best choice because they haven’t been able to spend enough one on one time getting to know your child individually.

Scholarships are often recommended more to the students that know the counselor the best. Find a reason to visit your counselor and get to know them!

Someone writing a letter of recommendation should be a person that has evidence of your child:

  • Taking initiative
  • Doing something they didn’t have to do
  • Showing determination
  • Using problem-solving skills

Recommendation letters should come from both the school staff and coaches or supervisors from outside of the school.

Biggest Mistakes that Parents Make

Parents tend to project onto kids what they should be doing. “You can’t put a square peg in a round hole,” explains Schwartz, “Encourage kids to cultivate their own interests and channel those interests down a productive road.” Find a happy medium.

Parents play an important role:

  • Keeping kids on task
  • Helping make decisions
    • Especially financially
  • Develop essay ideas
  • Strategize who to ask for letters of recommendation
  • Standardized test preparation

Schwartz emphasizes, “Make sure you are not forcing a kid down a path they don’t want to go because if they are stubborn and refuse, they end up achieving significantly below their potential in the end.”

Quick Tips

For parents of seniors it is getting down to crunch time. Be sure to get letters of recommendation and begin essays if you haven’t already. Junior year parents can look at last year’s applications for the college or universities you are interested in because they will not change that much. Start planning ahead about the different components so you are ready when applications are due.

Schwartz’s biggest piece of advice is: “Planning ahead, even when it comes to college essay topics. You don’t want to be writing them the night before or the week before. The best essays are written over a period of at least a few weeks so you have time to review and get some distance from it before coming back.”

College application deadlines vary based on the college you are applying to, but it is usually due the November of their senior year.

This needs to be well in process during the junior year of high school because by senior year your child should be writing about their experiences and getting their letters of recommendations. It can’t be done last minute; the more time the better.

LINKS AND RESOURCES

BRAD RECOMMENDS

“PUTTING COLLEGE TO WORK” BY KAT CLOWES, M.B.A. This is a book about the process of college and things to do along the way. Includes the pre-college process, as well as taking advantage of what is available at your college, building a resume, and finding a job. This would be great for parents of high school kids and students to read. It is full of great information to think about the long view of college. Parents should read this so you can help coach your college child to accomplish goals with more intention, making a plan, and doing things on purpose.

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are interested in learning more about scholarships please visit:

www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.

Contact Us to submit a question to our email
Leave us a voicemail message on the computer! (We use questions for future shows because it’s likely other people have the same question.)

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with College Admissions Toolbox.

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The post THCC60 – How to Stand Out When Writing Your College Essay Interview with Steve Schwartz, Professional College Admissions Counselor. appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC59 – Starting a Business in College Interview with Kate Steadman and Sharon Bui, Frill Clothing Founders
34:31
2017-10-06 04:15:22 UTC 34:31
THCC59 – Starting a Business in College Interview with Kate Steadman and Sharon Bui, Frill Clothing Founders

Kate and Sharon began looking into the apparel industry in high school. They both had a love of sewing and designing starting at a young age. They took a course and completed an internship before going to college and pursing a degree. Their company launched in their junior year of college as a hobby. The business took off and by the time they graduated they rolled right into their full time company. An appearance on “Shark Tank” provided them new opportunities.

”Frill is the one stop sorority shop. Sorority girls can come to us and buy anything they need for any day of sorority recruitment,” explains Sharon. For sorority recruitment, uniformity is important. “We design each of these pieces specifically for each chapter to make sure they are the only chapter at that school wearing that outfit in that exact color,” says Kate. They have also branched into the bridal market to create custom bridesmaid attire.

Kate and Sharon were not able to start paying themselves regularly until after graduation.

Starting a Business in College

There must be a need in the market. “Make sure first and foremost that people are going to buy what you are selling,” stresses Kate. Being an entrepreneur is great, but make sure there is a need you will fill. College is a great time to launch a business because you have professors and other experts in their field available to mentor and assist you.

Colleges are now starting entrepreneurial initiatives and clubs to assist students with having a free office space or to provide resources. Check the Student Center to see what programs and majors are available at your college.

Sharon and Kate’s parents were initially apprehensive about the start of this business. “My mom told me verbatim, “I want to make sure you have a real job and can pay the bills’, but one of the main things we have learned is there are so many aspects and careers that go into each industry,” recalls Kate. Students need to evaluate if they can live on their company salary. Sharon notes, “So many entrepreneurs out there that are really successful first had to pick up a part time job.”

Being on “Shark Tank”

Sharon was a fan of the show and got the idea to apply while still in school, but waited until after they both graduated to submit a video to the casting call in January 2014. “The greatest way this impacted us is it opened a lot of doors to production opportunities,” says Kate. Finding factories to create orders of different styles and colors to fit their needs and minimums was difficult until this episode aired.

Quick Tips for Parents of Entrepreneur Students

Kate and Sharon suggest:

  • It is best for parents to stay out of the way and allow their child the space to create their business.
  • Wait to be contacted about assistance until your child requests it.
  • “A parents’ opinion is always valued,” says Kate, “But it’s about finding a good balance.”

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

  • http://www.frillclothing.com
  • Instagram and Twitter are: Frill Clothing
  • Follow their blogs at:
    • @sarakatestyling
    • @shabui
  • Season 6, Episode 21 of “Shark Tank”
    Clip available via ABCGO:
    http://abc.go.com/shows/shark-tank/video/cant-miss-clips/VDKA0_e43onmf9

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are interested in learning more about scholarships please visit:

www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.

Contact Us to submit a question to our email
Leave us a voicemail message on the computer! (We use questions for future shows because it’s likely other people have the same question.)

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with Frill Clothing or Shark Tank.

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The post THCC59 – Starting a Business in College Interview with Kate Steadman and Sharon Bui, Frill Clothing Founders appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC118 – Understanding College Tax Deductions Interview with Craig Cody, Certified Tax Coach and Author “Secrets of a Tax Free Life”
36:46
2017-12-15 14:55:46 UTC 36:46
THCC118 – Understanding College Tax Deductions Interview with Craig Cody, Certified Tax Coach and Author “Secrets of a Tax Free Life”

Understanding College Tax Deductions

What is a certified tax coach? “We help our clients keep more of what they make by lowering their tax liability through legal means,” describes our guest Craig Cody. He is a best selling author and certified tax coach that works in all 50 states with his average client saving over $20,000 a year in taxes. Filling out the forms properly is very different from planning your life to get the most back from completing those boxes. Listen to this short episode for all of the tax secrets you can’t miss!

Questions Answered Today:

Are there tax benefits for paying for college?

Yes! Some of the top ones include:

  • Lifetime Learning credit
  • New Opportunity credit

People with children in school sometimes make too much money and they miss out on these. They didn’t plan and these credits phase out.

Some simple planning to perhaps move more money towards retirement can lower you back into the threshold.

Most people that file on their own or typical tax accountants would just say, “Sorry, you don’t get the credit,” instead of working to find a way to get the credit.

Financial aid is based on your income and assets.

There are legal strategies to lower your income by writing off expenses, or maybe restructuring a business/changing your entity, that can be very beneficial to business owners.

That’s where Craig Cody comes in- his company is filled with experts to help you with your unique situation to figure out if the benefit is worth the effort.

Bottom line: It is complicated and you really need to work with someone that understands both the college side as well as the tax side.

Communication is the key!

Can I hire my child?

Be sure to consult with your advisor to be certain you are doing everything correctly!

You can legally hire your child as young as 7 years old (Craig recommends 11 years old) to work on rental properties and start paying them a reasonable compensation.

Everything has to be well documented with excellent records (including how much you are going to be paying your child supported with comparable invoices of what a fair market price is), but then the money can be transferred into their own account (again, with documentation) and they can pay for college from there.

As long as they are under 21, their income is not subject to self-employment tax.

If you aren’t going to claim them as a dependent, they can file their own tax return and then you are eligible for some of those education credits.

Education Assistance Plan: Where you pay your nondependent $5,250 a year which is tax free to the student, but tax deductible to the business.

What else should I know?

Check with your professional on what is available in your state.

It is never too late to start a 529 plan if you are going to have a child in college eventually. Most people just aren’t aware of who or how much they can put into it.

Cody also wrote “10 Most Expensive Tax Mistakes that Cost Business Owners Thousands” which includes:

  • Failing to plan
  • Choosing the wrong entity
  • Missing family employment
  • Missing medical benefit plans
  • Home office
  • Retirement plan
  • Missing Craig’s help

Our listeners can have a FREE copy of this book! Check out the Links And Resources for yours!

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

Core Area- Scholarships

All families have to talk about scholarships, but not all will pursue or win them.

Beginning in the sophomore or junior year of high school, start figuring out how scholarships work and if you are going to pursue them.

There are two broad types of scholarships:

  • Directly from the college you are attending
    • EVERYONE should look at these and go for them!
  • Private scholarships
    • From outside companies or other sources, including local

Some families will not be very successful at winning these because their child is relatively average and participates with activities/sports at a basic level.

Other families could win quite a bit if their child is a great communicator, has strong grades, is very talented in an area/gifted, or deeply involved with something.

If your student is going to fill out 40 scholarship applications, first they have to find 40 they qualify for and then do all the application processes. It is a lot of work!

The most successful families have mom and dad as part of the process with regularly scheduled meetings where they help keep their child organized and focused.

You will have to figure out if this is worth your time. Time might be better spent getting a job and working to earn money and putting that towards college expenses instead.

Decide: a lot of scholarships, a handful we are very qualified for, or no scholarships at all.

Check out the scholarship guide in the links for great information!

Episode 43: How to Help Your Student Win Scholarships!

Episode 87: Win Scholarships Even With a Low GPA and Test Scores

Episode 96: Using LinkedIn and Other Social Media to Find Scholarships

Episode 112: How Kristina Ellis Won Over $500,000 in Free College Money

Optional Area- Getting Involved in the Military

There are a few ways the military can be part of the college process including:

  • ROTC (Reserve Officer Training Corp) while in college
  • GI Bill
    • For after the child has served or parents can possibly transfer theirs
  • Military Academy
    • If it is a right fit for you

 

Episode 46: Benefits of the GI Bill to Pay for College

Episode 42: ROTC Scholarships and Careers

Episode 101: Joining Forces with the Military to Cover the Cost of College

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Share

The post THCC118 – Understanding College Tax Deductions Interview with Craig Cody, Certified Tax Coach and Author “Secrets of a Tax Free Life” appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC117 – Choosing a Winning Career Path Interview with Casey Stanton, CMO of Tech Guys Who Get Marketing and Author “Functional Marketing”
55:26
2017-12-15 14:55:46 UTC 55:26
THCC117 – Choosing a Winning Career Path Interview with Casey Stanton, CMO of Tech Guys Who Get Marketing and Author “Functional Marketing”

Choosing a Winning Career Path

Speaking today is Chief Marketing Officer Casey Stanton. After the recession of 2008 hit, Stanton was stuck without a job. Using some creativity, salesmanship, and a little luck he was able to find his passion in life through the success of marketing. Using his career achievements, he was even able to land as a professor of marketing at Tulane University where he created and taught several courses. Want to stand out in a sea of homogeneity at a job interview? Stanton has the secrets you need right now!  

Questions Answered Today:

How can students stand out?

“I think the difference between students that do well and don’t do well comes down to a certain sense of flexibility,” describes Stanton.

The students that did the best considered:

  • What they were interested in
  • Implications of what will happen in the next 10 or 20 years
  • How the industry could change
  • Being creative

“Don’t shoot with a shotgun (for a job), but use a sniper rifle,” notes Stanton.

Find the specific job you are interested in and tailor everything you can to get there. Appeal to people who have that job by presenting your value and even sending actual mail.

Stanton also suggests, “You don’t need a cover letter until you have the job,” because you will be working on building a relationship with people from that company and proving how hard you work.

What can parents do if children aren’t really motivated?

“You either have results, or you have excuses,” says Stanton. If your student isn’t driven to figure out what their perfect job is, you can’t really help them. You might be able to set up a job for them through your own connections, but if a student has to figure it out for themselves they will work very hard.

“There are more 4.0 students in India than America has total students. The competition has never been greater and the odds have never been worse for us,” warns Stanton.

Hard work is the only way to separate yourself.

It is also very difficult to choose something if you haven’t seen anything. Students need to be exposed to job possibilities that are out there.

There is a new phenomena where jobs can disappear very quickly and be replaced by an app. Millennials are acutely aware that longevity is rare.

“Confidence is at an all-time low,” notes Stanton. There is an understandable lack of confidence amongst young people that might need some building up.

Young people today need to have their own “personal brand” based on what they can deliver. This should include the referability habits:

  • Show up on time
  • Do what you say you are going to do
  • Finish what you start
  • Say “please” and “thank you”
  • Develop a level of expertise in something
    • Follow your passion or don’t, but what is the potential you are going to be an expert, make an impact, get paid, and stay employed?

 

“Have the commitment and courage to stick through and do something and in getting to that result, you develop a sense of confidence from it and a capability that you can then charge for,” stresses Stanton.

The most successful of his friends from college put their heads down and did the work to get to the top of wherever they went.

You don’t have to choose your path early, while that can certainly help, it just only matters that you stick with it to gain confidence within that profession.

What is the Kolbe test?

There are 3 major pillars of psychology including mental (IQ), affective (strengths finder or what motivates you), and the way you go about doing things.

According to “Managing Oneself”, there are 2 types of people:

  • listeners (someone who can listen to information and respond)
  • readers (need more time to prepare)

Visit Rocketfuel for a free test on being an innovator or an integrator.

Stanton’s favorite test costs $50 and can be found at Kolbe. This will help you learn your cognitive abilities to help know your own strengths, weaknesses, and how to better manage and delegate responsibilities.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

Core Area- Family Discussions

These can be either informal (in the car or just out of the blue) or formal.

The first big conversation should be between mom and dad discussing in detail:

  • How college should go/you’d like it to go
  • How much you can pay
  • Who is helping the kids
    • Applications
    • Essays
    • Planning visits
    • Choosing careers
  • Hiring outside help
    • ACT Prep, college admission counselors, someone to help plan finding college money, etc.

Figure this out between the two of you so you don’t give conflicting information to your child.

There will also need to be a sit-down/formal meeting in the beginning. This might have to be broken up over more than one day, depending on your student. It is your chance to set clear expectations, who is responsible for what, how you will help, and what you will do on your own.

Be careful of how much you promise to spend- finance is an issue and you might not be able to pay everything at a very expensive school.

It’s also good to make sure students are responsible for pieces themselves. You’ll know it when you see it when your student is ready to have this talk.

Optional Area- Study Abroad

This is a viable option for students. It could be just a summer, 1 semester, a whole school year, or more.

There are many programs available that differ from college to college. Some have partnerships already set up, and others have certain unique opportunities.

Mom and dad should also talk about this first, explore the cost, and decide if it is something you want to encourage.

Ultimately there is a lot to gain from study abroad and it could be quite beneficial for a student if the right fit is found.

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Share

The post THCC117 – Choosing a Winning Career Path Interview with Casey Stanton, CMO of Tech Guys Who Get Marketing and Author “Functional Marketing” appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC116 – Making College Finance Decisions Interview with Debbi King, Author “The ABC’s of Personal Finance”
40:26
2017-12-15 14:55:46 UTC 40:26
THCC116 – Making College Finance Decisions Interview with Debbi King, Author “The ABC’s of Personal Finance”

Making College Finance Decisions

“Personal finance is about 10% math and 90% emotion,” describes our guest today and money expert Debbi King. After ending up in bankruptcy, she finally got debt-free and decided nobody else should ever have to go through what happened to her. Using her accounting degree and education degree she became a coach and author to help everyone succeed financially.

Questions Answered Today:

What is your perspective on parents planning for college?

“Sadly I see a lot of stress and non-preparation,” laments King.
Parents often have their own struggles and aren’t able to just write a check to pay for college.
College should not be a given! Children need to find out what their passion is and then decide if college is the right path to reach that dream.
To a certain generation, college seems mandatory. It really isn’t anymore.
King suggests asking, “What would I do if I could do it for free?” Use job shadowing and other ways for kids to explore what they think they are interested in. Once they find what their passion is, they need to plan how to achieve it.

What is your recommendation when parents feel like they are coming up short?

“A lot of parents feel guilty and that it is their job to send their kids to college. It isn’t,” says King. It is very important that you don’t ruin your own financial future. Students have a lot more financial options.
Together, you can both work and pay for as much as you can of their educational expenses.
Consider going to community college for the first 2 years and then transferring.
Scholarships are critical if you need to attend a university. Even awards of $100 will add up quickly. Be sure to let your adult student take responsibility and lead the charge for tackling their college expenses.
 

How can you pay down debt?

It has to be your #1 goal to pay down debt quickly. King recommends:

  • Do not wait! Pay it down even while you are still in school
    • Get a summer job and put that towards your loan
  • Make it a priority to pay it off
    • Pay this off before buying a car or any other large expense
    • Lower every budget item you can and get rid of that loan
      • Live with parents, get a roommate, anything you can do
    • Interest accumulates fast, so be sure to pay off that debt as quickly as possible to avoid having to pay more in the long run

“You don’t want that debt looming over you,” stresses King. If you only pay minimum payments, you could have that debt for 20 years.

What does the financial conversation with your child look like?

King has a few tips on how to have that awkward financial conversation about college with your child:

    • Just casually drop pieces of the conversation in relaxed settings such as driving in the car, at the mall, or on vacation.
    • Whoever can get through without the child putting their guard up is the one to start the conversation. You have to know your family dynamic.
    • Be honest and upfront. Know what you can do and be frank.
      • Be certain you and your spouse are clear with each other first about what you can do while still taking care of your own financial future.
    • Kids don’t really understand money until they have their own experience.
      • King’s daughter got a job at 16 and could figure out how many hours she would have to work in order to buy something and that made money make more sense.

 

  • Senior year of high school is too late! “You can start as early as sophomore, but really ramp it up during junior year,” notes King.

 
Money is an area that is still very taboo and private for most people. King’s book “The ABC’s of Personal Finance” is very user friendly and explains everything you need to know to be in command of your own finances from A-Z.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

Core Area- True Price of College
In order to estimate how much college will actually cost, families have to figure out:

  • Need-based aid
  • Merit-based aid
  • Scholarships/awards at the college
  • Outside scholarships/awards

This will give you what college might actually cost. From there, you have to create a budget of how much to save and what you will need to spend.
Optional Area- Rental Property
A rental property is generally considered an asset.
For example: If you have a 4 family rental worth $400,000 and a mortgage for $300,000 you will use the net value ($100,000) on your financial aid forms.
You can also deduct fix-up costs, realtor fees, and taxes to determine the actual check you would get at closing then use this number (say, $40,000) on your financial aid form.
A rental property is also something you can use to employ your children. If you have your child go and help clean the place every once and awhile, parents can claim that deduction as an expense and students can claim that as income. They might not make enough money to pay taxes and can then save that for college.

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.
If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!
The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Share

The post THCC116 – Making College Finance Decisions Interview with Debbi King, Author “The ABC’s of Personal Finance” appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC115- Getting Additional Support Beyond Your High School- Outside Agencies That Provide College Support Interview with Dr. Toinette McClellan Gunn, VP of Programs at Chicago Scholars
48:04
2017-12-15 14:55:46 UTC 48:04
THCC115- Getting Additional Support Beyond Your High School- Outside Agencies That Provide College Support Interview with Dr. Toinette McClellan Gunn, VP of Programs at Chicago Scholars

Getting Additional Support Beyond Your High School

Chicago Scholars has the goal of finding students in the Chicago area that want to go to college, but might need some additional support. Even if you are not in Chicago, tune in to this episode with Dr. Toinette Gunn to understand how these programs work! There is support out there ready and waiting to help you guide your student through the college process.

Questions Answered Today:

What is Chicago Scholars?

“I’ve been in the college access or readiness space for over 15 years,” shares Dr. Gunn. She is a first-generation college student that didn’t have a lot of guidance or family support.
Education broke the poverty cycle of her family and she is very passionate about working to help other students to change their own futures.
Chicago Scholars began in 1996. It is a nonprofit organization with the largest college access and success program in Chicago. “We help students get to and through college. It is about helping these young people transition into careers and roles of leadership,” notes Dr. Gunn.
Some examples of the types of things they do include:

  • Working with students and parents
    • Parents are involved from the very beginning establishing a partnership to achieve the common goal of the student earning their degree.
  • College access
    • Lecture lab about the college process
  • Individual counseling about college
  • Workshops
  • Mentors
    • Help through the application process

The programs begin June of the summer before the senior year of high school. Beginning in October of their senior year, these students have already applied to about 5 colleges on average.
Once a student is enrolled in college, there is a college success team available to offer multiple types of support as well as workshops around careers, leadership, and identity/self-advocacy for resources on campus. “Students have to be proactive and initiate,” describes Dr. Gunn.
Students are also strongly encouraged to get involved with campus life. Research suggests that a student who feels more connected and is involved with their campuses, or feels part of the community at a college, is more likely to persist and graduate.

How do I find something similar in my town?

There are over 30 organizations that are partnered with Chicago Scholars in Chicagoland.
If you don’t live in Chicago, you should ask your high school counselor or look on the internet for:

Dr. Gunn also suggests to start with an individual education counselor if you can afford the fee.

What are the important factors students and parents need to consider when applying to a college?

“First and foremost do your research,” warns Dr. Gunn. This includes:

    • Complete an academic profile (SAT/ACT test scores and GPA) and make sure it helps guide the institutions you are applying to.

 

  • Even if you are a little under the average of a school, if you really want to go there you should still apply and highlight your compelling story via the essays/personal statement.

 

  • College selectivity rating
    • Colleges that are more selective have higher graduation rates.
  • Graduation rates
    • Especially if you are an underrepresented minority.
  • Supportive services available on campus
  • Area of study
    • If your major is available or not
  • Financial Aid
    • Average awarded
  • FIT!
    • Does this college fit for this student?
    • You have to visit the campus in order to properly be informed about the fit of a school.
    • Parents and ultimately students will craft their personal definition of what a “just right fit” will be.
  • Financial
  • Socio-emotional
  • Culturally
  • Geographically

“Colleges have personalities and students have personalities,” advises Dr. Gunn. So be sure to check out your finalist campuses you want to apply to in order to confirm your student can see themselves spending the next 4 or 5 years there.
Begin with your local state schools or nearby community schools. Visits look different for freshmen/sophomore or junior/senior. Upperclassmen can:

  • Sit in on lectures
  • Meet with professors or advisors
  • Student shadowing

There are lots of good fit schools out there for students. If one doesn’t work out, there is another one that is still a good path. Dr. Gunn adds, “That is why you need to apply to multiple schools, so you aren’t putting all your eggs in one basket.”

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

Core Area- Career Planning
Career planning means: What does your student want to be when they grow up?
There are a few ways to help your student pick a direction if you do not want them to go off to college undecided:

  • Local High School
  • Tech College
  • Community College
  • Job Shadowing
  • Volunteering
  • Websites
    • Career assessments
    • Before you pay for anything, check with your high school to see what they already have a subscription to.

Career planning is something that students, and/or parents, will have to work on to help make choosing a college easier.
Optional Area- Athletics
Check out these episodes:
111: The Reality of Athletic Recruiting, A Talk with NCSA with Lisa Strasman
76: Get Recruited! Understanding College Athletics with Jon Fugler
If your student is interested in playing sports in college, that is an additional challenge you will need to prepare for.
You will have to find a college where the coach is interested in your student.
Will you attend a school even if you can’t play your sport there?
You will have to start earlier, perhaps your freshman year of high school, talking to coaches, setting up visits, creating film, and attending camps.

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.
If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!
The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Share

The post THCC115- Getting Additional Support Beyond Your High School- Outside Agencies That Provide College Support Interview with Dr. Toinette McClellan Gunn, VP of Programs at Chicago Scholars appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC114 – Learn How Entrepreneurship is Becoming a Major in College Interview with Eric Liguori, Entrepreneurship Expert and Author “The Startup Student”
47:39
2017-12-15 14:55:46 UTC 47:39
THCC114 – Learn How Entrepreneurship is Becoming a Major in College Interview with Eric Liguori, Entrepreneurship Expert and Author “The Startup Student”

Learn How Entrepreneurship is Becoming a Major in College

“Entrepreneurship is one of the fastest growing majors on college campuses around the country,” shares our guest today Eric Liguori. He is the author of “The Startup Student” and an expert in the growing field of entrepreneurship. Hear what he has to say about building a better business and controlling your own destiny in this episode.

Questions Answered Today:

What is college entrepreneurship?

“On any campus you visit right now you are going to see students starting and running their own businesses,” states Liguori. Luckily, there are now resources in place to support this at most universities.
These are usually small to medium sized businesses already turning a profit.
It is NOT just high-tech/high-growth. Students are doing everything from producing their own juices to laser engraved lacrosse balls.
Universities are approaching this in 2 ways:

  • Incubation Model
    • Lends itself to faculty research where they want to slowly take something through the market and commercialize it.
  • Accelerator Model
    • Geared towards bundling resources around students to help them launch their own companies.

 

What should parents know?

Parents need to challenge students to research and choose a college with resources to support that dream. It will be an up and down ride for parents.
Entrepreneurship is a major that is usually under the Business college.
“Some campuses are much more focused on interdisciplinary education, and other campuses are focused on entrepreneurship as its own discipline and major,” notes Liguori.
The final series of courses usually allows for students to work on their own or to work as a team.
College entrepreneurs learn 3 major categories:

  • Business basics
    • Setting up the books, hiring of staff, entity creation, cash flow management, pricing the product, advertising, cost analysis, intellectual property protection, and all other basics of business
  • Entrepreneurial basics
    • Different types of entrepreneurships, characteristics of entrepreneurs, understanding the process, nature of an opportunity, taxonomy of infrastructure in place, knowing how to start and launch leads, entrepreneurial orientation and how to position your company, seed and venture capital
  • Mindset and Competency of an Entrepreneur
    • Opportunity alertness, passion, persistence, tenacity, gorilla behavior, learning from failure, resilience, creative problem solving, building and using networks

 
“We give them the guidance they need to navigate that choppy water of uncertainty at the beginning,” describes Liguori.
Students usually fall into one of two categories:

  • Have been hustling and working since a very young age
  • Like the idea of starting something or creating something, but aren’t sure how to go about it

Classes focus on tool-building and help students understand if it is worth it or not to just take a market wage.
Credibility challenges are the toughest, so students are matched with experts and mentors. These connections can help introduce them to more partners and get access to capital. Instructors also help students to set up plans for beyond college.
Investment pitches and competitions are other ways students can gain capital without losing equity.
Sometimes parents are worried and prefer students to get job training.
“My experience has been that students who are really passionate about it find resources,” says Liguori.
Every university will have something different offered ranging from a certificate program all the way up to graduate degrees.

How do you pursue entrepreneurship?

There are a few steps high school juniors should do:

  • Check state schools in your area for entrepreneurship centers
  • Email the faculty and directors of these centers to ask about the programs
    • If you are polite and professional you should get a response
  • Check the U.S. Association for Small Business and Entrepreneurship
  • US News and World Report
  • Princeton Review

 
Don’t be afraid to pick up the phone and ask the admissions office of any college you are interested in.
Entrepreneurship is generally in the Business school, which might have minimum requirements above and beyond the major itself.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

 

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

Core Area- Building a Budget
Start by looking up what it might cost to attend your local state school.
There are two ways to build your budget:

  1. Figure out how much money you need and create a plan to get there.
  2. Define your budget and base your school choice on what you can afford.

In the end, just because you can only afford a certain amount a month, does not mean that is enough. You might need to recalculate what you can afford, take a job for additional income, or consider borrowing.
Begin freshmen year of high school to figure out what college will probably cost.
Then you will know what you might have to save or invest.
This will not be necessarily easy, but it IS necessary!
Optional Area- Divorce Planning
This impacts:

  • Need-based aid
    • Based on income and assets of the family
    • Usually just one parent is considered for financial aid, but their new spouse might also be included
  • Family politics
    • Parents could be cooperative to solve the college dilemma, or one parent feels responsible

This can get complicated, so do your research!
Episode 39: Divorce and College Planning
Episode 11: College Planning and Divorce

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.
If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!
The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Share

The post THCC114 – Learn How Entrepreneurship is Becoming a Major in College Interview with Eric Liguori, Entrepreneurship Expert and Author “The Startup Student” appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC113 – Health Care on Campus and How It Works Interview with Dr. Sarah Van Orman, Executive Director of Health Services at the University of Wisconsin- Madison
37:39
2017-12-15 14:55:46 UTC 37:39
THCC113 – Health Care on Campus and How It Works Interview with Dr. Sarah Van Orman, Executive Director of Health Services at the University of Wisconsin- Madison

Health Care on Campus and How It Works

Healthcare, insurance, and everything health related that you need to understand when you send your student to college are what we cover in our episode today with expert Dr. Sarah Van Orman. She is a former President of the American College Health Association and a primary care physician with a focus on keeping students healthy and successful in college. “This is the opportunity to be teaching your student about being a health care consumer,” shares Dr. Van Orman.

Questions Answered Today:

What are health services at a typical university and how do they work?

Factors that impact services available include size of school and the needs of students.
Campuses that have residential students provide some sort of health services that include:

  • Primary medical care
    • Sprained ankle, sore throat, screenings, check-ups, or anything like that
    • Typically has a lower co-pay
  • Mental Health services/Counseling services
    • Crisis counseling and short-term counseling are generally provided
    • Psychiatric services are not as common
    • Services are growing rapidly
    • Can help refer to a professional in the community to make sure all needs are met
  • Public Health
    • How do we keep and maintain a healthy community?
    • Promote education and safety around campus that most students don’t realize are part of the health services

If the college specializes in something unique, such as travel care, you will find that more readily accessible on that campus.
“Most students will be covered by their parent’s insurance in network,” notes Van Orman. It is important to consider what is provided by the student health services that might cover outside of their regular insurance. This varies by the health service and by the insurance.
Dr. Van Orman strongly recommends that parents of seniors in high school understand what coverage their child has and to see what options will be available where they will be going to school. Talk to your provider and ask about medical scenarios to see if your child must come home for treatment or not.
Some ideas to research include: A student health insurance plan, looking through your employer for the option to select a PPO so there is better coverage out of network, supplemental plans available, does the university provide an insurance policy, etc.
These are great questions to ask during your college visit before selecting a school- especially if your child has a pre-existing condition!
Some campuses require a verified policy in place, but some don’t.
Some extra advice from Dr. Van Orman:

  • Stop by the student health services building during your campus tour
  • Make sure you know all services that are available and that your student can access them
    • Also includes what your campus is doing for wellness, recreation, and nutrition
  • Help your student become more independent
    • Turning in and picking up prescriptions, understanding co pays, etc.
  • Be sure your student has their insurance card and prescription card because it is likely possible your child with have a health or mental health crisis
  • Don’t be afraid to call the health services, but be aware of privacy laws
    • Talk to your student about release of information and when you want them to contact you

In most states, the next of kin has power of attorney if a student becomes incapacitated. If you have someone you specifically want as having power of attorney due to a complex family situation, you would want to legally file for power of attorney.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

Core Area- Tax Planning
You need to understand how college and taxes work together. Most families don’t realize they could, or should, be doing this!
American Opportunity Tax credit:

  • Married couples under $160,000 of income and singles under $80,000 of income
  • Phases out between $160,000 – $180,000 for married couples and $80,000 – $90,000 if you are single
  • Can claim a tax credit up to $2500, as long as you pay $4,000 in tuition expenses. If your income is near the limit of phasing out, you might want to plan in order to get the maximum credit where possible.

Also, the 529 plan usually has a deduction available when contributing for most states.
Optional Area- Special Needs
This covers everything that might be unique to your student if they need additional help for any reason. It will impact your college search so that you find the right school that is the right fit.
Episode 8: Helping Students with Learning Disabilities Prepare for College

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.
If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!
The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Share

The post THCC113 – Health Care on Campus and How It Works Interview with Dr. Sarah Van Orman, Executive Director of Health Services at the University of Wisconsin- Madison appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC112 – How Kristina Ellis Won Over $500,000 in Free College Money. Interview with Kristina Ellis, author of How to Graduate Debt Free and Confessions of a Scholarship Winner.
43:55
2017-12-15 14:55:46 UTC 43:55
THCC112 – How Kristina Ellis Won Over $500,000 in Free College Money. Interview with Kristina Ellis, author of How to Graduate Debt Free and Confessions of a Scholarship Winner.

Free College Money

Get the ball rolling on college planning right now with scholarship expert Kristina Ellis. She swings by the show to share her secrets of how she won over $500,000 in free money for college. She started researching her junior year, but really put the pedal to the medal during her senior year. “I often recommend to students to not get too stressed about filling out the applications their sophomore and junior year,” says Ellis. Get the rest of her can’t miss tips in this episode!

Questions Answered Today:

What was your scholarship experience like?

“For about 6 months I sat in a library with my mom and worked, worked, worked on filling out those applications,” describes Ellis. She strongly recommends waiting until your senior year and spending your time during your sophomore and junior year building your resume and having experiences.
Freshmen year is when Ellis started looking at applications to plan what she wanted to do during high school to tailor herself to future scholarship and application essays. This made her intentional in committing to activities she loved doing, but that would be great to write about.

What should parents do (and when) to make the scholarship process work successfully for them?

“I definitely encourage parents to start early,” notes Ellis, with early financial conversations starting freshmen year. You can start as early as possible, such as kindergarten, to get involved in community service and start offering those experiences to build that character in your child.
Show your student what loans look like financially and how paying that debt off will impact their life. The better they understand what debt is, the better off they will be.
Set up a “scholarship night” where once a week you sit down and look at scholarship applications and fill out a few.
“It is a numbers game,” warns Ellis, “You have to keep trying, you have to keep applying; it might take multiple attempts and multiple rejections before you win a really great award.”
On your scholarship night each week you should:

  • Start with scholarship databases and create a targeted list of 25-50 scholarships to pursue that match your student well.
  • Look into programs to figure out the “why” in the who. Why are they giving away this award? What do they value? What kind of person are they looking for? Get to know these programs that are giving away money to tailor make your responses.
  • Once you have a few tight essays, you can recycle the foundation and take the time to customize the details to each program. Find the balance.

College ROI (Return On Investment) means, “looking beyond the prestige of a school and their rank, but also looking at what school will profit you the most in the long run based on your projected earnings,” states Ellis.
This includes:

  • Net price
  • 4 year completion rate
  • Earning potential
  • Opportunity cost

It is important to figure out from a financial perspective what school will really be the best for you and to go there, no matter where else you might have been accepted.
Just getting accepted is half the battle, you have to look at the finances as well, which is where scholarships come into play.
Example: Getting into an ivy league school with $0 in financial aid is not as great as getting into a state school on a full academic scholarship.
Ellis understands that sitting and filling out scholarship applications doesn’t sound very fun to a lot of students, but she is an example of how it is totally worth it. Her book “Confessions of a Scholarship Winner: The Secrets That Helped Me Win $500,000 in Free Money for College” was written in a way to communicate with high schoolers, but it also helps parents by describing exactly what you should do to support your student through this process.
“How to Graduate Debt Free: The Best Strategies to Pay For College #NotGoingBroke” was written for students again, but really goes into depth on the best way for parents to start financially saving. It also includes some pre-college action of how to plan high school and a great financial aid breakdown for everyone, even those that think they would never qualify for any extra dollars.
Bottom line: Get involved and spend some time learning about the world of college finances as soon as possible.
“If you are a junior or senior that thinks they missed the boat on scholarships, I want to encourage you to still go through the process. There are tons of scholarships given out senior year and throughout college,” suggests Ellis. There are scholarships out there for everybody!

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

Core Area- Saving and Investing

Lots of families have saved something for college already, but there are lots of opportunities to start saving now.
Three things to consider while saving and investing for college are:

  • Impact on Financial Aid
  • Tax Benefits
  • Rules and Restrictions

For example, having money in a bank account will count against your ability to get financial aid, you pay a little bit of taxes on the interest, but you have few rules and regulations about spending that money on whatever you want whenever you want.
529 plans still count against you for financial aid, but there are numerous state and federal tax benefits. There are also rules and regulations about how and when this money is spent.
Saving and investing can be done at any time by parents and doesn’t really need the involvement of the student.
Figure out what you can save starting right now- even if your student is just a few weeks away or year away.
Loans for college come with loan payments. So, if you can afford to pay that monthly payment, theoretically you should be able to save that same amount each month which will prevent you from having to take the loan out at all.

Optional Area- Family Funding

If you have grandparents or other family members that say they want to help give towards college expenses, from a financial aid standpoint it is sometimes good and sometimes bad.
You don’t report this on the FAFSA, but once the money comes to the individual to pay for college it DOES go on the FAFSA as income to the student.
With good planning, you can time when this money is provided (maybe, say, the junior year). Plan how to maximize this money so it won’t impact financial aid and other resources in a negative way.
Key factors to consider are:

  • Will you qualify for any financial aid without this money?
  • Are you being provided with a large sum?

Being given $1,000 doesn’t have the same impact as $100,000 on future requests for financial aid. Try to work this opportunity in a smart way for the most benefit.

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.
If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!
The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Share

The post THCC112 – How Kristina Ellis Won Over $500,000 in Free College Money. Interview with Kristina Ellis, author of How to Graduate Debt Free and Confessions of a Scholarship Winner. appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC111- The Reality of Athletic Recruiting, a talk with NCSA Interview with Lisa Strasman, President of Next College Student Athlete
46:11
2017-12-15 14:55:46 UTC 46:11
THCC111- The Reality of Athletic Recruiting, a talk with NCSA Interview with Lisa Strasman, President of Next College Student Athlete

The Reality of Athletic Recruiting

Meet Lisa Strasman, the President of the premier college athletics recruiting organization Next College Student Athlete. She is here on our show today to give you the secrets needed to be recruited for college sports at any level. These days, coaches are going to games to look only at specific players. “Of course there are examples of coaches finding kids, but it is really not the norm,” says Strasman. How do you get onto a coach’s list? Tune in here to find out what you can do to separate your student from the pack and get recruited for athletics!

Questions Answered Today:

How does NCSA help families?

“Our goal is to help student athletes play the sport they love at the college of their dreams,” describes Strasman.
NCSA has a team of over 550 former college athletes, coaches, and professional athletes to help student athletes find the right fit.
They help students create an athletic resume, edit videos, and provide specific advice tailored to each college program so students can be aware of where they have the highest likelihood of being accepted.
They also support students and parents through each key milestone of the recruiting journey for 31 different sports across men and women divisions.
“We work with most NCAA sanctioned sports, but there a few smaller or emerging sports we don’t have a big enough volume in,” notes Strasman. They help to place students at all levels, not just Division 1.

What steps does a student need to take to play their sport in college?

The first step is to take action! “When you have that realization that your student athlete is serious about playing their sport at the next level, don’t wait! Start putting together your game plan,” warns Strasman.
Freshman year is the time to start because sooner is better.
What you need to do includes:

  • Create your recruiting profile and plan.
    • You can do it right on the NCSA website and get a third party evaluation to help you find the perfect program out there for you
  • Reach out and communicate with college coaches to build those relationships
  • Go to different camps as they are available for skill development and to get noticed
  • Create a highlight reel
    • You can use your phone to put together clips
    • There are guidelines available at the NCSA website and the experts there can help to break it down into the 3-5 minutes a coach will want
    • It does NOT have to be fancy- the coach just wants to see what the athlete can do
    • Update it as you progress through high school
  • Take academics seriously; if you don’t meet the minimums to make it into the school, you can’t get in on athletics alone
    • Standardized tests are important just like for anyone else going to college
    • Athletic budgets are very tight for college coaches, but they might be able to give you some academic merit aid based on your grades
  • Research schools to think about what type of school you are interested in (geographic location, rural or urban, best scholarship money, highest academics, etc.)
  • Visit campuses and decide what level you want to play at
  • Find an expert to help you think through all these key questions

“Leveraging athletics might help you get into a school you might not get admitted to based only on your academics or even earn more money through financial aid,” shares Strasman. If your child is passionate, then athletics need to be part of your game plan early.
Athletics should not be an afterthought, so start communicating with college coaches early on to make it part of the process.
“Everything should be rooted in what your kid wants to do,” reminds Strasman. Sometimes travel teams and camps are important, but it doesn’t guarantee you a scholarship or roster spot.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

Core Area: Parents vs. Student Responsibilities
The reality for most families is that mom and dad are very involved and the student is just along for the ride. Every family needs to come up with who is responsible for what pieces.
It needs to be clear who is in charge of important college areas such as:

  • Research
  • Funding
  • Communication
    • Whose email do they have? Who is staying on top of the programs and opportunities the college is offering?
  • Visits
  • Scholarships
  • Applications/Essays
    • Parents might need to help by being on top of deadlines and the overall process

Have a monthly meeting where everyone can check in on how things stand.
Optional Area- Transfer Programs
This is where you attend a particular school and then transfer to a different school to finish your degree.
3 reasons you might be interested in a transfer program include:

  • Admissions
    • If the school is really tough to get into, you can transfer which might be easier
  • Cost savings
    • Get your basic classes done to save on tuition, then transfer to the program you really want to finish your degree in
  • Stepping stones
    • Not quite ready to go away to a big university, so you get a year or two under your belt and work your way up

It is important to understand there are some formal programs where two colleges have gotten together and have a set list of classes that will 100% transfer to a different university. Otherwise you won’t know for sure the courses you are taking will allow you to transfer and you might have to start over or take similar classes again.

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.
If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!
The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Share

The post THCC111- The Reality of Athletic Recruiting, a talk with NCSA Interview with Lisa Strasman, President of Next College Student Athlete appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC110 – Understanding College Rankings Interview with Farran Powell, Writer with U.S. News and World Report
42:56
2017-12-15 14:55:46 UTC 42:56
THCC110 – Understanding College Rankings Interview with Farran Powell, Writer with U.S. News and World Report

Understanding College Rankings

Choosing from ranked schools can be tricky. Is one school really that much better than another? We invited Farran Powell on the show to help clear up what this ranking thing is all about. She is the “Paying for College” writer for the publication that started the ranking craze, U.S. News and World Report. Having written somewhere near 100 articles on the topic, Farran has a wealth of knowledge she shares in this great interview.

Questions Answered Today:

What is a school that claims to meet full need?

“Different schools have different ways of determining what your need is,” says Powell. While some schools rely on FAFSA, others will ask you to provide a CSS profile as well. If you are looking for federal financial aid, you will need to complete the FAFSA.
Each school has a different formula for determining that they have met your full need. The schools that offer this feature are usually private schools with only two public schools on the current list.
These schools tend to be highly ranked and use a need blind admissions policy. These are generally intensely competitive.
Powell recommends if you are considering this type of school, “You want to look at the fit financially, and does it have what you want to study at this school?”
There might be a cheaper school out there that is great and has a perfect program for your desired major.

How are colleges doing things differently to adjust to the new FAFSA?

Some schools have moved up their deadlines to as early as December. The Department of Education has also released the Pell Grant schedule earlier.
FAFSA is no longer based on an estimated value, you are using taxes from two years back.
This makes the colleges more comfortable in packaging their awards because the numbers are more verifiable. These are now being released 6-8 weeks earlier than before.
This current year is the only year where there might be discrepancies. “It is a one year issue that could happen to current students,” notes Powell.
If something has drastically happened since your FAFSA application or the tax return you use for it, such as death in the family or large medical expense, you can apply for a reconciliation of your award at the financial aid office of your school since your circumstances have changed.

What advice do you have for parents?

Visiting schools out of state will cost money, but you can always go locally. See the different types of schools to see what will be a good fit for you.
This will help you to narrow down your shortlist so you don’t take unnecessary and expensive road trips.
Also, consider visiting schools during the non tourist season to save money on airfare and hotels. Maybe go during the winter.
The USNews.com website has lots of information available that is put together by both a data team and reporters so you can search based on what is important to you.
Some things you can check out on the website include:

  • Short-lists
    • Different ways you can pay for school, what it’s like living on campus, and many more.
  • College navigator
  • Best value schools
    • Even if they might have a high sticker price, they try to help out students the most.
  • A+ schools for B students
  • Studying abroad
    • Powell herself studied abroad and notes that schools oversea have a lot more emphasis on test results and AP courses in high school. Programs are also only three years long, so you need to be sure of the area you want to study and if it will transfer well back to the states.
  • Paying for grad school information
  • Online education

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

 

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

Core Area #6 Merit-Aid
Merit-aid is aid that is offered to families where the student has achieved some success, either academically or athletically, and they are able to receive additional funds on top of other aid they may be receiving.
It is not tied to the family finances.
A typical private school might offer a scholarship such that if your test scores and grade point average meet a certain requirement, they can offer you a set amount of money. This can be tiered where different thresholds offer differing amounts of money.
In addition to academics, scholarships might be based on:

  • Athletics
  • Music or other unique abilities
  • Extra-curricular activities
  • Science fairs

If you are just barely accepted to a certain college, you probably won’t earn very much merit aid and will have to probably pay full price. Conversely, if you are accepted somewhere else that is less competitive, you might be able to win more.
Episode 2: Need-Based Financial Aid Part 1
Episode 3: Need-Based Financial Aid Part 2

Optional Area- Performing Arts

You could qualify for merit-aid with performing arts, but there will usually be some type of audition required. Many schools offer these on campus, but some occasionally offer satellite auditions around the country.
Episode 38: Insights Into Majoring in the Performing Arts

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.
If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!
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The post THCC110 – Understanding College Rankings Interview with Farran Powell, Writer with U.S. News and World Report appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC109 – InviteEducation.com: Helping Families Plan and Pay for College at Any Age Interview with John Hupalo, Founder and CEO of InviteEducation.com
38:52
2017-12-15 14:55:46 UTC 38:52
THCC109 – InviteEducation.com: Helping Families Plan and Pay for College at Any Age Interview with John Hupalo, Founder and CEO of InviteEducation.com

InviteEducation.com

Most families find it challenging to jump in and learn the college process, but we have John Hupalo here today to share all his great resources to make this simple! After his personal and professional experience with the issue of college financing and planning, John recognized that there were not too many resources available. He and his partner decided, “There has got to be a better way to help families plan and pay for college.” So InviteEducation.com was founded.

Questions Answered Today:

How can InviteEducation.com help me?

Hupalo set out with his partner to create some simplified steps for both planning and financing college. Each family and situation is unique, but the purchase decisions and shopping for college are exactly the same as shopping for a car.
InviteEducation.com is set up to assist with 3 very specific points:

  1. You might have more than one child, so you will need grade specific guidance for each child.
  2. Finding that just right college. You have to figure out if your student can get in AND if you can afford it. Don’t buy now, and pay later!
  3. Interact with your student to make sure they are taking care of what they need to do and you are managing what you also should be doing.

Students can go onto the site as well to get tons of fantastic resources and clear information.
“When parents see there is an actual process involved, and they don’t have to worry about it all at once, it makes it a little bit easier,” notes Hupalo.

What should I know about scholarships?

“I believe there is an affordable school for every student and every family,” shares Hupalo. You know how much you have saved by junior or senior year, and now you have to find the free money.
Beware when schools give you federal loans, because you have to repay that, and also work study, because you have to earn that.
Grants are usually need-based aid given through filing the FAFSA.
Merit-based aid is usually from the school itself or you can get scholarships from third parties. Check out Petersons.com for their scholarship search engine. It is also linked to InviteEducation to help you find and apply for free money.
Hupalo cautions, “If you are awarded a third party scholarship and you are getting need-based aid, the school will reduce that amount of grant aid by the amount of that third party scholarship.” Go talk to your financial aid officer at your college because they can help you get creative to possibly keep it all.
Put your general gross income into the engine at InviteEducation to find out how much a particular school awarded to those with similar finances.

Do you have any advice for parents?

According to Hupalo:

    • It is really important to save some kind of money towards college. If your child is young, you are so much better off saving just a little bit now (such as with the 529 college savings program). InviteEducation has a calculator to show you the cost of delaying and how much more you will have to contribute to reach your goal.
      • Most students take more than 4 years to graduate, so if your child is in high school already it isn’t too late.
  • “Saving a dollar for college today is better than borrowing one tomorrow,” suggests Hupalo.
  • Take a breath! Just like potty-training, you never think it will happen, but it comes!
    • Almost all students borrow the appropriate amount of money and come out of college in a career where they can pay that back without a problem.
  • Beware of how much time it will take to get this done.
    • Pay attention along the way! Starts looking at ideas and visit the website during 9th grade.
    • Time is also dependent on how involved parents will be and how motivated the student is.
    • It doesn’t hurt to start early and always watch out for deadlines.

“There is no mystery to this,” says Hupalo, “You just need to be aware of it.”
LINKS AND RESOURCES:

 

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

Core Area #5 Extra-Curricular Activities
These are critical to some families to getting to where you want to go, but don’t matter at all for others.
Understand what you are doing for extra curriculars and if it is appropriate for where you want to go.
Some higher end schools require a more competitive level of extra-curricular activities, such as not just being on the football team, but being the captain on a champion football team.
These will also be helpful for scholarships.
If you have above average grades/test scores, then these probably won’t be as helpful. On the flipside, if you have lower grades/test scores, then these could make the difference and get you the benefit of doubt.
Episode 72: Science Competitions and Robotics Scholarships

Optional Area- College Fairs

Great for when you are just starting out to get some basic information from a lot of different possible colleges.
These are usually provided by NACAC (National Association of College and Admissions Counselors) or other organizations at the state and local level.
Episode 90: The Untapped Gold Mine of College Fairs
If there is a college fair in your area, or within driving distance, get that on your calendar! Get on the internet and search college fairs to find out when and where they are.
Fairs are additionally helpful when you have narrowed it down to the last few colleges you might want to pursue because there are representatives right there to answer your questions and give you more information.

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.
If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!
The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Share

The post THCC109 – InviteEducation.com: Helping Families Plan and Pay for College at Any Age Interview with John Hupalo, Founder and CEO of InviteEducation.com appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC108 – Interview with Mark Kantrowitz, College Planning Guru Founder of FinAid.org and many others!
44:42
2017-12-15 14:55:46 UTC 44:42
THCC108 – Interview with Mark Kantrowitz, College Planning Guru Founder of FinAid.org and many others!

Interview with Mark Kantrowitz

Meet Scholarship Jedi, Mark Kantrowitz. Mark is a mathematician, author, speaker, and expert on scholarships with over 20 years of higher education experience. We invited Mark on the show today to share his incredible knowledge about scholarships and help you learn the lingo. “Financial aid is like a different language, the more you learn about it the easier your process will be,” says Kantrowitz. This episode is chock full of great information!

Questions Answered Today:

What types of scholarships are out there?

“There are about six billion dollars worth of scholarships awarded each year to just about under two million students,” shares Kantrowitz.
Those include:

  • Academic
  • Unusual talents
    • such as artistic or athletic talents
  • Need-based grants
  • Institutional aid
  • Pell grants

This does NOT include federal money- it is strictly private scholarships from nonfederal/noninstitutional sources.
“Most of the money coming from a college is in the form of a discount,” describes Kantrowitz. This means that the price you actually pay might be a little less than half of the sticker price.
About 1 in 8 students receive private scholarship money they then use to help pay for college, with the average amount being just under $4,000.
“Winning a scholarship is part of your plan for paying for college, but it’s not the entire plan,” warns Kantrowitz, “Everyone should file the FAFSA form because it is your gateway to need-based aid.”
With all of the free scholarship search databases available, there aren’t any scholarships that go without applicants. It is much more likely that a scholarship goes unclaimed due to requirements not being met. The one that generally is missed the most is the Pell Grant.
You can figure out the total return on investment for attending a college by visiting payscale.com
Kantrowitz strongly recommends that all students include in their college search their in-state public college.
There are six dozen very competitive colleges that have no loan financial aid policies that substitute grants for loans. These or the in-state college will be your cheapest options.

What should we expect in the near future of college?

“Free college isn’t entirely free-it is just free tuition,” notes Kantrowitz, who has published a paper advocating for free tuition and free textbooks for public colleges which includes how to reallocate existing money spent on financial aid and not raising any taxes.
At this time, it does not appear this will be a priority of the incoming presidential administration, but it remains to be seen what will be enacted.
While online courses are becoming popular, colleges will still need a professor to work with students and meet their individual needs. “The reality right now on the ground is that most students don’t benefit from online education,” explains Kantrowitz.
Online courses required students to be very strong self-starters. The most successful students of online courses have already earned a college degree.
The cost of a college education increases by a factor of three over any 17 year period, but don’t worry because you only need to be saving about one-third of the price of future college tuition, or what college currently costs.
Kantrowitz gives a strategy for this as, “From birth you should save about $250 a month for an in-state public college, $400 a month for an out-of-state public college, and $500 a month for a private nonprofit college.”
It will be easier to increase the amount you save if you start now! As your child grows out of expenses, like diapers, allocate those funds towards their college savings plan.
Whatever age your child is, you have to start looking for scholarships now. There are many available to all age groups.
With the new prior, prior year for FAFSA, parents will need to start planning sooner than the junior year of high school for financial aid.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

 

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

Core Area #4 College Visits
This is probably one of the first things you will be doing to create your college plan. There are five types of visits:

  • Stealth Visit
    • Drive-by and get out of the car to just check out some buildings or the general campus. You are just looking around because you are already there or it is close by. Very informal and you might not even talk to anybody from the college.
  • Open House
    • This is the college encouraging families to come and check out their campus. There might be a themed day (engineering day, nurse day, etc.) or it is just a general organized event, but it is a good way to get a feel for what a tour is going to be like. Check out an open house at your local college, even if it isn’t one you are planning to attend. These are usually on a weekend, but there are a lot of people there and not very much individual attention.
  • Scheduled Visit and Tour
    • More one-on-one, or one-on-a-few, where you can call and schedule ahead of time. This can have appointments with professors and it is a personalized tour of the college. Important to do this the junior year of high school to all prospective colleges you will apply to.
  • Accepted Senior Visits
    • This is more detailed and usually only offered to those students that have already been accepted.
  • Overnight
    • Opportunity to really get a feel for the college. You might be paired with a student and stay in their dorm overnight or attend classes for the day.

Families need to work on a visit plan if college options are including out of state schools. Parents need to plan vacation time around school off-times to take advantage of scheduling your visits.
Optional Area- Direct Admit
As an incoming freshman, you can sometimes be directly admitted to a department or program. This isn’t available at all schools or for all majors. The medical field, engineering, and business courses of study are popular to have direct admit at some schools. Other majors are more competitive and you can not even apply to that major or program until after completing some prerequisites.

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.
If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!
The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Share

The post THCC108 – Interview with Mark Kantrowitz, College Planning Guru Founder of FinAid.org and many others! appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC107- Majoring in Hospitality- A Case Study with Lisa Sturgeon, Adjunct Professor at Husson University and Communications & Resource Manager at Geaghan Brothers Brewing Company
41:03
2017-12-15 14:55:46 UTC 41:03
THCC107- Majoring in Hospitality- A Case Study with Lisa Sturgeon, Adjunct Professor at Husson University and Communications & Resource Manager at Geaghan Brothers Brewing Company

Majoring in Hospitality

Majoring in hospitality can open many different doors to amazing jobs. ”It’s not just managers or hotel operators. It is all-encompassing of other industries and professions,” notes today’s guest Lisa Sturgeon. She is now the communications and resource manager at Geaghan Brothers Brewing Company and has returned to her alma mater Husson University in Maine as a professor. In this episode, Lisa shares her personal journey through undergraduate and graduate school to tailor her experience to achieve her dream career.

Questions Answered Today:

What was Lisa’s experience like?

Lisa was able to participate in several internships, even though they were outside of her comfort zone, such as a four month experience at an airport working in marketing. She wasn’t sure how it fit with her degree, but she kept an open mind and went with it.
Some schools have internship programs available and will even assign them as part of your curriculum. It is also possible to solicit your own internship.
Some internships are paid, and others are not. If you are an employer, be aware of the tax laws applicable to your situation.
Also available are job shadow experiences where you can spend the day with someone in your chosen profession to do what Lisa describes as, “See what a day in the life is like.” It can be as simple as calling a professional in your field and seeing if they would be interested in allowing you to shadow them for a day.
Before Lisa began applying to colleges, she started by applying to scholarships. During her study hall period of her junior year in high school, she spent the entire time filling out scholarship applications instead of talking or sleeping like some of her classmates.
She won an academic based scholarship from Husson and an additional five other scholarships to cover the costs of her first two years of undergraduate study in full.
Lisa recommends checking all the possible scholarships that do not have an application fee. Your counselor can help you pinpoint specific and unique ones to apply to.

What should parents of high school students be aware of?

“Time management is huge and the transition from life in high school to life in college is completely different,” says Sturgeon.
This is something many freshmen college students will struggle with.
Lisa recommends breaking down the hours over the course of a week, hour by hour and day by day, to budget your time appropriately.
This will help students have some breathing room.
“You can either pay now and play later, or play now and pay later,” warns Sturgeon. Time management is crucial because there isn’t extra credit in real life.
You do not want to fail classes and have to pay for the same class again! This puts a stop on your educational process because you can’t move forward without certain prerequisites complete.
“You get what you put into it,” Sturgeon describes about a college degree, “it should be more than just a piece of paper.”

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

Core Area #3 Building a team
Every family is going to have to build a team. Who will be on this team? Will you add a professional or two? Your team could include:

  • Parents
  • Student
  • Coaches
  • Teachers
  • Other Family
  • School Counselor
  • Financial Planner/Tax or Investment Advisor
  • Specialist
    • College Funding Advisor
  • College Admissions Counselors
  • Test Prep Experts
  • Athletic Recruiting Experts

Some things they might help with are finding scholarships, maybe help with athletic recruiting, and those with financial qualifications can guide you through finding financial aid, the tax process, and student loans.
Episode 21: Is Your Financial Advisor Ready For College
https://www.higherscorestestprep.com/
Episode 33: Test Prep for High Scores
Episode 85: Should Your Student Test Again As a Senior?
Episode 79: What is Your Test Strategy?
Episode 78: 3 Ways to Make the Most of Your College Visit
Episode 66: Tips on How Undecided Students Can Choose a Major
“Put College to Work” by Kat Clowes
Episode 20: The Write Stuff- Acing The College Essay
Episode 40: How to Get Into and Afford Ivy League Schools
Episode 24: Game Plan: Athletic Scholarships

Optional Area- Pre Med

There are many families out there with students considering a profession in the medical field, which requires an advanced degree.
A lot of these majors are on a path where you need to really understand what you are getting into. What you do in late high school will lead into what you do in college, which will lead you to medical school.
Episode 52: Successful Planning for Pre-Med and Medical School Students

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.
If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!
The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

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The post THCC107- Majoring in Hospitality- A Case Study with Lisa Sturgeon, Adjunct Professor at Husson University and Communications & Resource Manager at Geaghan Brothers Brewing Company appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC106 – Charting a Path through College For Every Student Interview with Amy Greene, Program Supervisor of Continuing Education at the University of New Mexico
46:59
2017-12-15 14:55:46 UTC 46:59
THCC106 – Charting a Path through College For Every Student Interview with Amy Greene, Program Supervisor of Continuing Education at the University of New Mexico

Charting a Path through College For Every Student

Not everyone is a high-flyer that has been dreaming of college. “The thing I wish I had known,” described Green about her own experience, “was that there were so many options out there.” What’s the secret to a successful college experience? According to our expert guest today Amy Greene, you have to take advantage of the relationships and network building. Listen in today to hear exactly how to do that- no matter what college you go to or what GPA you have.

Questions Answered Today:

What can parents do to help pick the perfect college and major?

If your child isn’t sure yet of what college or major they want to pursue, don’t worry. “I’d tell parents that it’s ok,” says Greene. There are so many schools out there and there will be a right fit that matches the unique talents of your child.
Being undecided is NOT a bad thing!
Greene encourages families to consider the range of options such as state schools, private institutions, and community college. “The sticker price you see right off the bat isn’t what you are going to pay out of pocket,” warns Greene. You have to research and see what kind of financial aid is available.
All schools are working on enrollment goals and not every school has the same target market.
Something to look for at a university is the community service office. This usually has community-based work study jobs available which offer great experience. The personnel are also generally quite good at matching students to help their career development and help their community.
To find this “match-maker”, you should start by looking for the academic coordinator or with student activities. This person is there to help YOU!
These experiences often lead students to discovering a true passion and can begin as early as freshmen year.

What is out there to help kids decide if they should go to college and what major to select?

“If you are really unsure about your major or type of institution you want to pursue, there are tons of programs out there,” notes Greene.
She recommends to get onto the internet and look for ‘outreach’, ‘pre-college’, or ‘college experience camp’. Check local schools first.
These are usually offered by the actual college and take place on campus. It is a great way to sample the major you are considering and to find out if it is really the right path for you.
If you have your heart set on a big brand name ivy league school, they offer these as well which can look pretty good on your resume and college applications.
These generally have a tuition from a few hundred dollars to a few thousand dollars depending on length and if you get to stay on campus.
You can also apply for free, low-cost, or targeted programs based on your income and interests.
“I do still think those are a great investment considering what you are going to save from making a four year investment that maybe isn’t a good fit,” adds Greene.
Also available are other pathways, such as certificate programs. These are short-term and a fraction of the cost of full-time tuition, but keep students engaged and working towards a goal. There are also quite a few options available online.
Some such topics include:

  • Personal training
  • Paralegal
  • Leadership
    • Beneficial to all students and particularly those ‘B’ students.
  • Social Science
  • Business
  • Architecture
  • Entrepreneurship
  • International Travel/Study Abroad
    • Some are organized around service where you can travel and teach English, for example.

Green strongly recommends these opportunities, especially for those ‘B’ or undecided students, to help find that passion to carry through into their college experience.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

Core Area #3 Essays
Essays are usually required as part of the application process. They can be short, just 4 or 5 sentences, or they can require much more.
You will also see these required for scholarships.
Students pursuing different schools and scholarships will possibly need to write upwards of 5 or 6 different essays.
Essays are something families will need to really focus on, potentially. You must understand how many essays are going to be required and what it will take to get those essays done, and done well.
You can seek assistance from family members or from the counselor at your high school
Episode 65: Writing Quality Essays
Episode 60: How to Stand Out When Writing Your College Essay
Episode 20: The Write Stuff- Acing The College Essay
Episode 16: Es(say) It Right! College Essay Writing Tips
Episode 19: Surviving the College Application Process
Episode 63: Understanding the Admissions Process

Optional Area- Internships

These are a great way to pay for college and get experience in your field! There are colleges out there that advertise internships that not only give you coursework credit, but provide the actual opportunities and connections for internships.
You have to understand how they work and if they are applicable to your field. If it is something you are interested in, will you pursue an internship independent of your college or will you choose a college that requires internships?
Episode 71: How to Find a College Internship to Supercharge Your Career
Episode 77: Why College Students Should Work

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.
If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!
The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Share

The post THCC106 – Charting a Path through College For Every Student Interview with Amy Greene, Program Supervisor of Continuing Education at the University of New Mexico appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC105 – What Walt Disney Can Teach Us About College Planning Interview with Dr. Jeffrey Barnes, Professor and Author
2017-12-15 14:55:46 UTC
THCC105 – What Walt Disney Can Teach Us About College Planning Interview with Dr. Jeffrey Barnes, Professor and Author

What Walt Disney Can Teach Us About College Planning

“Every great story has conflict,” says author, public speaker, professor, and our guest today Dr. Jeff Barnes. He has created a unique class “The History of Disneyland” at California Baptist University in Riverside, California. Once he studied the history of Walt Disney, he discovered a multitude of life lessons and leadership skills that you could use yourself!

Questions Answered Today:

What can I learn from Walt about college?

The first lesson is to take a really deep breath. “We usually want it all figured out yesterday!” states Barnes. Walt Disney dropped out of school and never got past 9th grade. He tried lots of different jobs and careers before discovering what he truly loved.
“At some level we are all living our life undeclared,” describes Barnes, because we are learning to adapt and be flexible with change.
70% of college students end up changing their major at least once, if not more than once, before graduating.
Barnes notes that students have a little bit more time than you might think because there are so many core classes that have to be completed before they have to get into their major coursework.
“Use that time valuably not to just get those general education courses out of the way, but to explore where they are genuinely gifted,” explains Barnes. When you take those classes, pay attention to what sparks your curiosity or confidence and then start asking questions to find out what that might be like as a career path.
Barnes shares one of his favorite quotes to help those parents that have a very focused and driven student: “It is easier to tame a zealot than it is to pump life into a cadaver.”
That deep dedication needs to be protected and is very rare!
There will be difficulties and obstacles, but it is important to learn how to use them instead of giving up or no longer pushing forward. “Every great story has conflict,” notes Barnes.

What do parents do once kids leave the nest?

The key to this leap to college will be balance. The first semester will be all about transitioning. “When you check in with your student,” warns Barnes, “it is all about the details.” If your student is struggling, they will probably give bland and undescriptive details.
If you discover your child is struggling with something at school, be it personal or academic, Barnes encourages parents to find out the resources available on campus to help. Struggling could be any definition. Every college will have a resource center or other help readily available on campus.
For example, if you know math will be a problem, then set up a tutor before classes even begins.
“Get the help that is needed and the help that will help them succeed,” reveals Barnes.
You should also find someone on campus directly that you can reach out to who can help check in on your son or daughter, if you feel they are beginning to have difficulty with something.
If your child is interested in studying abroad or doing an internship, Barnes recommends Disney World in Florida as a wonderful place to apply to. Having “Disney Cast Member” on your resume is also quite impressive to future employers.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

Core Area #2 College Research
Research is key to determining what college will be the right fit for you and your family. There are lots of ways you can do this such as visiting web sites, buying books, etc.
Brad has some ways to help you here!
Sign up for our newsletter and get the top 10 college web sites
Episode 18: Virtual Campus Tours, Real Benefits!
Episode 90: The Untapped Gold Mine of College Fairs
Optional Area- Gap Year
Can be at the beginning of college for a full year or could be in the middle as just a semester, summer, or other break of some kind. This might be done for religious activities, work experience, a chance to travel, or whatever might be best for your family.
Episode 28: Taking a Gap Year
Episode 37: My Daughter’s Gap Year

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.
If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!
The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Share

The post THCC105 – What Walt Disney Can Teach Us About College Planning Interview with Dr. Jeffrey Barnes, Professor and Author appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC104 – How To Use Freelancing to Help Pay For College Interview with Laura Pennington, Freelance Writer and Coach
39:32
2017-12-15 14:55:46 UTC 39:32
THCC104 – How To Use Freelancing to Help Pay For College Interview with Laura Pennington, Freelance Writer and Coach

How To Use Freelancing to Help Pay For College

If you have ever thought about earning some extra income on the side, parents or students, here is a great introduction to freelancing by Laura Pennington. We give some examples here of how to use freelancing to help pay for college plus how it can help students acquire some great skills and resume building experience. It’s easy and you can start today!

Questions Answered Today:

What do I need to do freelance work?

The characteristics needed to work in freelance include:

  • Self-discipline
  • Organization/time-management skills
  • Ability to put yourself out there to ask for the business
  • Confidence

 
“Freelance is becoming more and more popular in the marketplace today because we live in an online world,” describes Pennington.
You work on your own time and that is what makes it such a great fit for so many people.
Some of the biggest job areas include:

  • Graphic design
  • Virtual assistant
  • Web developer
  • Web designer
  • Voice over work
  • Comic book artist
  • Transcription
  • Translation

 
“I was earning the same amount of money freelancing as I was at my day job in a little less than 3 months after getting started,” notes Pennington.

How do you start?

Begin by taking an inventory of your skills so the learning curve is as easy as possible. Pick something you think you are good at and feel some confidence in. It should be something you have a background in and enjoy doing.
Check UpWork to find jobs to apply to. You bid for a job and the employer then chooses. The web site also acts as an intermediary to manage conflicts and payments to ensure you get paid for your work. You do have to pay to be a member, but it is minimal.
Be sure to have work samples and testimonials available for clients to show your skill level and quality of work. This also helps to prevent the client not liking what you do since they have already seen your style.
Most clients have a deadline, but do not require you to be at your computer during specific hours. “That’s why it is such a good fit for college students and parents,” says Pennington, “because they can determine how many hours they have free a week.”
When people are first starting out, Pennington recommends charging hourly and estimating how long it will take you to do the job. Your first couple jobs will help you learn how much time it will take you to actually complete an assignment. Be up front with the client when you estimate how long it might take you. Employers generally do not like being told something should take 3 hours and then are charged for much more than that.
Once you become accustomed to certain tasks you can then move towards a flat rate per project.
Try various tasks that interest you, then choose where you feel strongest and become a specialist in an industry. Check out Upwork to familiarize yourself with what is available out there and what you might like to do. “Don’t wait!” states Pennington, “You could be banking some money already!”

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

 

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

Core Area #1 Need-Based Aid
Every family will have to deal with need-based aid. It is based on the income and assets of parents and also of the student. This is one of two types of financial aid available and you will have to determine if you qualify for it.
Applications are completed by filling out the FAFSA, or sometimes the CSS profile, and begins at the start of senior year. You do NOT have to accept it all! There are multiple factors that determine how much of what kind of aid you will be offered and it will not be the same for everyone.
You can then accept scholarships and grants (which you do not repay), but decline loans with less than desirable interest rates, or be offered work-study on campus- whatever meets the needs of your unique situation.
Episode 2: Need-Based Aid Part 1
Episode 3: Need-Based Aid Part 2
EFC calculator and training videos

Optional Area- Homeschool

Most families get extra support from their high school in transitioning to college. Guidance counselors help students choose majors, careers, and help guide students towards a college. Without a counselor, this is left up to parents or you can hire an independent counselor for a fee.
Colleges also like to see a transcript with a GPA. If you are homeschooled, this won’t look the same. You will have to document the classes, coursework, and other opportunities that the child has had.
Episode 26: Right At Home, In School

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.
If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!
The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

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The post THCC104 – How To Use Freelancing to Help Pay For College Interview with Laura Pennington, Freelance Writer and Coach appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC103 – The Ugly Truth About Debt Interview with Travis Jennings, Founder of Debt Reduction Inc.
25:14
2017-12-15 14:55:46 UTC 25:14
THCC103 – The Ugly Truth About Debt Interview with Travis Jennings, Founder of Debt Reduction Inc.

The Ugly Truth About Debt

“Debt is a bad thing and your personal finances have to be in order,” states our guest today and creator of Debt Reduction Inc. Travis Jennings. In this episode, we learn about the problems that come along with chaining yourself to your lifestyle, which often starts late in high school. Don’t let your student fall down this slippery slope! Set them off on the right foot and make sure your own finances are clear in the process with the great advice here- Win, win!

Questions Answered Today:

What does the typical person with debt look like?

Travis helps everyone that can’t necessarily afford a wealth manager. “What we try to do is focus on the debt aspect because I don’t see a lot of people out running around teaching how to get out of those issues,” says Jennings.
There is technology available now to help you restructure your debt and properly pay it down as quickly as possible.
Most people are doing okay covering their payments, but can’t quite squeeze college in as well.
“I think it is important to look back and analyze how we got into this mess,” Jennings notes when describing how people get into debt. Paying for college requires excess income.
Assets show up on the financial aid forms, but debts do not. You have to get your debt in order to be eligible for more financial aid.
Options for student loans include:

  • Mom and dad can borrow to help pay for college (Jennings does NOT recommend this!)
    • Formal student loan
    • Home equity
    • Credit card
  • Students can get their own loans to “have skin in the game”

The solutions that Jennings recommends the most are educationally based. These include:

  • Get a written plan
  • Understand the effect of the interest you are paying or receiving
  • Transfer from a position of debt to a position of wealth

Where can you learn more?

Jennings recommends the following:

Seek help from professionals, such as this podcast, to better plan your finances or to figure out how to get rid of your debt if nothing else works.
When it comes to bankruptcy or debt consolidation Jennings warns, “I’m not a big fan. It is not fixing the behavioral finance aspect.”
The problem is that most people don’t understand finance and people don’t apply education to their own lives.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

Consolidating debt
It may make sense early on in the college process to use other assets to pay off debt. For a family that has both assets and debt, it might make sense to use those assets to help pay down the debt so you can qualify for more financial aid. You can also redirect the cash flow that will be freed up from paying off these debts towards paying for college.
Rolling debt into your mortgage
Brad also suggests refinancing a mortgage to help pay off any outstanding debts, if it makes sense for your family. This is also advantageous because it helps prevent new debts in the form of student loans where the interest rate is substantially higher than if you had stretched your mortgage to a 15 or 30 year.
You have to be disciplined! Don’t pay off your credit cards and then run them right back up again and put yourself back into debt.

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.
If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!
The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

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The post THCC103 – The Ugly Truth About Debt Interview with Travis Jennings, Founder of Debt Reduction Inc. appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC102 – Naturopathic Medicine – An Up and Coming Career Interview with Dr. Kimberly Sanders, Naturopathic Doctor
31:31
2017-12-15 14:55:46 UTC 31:31
THCC102 – Naturopathic Medicine – An Up and Coming Career Interview with Dr. Kimberly Sanders, Naturopathic Doctor

Naturopathic Medicine

Pssst. Have you heard of naturopathic medicine? Dr. Kimberly Sanders is on the show to share how she decided to follow her dream and become this specific kind of primary care doctor. Natural solutions are very popular, but people are searching for experts in the field. “Just because something is natural doesn’t make it safe,” notes Dr. Sanders. Today you will learn about this little known medical profession that might be the right path for you!

Questions Answered Today:

What is naturopathic medicine?

These doctors are primary care physicians with a strong focus on prevention and treating the underlying causes of disease. They can write prescriptions in most states, but try to use mostly natural medicine to address a condition.
Students still follow the path of medicine through undergraduate studies, such as pre-med, and this is a specific focus in medical school.
There are a number of paths that naturopathic doctors can take. This is a very exciting time to be in this field with lots of opportunities out there.
Options for what you can do after graduating include:

  • Private practice as a primary care doctor (open your own or join one)
  • Teaching opportunities
  • Consult at laboratories
  • Research
  • Develop natural products
  • Lecturing>
  • Writing

This type of medicine is covered in many states by insurance and is considered primary care. Other states consider it a specialty. Be sure to check where you live.

How do you become a naturopathic physician?

“The training is mostly the same,” says Dr. Sanders. Most of the incoming students have completed a bachelor’s degree in some kind of science, pre-med, or have otherwise met the prerequisites to get accepted to a naturopathic medical school.
Some examples of classes that are required as an undergraduate are:

  • 2 Biology classes
  • 4 Chemistry classes
    • 2 of general chemistry and organic chemistry
  • 1 Physics class
  • 1 Psychology type class
    • Counseling, introduction to psychology, or similar
  • Variations on what is needed in Humanities, English, and Writing depend on which particular college you are applying to

Students go through the application and interview process to one of 8 naturopathic colleges that is very similar to going to any other medical school. Admissions look strongly at GPA, extracurricular activities, and essays.
Financial aid is available and naturopathic doctors are eligible for income-based loan repayment. This means you pay no more than 10-15% of your income back towards your loans, which makes it easier to start a practice or get into a residency.
There is NO requirement for the MCAT or GRE at the time of this episode.
It is a 4 year program with the first 2 years heavy in basic sciences and the last 2 years focused on the specialty.
Naturopathic doctors are not required to complete a residency, but there are some available. After 4 years of undergraduate studies and 4 years of medical school you will be ready to open a practice and begin your career.
There is also the opportunity for a sub-specialty post-graduate to specialize in pediatrics, cancer, diabetes, or something else.
The starting salary is usually $80,000. “A lot of that salary is in your own control,” states Dr. Sanders. It will depend on usual factors that every doctor faces such as opening your own practice, joining a hospital, or what field you pursue. Naturopathic medicine is a growing specialty where doctors are found on staff in most practices and hospitals.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

Episode 17: College 100: Helping the Undecided Find a Career
Episode 44: How To Reduce Stress During the College Process
Episode 52: Successful Planning for Pre-Med and Medical School Students
Episode 58: Interview with Roger Dooley, Co-Founder of CollegeConfidential.com
Episode 86: I Think My Student Likes the Sciences, Now What?

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.
If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!
The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Share

The post THCC102 – Naturopathic Medicine – An Up and Coming Career Interview with Dr. Kimberly Sanders, Naturopathic Doctor appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC101 – Joining Forces with the Military to Cover the Cost of College Interview with Rob Aeschbach, Retired Marine and Financial Planner
26:47
2017-12-15 14:55:46 UTC 26:47
THCC101 – Joining Forces with the Military to Cover the Cost of College Interview with Rob Aeschbach, Retired Marine and Financial Planner

joining forces with military to cover the cost of college

Looking for another college option? Rob Aeschbach swings by our show to share his personal military experience and how that impacts financial planning and paying for college. “Although it is a dangerous job in a lot of ways, it isn’t like that all the time,” notes Aeschbach. His father was in the Navy, and that inspired him to pursue attending a military academy after high school. By enlisting after graduation, he was able to attend a prestigious college with a fantastic education FOR FREE!

Questions Answered Today:

How can the military help pay for college?

Most officers are going to be college graduates. There are some military academies that only service members can attend. You will graduate with no tuition bill or any student loans, but have a commitment to serve in the military for five more years. These are very competitive to get into and will usually require a nomination from your congressman or senator.
Another way to pay for college is toearn ROTC scholarships. You can join the college group and then serve in the military for 5 years after graduation.
Additionally, students can enlist in the military right out of high school and serve 4 years, then be eligible for the G.I. Bill to go to college for free.
“I definitely would not say to join the military just to have college paid for,” states Aeschbach. Make sure to ask advice from people you know and trust that have experience with the military. It is also critical to consider what it is you would like to get out of this experience and what branch of the military might suit you the best. What is it that attracts you to it? How does the military lifestyle fit you?

How do you work on getting into a military academy?

This is the same timeframe as applying to any other college and should begin in the junior year of high school. It requires good test scores and everything else needed in order to apply to college.
Senators and congressmen usually advertise when they are accepting applications for recommendations to these academies. They will then take and refer the top 10 or so applicants to the academies and the academies themselves decide from there.
The military is usually looking for:

  • Good test scores/grades
  • Physically fit people
  • Leadership experiences
    • Team captains, group leaders, etc.

You can leave during the first two years of the military academy WITHOUT a commitment to serving later.
ROTC scholarships are generally very competitive.

What is the difference between an officer and being enlisted?

“The leadership, for the most part, are the officers that are coming in after college and are trained in a particular skill (like a pilot),” describes Aeschbach.
Enlisted ranks are usually very young and are on their first tour. The average age is under 25.
Most service members are in their 20’s or early 30’s and aren’t used to having a steady paycheck yet. This impacts saving for retirement and big ticket items like buying a car or house. Once you are commissioned as an officer, you get a pay increase. Be sure to visit Rob Aeschbach’s web site and the links to get advice on military member finances if you are considering joining the military.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

Episode 42: ROTC Scholarships and Careers
Episode 46: Benefits of the GI Bill to Pay for College
Episode 90: The Untapped Goldmine of College Fairs
Episode 95: How to be More Successful in College

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.
If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!
The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Share

The post THCC101 – Joining Forces with the Military to Cover the Cost of College Interview with Rob Aeschbach, Retired Marine and Financial Planner appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC100 – What Parents of Juniors Need to Be Doing Now! Interview with Brad Baldridge
32:31
2017-12-15 14:55:46 UTC 32:31
THCC100 – What Parents of Juniors Need to Be Doing Now! Interview with Brad Baldridge

What Parents of Juniors Need to Be Doing Now

We have our host Brad Baldridge leading the show today and giving you the tips he usually charges money for! Want this free advice? Of course you do! In our 100th episode, Brad breaks down a quick outline of what parents must be doing in order to prepare for college. The college planning process starts, at a minimum, early in the junior year of high school. You will need a test plan, scholarship plan, visit plan, and a financial plan in order to have the best strategy to get your student off to college successfully. What are these key areas all about? Brad has the knowledge and know-how right here!

Questions Answered Today:

What is a test plan?

This is all about planning for the ACT/SAT test that will be needed to get into college. Test prep usually leads to better scores. “The reality, of course, is that everyone is looking for that edge,” explains Baldridge. These better scores can lead to more opportunities.
Some important questions to consider include:

  • Should we take the ACT or the SAT?
  • When can we schedule and take the test?
    • Make sure it doesn’t conflict with other activities and that you have plenty of time to prepare.
  • How many times will you be taking it?
  • What kind of prep will you be doing for that?

The test plan ties into your school selection and visit plan.
If you are planning to apply to a more competitive school or follow athletic dreams, then you will need the best scores you can get. “Better scores are always better,” notes Baldridge.
Test prep is 100% on the student. Parents can’t study for them! If a student is dragging their feet that might dictate how much time and money parents spend on test prep.
By the end of the junior year, your goal is to have a test score you are proud of.

What is the visit plan?

There are multiple types of visits on a college campus. There is the stealth visit, where you just surprise show up on a campus (such as when you are on vacation) and check out the buildings and keep it simple. This is great for freshmen and sophomores.
There is also a more in-depth visit plan that considers:

  • How many schools do you need to visit?
  • Are they local or far away?
  • How can we get there?
    • Airfare, traveling plans, scheduling, etc.
  • Where do we start?

If you aren’t sure where to begin, start with the local schools as test visits. Some people complain they don’t know what schools to visit because they don’t know what they are looking for. Brad suggests seeing nearby schools to start, so you can pinpoint things you like and things you don’t like in order to figure out what is important to you. This also gives you a chance to practice what questions you want to ask and think about what you really want to see.
Once you understand what is important to your student that will help you to start customizing your visits.
If you have a junior, pull out your calendar for school and your calendar for work in order to plan visit days now. You might not know where you are visiting yet, but schedule those days or weekends now and you can choose later.
Some colleges offer open houses, only schedule appointments, or can give you a tour anytime. You will need to call and scout out what information is available at the colleges you are interested in.
On a college visit, it is important to find out:

  • What it takes to be admitted
  • What test type or score is ideal
  • The price of the school
  • Scholarships and financial aid available

This is where you get your first layer of information about the school. It is best to visit while classes are in session to get an idea of what the school is like when in full swing.

How do I create a scholarship plan?

Of course everyone wants scholarships, but you need to think about how you will win them. “A lot of families talk about scholarships, but in the end, only a few families pursue and win scholarships because it takes a lot of work, effort, and it has a learning curve,” says Baldridge.
Check out “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents” in the resources. It contains 4 quick videos to help teach you about scholarships and help you decide how much time and effort you would like to put into chasing them.
Scholarships should be done during the junior and senior years. Depending how many you will be applying to, you should be sure to schedule those in your calendar because they do take time.

How am I going to pay for college and create a financial plan?

This is the last plan, but it is revised as you visit schools and figure out where you want to go and what you can afford.
You don’t want to get to the end of the process and realize that all of the colleges you are considering are very expensive!
Things to be working on for the financial plan include:

  • Figuring out if you qualify for need-based aid
  • Determining how much money parents will be paying towards college and how much students will be contributing
  • Savings and cash flow availability
  • Loan options

The financial plan is the last plan to come together because you have to know which schools you are going to be applying to in order to consider how much they will cost as well as how much financial aid you will be pursuing.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

Episode 90: The Untapped Gold Mine of College Fairs
Episode 85: Should Your Student Test Again As a Senior?
Episode 81: Four Fatal Errors Families Make When Planning For College
Episode 33: Test Prep For a Higher Score
Episode 18: Virtual Campus Tours, Real Benefits!
Episode 13: 8 Components of College Planning & Test Case

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.
If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!
The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Share

The post THCC100 – What Parents of Juniors Need to Be Doing Now! Interview with Brad Baldridge appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC99- How Choosing the Right College Can Save You Big Money! Interview with Sam Feeney, Author “Choose the Perfect College…For You”
44:33
2017-12-15 14:55:46 UTC 44:33
THCC99- How Choosing the Right College Can Save You Big Money! Interview with Sam Feeney, Author “Choose the Perfect College…For You”

How Choosing The Right College Can Save You Big Money!

Your family is starting to plan for after high school, but don’t skip this critical first question- “Why are you going to college? We have college admissions coach Sam Feeney here to help you figure out how to choose the right college… for you! Parents- here is the advice you can’t afford (literally) to miss.

Questions Answered Today:

What do you recommend for parents?

Feeney made some of the classic college mistakes himself such as looking at schools by rankings to get in the “best possible school” and he should have been personalizing the college search by academics, campus life, opportunities, and finances.

You have to figure out why you are going to college before where and how you will be going to college.

Feeney suggests having students and parents write out a request for proposal to clarify why this particular path is the one they should take to get to the destination. He calls this the “True North College Program”. Create a vision of what your student wants their life to look like, a mission statement, and then you will know what you are hiring the college to do for you. It will put in perspective how to choose a school and getting as much value out of it as possible.

Feeney recommends parents start out as being honest that they don’t really know the best path. Have an open dialogue and figure it out together. Ask, “What do you want to do next?”

How do I be a coach for my child and not a dictator?

Feeney’s next book is called, “College Level Confidence” which means if a student really owns what they are good at, they are ready, as opposed to circumstantial confidence.

“The things that a kid does (like videogames) springs from what they believe in,” describes Feeney. Parents should come up with 20 things they think their kid is good at now and 20 things their kid enjoyed when they were 5 years old.

Take the time to tell your kid exactly what you think they are good at.

Feeney always recommends to find an outside coach such as an aunt, a brother, or a friend that has multiple children who have found success. “Once you commit to listening to somebody,” warns Feeney, “shut everybody else off because there is so much noise about this topic.”

What are the 5 warning signs that your child is applying to the wrong college?

  • Your child doesn’t have a plan of how to use a school’s unique resources.
  • Your child is basing their college choices solely on national rankings.
  • A girlfriend, a boyfriend, or a best friend is going there.
  • Your child delays applying.
    • Take a step back and don’t nag. Maybe they have just changed their mind so talk to your child.
  • Your child chooses the college with the simplest application.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

The Five Facets of College Finances

Episode 95: How To Be More Successful In College

Episode 6: 9 Ways To Reduce College Costs If You Don’t Qualify For Financial Aid

Episode 17: Career 100- Helping the Undecided Find a Career

Episode 29: 6 Types of Colleges and How They Impact Pricing

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with My College Life Coach.

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The post THCC99- How Choosing the Right College Can Save You Big Money! Interview with Sam Feeney, Author “Choose the Perfect College…For You” appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC98 – Helping Teens Succeed Through Adversity Interview with Marc Hoberman, Author “Search and Seizure: Overcoming Illness and Adversity”
27:24
2017-12-15 14:55:46 UTC 27:24
THCC98 – Helping Teens Succeed Through Adversity Interview with Marc Hoberman, Author “Search and Seizure: Overcoming Illness and Adversity”

Helping Teens Succeed Through Adversity

“Don’t let your struggles define you, you define them,” shares our speaker today Marc Hoberman. He is the author of “Search and Seizure: Overcoming Illness and Adversity.” After suddenly moving from New York to Florida during high school, Marc suffered a grand mal seizure while driving and was diagnosed with epilepsy. Hoberman tells us his story and how he came to terms with this diagnosis while still planning for college. “I am not who I am in spite of my illness, I am who I am because of my illness,” declares Hoberman.

Questions Answered Today:

If I’m a parent of a struggling teen, what can I do to help?

Children will not deal with their parents the same way they work with other adults. It will probably be helpful to look for a qualified outside tutor. “If you are too emotionally involved, you have to take a step back,” says Hoberman.  

He also strongly advocates against comparing one child to another.  

Students often suffer test anxiety as a result of poor study skills. These skills can be taught! If you study wrong and take notes incorrectly, it can create a vicious cycle. “You have to meet your children at their reality,” states Hoberman.

Everyone has adversity, and it makes it difficult to focus on academics when other things are going on such as bullying, stress, illness, or anxiety. There are ways to help handle these stressors such as deep breathing, talking to someone, or finding a support group in person or on the internet.

Marc wants everyone to know that they are not alone- whatever the problem is.

He has also noticed an increase in the number of students not graduating from college in recent years because parents are not helping their children get organized or preparing them for the independence of going away to college. “Every school I know of has places you can go on campus for assistance,” notes Hoberman. Parents have to be open and honest about the adversity students will face in college and they have to be there to listen and support their child as needed.

There is help available everywhere through the internet, groups, or books. You can find it if you research and seek it out, depending on what the particular issue is. Marc also cautions against keeping whatever the problem is a complete secret. “If people don’t want to be friends with you because of your struggles,” Hoberman explains, “those aren’t people you want as friends anyways.”

“Search and Seizure: Overcoming Illness and Adversity” is a short read that will be helpful for parents, students, and teachers that experience adversity in their life.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

The Six R’s For Stress Management

Episode 92: Don’t Let Student Anxiety or Depression Derail Your College Plans

Episode 70: Impact of Grief on Planning For College

Episode 80: Online Course- What You Need to Know, Even For Traditional Students

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with Marc Hoberman.

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The post THCC98 – Helping Teens Succeed Through Adversity Interview with Marc Hoberman, Author “Search and Seizure: Overcoming Illness and Adversity” appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC97 – College Planning with a Family Business Interview with Matt Miller, Owner of School Spirit Vending
32:16
2017-12-15 14:55:46 UTC 32:16
THCC97 – College Planning with a Family Business Interview with Matt Miller, Owner of School Spirit Vending

College Planning with a Family Business

Before you know it, your child will be an adult. “There is so much opportunity out there today, so I challenge you to get your kids involved and give them more responsibility than you ever thought you could,” shares our speaker today Matt Miller, who owns a small family business. He shares his perspective today on how starting a side business, that eventually grew into a full time company, has exponentially benefitted his family. It gave him the chance to involve his children and to teach them hands on life lessons all from within their home. Kids are very capable if they want to be and are allowed to be, so what’s stopping you from empowering your student?

Questions Answered Today:

How does responsibility benefit kids?

By running a business and employing your children, kids can earn an income. Their tax rate is much lower because what they earn is so little. This gives children the chance to manage their income.

“They begin to see that tie between work and income,” describes Miller.  

A lot of kids are ill prepared for the transition from mom and dad’s home to being on their own.

Students particularly have trouble because:

  • They don’t go to school with a goal in mind
    • Just feel that they are supposed to go
  • Debt taken on to pay for a degree
  • The real learning happens after college
  • Students usually either go to college for job training (nurse, teacher, lawyer, etc.) or a liberal arts focus, but each family has different expectations

Many future careers aren’t even invented yet!

Skills about how to work, communicating effectively and managing your time and money will be applicable to any future career. It is up to parents to empower their children with responsibilities around the home, or in the family business, to learn these skills before they go out on their own.

What should parents know about starting a side business?

“It’s not as big of a deal as you might make it out to be,” notes Miller. He recommends using professionals for certain tasks so you don’t have to worry about unnecessary things.

Start small, and learn along the way. There will be mistakes and risks that you can’t recover from quickly, but you will be ok. “Be empowered,” says Miller, “and know that you can do it!”

Be willing to get started, even if you feel unsure of what you are doing. Don’t suffer from “knowledge constipation”- nothing will ever line up 100% perfectly. You have to just get started and learn by doing. Failure is ok, as long as you learn from it.

Miller warns, “Your business won’t grow as fast as you think, it will cost more than you think, and it will take longer than you think, so plan on that.”

Also, be aware of the technology that is out there to help you so you can balance your full-time job and keep food on the table while starting your side business.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

Episode 68: How to Help Your College Student Build Their Credit

Episode 59: Starting a Business in College

Episode 77: Why College Students Should Work

Episode 34: Financial Advice for Teens, By a Teen

Episode 83: Raise “Money Smart” Kids; Allowance, Budget, and Financial Responsibility

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with School Spirit Vending.

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The post THCC97 – College Planning with a Family Business Interview with Matt Miller, Owner of School Spirit Vending appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC96- Using LinkedIn and Other Social Media to Find Scholarships Interview with Ellen Reaves, Co-Host College Money Maze Podcast
37:23
2017-12-15 14:55:47 UTC 37:23
THCC96- Using LinkedIn and Other Social Media to Find Scholarships Interview with Ellen Reaves, Co-Host College Money Maze Podcast

Just try to keep secret from your friends and family everything that you learn today! With Ellen Reaves on the show, you won’t believe how easy winning scholarships can be. She also gives us the leg up on how using LinkedIn will make your child’s hunt for a career so much easier. There is no doubt about it, you need to get on this #1 business platform and social media site. Parents, you can help launch your student into the career of their dreams AND help them win free money for college. So what are you waiting for? Get started now!

Questions Answered Today:

How can social media help find scholarships?

Social media can be used to your benefit, specifically LinkedIn. By creating a dynamic profile, you can interact with brands and companies. Everyone should create a free profile–average students, athletes, or anyone planning to go to college.

Ellen Reaves says this is the best way to find internships and to network with brands and professional organizations your child is specifically interested in.

This is also a place to be recommended for your various skills and services or to find volunteer opportunities.

How can parents help?

LinkedIn isn’t about just posting your resume. It is a way to showcase yourself as being something more than a GPA.

Some easy things that parents can do to help their child set up a great profile include:

  • Be sure to use a professional image and not just any old selfie
  • Include information about your child’s background
  • Describe activities and organizations they are involved with
  • Post examples of artwork, creative writing, or whatever they excel at

It is also important to teach your child about finances and how spending works. A lot of families don’t have the money conversation early enough or even at all. Help your child and have this conversation!

If your student is thinking about a gap year, be aware of the limitations on state aid or other financial aid options. Do the necessary research.

What should you be doing and when?

“If you don’t ask, you don’t get,” states Reaves. Remove your preconceived notions about financial aid. Believe it is possible for your family.

Parents also need to be honest about finances and what you can afford. If their dream school is outside your budget, then your student needs to be responsible for finding a way to cover the cost and to hopefully not use student loans.

The most successful families have these things in common:

  • Start looking for scholarships early, even in freshmen year
  • Be organized to keep track of deadlines and application pieces
  • Recognize they have a unique story to tell and can use that information to repurpose essays for both applications and scholarships
  • Seek local scholarships and don’t only focus on the large and competitive choices
  • Have a great relationship with your high school counselor

Be sure to research the price of potential colleges so you can foresee upcoming costs and plan accordingly. Community college is also a fantastic way to start and then you can transfer.

What is the college money maze podcast about?

“We are focusing on a lot of the hot topics,” describes Reaves. One of the newest topics is on the adjusted FAFSA deadline that has been moved to October so you can submit it earlier.

The podcast also breaks down common terms and acronyms into plain language for people so they don’t need to feel overwhelmed.

The main audience of this show includes the parents of juniors and seniors in high school. There is a lot of information available, but a particular focus in on scholarships.

Understanding the college process will take time and the best way to understand all the technical jargon you will have to know would be to listen to podcasts, read, and to start learning how this process works. You can’t leave it up to your child! Be sure to share some sources you found helpful with your friends.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

 

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

Network Like a Billionaire

Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents

Episode 25: Get Your Student LinkedIn to College Success

Episode 14: What Is a Scholarship

Episode 43: How to Help Your Student Win Scholarships

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with College Money Maze.

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The post THCC96- Using LinkedIn and Other Social Media to Find Scholarships Interview with Ellen Reaves, Co-Host College Money Maze Podcast appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC95 – How to Be More Successful in College Interview with Brian Robben, Founder of www.TakeYourSuccess.com and Author “How To College”
22:31
2017-12-15 14:55:47 UTC 22:31
THCC95 – How to Be More Successful in College Interview with Brian Robben, Founder of www.TakeYourSuccess.com and Author “How To College”

Congratulations! Your college manual is now available.

Yes, Brian Robben has written the college manual you need. “It’s for any college student before they are entering or already in college,” describes Robben. He took everything he himself learned in college, and advice he was constantly asked for by his friends, and then compiled it into an 80 page manual.

“The reason I wrote the book is because I felt a ton of college students had this misconception that they have to choose between having fun or locking themselves in the library trying to ensure their future success,” says Robben. This manual teaches you how to have the best of both worlds!

Questions Answered Today:

Who is this book for?

“My advice applies to all college students,” notes Robben. He also has a blog available with great articles that touch on topics for all kinds of college students, even quiet and less motivated students.

“How to College” covers important life skills, such as time management, that will be useful for everyone.

Are there any misconceptions out there?

Ambitious students will latch onto their grades and social students will focus on activities. You do not have to choose! You can have a better, more balanced life and it doesn’t have to be one or the other.

Scholarships also don’t stop once you enter college. You can continue to apply for more each and every year.

How is the book organized?

There are a few chapters in “How to College”, but some topics included are:

  • When to do laundry
  • Dorm life, including how to handle roommate relationships
  • Class hacks
  • Study strategies
  • How to write papers
  • Scheduling freetime
  • Stress relief
  • Career advice

What is on your blog?

There is a lot that coordinates between the book and the blog. Check out the articles, advice, and fun activities for both students and parents on http://www.takeyoursuccess.com

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

Episode 34: Financial Advice for Teens

Episode 14: What is a Scholarship?

Episode 5: Scholarships: Tips, Timelines, and Where You Can Find Them

Episode 3: Need Based Financial Aid Part 2

Episode 2: Need Based Financial Aid Part 1

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with Brian Robben.

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The post THCC95 – How to Be More Successful in College Interview with Brian Robben, Founder of www.TakeYourSuccess.com and Author “How To College” appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC94 – Five College Myths to Avoid Interview with Dr. Christopher Lewis, Author of “The Ultimate College Preparation Blueprint”
36:29
2017-12-15 14:55:47 UTC 36:29
THCC94 – Five College Myths to Avoid Interview with Dr. Christopher Lewis, Author of “The Ultimate College Preparation Blueprint”

College graduates earn an average of 74% more money compared to high school graduates.

You can’t get far without a degree these days. Dr. Lewis has been in the college admissions and student affairs fields for almost 20 years. He knows it inside and out and is happy to share what he has experienced with us today. In all his various roles with higher education, Dr. Lewis kept encountering these 5 myths from both students and parents. He is the author of the fantastic book, “The Ultimate College Preparation Blueprint” that is short, but very effective, to help jumpstart the college planning process for anyone.

Questions Answered Today:

What are the five college myths?

Myth 1: There is only one true and perfect college. “There are so many colleges that you do not even know about,” describes Lewis, “To say there is only one out there that is a right fit is a misnomer.”

Students need to be the ones to decide which college will be right for them- do not let other people make this big decision.

Myth 2: A career or major has to be chosen before picking a college. Paths change frequently in college. The current national average shows that college students will change their major at least 3 times. The Department of Labor predicts that people entering the workforce will have between 12-15 jobs, including 4 different career changes.

The first year of college, no matter where you go, will usually be general education courses. It is important to take the time to find where you will be happy.

Before picking a major or certain program track you should:

  • Check with Career Services
  • Talk to people with that major
  • Find what careers your major will lead to
  • Imagine yourself in one of those careers to be certain it is what you want for your life

 

There is nothing wrong with starting at a community college first if your student is undecided. This could be especially beneficial because class sizes are smaller and professors are just as qualified. These are also much cheaper compared to a four-year university.

If you are planning on a university no matter what, look for a college that has a broad choice of academic areas. A liberal arts focus is also a good choice for undecided students. Going on to graduate school can provide better training after that in a specific field.

Myth 3: You can only afford low-priced colleges. Dr. Lewis recommends having a list of colleges that would be a good fit. Apply to them all and see what financial aid packages might be available.

Myth 4: I have never heard of this college, so it can’t be any good. There are over 3,300 colleges and universities just in the United States. “You have to go in with an open mind,” notes Lewis. College visits and quality questions are critical. Students must really envision if they can be there for the next four or five years. It can’t be based on where friends are going or what someone is telling them to do.

Myth 5: Maybe I will think about college someday, but I don’t really need it. If you don’t have a college education, then you will need technical training. Dr. Lewis also strongly recommends that undergraduate students volunteer, do internships, and do things in the career area of interest. This will provide connections for networking and possible options for the future.

People that do not go to college right away usually have life get in the way. Going abroad for a year or doing something else for a year is ok, but it’s difficult to be able to go back.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

 

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

Episode 71: How to Find a College Internship to Supercharge Your Career Interview with Sharise Kent

Episode 63: Understanding the Admissions Process with Lydia Fayal

Episode 37: My Daughter’s Gap Year with Kurt and Audrey Jacobsen

Episode 31: Grant Baldwin, Major Decisions, Career Choices

Episode 18: Virtual Campus , Real Benefits! Interview with Chris Carson

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with Dr. Lewis.

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The post THCC94 – Five College Myths to Avoid Interview with Dr. Christopher Lewis, Author of “The Ultimate College Preparation Blueprint” appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC93- From High School to Law School – The Info You Need Interview with Adam Almaraz, Director of JD Admissions at Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at Arizona State University
42:48
2017-12-15 14:55:47 UTC 42:48
THCC93- From High School to Law School – The Info You Need Interview with Adam Almaraz, Director of JD Admissions at Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at Arizona State University

“I get to help students and applicants that dream of being lawyers be successful in the application process,” says our guest Adam Almaraz, who is the director of JD admissions at the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at Arizona State University.

He is one of the people that makes the decisions about who gets to be admitted to this competitive program. Each year there are 1,500-2,000 applications, but only 500-600 students are admitted. That equals only about 230 law students for each incoming class.

You need these tips today on how to improve your child’s chances of being admitted!

Questions Answered Today:

What kind of coursework is required in law school?

In the first year, or 1L year, students are assigned a standardized curriculum. Students do not really pick their schedules. Once students get past this, they can then focus in on particular areas of interest.

“After the first year, it is largely self-driven by the student and what it is they want to accomplish,” describes Almaraz.

Some practice areas that a student might build their curriculum around include:

  • High interest, but non-typical areas, such as Space law
  • Criminal
  • Business
  • Environmental
  • Patent and intellectual
  • International
  • Family

These are standard practice areas of what attorneys usually do.

How do students set themselves apart in their application?

The two most important elements of a law school application are LSAT scores and undergraduate GPA.

The other pieces that help with subjective measuring of an applicant include:

  • Letters of recommendation
  • Resume
  • Personal statement
    • This lets the committee get to know you and helps explain why they should let you into this program.
  • Full file review
    • Includes transcripts, academic trend analysis, difficulty of coursework, major, and university of undergraduate studies.

Almaraz stresses that students must complete these pieces in a very genuine way.

“Applicants who really approach the application process from a genuine place end up faring much better than the applicant who is trying to do things just because they think it might give them a little bit more leverage in the application process,” warns Almaraz.

Always reach out to law schools! Never hesitate to pick up the phone or email the colleges you are interested in. Admission counselors are there to help you and to make sure you have everything you need for success.

When should I start the application process?

Potential applicants should begin collecting information as early as possible to be sure you are ready when it comes time to actually apply to law school. Some great ways to start include:

  • Shadow local attorneys
  • Visit law school campuses
    • There might be pipeline programs or other educational opportunities for high school aged students.
  • Contact a pre-law advisor at a law school you are interested in

Junior year of college is when applicants should start thinking about taking the LSAT and planning out their application to get all the pieces together that are required if they want to go straight into law school after graduation.

The summer before senior year, students should have all the parts of the application planned out so they do not feel rushed for the hard application deadlines that following Spring.

Some students choose to take a gap year after undergraduate graduation. The average age of entry at the Sandra Day O’Connor School of Law is between 24-26 years old.

“I don’t think doing a pre-law major, if the school offers one, is necessarily the best option,” notes Almaraz. There is no required major to apply to law school, so be sure to choose one that you are genuinely interested in and will enjoy doing your undergraduate studies in. This usually helps with having a higher GPA.

According to Almaraz, the national average applicant applies to between 6-10 schools. It is an important decision. If you are accepted at more than one institution, it is very important to do campus visits. Another great resource is to talk to current students. They will usually be very candid.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

Investigate: Law schools cutting back

Episode 89: Help Your Child Get Into Law School

We have a great video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents.” It is 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are interested in learning more about scholarships please visit:

www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with Sandra Day O’Connor Law School.

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The post THCC93- From High School to Law School – The Info You Need Interview with Adam Almaraz, Director of JD Admissions at Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at Arizona State University appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC92 – Don’t Let Student Anxiety or Depression Derail Your College Plans Interview with Jillian Arany, Graduate Student Studying Biology
31:41
2017-12-15 14:55:47 UTC 31:41
THCC92 – Don’t Let Student Anxiety or Depression Derail Your College Plans Interview with Jillian Arany, Graduate Student Studying Biology

Depression and anxiety can be a struggle for many college students. It happened to Jill Arany. Now she is about to graduate with her masters degree and has already landed her dream job after overcoming these hurdles personally.

“There is a difference between being sad and being depressed,” explains Arany. She shares her story today how the death of her grandmother during her senior year of high school impacted her academics and college experience. Free help is available on campus if your child is struggling with depression, anxiety, or any other mental health issues.

“Don’t let having a mental illness deter you from going to a university because it is manageable and there are ways around it,” stresses Arany.

Questions Answered Today:

What can a school do to help?

High schools and universities can always help provide accommodations for testing. There is a lot of free support and many resources available to students that feel they are struggling with depression, anxiety, a learning disability, or any other mental illness.

Where Arany attended college, there was a department of Accessibility Services that helped to grant her extended time on course exams and also spaced them apart more during the week with at least one day between tests.

“I think the stigma of mental health is shifting, these resources are becoming a lot more evident and students are using them more,” says Arany.

Some other accommodations that can be available include:

  • Extended time on exams
  • Having a test read aloud to you
  • Small group testing
  • Scribes that can help circle answers
  • Computerized testing
  • Note-takers for your classes
  • Free counseling

Arany was unaware of all the resources available to her until she sought these options through her school.

How do you learn about what services are available?

“The ones I was involved with were called Disability Services or Disability and Access Services,” states Arany.  

The department responsible for providing accommodations can usually be found with other services provided on campus, but you can always ask the registrar for more information.

Smaller universities are better able to accommodate students than larger scale campuses. A smaller population at the university makes assistance easier.

Arany found that, in her situation, the professors were always willing to help and were very understanding. She had some slight trouble with her peers and the stigma attached to mental illness. As more people found out about her accommodations, they themselves were able to seek resources for themselves because they were unaware of the services available.

Who determines if you can get accommodations?

For Arany, she simply needed a doctor’s note. She sat down with her doctor and discussed what might help her and what she would feel comfortable with. Each university has a different protocol and separate requirements.

“They do make accommodations for all various levels of education,” shares Arany.

Accommodations do not go onto your permanent record, so you must speak up for yourself. If you know that your child struggles, you have to go into the registrar and look into what is available on campus. Arany suggests browsing the university’s website and seeing what is available.

Are there outside resources available?

Arany enjoys sharing her story to help break down the stigma associated with mental illness. There are lots of books and support groups out there online or on campus. Counselors are a great resource and medication can be prescribed by a doctor if they feel it meets your needs.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

 

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

Episode 70: Impact of Grief on Planning for College Interview with Natalia Volz

Episode 39: Divorce and College Planning Interview with Sandy Durst

Episode 11: College Planning and Divorce

Episode 8: Helping Students With Learning Disabilities Prepare for College

ARTICLE ON STRESS/RELAXATION TECHNIQUES

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with Jillian Arany.

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The post THCC92 – Don’t Let Student Anxiety or Depression Derail Your College Plans Interview with Jillian Arany, Graduate Student Studying Biology appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC91- How to Leverage Your Career Services Office Long Before You Graduate Interview with Dr. Tricia Zelaya-Leon, Director of Career Development at Rollins College
38:48
2017-12-15 14:55:47 UTC 38:48
THCC91- How to Leverage Your Career Services Office Long Before You Graduate Interview with Dr. Tricia Zelaya-Leon, Director of Career Development at Rollins College

Every college has a career office, but what do you do with it? Take a listen to Dr. Tricia Zelaya-Leon as she explains who is there and how it works. So many students are missing out on this free resource! Is your student one of them?

Still in high school? Be sure to use this information on your college visits so you can have some great questions ready. Already in college? This is great information just for you because most families aren’t taking full advantage of this superb resource!

The career services at your college will do so much for you! It is so much more than just help building a resume. As Dr. Zelaya-Leon notes, “It’s about exploration and finding what fits.”

Questions Answered Today:

What is typically provided by career services?

Some things that every career services department will generally offer:

  • Put together a resume
  • Creating cover letters
  • Mock interviews
  • Information about jobs and internships
  • Network with alumni

These are just the basics that are usually offered. Dr. Zelaya-Leon explains how she can help students, even before they declare a major, to find where their place might be in the world after college.

Students should be visiting the career services department at their college during their first year to better plan their college track of courses.

There are also multiple inventories/assessments that can be taken to help a student better understand themselves and what they might enjoy doing professionally. It is important to then discuss these results with your career counselor to figure out the next steps BEFORE your senior year.

Services are still available to alumni as well.

Do we have to declare a major right away?

“I wish every student would come into our institution undecided,” states Zelaya-Leon.

Courses in the first and second year are designed to help expose students to different disciplines and expand their breadth of knowledge. Nationally, over 40% of students that enter college with a decided major will change that major by the end of their first year. Even more students change majors after that with changing up to 6 times.

In different majors, there are different courses. By changing your major, you will probably delay graduation.

How can parents help?

First and second year students don’t often take advantage of career services, but really need to.

“The transition from high school to college is not easy,” warns Zelaya-Leon.

There are a few issues that arise with being in college now that students have the freedom of no curfew and being away from home. It is easy to get off-track.

Be sure to discuss with your student what you expect of them now that they are more on their own, but allow them to make mistakes and to learn from them.

Also, ensure your student can do basic things for themselves before they leave for college such as washing and drying laundry, making a bed, and managing their schedule.

It is helpful to have your child participate in some community service activities in high school with a focus on the experience as opposed to the number of hours completed. This can help them practice public speaking and communication skills, both of which are critical to the modern workplace.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

 

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

Use this information to create an action step for your family! How will you take advantage of these services?

Episode 90: The Untapped Gold Mine of College Fairs

http://www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/college-fairs/

Episode 66: Tips on How Undecided Students Can Choose A Major

http://www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/tips-on-how-undecided-students-can-choose-a-major/

Episode 47: Habits of “A” Students and Preparing For College

http://www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/habits-of-a-students-and-preparing-for-college/

Episode 41: Finding the Right Roommate! Textbooks: Buy or Rent?

http://www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/finding-the-right-roommate/

Episode 8: Helping Students With Learning Disabilities Prepare for College

http://www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/008/

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with Rollins College.

Share

The post THCC91- How to Leverage Your Career Services Office Long Before You Graduate Interview with Dr. Tricia Zelaya-Leon, Director of Career Development at Rollins College appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC90– The Untapped Gold Mine of College Fairs Interview with Marie Bigham, Board Member of National Association of College Admission Counseling
43:08
2017-12-15 14:55:47 UTC 43:08
THCC90– The Untapped Gold Mine of College Fairs Interview with Marie Bigham, Board Member of National Association of College Admission Counseling

If you are interested in learning more about college (and who isn’t?!), then you need to listen to this episode with Marie Bigham. She shares all the amazing details you need to know about college fairs.

High school is a singular experience that lets students find their authentic self. Parents should enjoy this time of growth with their child. When done right, planning for college is a tremendous personal development opportunity where students can think about their skills, talents, and goals for the future.

You can’t miss these FREE opportunities with your student! Find your local college fair and put it on your calendar today.

Questions Answered Today:

What is a college fair?

NACAC (National Association of College Admission Counseling) sponsors college fairs all over the country and in Canada. Bigham defines the goal of a college fair as, “To share as much one on one information with college bound people about the opportunities in this country.”

These can be big and slightly overwhelming, but definitely worth it. You can and should attend these starting your freshman year of high school.

What to expect at a college fair:

  • Around 300 colleges from around the world
  • Informational sessions in more than one language
  • Advice on paying for college
  • How to apply
  • Essay writing tips
  • Student athlete information
  • Counseling services
  • Scholarship sponsors
  • GI Bill information for veterans

These are usually held in metropolitan areas, but not always, and cost nothing (aside from potential parking fees).

How do we prepare for a college fair?

Step one is to find a fair near you. These can easily be found in the newspaper, through a high school counselor, or on the NACAC website.

Online is where students will pre-register, find a list of colleges presenting at the fair, and a map of the event. Don’t forget about the presentations! Be sure to check some of those out for more great information on specific topics.

“For every college you go see that you know of already, go see two more you have never heard of,” suggests Bigham. She also recommends to split up with family members to get as much information as possible from as many colleges as you can.

Do some research on the colleges you are most interested in and prepare a list of quality questions to ask. The person at the table is usually involved in admissions in some way, so introduce yourself and have one or two of those questions ready to go.

Also, check out what campuses are nearby the event and take a college tour- even if you aren’t interested in that particular college, just go for the experience.

What kind of college fairs are there?

In addition to a standard college fair, there are specialized fairs for visual and performing arts. These provide amazing opportunities for people in the arts to have their portfolios looked at and to get more details about auditions.

If your student is even a little bit interested in visual or performing arts, be sure to check out this specialized fair early during the freshman or sophomore year to get the appropriate timeline for applications to college. It is different from a regular college.

STEM fairs are just starting to roll out. They will include tables of professionals that will share how these opportunities extend into careers in addition to all the other great things to expect at a standard college fair.

What other resources does NACAC have?

Some other resources that are available on the NACAC website includes information:

  • Broken down by age and topic
  • For transferring
  • Undocumented students
  • Financial aid
  • Born abroad
  • How to utilize college rankings
    • Look at rankings and find what is useful for a specific individual

Parents absolutely need to have an honest financial conversation with their child including what they expect their child to contribute to college costs.

“The biggest mistake parents and families make in this process is not being open and honest and realistic about cost and affordability,” warns Bigham.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

All NACAC Resources

Episode 74: How to Get Started In College Planning

http://www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/how-to-get-started-in-college-planning/

Episode 66: Tips On How Undecided Students Can Choose a Major

http://www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/tips-on-how-undecided-students-can-choose-a-major/

Episode 30: Joe Saul-Sehy, College Planner, College Parent

http://www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/30/

Episode 19: Surviving the College Application Process

http://www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/19/

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with NACAC.

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The post THCC90– The Untapped Gold Mine of College Fairs Interview with Marie Bigham, Board Member of National Association of College Admission Counseling appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC89 – Help Your Child Get into Law School High School Undergrad and the LSAT Interview with Nathan Fox, LSAT expert
40:29
2017-12-15 14:55:47 UTC 40:29
THCC89 – Help Your Child Get into Law School High School Undergrad and the LSAT Interview with Nathan Fox, LSAT expert

Is your child a hard worker or high achiever? Do they like to argue? Maybe law school is the right graduate school path for them. Nathan Fox is the author of “Cheating the LSAT” and four other LSAT books. He shares his wisdom here for any family even remotely considering the idea of taking the LSAT and going on to law school.

“It’s the most expensive thing you are ever going to buy, except for maybe a house,” warns Fox.

Is your child dreaming of being a lawyer? Nathan has the answers, and the help you need, if your answer is “Yes!” Get all the info here before making this very important decision.

Questions Answered Today:

What is the LSAT?

This stands for the Law School Admission Test. It is the test taken before going to law school and helps determine where you get in as well as how much scholarship money that school will offer. It is NOT the Bar exam.

It is a test of:

  • English language abilities
  • Logic
  • How hard you can work
  • NO math section

There are over 80 practice tests available to help students to prepare for this test. It is scored from 120-180 with the average score at 145. “Almost every school cares about your highest score and will ignore your lower scores,” notes Fox.

What is a typical timeline for going to law school?

Going straight into law school after graduating with your undergraduate degree requires prepping for the LSAT to begin in the sophomore or junior year. Law schools admit one year in advance, so if you are planning to go straight into law school after completing an undergraduate degree it is important to plan accordingly.

“You can go to law school with any undergraduate major,” states Fox. Good grades are one of the 2 primary determinants of where you get into law school (along with the LSAT).

The test is offered four times a year: February, June, September OR October (depending upon the year), and December. You may take the test 3 times in any 2 year period.

What is the best way to prepare for the LSAT?

Fox recommends to begin preparation at least 3 months before taking the LSAT. Generally, students who enjoy reading and read a lot will do better.

The best thing to do is to take as many of the available practice tests as possible. There are no specific topics to study in particular. What is included on the LSAT are:

  • Logic Games
    • Very easy to train for, you just have to practice.
  • Reading Comprehension
    • Gives long passages and then asks basic questions about what you read.
  • Logical Reasoning
    • This is 2 of the 4 sections on the test.
    • Presents short arguments that are flawed or incomplete in some way and you are asked to do something to that argument.

An average student will improve their LSAT score by 10 points or more with studying.

How expensive is law school?

“Law school costs $50,000 a year or more,” shares Fox. This can change depending upon the scholarships offered to your student and which school you choose to attend. Parent information is no longer required for financial aid, it is now up to the student. There is quite a bit of loan opportunity available.

Just because loans are available does not mean you should take them.

Seek all available scholarships and try to pay for it yourself before borrowing money and incurring debt. Also apply to a wide range of schools to see what scholarship opportunities they can provide you.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

BRAD RECOMMENDS:

Episode 38 with Alexis Amarante

http://www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/38/

Episode 52 with Ryan Gray, MD

http://www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/successful-planning-for-medical-school/

Episode 55 with Ryan Parker

http://www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/culinary-school-and-the-food-industry/

Free Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents

www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Contact us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends!

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with FoxLSAT.

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The post THCC89 – Help Your Child Get into Law School High School Undergrad and the LSAT Interview with Nathan Fox, LSAT expert appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC88 – Bitcoin and Blockchain Technology. Is Your Child Ready For This New Frontier ? Interview with Trace Mayer, editor “Bitcoins for Kids”
35:51
2017-12-15 14:55:47 UTC 35:51
THCC88 – Bitcoin and Blockchain Technology. Is Your Child Ready For This New Frontier ? Interview with Trace Mayer, editor “Bitcoins for Kids”

Imagine being one of the first people to create the internet. Can you picture it? Right now your child could be working on the new digital frontier that is trending up. It is so new, there are hardly even any classes available. Tweens and teenagers all over the world are earning revenue through the internet this way. What is it? Super smart Trace Mayer shares today how the hottest new technology is impacting the world and what it means for the future.

“It’s important for parents to understand what their kids are involved in,” notes Mayer.

It’s also important to encourage entrepreneurialism with kids. In today’s world that is happening almost exclusively on the internet. Don’t miss this easy opportunity to get a leg up on some high-paying jobs. Listen to Trace and get the scoop before anyone else!

Questions Answered Today:

What is bitcoin and blockchain technology?

“The easiest way to understand it is that we can send money over the internet,” defines Mayer. Bitcoin is one application of blockchain technology where you can use money (or value) around the world via the internet. There is an international exchange called Kraken, and even wallet software to protect your bitcoins from hackers.

Blockchain technology is like metal, and bitcoin is like gold.

This establishes trust that is mathematically provable with cryptography. Mayer describes it as being like a ledger that cannot be erased or tampered with because it must be proven through math. It will bring increased transparency and other forms of stability to the financial systems, supply chains, health care services, and other areas.

It is so new there aren’t very many college courses or any degrees available on it yet.

Is there a future in this technology?

Yes! Some current and future uses of this technology include:

  • Anywhere you need to establish trust.
    • For example, your bank account.
  • Payment for work around the world.
  • Remittances.
  • Robotics and artificial intelligence.
  • Settling stock trades.
  • Managing health records.
  • Smart contracts.

Many of the jobs that use this technology have not been created yet, similar to when cell phones first came out there weren’t the jobs of creating apps or designing smartphone software.

How and why would kids use bitcoin?

The world economy is changing so much, and in this day and age you almost have to use bitcoin to be an entrepreneur on the internet. Credit cards require a merchant account, but bitcoins can be used by just about anyone anywhere.

“Some of the really cool innovations in the bitcoin space have been done by kids,” says Mayer. Even as young as 9 years old.

If a major company is looking to hire someone with blockchain technology experience, nobody really has any. “It means if your kid has been tinkering around on bitcoin for a couple years, they will have a leg up on a lot of these jobs,” shares Mayer. These will most likely be 6 figure income jobs with prestigious companies.

How do I introduce Bitcoin to my child?

There are some great websites dedicated to teaching the fundamentals of Bitcoin linked in the resources below. The best way is to try it! Go get comfortable with the technology by doing it. Mayer suggests getting $5 of Bitcoins and try trading them around.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

BRAD RECOMMENDS

Episode 72 with Michael Vawter on the Robot Academy

http://www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/science-competitions-and-robotics-scholarships/

Episode 25 with Nile Nickel on LinkedIn

http://www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/25/

LINKEDIN TUTORIAL

http://www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/blog/

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are interested in learning more about scholarships please visit:
www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.
Contact Us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with bitcoins or Trace Mayer.

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The post THCC88 – Bitcoin and Blockchain Technology. Is Your Child Ready For This New Frontier ? Interview with Trace Mayer, editor “Bitcoins for Kids” appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC87– Win Scholarships Even with a Low GPA and Test Scores Interview with Felecia Hatcher, Author “The C Students Guide to Scholarships”
39:21
2017-12-15 14:55:47 UTC 39:21
THCC87– Win Scholarships Even with a Low GPA and Test Scores Interview with Felecia Hatcher, Author “The C Students Guide to Scholarships”

What an inspiring story with Felecia Hatcher. Wow. Even though her GPA never touched a 3.0 in high school she was able to win over $130,000 in scholarships and grants. “Whether you have a 2.0 or a 5.0, you can get creative with your limited resources, get creative with your approach, and get the scholarship committees excited about what you’re doing,” describes Hatcher who went from a C student to a White House Award winning CEO.

Your student can do it too!
Thankfully, Felecia stops by our show today to tell us what she did to take control of her future during the beginning of her senior year of high school. Your child can enjoy this same success if they work hard at the smart things shared here today. Senior year is the biggest opportunity for scholarship and grant money, so don’t leave any on the table!

Questions Answered Today:

How do you take attention away from lacking grades?

What looks good to a scholarship committee?

How do you pick which scholarships to apply to?

Is there a great essay strategy?

Are local scholarships better to apply to?

Are scholarships good for everyone?

How can parents help?

What should a parent’s role be in helping with scholarships?

When is the best time to start getting prepared for scholarship applications?

What do I highlight in my application if I have a low GPA?

 

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are interested in learning more about scholarships please visit:
www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.
Contact Us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with Felecia Hatcher.

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The post THCC87– Win Scholarships Even with a Low GPA and Test Scores Interview with Felecia Hatcher, Author “The C Students Guide to Scholarships” appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC86 – I Think My Student Likes the Sciences, Now What? Interview with Marie McNeely, PhD in Neuroscience and Professor at Washington University
29:51
2017-12-15 14:55:47 UTC 29:51
THCC86 – I Think My Student Likes the Sciences, Now What? Interview with Marie McNeely, PhD in Neuroscience and Professor at Washington University

Professor Marie McNeely stops by today to share how she turned her high school love of science into a profession. “There are lots of career opportunities out there that parents might not be aware of,” says McNeely. Figuring out how to turn something your child is passionate about, like science, into a paying job can be tricky. So how do you do it?

Marie knows! She is living proof that people can grow up to do exactly what they love every single day and make money at it.

Are you the parent of a high school student that is even just a tiny bit interested in any of the sciences? Listen now to Marie McNeely break down EXACTLY how to get prepared for college and what to expect through graduate school and beyond.

Check out this great advice from a very knowledgeable expert on how to help your child turn their dreams into a reality.

Questions Answered Today:

What science jobs and opportunities are available?

How does my student get into the science community?

What questions should I ask when considering colleges?

What is shadowing?

Can my student earn money while working in a lab?

How can my child prepare for a job that doesn’t exist yet?

What is it like to work in the science field?

What is graduate school like?

If my student is interested in science in high school, what do we do now?

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are interested in learning more about scholarships please visit:
www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.
Contact Us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with Washington University or Marie McNeely.

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The post THCC86 – I Think My Student Likes the Sciences, Now What? Interview with Marie McNeely, PhD in Neuroscience and Professor at Washington University appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC85– Should Your Student Test Again as a Senior? Interview with Lauren Gaggioli, Founder of Higher Scores Test Prep
46:32
2017-12-15 14:55:47 UTC 46:32
THCC85– Should Your Student Test Again as a Senior? Interview with Lauren Gaggioli, Founder of Higher Scores Test Prep

Meet Lauren Gaggioli, expert tutor and founder of Higher Scores Test Prep. We’ve invited her back today to help figure out if seniors need to test again on the SAT. This is a huge investment that ripples across the future of a future college student. Is your senior the one that needs to take the test again?

Lauren sits for these standardized tests all the time to stay current on how the questions and formats are changing. She is also able to customize her prep plans with her insider knowledge. Lucky for us, she just came out of taking the newest SAT version! Her analysis breaks down some of the changes and how that impacts if a senior should take the test again.

She also has some great advice for families to get the most out of your motivated (or sometimes not) student. Listen up parents; Lauren has some really important tips just for you! You CAN help your child successfully get past this major hurdle with a smile on their face. If you have your sights set on a certain school or if you want the most scholarship money you can possibly have, you’ve got to hear what Lauren has to say.

Special thanks to Lauren Gaggioli for chatting with us again!

Questions Answered Today:

  • How can parents help with standardized testing?
  • When do I take the SAT?
  • When do I take the ACT?
  • Should we test again as a senior?
  • What’s the best way to prepare for the SAT?
  • How has the SAT changed?
  • How involved should students be with these decisions?

Want more? Download HERE for questions to consider when thinking about testing again.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are interested in learning more about scholarships please visit:
www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.
Contact Us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with Higher Scores Test Prep.

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The post THCC85– Should Your Student Test Again as a Senior? Interview with Lauren Gaggioli, Founder of Higher Scores Test Prep appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC84 – Understanding the Psych Major Interview with Robert Wickersham, Psychology Graduate Student
32:41
2017-12-15 14:55:47 UTC 32:41
THCC84 – Understanding the Psych Major Interview with Robert Wickersham, Psychology Graduate Student

What is the college process like? What should I expect? Psychology Graduate student Robert Wickersham pulls back the curtain on a typical college experience including leading up to and through earning multiple degrees.

His Graduate and Undergraduate Journey

Wickersham switched high schools his junior year. His new school did not have a psychology class available, so he started a club.

“In terms of grades, switching definitely hurt me,” describes Wickersham. “Basically all my grades went down a level.” It was also beneficial because he switched early enough to qualify for in-state tuition and applied to all the University of California schools.

When taking the ACT/SAT, as well as the GRE for graduate coursework, Wickersham stresses that studying is key.

Invest in a quality test prep program.

There is also a licensure exam at the end of his degree to practice in his chosen profession.

“With psychology it is really important to think ahead of where you want to go with your degree because there are not a lot of options for just an undergraduate degree,” notes Wickersham.

A student will have to choose between:

  • PsyD
    • Higher degree in psychology.
    • Not a lot, or very little, research.
    • Focuses on helping people.
  • PhD
    • Still focuses on clinic work and helping people.
    • Includes more research and publishing.

If you want to go to a higher degree in psychology, you NEED research experience,” emphasizes Wickersham. You can begin as an undergraduate working with grad students or professors.

This can lead to letters of recommendation to help gain acceptance into competitive graduate schools.

When choosing an undergraduate college, Wickersham considered the profession he wanted to pursue. His major is so competitive at UCLA that students can’t declare psychology as a major until their junior year and only if they have the credits and grades for it.

One or two classes had a professor that was more research based, or they were teaching assistants, which made a difference in the style of the course. Ultimately, those are the people that will be able to help you the most with getting involved in research.

Wickersham completed his undergraduate degree in 4 years, but due to advanced high school classes with transferable credits he actually began college as a sophomore.

This allowed him to study abroad more freely and not be so concerned about academics that were exclusively focused around his major.

Advice for Parents

“A great thing to do is to get some kind of teaching experience,” recommends Wickersham. This can also be tutoring or a job helping other students. This is very useful in graduate school application essays.

Choose which degree you want to pursue and get involved with research as fast as you can.

Some possible careers that come from the psychology field are:

  • Private Practice
  • Professor
  • Hospital Setting
    • Including performing Emergency Psych evaluations
  • Integrated Health Teams
  • Research
  • Teaching

 

These can be combined in any way you like.

Be sure to choose a specialty area you really enjoy within this field.

Wickersham concludes, “Even if you have a strike against you, such as low GPA or test scores, where there is a will there is a way.” Always follow your dreams.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

  • email RWickers@UCCS.Edu

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are interested in learning more about scholarships please visit:
www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.
Contact Us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with Robert Wickersham or University of California.

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The post THCC84 – Understanding the Psych Major Interview with Robert Wickersham, Psychology Graduate Student appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC83 – Raise “Money Smart” Kids Allowance, Budget and Financial Responsibility Interview with Bret and Tracie Shroyer, AllowanceAcademy
38:29
2017-12-15 14:55:47 UTC 38:29
THCC83 – Raise “Money Smart” Kids Allowance, Budget and Financial Responsibility Interview with Bret and Tracie Shroyer, AllowanceAcademy

Finances are an important lesson to teach our children. It is especially important that students have a strong understanding about money before leaving for college. Parenting experts Bret and Tracie Shroyer share their expertise on allowance and help you get started teaching these concepts today!

Allowance Academy

The website is broken into 3 different parts:

  • Young Children
    • How to start kids with their first allowance.
    • If kids don’t really know what money is.
  • Medium Kids
    • Some experience with birthday money.
    • Maybe you are thinking of starting an allowance.
  • Big Kids
    • Teenagers or children with experience having an allowance and what to do next.
    • How to wean your child off the allowance.

A common mistake is that parents don’t give children an allowance and parents pay for all of their expenses such as clothes, activity fees, etc. “The kids are learning not to manage money or manage a budget, but they are learning to spend their entertainment budget,” explains Bret Shroyer.

“Use that same money that you are spending on them anyway and make them accountable for it,” says Tracie Shroyer.  “Then you are teaching them how to manage a budget and manage their expenses.”

Allowance is defined as the amount of the household budget that a child is allowed to spend on their own behalf.

Great beginning items to allow children to start with managing are school lunch, shoes, and then clothes.

Think about what you spend on something per year, for example shoes. Divide that total yearly amount you usually spend by 12 for a monthly budget. Children are then in charge of that money, but have to save it up for shoes at a later date.

“There are some categories that we don’t give them control of and we continue to manage,” shares Tracie. There are also some very expensive activities/sports that children should partially have control of, but not the whole price tag.

“You have to let the kid make some mistakes; it’s the only way we learn how to manage money is by making boneheaded mistakes. The responsibility of this budget is so that your kid makes mistakes and they learn from it,” states Bret Shroyer.

“It’s much better for them to make that mistake now, rather than waiting until they move out on their own,” adds Tracie Shroyer.

Allowance During and After High School

The peak of allowance is 15 years old. Once the student gets an outside job, start lessening their allowance quarterly until it is $0 just after they graduate from high school.

Parents must also have a conversation with their child about what they can and will contribute to college expenses. Also consider what debt students must take on to finance college and will be left with after graduating.

“Your number one job as a high school student is getting good grades. That doesn’t take all of your time,” indicates Bret Shroyer. It should be an expectation that students are working about 10-15 hours a week. This will go up or down depending upon activities.

“The average teenager cannot actually make enough money in a part time job to really be able to use that money and learn how to spend it responsibly. They would need to work a 40 hour a week job,” stresses Tracie.

Be sure to also include long-term saving as part of your allowance plan.

Mechanics of Allowance

“Start with the cold hard cash and then move up to a checking account,” The Shroyers recommend.

It is very important to start with cash.

A checking account is a great next step. This usually comes with a debit card. The debit card is not wise to use for everyday purchases. Try prepaid spending cards instead such as FamZoo.com

Famzoo has multiple features including loans, tracking spending, and total parental control.

There are other prepaid cards available, but the Shroyers recommend FamZoo.

 

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are interested in learning more about scholarships please visit:
www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.
Contact Us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with Allowance Academy.

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The post THCC83 – Raise “Money Smart” Kids Allowance, Budget and Financial Responsibility Interview with Bret and Tracie Shroyer, AllowanceAcademy appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC82 – Get Out of College Debt Free Interview with Jason Lum, President of ScholarEdge College Consulting
41:38
2017-12-15 14:55:47 UTC 41:38
THCC82 – Get Out of College Debt Free Interview with Jason Lum, President of ScholarEdge College Consulting

Looking for a scholarship? Jason Lum won over $250,000 in scholarship money and shares how he did it in today’s episode.

Misperceptions about Scholarships

The top misperception is that the only people out there who can win scholarships are those students with straight A’s, perfect ACT/SAT scores, or are brains with appendages,” jokes Lum.

These kinds of kids are intimidating, but these kids are generally not applying for scholarships. There ISN’T much competition out there because few students actually apply.

The students with outstandingly exceptional academics are often sought after by colleges or just don’t feel the need to apply.

“I tell families to ignore the price tag of a school. Find the right fit for a college then devise a strategy heavily built on scholarships to attack the student debt you will accrue,” explains Lum.

Lum also warns to be aware of what the total cost of college will be and plan for that so as not to leave college with incredible debt.

Getting Ready for College

Parents of juniors in high school should considering the following 3 points:

  • The number one thing a parent must do is illustrate what debt means in the real world and what it is.
    • Have family with experiences share.
      • How will it transform your life after college?
  • Get active in the community by volunteering.
    • This is critical to scholarship applications.
      • Compassion and authenticity are key to winning scholarships.
  • Don’t get overwhelmed by the amount of scholarships available.
    • Sometimes less is more. Don’t register with multiple scholarship websites and get inundated with email.
    • Look for what is available in your area specifically.
      • High school websites are starting to upload links to local scholarship opportunities.
      • These local scholarships generally have less competition.

Good Candidates for Scholarships

“As much as a parent wants to do the applications themselves, resist that temptation at all costs,” cautions Lum, “The student has got to be all in on this.”

Students must invest the time and passion into the applications or the committees will see through it.

Low GPA, poor performance on standardized tests, or absence of participation in athletics does NOT disqualify you from applying for scholarships.

The ideal candidate for a scholarship is:

  • Motivated.
  • Invested in the community.
  • Passionate.

“I think every kid has the potential to have that ‘aha’ moment,” describes Lum. Parents should push their kid, even if they are considered average.

Identify ALL of the student’s interests and find organizations out there through the internet that have memberships. Also look at what parents do and who they are, including ethnic background. Call these organizations and ask if they offer any scholarships and also ask for 2 or 3 organizations they know of that might.

“Every student has the potential to win scholarships, it is just the strategy that isn’t well-aligned to the result intended,” says Lum.

If your child is very talented in a specific area or has that something above average about them (being nationally ranked, etc.), they have increased chances of winning the larger available awards (above $5,000).

Scholarships in smaller amounts do not include an interview, but once they start to become larger amounts they will need to be articulate about their specific skills.

“For every scholarship you don’t win, do a post-game analysis,” suggests Lum. Call the organization and respectfully request what pushed the winner over the top. You can use this information to improve your application for the next year.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are interested in learning more about scholarships please visit:
www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.
Contact Us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with Scholaredge.

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The post THCC82 – Get Out of College Debt Free Interview with Jason Lum, President of ScholarEdge College Consulting appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC81 – Four Fatal Errors that Families Make When Planning for College Interview with Todd Weaver, Vice President at Strategies For College
35:18
2017-12-15 14:55:47 UTC 35:18
THCC81 – Four Fatal Errors that Families Make When Planning for College Interview with Todd Weaver, Vice President at Strategies For College

In this episode, Vice President of Strategies for College Todd Weaver shares the four fatal flaws that families make when it comes to the college planning process. Be sure you avoid these common pitfalls and set both your child and yourself up for college planning success.

Strategies for College

“We want families to take an integrated approach to finding college affordability and admissibility,” says Weaver.

They use a three-pronged approach that includes:

  • Family financial review.
  • Search for colleges.
    • Line up with target schools.
    • Be competitive for financial assistance.
  • Make sure family and student priorities are met.

The Four Fatal Flaws that Families Make

These common flaws are:

  • Families search for a college and then figure out how to pay for it later.
    • Don’t choose a college first!
    • Families often apply and get accepted then wonder, “How do I figure out how to pay for this?”
      • This is the backward way to go about it.
    • Figure out your expected family contribution around the sophomore year of high school.
      • All colleges are now doing a two year “look back” at taxes starting October of 2016.
      • The CSS will also be doing this prior prior year.
    • Use the financial aid information to pick schools that will work to your advantage.
    • Reach schools are particularly difficult to get financial aid for unless you are a very strong student with a great GPA and/or test scores.
  • Lots of scholarship money does NOT go unclaimed each year.
    • If you earn a lot of outside scholarships, the college might reduce the grants given.
    • “I think it is better for a student to focus on, rather than the small scholarships, focus on the private scholarships or campus-based scholarships at the school they are applying to,” recommends Weaver.
    • Figure out where you can best use your time and efforts.
      • College is paid for in time, money, and emotions. Plan all three of those resources.
    • Brand name paralysis.
      • “(Parents and students) feel the only way to be successful is to go to the highly visible colleges,” laments Weaver.
      • Choose a school that matches your needs as a family.
      • There are so many great collegiate options beyond the ranked top 30.
      • What you do in college is much more important than the name recognition of the school.
        • Be sure to use the career services and gain professional experiences.
      • Choosing a school should start with looking at the finances. Then go look at schools that provide the opportunities your child wants or needs.
      • Families often grossly underestimate the project management aspect of planning for college.
      • Weaver warns that families should expect to put in about 90-100 hours of work over the course of two years or more to make sure they are doing everything they need to do.
      • Waiting until fall of senior year of high school is a huge mistake.
      • Typically, junior year is when students are ready to start thinking about college.
      • Parents need to have their financial strategy in place by the middle of their student’s sophomore year of high school.
        • Take a subtle visit when on vacation and let your student, even as a freshmen, walk around and see a college campus nearby.
        • Students need to see different kinds of schools before thinking about what they want or need.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are interested in learning more about scholarships please visit:
www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.
Contact Us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with Strategies for College.

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The post THCC81 – Four Fatal Errors that Families Make When Planning for College Interview with Todd Weaver, Vice President at Strategies For College appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC80 – Online Courses – What You Need to Know – Even for Traditional Students Interview with Dr. Tawna Schmidt, Founder of Career Matters
31:27
2017-12-15 14:55:47 UTC 31:27
THCC80 – Online Courses – What You Need to Know – Even for Traditional Students Interview with Dr. Tawna Schmidt, Founder of Career Matters

Online Courses – What You Need to Know – Even for Traditional Students

Online courses are becoming more mainstream at college universities. These are not just for adult learners anymore! Dr. Tawna Schmidt delves into what makes online courses unique and how they could work for you.

Online Courses Explained

An online course could consist of a few different methods:

  • 100% Online.
    • Coursework can be completed anywhere at anytime.
    • Never have to be on campus.
    • Uses a specific platform where the student logs in and everything they need for the class is there.
      • Instructors interact with students requiring responses to questions and completed assignments/test.
      • Students are responsible for responding back to other students on discussion boards/posts.
    • Hybrid/Blended Courses.
      • Students are required to go to campus once or twice.
      • This blends some components of strictly online classes and traditional on campus work.
    • Satellite courses are different from online courses.
      • Requires students to log in at a specific time online.
      • Does not require commuting to campus.

“In 2014, the National Center of Educational Statistics found that in 2012 there were 5.4 million students that took at least one online course,” states Schmidt.

Attendance is taken through the platform and records what students are doing and how long they are doing it. “The daily questions are the alternative for the discussion,” explains Schmidt. There is usually a minimum number of responses required to create an online discussion board to mimic in-class conversations.

Advantages and Benefits of Online Courses

“Five or six years ago, they became popular for the nontraditional student,” describes Schmidt. However, online classes provide incredible flexibility for every type of student.

Some examples of who is taking an online class:

  • Mothers who work from home.
  • People with inflexible work schedules.
  • Students that want to get ahead or catch up in high school.
  • Student athletes.
  • Traditional students wanting to get ahead over summer school.
  • Students that go to college out of state.
  • Community college students that are planning to transfer.

Online courses are on the rise at all universities. They are no longer strictly for the nontraditional student.

Universities are offering an increasing number of courses and credits through the online platform.

While younger students have grown up with technology, older generations are still able to successfully use online courses.

Are Online Courses Right For Me?

Dr. Schmidt recommends beginning with one online course because it is not for everyone.

This type of coursework requires a lot of self-discipline and self-motivation. It is a different type of learning.

Some of the traits parents/students should consider when thinking about taking an online class:

  • Self-motivation.
  • Learning Style.
    • Are you very social? These students probably need to be in class so they don’t miss that component.
    • Visual learners might need to go to class and see the actual presentation/power point.
    • Online courses are usually more expensive because you pay for the convenience.
  • Resistance to Technology.
    • The platform the class is offered in is it. You have to be able to adapt.
  • Can you read online or do you need an actual book/paper in your hand?
    • Do you need to show up at class and explain why you didn’t do something to be motivated to get it done?
    • It is near impossible to catch up if you fall too far behind.

“When I first started with online, teaching it and as a student, I was amazed to learn you can get a lot of interactions from the online discussions, but it doesn’t feel as tangible as in person,” notes Schmidt.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are interested in learning more about scholarships please visit:
www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.
Contact Us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with Career Matters.

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The post THCC80 – Online Courses – What You Need to Know – Even for Traditional Students Interview with Dr. Tawna Schmidt, Founder of Career Matters appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC79 – What is Your Test Strategy? Interview with Alexis Avila, Owner of Prepped and Polished ACT/SAT Tutor and Test Preparation company
30:54
2017-12-15 14:55:47 UTC 30:54
THCC79 – What is Your Test Strategy? Interview with Alexis Avila, Owner of Prepped and Polished ACT/SAT Tutor and Test Preparation company

ACT/SAT Tutor and Test Preparation

Former guidance counselor Alexis Avila is an expert on high stakes testing and the creator of Prepped and Polished tutoring services. Are you stressed about taking the ACT or SAT? Don’t be! Get a breakdown of the new ACT/SAT tests and the secret to amazing essays in this episode.

About the New SAT/ACT Tests

“They are little more alike than they used to be,” describes Avila, including:

  • The SAT no longer has a guessing penalty for getting a question incorrect.
  • There are only 4 possible answer choices per question.
  • It has been reduced from 10 sections to 5.
    • Grammar and Reading are now combined.
  • Scored out of 1600.
  • You are allowed more time on the SAT than the ACT, but there are more inference type questions that require extended thinking.
  • The math is similar.
    • A calculator section and a non calculator section.
  • Essays are now optional.

“The new SAT better overlaps with the school curriculum,” explains Avila.

“If your student really struggles with pacing,” says Avila, “you might want to steer towards the redesigned SAT.”

Getting Ready for the Tests

Avila recommends taking practice tests of each kind to determine if your child is stronger at one test than the other.

It is not uncommon for a student to take the test 3 times. It depends on what is needed for the college you are applying to and the effort put in to raise the original score.

“Expect a 3 to 4 point jump with a solid test prep plan for ACT, or 200 point increase on the new scale of SAT,” states Avila. This can be done at home or with a test prep facility.

A typical session is 2 hours with a 3 hour homework assignment to make 5 hours a week. The average student will need 10 weeks of test prep.

“Your competition is doing it,” notes Avila. Good test scores can open the door to scholarships. Test prep does work!

Test prep choices are:

  • Self study at home.
    • Have parents use a stopwatch and watch you take the practice test.
  • Use a tutor.
    • Can be group tutoring at a building, but make sure the other students are at your level and not distracting.
    • One on one tutoring that custom designs your program to meet your individual needs.
    • Online tutoring is also available- just be sure to screen your tutor and be sure they are qualified as well as that you get along with them.

More about the Tests

Essay graders spend no more than several minutes reading and grading your essay. “They do a masterful job glancing through your essay,” says Avila, “so just take care of the basics.”

SAT is more difficult with critical thinking, particularly in the reading section.

The test companies make millions of dollars.

“The SAT and ACT, it is proven, won’t predict how successful you will be in life,” acknowledges Avila. The key is how you utilize your time in college. It is not automatically that you will do better in life because you went to that name brand school.

Both essays (one on each test) are optional and are written by hand over 3 pages, unless you have an accommodation to type it.

The ACT essay asks you to evaluate multiple perspectives over 40 minutes. The SAT essay asks you to critique an author’s persuasive piece over 50 minutes.

If you are a good writer, take the essay portion. If not, opt to not take it. Competitive schools will require it and want to see your response.

Avila describes how to create a successful essay:

  • First decide if you will defend or attack.
  • Brainstorm tangible examples for 2-3 minutes.
  • Outline a simple list of ideas for 4 minutes.
  • Spend 35 minutes writing the essay and stay neat and focused.
  • Take 5 minutes to proofread your essay.
    • Spelling does count, especially for a key word you are repeating.
    • If you are unsure of the spelling for a word, find a synonym and use that instead!

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are interested in learning more about scholarships please visit:
www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.
Contact Us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with Prepped and Polished.

Share

The post THCC79 – What is Your Test Strategy? Interview with Alexis Avila, Owner of Prepped and Polished ACT/SAT Tutor and Test Preparation company appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC78 – 3 Ways to Make the Most of Your College Visit Interview with Kathryn Clowes, Author “Put College to Work” and Educational/Career Consultant
44:57
2017-12-15 14:55:47 UTC 44:57
THCC78 – 3 Ways to Make the Most of Your College Visit Interview with Kathryn Clowes, Author “Put College to Work” and Educational/Career Consultant

3 Ways to Make the Most of Your College Visit

In this episode, educational and career consultant Kat Clowes shares how to figure out what you want to be when you grow up and how to get there. Use those 4 years of college to your advantage and get that career of your dreams!

Getting the Right First Job

“When you graduate, if you are not planning, that first job is just whoever will hire me,” notes Clowes. This makes it difficult to change careers in the future.

Do not pick a major for a guaranteed career that might not be the right fit.

There are quite a few careers available out there to you.

Personal branding is defined by Clowes as, “Whatever people think of you, or your company, when you aren’t in the room… What people think of you professionally.” This can be positive or negative.

Your personal brand is very important. To find out what it is, Clowes recommends to:

  • E-mail 10 family members and friends.
  • Ask them for 2 positives and 2 negatives.
  • Identify what they think of you and what you want for people to think of you.
    • If someone notes that you are often late, is that something you want potential employers to think about you? How can you change that?

Majors can be very broad and employers will want to know, “What else have you done.”

“If we can get students more thinking ahead of who they want to be because once you graduate, everyone has the same piece of paper,” says Clowes. Employers aren’t necessarily hiring the smartest person in the room, they want people that will fit on their team and they can have conversations with.

Undecided Students

“I think what is important is not to stress over the final title or major, but it’s more important to identify the skill sets that a student is strong in and what they are interested in,” states Clowes.

There is a lot of stress to choose a “label” of what students are going to be.

Clowes suggests for parents to, “Encourage your student to concentrate more on why they like the things that they like.”

This will plant a seed for students to start thinking about what it is they like about activities they do and why they avoid certain other ones. These traits can become their brand.

Tips for Families When Taking a Campus Tour

A tour is designed to market the school and will include some of the same things no matter where you visit, which won’t really help you to decide on the best choice.

Good questions that should be asked while visiting a college are about:

  • Facilities.
  • Opportunities.
  • Beyond the classroom.
    • Ask about the Alumni Network.
    • Career center.
    • What companies do graduates go on to after graduation?
    • Who recruits here?
      • Find out if a company you are interested in recruits on that campus.
  • In the classroom.
    • Are undergraduates allowed to work in the labs?
    • How close are students with their professors?
      • Do you feel close with your professors in your major?
      • Do you have a professional relationship with your professors?
      • Could you visit them during office hours?
      • Do you feel they have a lot of time for you?

“I would really like students and parents to focus on the different centers and opportunities the college offers beyond the academic,” stresses Clowes.

Use LinkedIn University and type in a university name to see what companies alumni work for and the industries they go to. Also research the professors and if they consult for an industry of interest. “That can help you rationalize if a school is worth an extra $2,000 or $3,000 a year,” adds Clowes.

LinkedIn is a great way to share your brand online and to connect with potential employers. See episode #25 for more information on LinkedIn.

See if the website domain of your name is available and get it. Build your own website and online portfolio for better networking. Put this on your business card.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are interested in learning more about scholarships please visit:
www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.
Contact Us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with Kat Clowes.

Share

The post THCC78 – 3 Ways to Make the Most of Your College Visit Interview with Kathryn Clowes, Author “Put College to Work” and Educational/Career Consultant appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC77 – Why College Students Should Work Interview with Robert Farrington, America’s Student Loan Debt Expert and Founder of TheCollegeInvestor.com
29:30
2017-12-15 14:55:47 UTC 29:30
THCC77 – Why College Students Should Work Interview with Robert Farrington, America’s Student Loan Debt Expert and Founder of TheCollegeInvestor.com

One of the leading causes of not investing or saving for the future is student loan debt. America’s Millennial Money Expert Robert Farrington shares the benefits of working through college in this episode with some great work ideas and the impact on your life after earning that degree.

Graduating With Debt

“Working through college is one of the best ways to minimize student loan debt. It is an amazing way to boost your skill set and get a head start for when you graduate,” states Farrington.

Some causes of having too much debt:

  • Took out too much debt for earning potential after graduation.
  • Mom and dad co-sign or borrow the money themselves.
  • Over educated and under experienced.
    • Graduate school is expensive and students can get loans on their own which can get them into more trouble.

Farrington notes some benefits of working during college as:

  • Pay for expenses.
  • Lower amount you have to borrow.
  • Gives students some things employers are looking for from college graduates.
    • Business and customer service communication skills.
    • Problem solving skills including:
      • Time management.
      • Developing creative solutions to problems.
      • Following through on action plans.

“Between the two candidates that both have the same degree, I’m probably going to look more at the one that has the job experience, worked during school, and has that skill set than the one that doesn’t,” says Farrington, concerning employers.

When Students Should Be Working

Internships are great opportunities, especially during summer. “For some students, working during school can make sense,” suggests Farrington.

Good jobs usually available during college include:

  • Working at a restaurant/fast food chain.
  • Retail.
  • Work study.
  • Any job on the actual campus.
    • Being a teacher’s assistant or research assistant.
    • Student housing.
  • The field you are pursing.
    • If you are looking at the medical field, find a job at a hospital, etc.
  • Graduate students can teach undergraduate classes.
  • Micro-entrepreneurship:
    • Start your own business at school.
    • Drive for Uber or Lift.
    • Postmate.
    • www.AgentAnything.com

“The other thing that isn’t talked about with work is that you learn things you might not want to do before you commit to a major program,” shares Farrington.

Try something different each summer until you find an area you are passionate in.

Working online is also a great solution so students can work on their own time and their own terms.

Work should be part of the conversation with parents about how to pay for college. “Working is just that important; that all families should be discussing it as part of the college experience,” stresses Farrington.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are interested in learning more about scholarships please visit:
www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.
Contact Us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with The College Investor or Robert Farrington.

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The post THCC77 – Why College Students Should Work Interview with Robert Farrington, America’s Student Loan Debt Expert and Founder of TheCollegeInvestor.com appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC76 – Get Recruited! Understanding College Athletics. Interview with Jon Fugler, Founder and CEO of Recruit-me.com
34:27
2017-12-15 14:55:47 UTC 34:27
THCC76 – Get Recruited! Understanding College Athletics. Interview with Jon Fugler, Founder and CEO of Recruit-me.com

Do you have an athletic child? Would you like them to be recruited to college for sports and earn some scholarships? In this episode, college athletics expert Jon Fugler explains some of the ins and outs of the athletic portion of college planning.  

Getting On Track

“The two biggest questions I get asked are about when and how,” describes Fugler.

Some important things to consider when pursuing an athletic scholarship:

  • Take the initiative.
    • “Coaches don’t just discover athletes,” explains Fugler. Parents have to market their child and seek out coaches.
  • Start early, but junior year is the best.
  • Apply to the college where the coach you want is at.
    • Make sure you can actually attend that college with academics and test scores.
  • Build relationships with 40-50 schools your sophomore year.
    • You have to cast your net wide.

Full-ride sports, such as football or basketball, are more competitive. There are also partial scholarships available for most of the other sports.

Some people that can help you to figure out if your child has the ability to go to “the next level” are:

  • High school coach.
  • Club coach.
    • These clubs travel and have the opportunity for your child to be seen by more people.
    • Doesn’t mean that college coaches will see them play, you still have to invite them to come and watch.
  • College coaches in the area.

“Coaches love it when athletes approach them,” states Fugler. It shows that you are interested in their program.

Fugler recommends doing the following when starting to consider college sports:

  • Make a great first impression.
    • Create an introductory package and then both mail and email this to the coaches.
    • Do NOT fill out the college contact online form first.
    • Reach out during sophomore year.
  • Remember that you are also recruiting a school.
    • There are no rules on you approaching schools or coaches.
    • The school should have other features about it that are important to you.
  • Attend camps put on by the colleges.
    • These can get expensive.
    • The coach often has athletes help to run these, so you can meet potential team mates.

Choosing a Program

“In most cases, athletic scholarship is a means to an end so that you can get your education and leverage that for your future,” says Fugler.

Think of more than just five schools. Fugler suggests to think of at least 40-50 schools and to send an intro packet to each of them.

Student athletes have strict rules. Coaches are very aware of what is allowed and the burden is on them.

Some rules to be informed about are:

  • If you call and leave a message for a coach, they can’t call you back.
    • If they are there when you call, then they can talk to you.
  • Students have unlimited visits, but coaches cannot initiate these.
  • More information is available at the NCAA website.

There are so many intangible benefits from participating in sports. Even if a student is not pursing this as a career, a lot can be gained from participating. Students might even go on to be coaches themselves, coach sports for their future children, or do something else within the sport.

Division 1 is the most demanding with a very high commitment level. After 1 or 2 years, most athletes are done.

“Go in there to enjoy it. Go in there to learn things outside the sport as well,” notes Fugler.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are interested in learning more about scholarships please visit:
www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.
Contact Us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with Recruit-me.

Share

The post THCC76 – Get Recruited! Understanding College Athletics. Interview with Jon Fugler, Founder and CEO of Recruit-me.com appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC75 – How to Use Social Media in the College Planning Process. Interview with Deborah Owen, Teen Confident Performance Coach, Parent Coach, Strategic Intervention Coach, and National Board Certified Teacher
31:30
2017-12-15 14:55:47 UTC 31:30
THCC75 – How to Use Social Media in the College Planning Process. Interview with Deborah Owen, Teen Confident Performance Coach, Parent Coach, Strategic Intervention Coach, and National Board Certified Teacher

Deborah Owen is a youth mindset trainer, parent coach, and #1 best-selling author who coaches parents through the stress of getting a teen into college.  In this episode, she has the advice you need to help your teen use social media effectively for college and to distress the application process for both parents and children.  

Social Media is Having an Impact

“Social media is a communication platform and kids are at a point where they don’t always recognize that what they put out on the internet is permanent,” says Owen.

One of the strengths of social media is that you can talk to anyone, anywhere, at anytime. A weakness is that what people put out there might not be the most positive.

Colleges are more and more checking online to see what kinds of images students portray. Owen warns, “If students have posted pictures of themselves in compromising positions, it will affect their ability to get into colleges.”

Universities are also using the more heavily used social media such as:

  • Facebook.
  • Twitter.
  • Snapchat.
  • Instagram.

Colleges are using these for marketing and to connect with potential and current students.

“When you have a younger teen, it is within your rights to say to your child that you need to know what their password is,” notes Owen.

Important skills to be sure you discuss with your child about the internet highway include:

  • Etiquette.
  • Consideration.
  • Respect for other people.

Don’t make rules that are unenforceable. If they don’t use a computer at your house, they will at a friend’s house.

Correcting Mistakes

“To the best of my knowledge, once something is on the internet, it is out there,” explains Owen who suggests the rule, “You do not put anything up on the internet that you don’t want your grandmother to see!”

If parents aren’t teaching children how to use these social media platforms, and schools aren’t, then where are they learning how to use these tools? From their friends!

Applying to College

The biggest struggle with college application is that parents become obsessed with the application itself.

Owen recommends that parents do the following to ease the stress of college applications:

  • Schedule only 2 times a week where you get to talk about college.
    • These are the only times a parent can sit down and check on their child.
    • Children are allowed to bring it up anytime they like.
  • Leave it on your child’s plate.
    • Parents can get a phone number or email for their child, but the main responsibility must be on the child themselves.
    • Offer help, but do not take large parts on yourself.
  • Be informed about deadlines, but let the kid be in charge.

It is developmentally appropriate for your child to be somewhat self-centered. You will have to be supportive and Owen suggests scheduling a tour of a college or to stop by a campus when you are on vacation.

This will help them to picture themselves at college and, despite themselves, they will work backwards to figure out how to get there.

If your child has something they are particularly interested in, find a college with a strong department and go look at it.

“There are so many options that you can major in that aren’t offered in a high school,” mentions Owen. If your child is going to begin college as an undeclared major, that is just fine.

“It is really, really important to step back and let your child live the life they have chosen, not the one you have chosen for them,” Owen stresses.

More about Owen

The book “Social Media Fascination” was created through Owen’s own frustrations as a librarian.

There are 6 skills that young people need to learn and social media is a great way to learn them:

  • Care and service.
    • Be a good person and treat others with respect.
  • Connect.
  • Communicate.
  • Collaborate.
  • Create.
  • Curate.
    • Find, evaluate, and use information efficiently and effectively.

These are life skills that everyone will need to be successful out in the work force, regardless of what profession they end up in.

Brad also suggests podcast episode 25 to learn more about LinkedIn. http://www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/25/

 

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are interested in learning more about scholarships please visit:
www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.
Contact Us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Share

The post THCC75 – How to Use Social Media in the College Planning Process. Interview with Deborah Owen, Teen Confident Performance Coach, Parent Coach, Strategic Intervention Coach, and National Board Certified Teacher appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC74 – How to Get Started in College Planning. Key Areas to Focus on First
28:11
2017-12-15 14:55:47 UTC 28:11
THCC74 – How to Get Started in College Planning. Key Areas to Focus on First

How to Get Started in College Planning

Are you just getting started with college planning? Not sure if you are on track? This show is for you! Expert Brad Baldridge helps you get organized with 4 key areas to consider for a smooth and simple planning for college process.

Organizing a Formal College Plan

The first step is to access where you are in the 4 plans to work on:

  • Visit Plan.
  • Test Plan.
  • Scholarship Plan.
  • Financial Plan.

“The whole purpose of the visit plan and test plan are to support your creating the school list,” states Baldridge. Earlier is better when it comes to having a school list, but students have to grow up and figure out what they want. It should be pretty well worked out by the end of a student’s junior year.

Each student and situation is different. When making a school list, one strategy is to make a larger list with 2 or 3 schools in the following categories:

  • Reach or dream schools that are unlikely to work out due to academic or financial reasons.
  • Target schools that are a good fit academically and financially. They would be a great opportunity for the student.
  • Safety schools which are places you are very confident you will be accepted and the financial side will also work out.

Another strategy is a shorter list with 2 or 3 local schools because you don’t want to travel too far or picking colleges that are just close to family.

Your ultimate goal is to have something to work with to move on to the other steps. “Start early so you have time to plan and it’s a little less pressure on the whole family,” stresses Baldridge.

Visit Plan

This is how you will gather information from the colleges you are interested in. Visit planning, for many families, is done during the junior year. Put it on your calendar and decide:

  • How I’m going to visit.
  • When I’m going to visit.
  • What I will do while I am there.

This coordinates with the test plan. “If you are visiting schools that require relatively high test scores, you need to work on getting the test scores required to be accepted,” explains Baldridge.

“Are you going to test and plan to get into the schools you are visiting? Or are you visiting the schools that your test scores indicate you can be accepted at?” asks Baldridge.

In addition to the actual visits, you can do college fairs and talk to college reps. There are some virtual tours available also for many colleges. See podcast Episode 18 on virtual tours: http://www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/18/

Test Plan

This goes along with visit planning. Some things to consider are:

  • How many times should I take the test?
  • Is it available at my high school?
  • Should I take the SAT, ACT, or both?
    • Find out which format works best for your student or is popular in your area.
  • Will there be prep in between?
    • Free online resources, classes, or one-on-one tutoring, etc.
    • The competition is doing it, so if you are planning for a more competitive school it might be something to consider.

Take the test in February, figure out if you need to do any prep work, then take it again in April. If you must, it’s also available in June and one more time fall of senior year.

“Understand your opportunities and what your plan is, then coordinate the test with your visits,” says Baldridge.

Scholarship Plan

See podcast episode 5  http://www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/005/  and episode 43  http://www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/how-to-help-your-student-win-scholarships/ for more resources on scholarships.

Free resource “Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents” available at http://tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

Most families just need to do a basic scholarship search with 10 or less scholarships that are closely associated with your student or family. If you are going to apply to 20 scholarships, it will most likely be a family event with help from parents to search for these scholarships and get them done, which requires more time management.

Financial Plan

This is how college can be paid for which includes:

  • Pursuing aid.
  • Loans.
  • Scholarships.
  • Attending an expensive school or low-cost school.

This is the last thing parents need to work on and can be slightly independent from the other plans. “Focus on the information you DO know relative to the family,” mentions Baldridge, such as:

  • Savings.
  • Investing.
  • Qualifying for aid.
  • Income.

This is important because when you go on college visits you can then ask the right questions and even talk to the financial aid office.

If you don’t have time, or are starting late, don’t panic! “Pick up the pieces from where you are,” encourages Baldridge.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Par-ents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are inter-ested in learning more about scholarships please visit:
www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.
Contact Us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Share

The post THCC74 – How to Get Started in College Planning. Key Areas to Focus on First appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC73 – What it Takes to Get Into the Ivy League Interview with Elizabeth Heaton, Vice President and Educational Consultant at College Coach
49:22
2017-12-15 14:55:47 UTC 49:22
THCC73 – What it Takes to Get Into the Ivy League Interview with Elizabeth Heaton, Vice President and Educational Consultant at College Coach

The admissions process for college can be intimidating, especially if you are considering an ivy league school. Former admissions officer, and current Vice President and educational consultant for College Coach, Elizabeth Heaton helps you understand the process of how to get into a school and what school to go for in this interview.

Applying to an Elite School

If you are thinking about applying to an elite school, be prepared to go elsewhere. “Make sure you have a balanced list because it is very difficult to get in,” recommends Heaton. These top tier schools are very competitive with about 5% of applicants getting in.
If you are thinking of pursuing ivy league schools, parents should take an honest look at your child’s accomplishments and consider the following:

  • Stellar academics across the board.
    • Room for a B or two, sure, but a C is really less likely to be accepted.
    • Rigor of curriculum.
      • Challenging in the most rigorous classes available.
    • Starts in 9th grade.
  • Great test scores
    • ACT 33 minimum, more like 34 or 35 out of 36.
  • Sat scores 750 or above.
    • Bare minimum is a 700 in each section of the SATs.
  • Achievement tests in different subject areas.
    • Most schools ask for 2 subject tests with a bare minimum of 700 in those sections.

“Those are just the quantitative side of things, so if you see holes in this quantitative effort that’s an indication that the most elite schools are not going to be a possibility or an option,” states Heaton stressing, “There might be exceptions whom academic expectations might be slightly less, but really the quantitative piece needs to be there.”
All applications must have these great academics. Because of this, Heaton describes the places where decisions really get made are:

  • Letters of recommendation.
  • Student essays.
  • Extracurricular activities.
    • Goes beyond average high school student activities (sports, school paper, etc.).
    • Has one area really emerged as a strength with “distinguishing excellence”.
      • Think of it as being the top in that area or passion.
      • Go above and beyond “If you’re going to be involved in something, you need to be involved with it in a lot of different ways,” explains Heaton.

Elite colleges are looking for diversity of geography, perspective, socioeconomic situations, interests, experiences, and activities.
“All of these elite schools are very different,” cautions Heaton, “Each school has a very different personality, things they are looking for, and applicant pool to stand out against.”
Being admitted to one highly selective school does not mean you will be admitted to another just as being denied at one school does not mean you will be denied at another.

Where to Apply since Ivy Schools Are Unlikely

Heaton shares, “79% of colleges accept more students than they turn away.” If your student isn’t quite measuring up to these higher ranked and name-brand schools, there are still plenty of good choices.
There is no official way to divide up schools by exclusivity.
“Find the best fit school and don’t focus just on prestige,” says Heaton. When considering what school to apply to, she suggests considering the individual student including:

  • Personal accomplishments.
  • Area of interest.
  • What they want to study.
  • The purpose of college.
    • To get an education, explore areas of interest, and get a degree for a career you love.

If you are focused on only ivy league schools, figure out why. “The idea that going to an ivy school guarantees you will go on to a career you love is a total and utter fallacy,” states Heaton. “There are other options out there.”
The best name school doesn’t necessarily equal the best experience or opportunity.

What to Consider About a College

Some things to do before applying to a college are:

  • Make a list of what is most important to a student and what they must have (programs, facilities, etc.).
  • What to possibly study.
  • Be exposed to various colleges.
    • If on vacation, go visit a campus even when children are young. Students won’t know what they like about a school if they haven’t seen anything.
    • Visit local schools.
    • It’s not about if you are really going to go to that school, it just gives you a sense of what it would be like to attend that kind of school.
  • What can you afford?
  • Make a list of schools you like equally and try not to fall in love with just one.
  • You can plan visits in advance and try to set up a meeting with someone in a department you are really interested in.
  • Check school websites.
    • Research professors.
    • See course catalogs.
    • Check activities available.
  • Do NOT wait to visit a school until after you are accepted!

“Make sure this is a place you would fit and why and be sure you can articulate that,” notes Heaton. A great name isn’t enough.
Have students really share why they are choosing a school to apply to before you apply there.
About College Coach
Everyone employed is a former admissions officer. There are blogs and lots of information on the website.
Heaton hosts a radio show on VoiceAmerica- “Getting In: A College Coach Conversation”.
Check with your company’s benefits program- lots of companies purchase this service that you could access for free.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Par-ents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are inter-ested in learning more about scholarships please visit:
www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.
Contact Us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with the College Coach or VoiceAmerica..

Share

The post THCC73 – What it Takes to Get Into the Ivy League Interview with Elizabeth Heaton, Vice President and Educational Consultant at College Coach appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC72 – Science Competitions and Robotics Scholarships. Leverage your Extracurricular to Help Pay for College. Interview with Michael Vawter, College Robotics Expert and Founder of Robot Academy
27:39
2017-12-15 14:55:47 UTC 27:39
THCC72 – Science Competitions and Robotics Scholarships. Leverage your Extracurricular to Help Pay for College. Interview with Michael Vawter, College Robotics Expert and Founder of Robot Academy

Science Competitions and Robotics Scholarships

Does your child have a passion? Can that passion help with college? Robotics expert Michael Vawter shares in this episode about his background with robotics, getting started with science competitions, and what impact extracurricular activities can have on scholarships and applying to college.

About Michael Vawter

Michael was home schooled all through high school and began competing in robotics competitions in middle school. This led to other extracurricular activities and scholarships.

“If your kid is into building with Legos, you have a kid that is very mechanically oriented and has a future in engineering and design,” notes Vawter.

“You have to stimulate productivity in that realm,” warns Vawter, “It’s one thing to just build with Legos, and it’s another thing to build with Legos in a structured setting and solve specific challenges.”

How Parents Can Be Involved

“The first thing I would do is Google and search for ‘Science Competitions’, because it changes now and then,” recommends Vawter.

Some competitions are easy enough for parents to coach. Vawter suggests some ways parents can help:

  • Make sure materials are created correctly.
  • Time management.
  • Moral support.
  • Don’t have to be very into science themselves.
    • Pursue excellence, don’t worry about what place you get.
    • This is to gain experience, not just to win.
  • Be engaged and help.
    • The kid is the one that has to do the technology.
  • Provide resources.
    • Check the internet.
    • Help solve problems if difficulties arise.
  • Talk to the school and get a club started.

“If the parent is too into robotics and already knows the technology, it can be tempting for the parent to have more of an active role than is actually helpful in terms of building,” says Vawter.

Vawter stresses that extracurriculars are very important for high school students.

Impact on College

Vawter earned over a half million dollars in scholarships and had many choices when it came to college.

“The better story you are able to paint, as far as your background and your competencies, the more money you end up getting,” describes Vawter. He had a resume, essays, and documentation from his competitions for his college applications.

Vawter created the Robotic Academy in high school. This now has a summer camp program, school curriculum available throughout the country, and is franchising. “The goal of the academy is to help kids learn about science technology and turn it into something fun,” states Vawter.

The prime value from this activity is, “There has to be a solution, how do we do it, and then you figure it out,” concludes Vawter.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Par-ents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are inter-ested in learning more about scholarships please visit:

www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.

Contact Us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with Robot Academy.

Share

The post THCC72 – Science Competitions and Robotics Scholarships. Leverage your Extracurricular to Help Pay for College. Interview with Michael Vawter, College Robotics Expert and Founder of Robot Academy appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC71 – How to Find a College Internship to Super Charge your Career Interview with Sharise Kent, College Success and Internship Expert
34:39
2017-12-15 14:55:47 UTC 34:39
THCC71 – How to Find a College Internship to Super Charge your Career Interview with Sharise Kent, College Success and Internship Expert

How to Find a College Internship to Super Charge your Career

Want to build your resume, make great connections, have real-world experiences, and leave college ready for a career? You need an internship! Sharise Kent has written the manual on internships and shares everything you need to know including how to find one, what to expect, and how to prepare.

About Sharise Kent

Author of “The Internship Manual: A Step-by-Step Guide to Getting the Internship of Your Dreams”.

This book explains why to do an internship, how to find one, and what to do once you get an internship. “It’s the manual. It’s walking you from A to Z and giving you what you need to understand in that process,” notes Kent.

Kent began her career as a college admission professional and then transitioned into a nonprofit and has helped over 400 students with internships.

Internship Defined and Explained

“An internship is supposed to be a learning experience,” expands Kent. A good internship is an opportunity to:

  • Be mentored.
  • Learn new skills.
  • Expand your network.
  • Explore a career from 8 to 12 weeks.
  • Be professional.
  • Experience an office.
    • There is a different environment in an office that usually includes bigger goals.

It is an experience that will enhance education and let a student explore what makes them a great professional. This is different from a regular job because it is a training environment and not just for a paycheck.

“When you look for a college, you want to investigate the career services department as a whole,” recommends Kent. This doesn’t need to make or break your decision about a college, but it is certainly a positive to consider.

There are some career paths that integrate field experiences such as:

  • Student Teaching
  • Medical Professions
  • Social Work
  • Counseling

This is different from an internship because there isn’t much choice or exploration. These majors usually have required amounts of hours, or work, as part of completing that degree and entering the work force.

Some internships require a portfolio or some classwork already completed, but it isn’t only for juniors and seniors! High school students can, and should, apply for internships.

“The culture is shifting and changing because employers are recognizing that if they can introduce young people to these types of careers as early as high school, they are going to introduce them to things they wouldn’t have majored in or would not have pursued careers in,” states Kent.

Kent strongly recommends looking into internships beginning as early as freshman year.

Typical Internships

Doing an internship for course credit needs to be approved by your department or career services. Academic internships can usually earn 3 credits and often require a paper or project that shows evidence of learning.

Paid internships vary. Some companies give stipends, offer paid transportation, or regular pay starting at minimum wage or more. Typically you are treated just like an employee.

“The time to look for summer internships is November for the following summer,” warns Kent.

How to Pursue an Internship

There are 5 quick ways to find an internship:

  • Ask around.
    • Talk to EVERYONE.
    • Parents can help by using their own network (where they work or through fraternity/sorority) and ask there.
  • Go to your college’s Career Services.
    • There is usually a free job/internship fair on campus.
  • Don’t ignore small businesses or nonprofits.
    • Walk in and just ask.
      • Might not be for credit or money, but it will go on your resume.
    • Online searches.
    • Internship programs.
      • You can find them online where you get paired with a company.

“If you are doing all five of those diligently, you are going to find an internship,” assures Kent.

Prepare for an internship by having a good resume, do mock interviews, dress for success, and have a LinkedIn account.

Kent acknowledges, “There might be a $10 -$40 application fee, but as a nonprofit that is just to defray the cost.” For profit companies have a different system.

Internships away from home cost money for living. If it is paid, will that cover the cost of living or moving away for the summer? Transportation also needs to be considered when applying.

Career planning starts in high school. Internships are vital for experience and resume building. Kent points out, “Everybody who graduates college has a degree. Why should an employer hire you over that other person?”

More about “The Internship Manual”

Kent authored this book based on her experience and the experiences of some of the over 400 interns she helped placed. “I thought a lot about the things that students come to me with and tried to put those into the book,” describes Kent.

 

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Par-ents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are inter-ested in learning more about scholarships please visit:

www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.

Contact Us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with Sharise Kent or The Internship Manual.

Share

The post THCC71 – How to Find a College Internship to Super Charge your Career Interview with Sharise Kent, College Success and Internship Expert appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC70 – Impact of Grief on Planning for College Interview with Natalia Volz, Founder of www.PassingThroughGrief.com
35:17
2017-12-15 14:55:47 UTC 35:17
THCC70 – Impact of Grief on Planning for College Interview with Natalia Volz, Founder of www.PassingThroughGrief.com

Natalia Volz uses her own experience to explain the process of grief, commonly due to death or divorce, and how to still successfully plan for college. Will you need to take a year or two off? Do you need to continue straight through into college? Ms. Volz has the information to help prepare you during the grieving process.

About Natalia

Volz’s husband was diagnosed with terminal cancer. She had children that were 11 and twins that were 13 at the time of his passing. “Life was turned upside. We don’t learn how to grieve or move through loss,” describes Volz.

It took 2 years for Volz to move through her grief and she became passionate about helping others.

“The death of a parent or spouse makes a huge impact on your life,” notes Volz, “There is no back to normal.”

Grief Facts

Volz discovered some interesting facts through her grieving process:

  • There isn’t a timetable to get through grief.
    • Our culture gives people about 6 weeks.
    • The average recovery is 4-6 years.
  • School is patient for a certain time.
    • They expect children to bounce back quickly.
  • Children grieve in 3 ways.
    • Strive for perfection.
    • Hide or become very shy/quiet.
    • Acting out.
      • This is actually the healthiest way.

Be sure to talk to the school, even if it has been multiple years after the event.

Volz defines, “Grief is the normal and natural response to a loss, or significant change, in our life.”

Applying to College While Grieving

“If you are a parent that is dealing with the loss of a spouse through death or divorce, you need to take care of yourself first,” recommends Volz.

Be sure to advocate for your children. Volz strongly suggests talking to the schools you are applying to, even if it has been a few years.

Something often impacted is finances. Be sure colleges are made aware and they will usually work with you.

“The part of your brain where you can critically think and plan ahead is not operating when you are deep in grief,” explains Volz. You have to recover from your grief first.

Healing from grief requires certain tools. Volz gives these tips:

  • Don’t judge yourself.
    • Volz’s website has great resources to help you start to move the grief.
  • Grief is not intellectual.
    • It moves through your heart/emotions and you can’t just read a book.
  • You can’t grieve alone.
    • You need to be with others and not left alone.
      • Parents must recover from their own grief before helping their children.
      • As you recover, you will be better able to plan.

Parents need to get the proper information about how to heal from grief in order to help their children. If you are choosing a therapist, ask lots of questions and be sure the person will fit your needs.

How to Know If Your Child is Ready for College

“Each situation is unique and each person is an individual,” notes Volz.

Have an honest talk and build your relationship with your child to see if they are ready. Share your financial situation. Talk about if college is something they want, what can they do in high school to help set them up for success.

Volz stresses, “It is important to have open communication and telling them what you are able to do for them and what you are not.”

Look at all your options and don’t judge yourself at where you are in the grieving process. “Friends and extended family are so crucial in both our children healing their grief and our self,” emphasizes Volz, “Turn to friends and others!”

If you have a friend that is going through the grieving process, make sure to reach out to them and offer help. You can do something as simple as filling out financial aid paperwork or visiting colleges.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Par-ents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are inter-ested in learning more about scholarships please visit:

www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.

Contact Us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with Passing Through Grief or the Grief Recovery Institute.

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The post THCC70 – Impact of Grief on Planning for College Interview with Natalia Volz, Founder of www.PassingThroughGrief.com appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC69 – Understanding Student Loans with author Jordan Goodman
27:16
2017-12-15 14:55:47 UTC 27:16
THCC69 – Understanding Student Loans with author Jordan Goodman

Student loans and financial aid are critical to pay for college. In this episode, The Money Answer Man, Jordan Goodman, explains if you should take loans in a student’s name, parent’s name, or from grandparents. If you want a high quality education, but don’t want to get into big debt, Goodman has the answers for you.

Student Loans

“It’s changing society. The average person graduates with $30,000 in undergraduate student loan debt,” says Goodman. Graduate school or special degrees cost even more.

“Financial aid is a burden, not a privilege!” states Goodman. It is imperative to begin saving as soon as possible. By junior or senior year of high school, a large portion of college tuition should already be saved.

Where people are getting money to pay for college:

  • Students themselves can save/borrow in their name.
    • The more you can put on the kid, the better.
  • Parent PLUS loans.
    • There is a certain limit on these.
  • There are some BAD ideas to pay for college that you should NOT
    • Loans against a 401K.
    • Home equity loans.
    • Life insurance loans.
    • Grandparents borrowing to pay for their grandkids.

When choosing a college, there is an emotional aspect and a financial aspect to consider.

  • Financial Part: Taking on extra debt might not pay off.
  • Emotional Part: I want my kid to go to a fancy school.

“Ultimately, the payoff should be if you would get a better job, have more income, and have a better life at the higher end college,” explains Goodman, “For some people absolutely, “Yes,” but for a lot of people the answer is, ‘No’.”

It is difficult for a high school senior to determine clearly what their career path will be. College is an investment in the future. Consider the payoff before taking on a large amount of debt.

Graduating with Student Loan Debt

Most students can take on about $30,000 of debt themselves.

“Anything after federal loans you start to get into private loans which are much more expensive,” warns Goodman.

When you get out of school, here is what you can do:

  • Consolidate all of your loans into one loan at the lowest possible interest rate.
  • Income Based Repayment.
    • Work in the public or nonprofit sector.
    • Pay the minimal amount for 10 years and then the rest is forgiven.
  • Refinance your debt.

Parents usually cannot shift the debt they take out back to the kids. Have students take as much as they can themselves. Goodman shares, “I’m unhappy with parents sacrificing their own financial futures for their kids.”

Parents Can Minimize Their Risk

Lots of options that parents can do:

  • Prepaid Tuition Plan.
    • No matter what the tuition is, it will be paid if you stay within the state.
  • Coverdell ESA.
    • Education Savings Accounts- put money aside to pay for education.
  • College Savings Bank CD.
  • Spend at the merchants connected and they put money away for you.

Scholarships

“If you can qualify for scholarships, it is money you don’t have to borrow from other places,” notes Goodman.

Schools themselves often offer scholarships. There are quite a few out there, some of them very specific, and they can sometimes be quite unique. Find these and apply to them all.

Higher end schools with lots of demand can keep their prices high. The biggest change has been foreign students coming to get a prestigious American education and they can pay these higher costs.

One thing that is changing is online education, which is a definite alternative. “You can get a perfectly good education online,” suggests Goodman, “Much cheaper than going away to school.”

Bargaining

“People don’t realize if they are accepted into a school, they have bargaining power,” describes Goodman.

You can ask for:

  • Lower tuition cost.
  • Financial aid.
  • Work study programs.
  • Many other options available.

This is especially useful to do if you have been accepted to more than one institution. Colleges are competing for students, and you can use this to your advantage!

Bargain with the admission office and financial aid office. Ask them what they can do for you. “It’s almost like bargaining for a car,” compares Goodman, “Play them off each other and get yourself the best deal!”

Common Questions

Goodman is a regular guest on many radio shows and has his own show “The Money Answers Show”. He happily answers questions via these shows and email to help families with the difficult decisions around paying for college.

“It is very easy to borrow, but the paying back part is a real problem for a lot of people,” notes Goodman. People are becoming more aware of this and are being more cautious about the debts they are taking on.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Par-ents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are inter-ested in learning more about scholarships please visit:

www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.

Contact Us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with Money Answers or Jordan Goodman.

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The post THCC69 – Understanding Student Loans with author Jordan Goodman appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC68 – How to Help Your College Student Build Their Credit Interview with Ty Crandall, Business Credit Expert and CEO of Credit Suite
32:12
2017-12-15 14:55:47 UTC 32:12
THCC68 – How to Help Your College Student Build Their Credit Interview with Ty Crandall, Business Credit Expert and CEO of Credit Suite

Do you understand your credit score? Does your child? Parents and students alike struggle to understand how credit works, how to build it wisely, and the severe consequences of making credit mistakes. In this episode, Ty Crandall shares his expertise on credit and financing and gives key tips on how to help your college student with building strong credit.

About Credit

“One of the frustrating things we see is that people are not taught this at a young age,” laments Crandall. A good place to start is with the FICO score to get an idea of how the credit score works.

Everybody should sit down with their children before they go to college and address this. Children need to be taught with lessons about how credit works and what it is.

The three major credit agencies populate a credit profile that is connected to your social security number, name, and address based on the credit you go out and get. This is averaged into a FICO score.

The FICO score has 5 separate components:

  • Payment History.
    • 35% of the score.
    • 30% of the score.
    • The amount that is owed in relation to the limits or original amounts on loans.
  • Length of Credit History.
    • 15% of the score.
    • How long you have had a credit profile.
  • New Credit.
    • 10% of the score.
    • Has to do with new inquiries.
  • Credit Mix.
    • It is the mix of credit that you have.
      • 2-3 loans, 1-2 mortgages, and 3 consumer credit cards is considered very good.
    • 10% of the score.

“FICO score reflects someone’s risk of going 90 days late within the next 12 months,” explains Crandall, “This will determine if you are approved or not approved and what rates you are given.”

Race, ethnicity, age, and gender are not factors into a credit score.

Companies used to call neighbors and would sell information to anyone that wanted it. Once information was put on computers, the government created the Fair Credit Reporting Act. This strictly regulates what information is allowed to be gathered and displayed.

Information is now regulated by the government and must now be 100% accurate, timely, and verifiable. Pulling a personal credit report requires written permission by you under Permissible Purpose.

Students Having Credit Cards

“Every parent needs to sit down and tell their child what is going to happen. A lot of kids are going to get into credit card problems early,” says Crandall.

Ways parents can help their child build credit:

  • Co-sign on a loan.
    • If you are buying a car for your child going to college, have them co-sign on the loan to build history.
    • Create a CD loan where you put money into a CD at your bank and get a loan against that CD which is a good way to establish credit.
  • Add your child as an authorized user to your current credit cards.
    • Your child can’t actually use the credit card, but they will get the benefit of the credit card history.
  • Start a secure credit card, NOT a regular credit card.
    • Credit card companies will raise the limit of a regular credit card the more they spend which can cause trouble.
      • A regular credit card gives a limit of what you can spend, but the limit can be raised by the credit company and you can spend more.
      • A secure credit card you give money to the credit card company and the limit is capped at whatever is given to open the card.

Parents should discuss this with their child. “The minute they go late on a credit card by more than 30 days, they start doing SERIOUS damage to that credit report and it will take at least 7 years to fall off the credit report. The worse they let it go, it can be sent to judgment and indefinitely stay on their credit report,” stresses Crandall.

You can rebuild after making a mistake by creating more positive credit choices. “It is not an easy or fast process,” cautions Crandall. The negative item will remain on your report the full 7 years and will impact what loans, rates, and types of credit will be available.

Credit scores are used on quite a few things such as insurance, on loans, property renting/buying, or anywhere that you are going to be given credit.

“Every parent should sit down and have a conversation with their child about how credit works,” Crandall reiterates.

Student Loans

Federal and private loans show up on your credit report. Deferred payments are not negative. These are not a recommended way to build credit, but they are one way.

“Student loans are tough. If you default on a student loan, you aren’t able to get any other kind of government financing,” warns Crandall, “Including an FHA mortgage.”

Final Tips

“I think it is essential that parents know that kids will not get this education on credit in school. It has to come from the parents,” emphasizes Crandall, “If you don’t educate them, NOBODY WILL!”

Crandall suggests that students really should know:

  • What the FICO score is.
  • The damage caused by negative items.
  • To be open with parents so parents can help early on if there is an issue and before damage is done.
  • If your child is looking at building a business, there is business credit that can be established to help them once they graduate and are ready to start their business.

Crandall concludes, “Helping them get started on the right foot, with positive credit, is so valuable to the rest of their life.”

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are interested in learning more about scholarships please visit:

www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.

Contact Us to submit a question to our email.

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with Credit Suite or Ty Crandall.

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The post THCC68 – How to Help Your College Student Build Their Credit Interview with Ty Crandall, Business Credit Expert and CEO of Credit Suite appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC67 – Using StatFuse to Better the Odds of Admission to College Interview with Jeet Banerjee, Co-Founder of StatFuse
25:22
2017-12-15 14:55:47 UTC 25:22
THCC67 – Using StatFuse to Better the Odds of Admission to College Interview with Jeet Banerjee, Co-Founder of StatFuse

“Statfuse is an online application that helps high school and community college students with the college admissions process,” describes Banerjee.

Students can fill out a college application and select a college of interest. The site will then give them a percentage of likelihood that they would be accepted to that university or college. Students will also be told their strengths, weaknesses, and what they can do to better their odds of acceptance.

In this episode, Jeet Banerjee shares about his experience with applying to college and his website Statfuse:

  • Jeet is an entrepreneur.
    • 22 years old.
  • Has delivered a talk for TedX.
  • Went to public high school and had a difficult experience with his co-founder figuring out how to apply to college.
  • Turned to the internet and struggled to find a credible source for helping with admissions.
  • Began serving other students immediately after graduating from high school.

Calculating the Odds of Acceptance

“We aggregate data from the universities of who was wait-listed, rejected, and accepted,” says Banerjee. The site was also in a beta testing mode for 6 months to test the algorithm and validate the software with actual students.

Other sites only use GPA and SAT/ACT scores. Statfuse has over 25 questions they ask to go in depth and really look at the whole picture and opportunity for acceptance.

Essays and personal statements required by universities cannot be measured through this program, but everything else from extracurricular activities to accolades are considered.

“We don’t directly have anything that will tell students if they will qualify for scholarships, but we are building relationships and partnerships with scholarship organizations where students can apply directly through our portal,” notes Banerjee.

The site is specifically created for students, but parents and students are both able to sign up. Users create an account and can save their information and edit it as needed.

As a parent, if you see a 15% or lower chance for your child to be accepted Banerjee suggests considering:

  • What grade is your child in?
    • As a junior or senior it is a little more alarming. The site will let you know what is weak about the application and gives you the opportunity to improve that area.
  • Be aware if it is an expensive school.
  • Create a list of colleges that include:
    • Safety schools you have a high chance of getting into.
    • Reach schools with around a 50% chance of being accepted.
    • High reach schools or dream schools with low percentages of acceptance.

“Anything above a 75% is a strong likelihood at a university and I would put them on your safety list,” recommends Banerjee.

Percentages can range from 95% at a school with less requirements and 5% at some of the top universities if a lot of things are missing from your application.

AP, Honors, and foreign language class requirements are considered.

Other Potential Features of StatFuse

“In terms of looking into the future,” says Banerjee, “We want to see other ways we can add additional value to the site.”

Some ideas for the future are:

  • 1 on 1 access with students already accepted to universities.
    • Letting them connect over a Skype call possibly and helping with their application, essays, and describing their experience.
  • Talking with previous admissions officers or consultants.
  • Offering virtual counseling.

All information collected through the site is stored in a secure database. None of the information is ever released to third parties without the user’s consent. There is an option users can choose to opt in and their information can then be given to colleges/universities or other third parties.

“It’s a great idea to go through our portal and get a realistic expectation of what colleges they might get accepted to and one’s they might not; that way they can really plan,” elaborates Banerjee.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are interested in learning more about scholarships please visit:

www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.

Contact Us to submit a question to our email
Leave us a voicemail message on the computer! (We use questions for future shows because it’s likely other people have the same question.)

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with Statfuse.

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The post THCC67 – Using StatFuse to Better the Odds of Admission to College Interview with Jeet Banerjee, Co-Founder of StatFuse appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC66 – Tips on How Undecided Students Can Choose a Major Interview with Kat Clowes, Author “Putting College to Work”
50:25
2017-12-15 14:55:47 UTC 50:25
THCC66 – Tips on How Undecided Students Can Choose a Major Interview with Kat Clowes, Author “Putting College to Work”

Tips on How Undecided Students Can Choose a Major“What I didn’t know is there is so much more to it that you should be doing during your college years that I was clueless about things like building your network, or knowing what my brand was, or taking advantage of all the resources available to me in college,” remembers Ms. Clowes, “I hoping to help students to figure what else they should be doing to be successful and not have some of the doubt and 10 years of searching afterward which is why I wrote the book.”

Kat shares why she wrote “Putting College to Work” and what can be found in the book:

  • Was a typical over-achieving student.
    • Got in an accident in high school and lost her short term memory.
  • Upon returning to school, she had to drop all her AP and honors classes.
  • Was able to graduate from high school early under the condition of starting junior college.
  • Changed her major multiple times in college.
  • Spent the next 10 years doing multiple different careers and changing her mind about her profession.

Examples from the Book

A typical problem of an undecided student is that they don’t know what schools they want to go to because they don’t know what they want to be.

If a student really doesn’t know what they want to do they should:

  • Think about who they are and what they are really good at.
    • What are you values?
    • What are your strengths?
    • What are your skills?
    • What are you looking for out of life in general?
    • There are some assessments available to help with this.
  • Try different subjects, clubs, and activities.
  • Identify what you really do not enjoy doing.
    • If you identify what you really do not like, it helps to focus on what you do like.
  • Don’t shy away from something that is a true interest.
    • Clowe’s brother made a full career out of video games. He is on the business end of the industry.
    • Investigate the industry or hobby they are already interested in.

The book helps students to step back and make a plan of action to get where they want to be and help students that don’t know what they want to do and discover that.

For parents of students that are completely unmotivated you should take them to a convention or give them a look at the business side of the company. “They are likely to be a lot more motivated if they know it is possible to turn this into a career,” says Clowes.

For parents of students that are very motivated, but can’t quite decide on one focus, have them start brainstorming what all the different areas of their interest have in common. Get them to job-shadow to help them discover if this is something they really want to do.

“I think there is a big push right now to turn majors into career training,” states Clowes. College is to provide a well-rounded experience. If you are going to be the best at something, then you will have a career path. If you are just going to be average, you have to think it through to the end. Find something connected to your big dream and you might end up on that path.

Categories of the Book

“My publisher and I tried really hard to not make it a read cover to cover kind of book,” describes Clowes. It is more of a “how-to” kind of book than an advice book.

Section 1 is called “Put Yourself to Work” and it is about:

  • Advocation for yourself, taking action, and how to take action.
  • Time management tips.
  • How to maximize your productivity.
  • Setting up goals.
  • Personal branding.

There are worksheets, areas for notes, and scripts you can use when calling people.

Section 2 is about “Succeeding in School” and it discusses:

  • How to choose a major.
  • How to plan your courses.
  • Using professors as a resource and being a student a professor might want to help.
  • Financial aid.
  • All the different resources you should be taking advantage of while at school.
  • Using your summer to the fullest.

Section 3 is “Succeeding After College” and helps set students up for getting that job:

  • How to use the career center.
  • About career counselors.
  • Job fairs and how to be successful at a job fair.
  • Resume help and guidance.
  • Alumni office.
    • The best pot of gold most people don’t take advantage of.
  • Specialty institutes.
  • Job shadowing and informational interviews.
  • Volunteering as experience.
  • Analysis on if you should be going to graduate school

Section 4 is all about “What You Need to Know to Be Successful Professionally”:

  • What networking is and how to do it efficiently.
  • Developing an elevator pitch.
  • How to research a company
  • How to network with manners
  • Finding network events
  • Being a resource to your network.
  • Crafting a resume and cover letter.
  • Acing an interview.
    • What to do before, during, and after.
  • Using social media wisely, especially LinkedIn.
  • Rocking a job fair.
  • Resources, worksheets, and a step-by-step timeline by quarter from freshman year through senior year of college. It helps map everything out by season.

This book is available on Amazon, Barnes and Noble, and anywhere that books are sold. “The price of college is so high now, you really want to make sure that your student and you are getting the most out of your money,” notes Clowes. This book will help you to make sure you are asking the right questions and choosing the best school that is the right fit for you.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are interested in learning more about scholarships please visit:

www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.

Contact Us to submit a question to our email
Leave us a voicemail message on the computer! (We use questions for future shows because it’s likely other people have the same question.)

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with Kat Clowes.

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The post THCC66 – Tips on How Undecided Students Can Choose a Major Interview with Kat Clowes, Author “Putting College to Work” appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC65 – Writing Quality Essays Interview with Ethan Sawyer, The College Essay Guy
36:29
2017-12-15 14:55:47 UTC 36:29
THCC65 – Writing Quality Essays Interview with Ethan Sawyer, The College Essay Guy

Most colleges use The Common App which allows students to apply to multiple colleges at once. This usually includes:

  • Personal information.
  • Main personal statement of about 650 words.
    • Sawyer suggests to think of this statement prompt as, “Describe the world you come from and tell us how your world has shaped your dreams and aspirations.”
  • Activities list.
  • Most colleges will request different supplemental essays.
  • This means several different essay requirements per school.

Some of these essays might be exactly the same prompt and can double, but if the topics are different then the essays will be different.

Sawyer gives the tip, “Take the different prompts you think will overlap and put them at the top of your word document. Write an essay that works for those two or three prompts. Actually writing and answering all three of those prompts at the same time will add some texture, layers, and levels to the essay and save time.”

 

Each of these essays is a chance to share a little bit more about yourself and show a variety of values. “Do these with someone else to get feedback and see how you are coming across,” notes Sawyer. The website has a “values exercise” so students can learn a few different values they have and should be sure to share through their essays.

Parents in the Process

How parents can help in the application and essay writing process varies. “It depends, but it can be useful to, as much as possible, serve in the role of cheerleader,” recommends Sawyer. It is also helpful to designate a certain day of the week as “college day”, and that is the one day of the week to discuss and work on college items.

Parents can also help by staying aware of deadlines. Be sure to follow up with your child on “college day” to remind them when certain things are due. Some parents also find it helpful to have an outside family member or consultant to be in charge of monitoring application progress. Ask your child how you can best support them.

“I like to invite students to begin the process after AP testing in the spring of their junior year,” explains Sawyer, “because we know what some of those prompts are going to be and you can gear your Summer towards that.” Supplemental essay questions are usually released in August. Get a draft of the common app done over Summer break. It is also important to have a balanced college list done by the end of Summer with 8 or 9 schools including:

  • 2 or 3 dream schools where you have a 5% chance of getting in.
  • 3 or 4 realistic schools where you will probably get in.
  • 2 or 3 really clear “likely” schools.

The Importance of Essays

While the entire package is important, Sawyer admits, “In some cases it can provide context and information to really make a difference.” You want your essay to make an admissions officer want to fight for you to get in. However, “An amazing essay isn’t going to make up for four years of slacking off,” states Sawyer.

The most importance piece is the main essay. Sawyer strongly says, “Allow a lot of time for that. Write it over a process of weeks, not just days or one day.” It will take between 6-10 drafts and revising before it will be of a high enough quality. Sawyer estimates it takes between 20-40 hours to create a fantastic essay that shows off a student’s strengths.

About the Website

There are lots of free resources available such as:

  • Sample essays.
  • Step by step guide to write an essay.
  • Advice on supplements.
  • Search bar to find anything you are looking for.
  • How to create a great college list.
  • “What should I be doing right now?” timeline.
  • Complete Guide To The College Essay.
    • A six video series where Sawyer walks you through what to do.

Sawyer also gives these quick tips:

  • Parents should encourage students to create a very balanced college list.
  • Listen through the process.
  • Check out Sawyer’s new book that will be released next year.

Brad suggests, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents” which is a video series available on our website. It teaches parents all about the different types of scholarships, how to apply to them (if you need to), and how to win them!

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are interested in learning more about scholarships please visit:

www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.

Contact Us to submit a question to our email
Leave us a voicemail message on the computer! (We use questions for future shows because it’s likely other people have the same question.)

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with CollegeEssayGuy.

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The post THCC65 – Writing Quality Essays Interview with Ethan Sawyer, The College Essay Guy appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC64 – Navigating the Admissions Process for Ivy League Schools Interview with Dr. Joie Jager-Hyman, Expert on the College Admissions Process & on American Education
27:58
2017-12-15 14:55:47 UTC 27:58
THCC64 – Navigating the Admissions Process for Ivy League Schools Interview with Dr. Joie Jager-Hyman, Expert on the College Admissions Process & on American Education

Choosing and Applying to a College

It is important to be realistic. If you are in the academic range of the college you are looking at, be sure to talk to real students.  Be careful to select colleges that your test scores fall into the accepted range of. “The grades are also very important,” explains Dr. Jager-Hyman, “Test scores are really easy- that information is front and center.”

When applying, Dr. Jager-Hyman recommends:

  • Start early.
    • Visit the campuses even in 10th grade, for example, but definitely during junior year.
    • Have a strategy to take the ACT/SAT and get it done.
    • Junior summer is also the time to get an application done. Senior fall is a very busy time. “Getting an early start is critical,” stresses Dr. Jager-Hyman.
  • Do research.
  • Have a third party help with the applications.
    • Jager-Hyman explains, “Teenagers don’t hear what you are trying to say.” Having someone such as a neighbor or other family member to help with the application process can make a difference.
  • Visit the school.
    • Go beyond the college advisor or guide when there. Talk to the actual students.

If you can’t visit, be sure to email and show interest.  Schools are specific on what they want. In 10th grade, start paying attention to what coursework you are taking and gear it towards a potential major.

Importance of Testing

“I advise students to plan for 3 test dates working back from the early decision deadline, November 1,” says Dr. Jager-Hyman, “They will take your highest composite score or super score- they want to pump them up that’s why they will give you multiple chances to take the test and even mix and match sections of the test.”

Subject tests are another option. “They are always good to demonstrate mastery of a subject,” recommends Dr. Jager-Hyman.  Some colleges have them as a requirement, so be sure to check with your choice colleges if it is needed or not to apply.

Colleges take the highest score for ACT/SAT, so take it a few times, but don’t do too many.

Deadlines

There are deadlines for applications. Dr. Jager-Hyman says, “I wouldn’t sacrifice quality to get it in early.” It is important to “sleep on it” and really work on it. “Give yourself the best shot,” Dr. Jager-Hyman suggests.

Letters of recommendations are also very important.  Colleges generally request letters from a guidance counselor and two teachers.  There are forms that go with these letters that students rarely look at that are very important. Look at the checklist and pick the teacher that will score you the best.

“It’s great if you are smart, but if you are not using your powers for good, as they say, you are not going to be as attractive to colleges,” states Dr. Jager-Hyman.

Dr. Jager-Hyman

  • Went to Dartmouth for undergraduate studies.
  • Became admissions officer there.
  • Received Doctorate degree from Harvard.

Colleges are looking for well-rounded individuals now. “Yes, academics are the most important, but beyond that they want students to make an impact,” Dr. Jager-Hyman notes.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are interested in learning more about scholarships please visit:

www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.

Contact Us to submit a question to our email
Leave us a voicemail message on the computer! (We use questions for future shows because it’s likely other people have the same question.)

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with CollegePrep360.

Share

The post THCC64 – Navigating the Admissions Process for Ivy League Schools Interview with Dr. Joie Jager-Hyman, Expert on the College Admissions Process & on American Education appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC63 – Understanding the Admissions Process Interview with Lydia Fayal, Co-founder of www.Admitsee.com
31:13
2017-12-15 14:55:47 UTC 31:13
THCC63 – Understanding the Admissions Process Interview with Lydia Fayal, Co-founder of www.Admitsee.com

Here’s some of the features of the website www.Admitsee.com

  • Provides a “big brother or sister” at dream school.
  • See application files of accepted students.
    • You can compare your own test scores, for example, to accepted students at different colleges.
  • Browsing is free.
  • College students get paid for posting their profile and sharing.
  • Great way to see what a student body really looks like.
  • Can sign up to have a college student mentor.
    • College students can review essays, give advice, and help guide prospective students. Essays are EXTREMELY important!

“Over the past ten years the (college) process has become that much more complicated,” explains Fayal, “But the offerings and resources haven’t improved.” This provides a way for high school students to connect to college students at their dream school.

Building Relationships

After you view profiles, you can begin a mentor/mentee relationship with actual college students. High school students get to remain anonymous and so do college students to make sure personal information is protected.

“It is students helping students,” says Fayal.

Once admitted, you can switch your profile to the “admit” side and get paid $10 up front, $2 each time your profile is viewed, and $7 for each person you answer questions to in a week. “It is usually less than an hour of responding to quick questions,” notes Fayal. There is an additional $20 fee for essay submissions by the high school student and then mentors provide notes back.

Focusing on Admissions

“Right now we have 890 different 4 year universities on the site,” states Fayal. Free access to the site is available to public and charter high school students through their guidance counselor.

This is a great way to see who was actually accepted into a particular college so high school students can custom tailor their application to meet that school’s needs. By connecting with a mentor, information about scholarships also becomes available as is guidance through that process.

$1,000 is given away each month to a new user on the web site. There are other give aways going on as well including Apple watches and iPads. “We are trying to give a lot of stuff away right now,” jokes Fayal.

26% of high achieving students hire a private consultant according to the Independent Consultant Association. A high-achieving student is defined as scoring at or above 70th percentile on standardized tests. The average price of private consultant is over $4,000. This site provides a peer to peer alternative that is affordable for students that can’t afford a consultant or in addition to those that can.

44% of students in the user base applied to 7 or more colleges. Fayal recommends to apply to at least:

  • 3 reach schools.
  • 3 target schools that you think are just right for you.
  • 1 or 2 safety schools.

Students coming from private high schools are significantly applying to more colleges. Fayal suggests, “If financial aide is a big concern for you, then it does help to apply to more schools because you can leverage a financial aide package you get from one school with another school.” You can also ask for waivers of application fees in order to apply to more schools.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are interested in learning more about scholarships please visit:

www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.

Contact Us to submit a question to our email
Leave us a voicemail message on the computer! (We use questions for future shows because it’s likely other people have the same question.)

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with Admitsee.com.

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THCC62 – College Test Prep Interview with Jean Burk, SAT Instructor
28:21
2017-12-15 14:55:47 UTC 28:21
THCC62 – College Test Prep Interview with Jean Burk, SAT Instructor

About the SAT and PSAT

“The higher the score, the more money you get,” says Burk.

The PSAT (Preliminary SAT) is just as important as the SAT, but it is used for scholarships in the junior year. The SAT is offered 7 times a year, but the PSAT is only offered once a year in October. There are only a few small differences between the two tests.

“The average student starts taking tests in spring of their Junior year. They are already so maxed out it is so stressful for them to start so late,” notes Burk.

Burk strongly recommends starting as soon as possible because there is no age limit. “At the MINIMUM I would say starting in ninth grade,” urges Burk. With score choice, scores don’t need to be sent anywhere except to your own house.

Students take the PSAT the third week of October, the booklet is mailed back in November, and then scores are sent out in December. You can use the homeschool code for your state so the book is sent right to you, which is very important, so you can review test questions and how they solved the problems.

The Junior year is the ONLY year the PSAT counts for scholarships, so you should practice before then.

“This is really a critical thinking test and these questions are purposefully designed to trick the kids,” states Burk.

When taking a test:

  • Read the question carefully with a critical eye.
    • “What is this question really asking me?
  • Eliminate the wrong answers FIRST.
    • Smart kids tend to overthink and second guess themselves.

When to Start Studying

When to start begins on your child’s grades. Burk’s program is 12 lessons at 45-50 minutes each. “At least start 3 months before you are going to take the test because you are only going to retain a small percentage you hear the first time. You really want to go back and hear it again to internalize the strategies,” explains Burk.

Most students that do poorly are looking at taking the test wrong. They are trying to take the test like they do school.

“Every question can be answered in 30 seconds or less. Once students learn that, especially the ones that aren’t good test takers, the confidence level is amazing,” Burk notes.

About the ACT

The American College Test and the SAT are both used to get into college and to get scholarships. “About one-third of students do better on the ACT, one-third do better on the SAT, and one-third do about the same because it is a standardized test,” Burk points out, “Bottom line is that test taking strategies work on both tests.” Colleges accept both type of test and can convert your score from one form to the other.

Take both! Each has a downloadable version available on their web site in order to decide which is more comfortable.

How to Prepare

These tests are logic based and you can prepare for this by doing puzzles and logic games at home. These strategies work on ALL standardized tests. “Because you know standardized tests are going to be based on thinking and logic skills, that’s what you need to be putting somehow into your daily life,” suggests Burk.

Some logic skill sources can be found by using a search engine to find logic games and puzzles.

Jean Burk began her career with her own son. Burk explains, “I started teaching kids how to take the test and showing them that it really was a skill. It wasn’t about your IQ or about what you knew; it was about how to take the test.”

  • Began tutoring local students.
  • Created CollegePrepGenius.
  • Speaks at conventions.
  • FOX News contributor.

Quick Tips

Burk recommends:

  • Start early!
  • Every school weighs and calculates their grades differently, so these scores are favored more.
  • Standardized tests are a fair way for colleges to determine scholarships and entry.
  • Compare your scores on Cappex.
  • There are lots of ways to get free college. Burk’s eBook is available for free to listeners.
  • You can do it!

“I want people to realize you don’t have to be strapped with loans and debts or change your college list. There is time in the day to learn this and it can be done,” encourages Burk.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are interested in learning more about scholarships please visit:

www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.

Contact Us to submit a question to our email
Leave us a voicemail message on the computer! (We use questions for future shows because it’s likely other people have the same question.)

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with College Prep Genius.

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The post THCC62 – College Test Prep Interview with Jean Burk, SAT Instructor appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC61 – Being a Collegepreneur Interview with Sandra Noonan, Content Scientist/Blogger
30:42
2017-12-15 14:55:47 UTC 30:42
THCC61 – Being a Collegepreneur Interview with Sandra Noonan, Content Scientist/Blogger

Noonan suggests following James Altucher. She developed the collegepreneur idea in response to critics, such as Altucher, that say to not bother with college anymore.

Things that college students going into college should think about:

  • The cost of college has increased by 300% in the last 30 years.
  • Wages for college students are declining.

Noonan defines a collegepreneur as, “A student who manages the college experience so it doesn’t manage them.” It is important for students to use the resources available at a college to launch themselves into the life they want.

“They will have something to show for their college experience aside from a transcript,” Noonan further explains.

How Parents Can Help

Noonan would keep tabs on her child’s social media and she would also say:

  • A career doesn’t have to start after college.
    • Can be small, just something that compliments your classwork.
  • What worked in high school might not work for you in college.
    • Loosen expectations, especially freshman year, because students are finding themselves.
  • Start with questions:
    • What value can I add to the world?
    • What kind of life do I want to live?

“The relationships you nurture in college can be intensely valuable in your life,” states Noonan. It is important to step away from social media and to develop real relationships. Social media can be used to lever success with clubs or in a professional way.

“Be a collegepreneur and start things; don’t look for the college system to provide them,” stresses Noonan.

What College Success Looks Like

Noonan notes this will be a very personal answer, but some questions to consider are:

  • Did I discover something about myself that I can get economic value from?
    • Forget what it means to be prestigious and focus on what makes you happy.
  • What relationships did I establish in college?
    • These relationships provide major opportunities in the future.

Background on ThatWritingThing.co

Noonan began this blog after reading a story about a typical college student that took her life. “The website is where I take things about college that resonate with me and I write pieces of advice and, hopefully, insight that will help young college students make sense of something that is increasingly complex,” explains Noonan.

More about Noonan:

  • Graduated from Duke in 2004.
    • Had a full academic scholarship
  • Lives in New York.
    • Freelance marketing consultant.
    • Has experience in print media and broadcast journalism.

”The market for talented, strong, compelling writers is not going away,” says Noonan.

Quick Tips

“Your career doesn’t need to start after college. It means pursuing your vocations in a way that add up to a meaningful career when you graduate and doing it while still in college,” says Noonan.

Some tactical tips:

  • Get off social media and pursue real relationships.
  • Write a mission statement.
  • Limit the number of mundane decisions you have to make.
    • Simplify what you have to decide and do things like make college uniform that way it is one less thing to think about.

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are interested in learning more about scholarships please visit:

www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.

Contact Us to submit a question to our email
Leave us a voicemail message on the computer! (We use questions for future shows because it’s likely other people have the same question.)

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with ThisWritingThing.co or Sandra Noonan.

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The post THCC61 – Being a Collegepreneur Interview with Sandra Noonan, Content Scientist/Blogger appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC60 – How to Stand Out When Writing Your College Essay Interview with Steve Schwartz, Professional College Admissions Counselor.
35:47
2017-12-15 14:55:47 UTC 35:47
THCC60 – How to Stand Out When Writing Your College Essay Interview with Steve Schwartz, Professional College Admissions Counselor.

Extracurricular Activities and Essays

“Simply being a member of an organization isn’t going to impress anyone,” says Schwartz. Having great scores isn’t enough anymore. A focal point of applying to college now is the essay. A great way to help with that is to have unique or exciting extracurricular activities.

Schwartz recommends for extracurricular activities:

  • Something really enjoyable. Kids won’t put in the effort if they are being forced to do it.
  • Make sure it stands out.
    • Go outside the school setting to find something unique, a passion, or what they want to pursue professionally.
  • Try online with programming, working remotely, or open source projects.
  • Create your own club.
  • Start a campaign, such as recycling.
  • Reach out to the local college or university and intern or assist a professor in the field you plan to major in.

“If you stay inside the high school world, it limits creating that superstar effect,” warns Schwartz. The top tier schools are looking for that stand out student and the best they can get. Schwartz notes, “If you can indicate one thing that shows you innovated in some way, created something, started something, or reached for some opportunity that is going to impress them,”

Letters of Recommendation

“All this stuff matters, and the most recent stuff matters most,” states Schwartz. It is ideal to get a letter of recommendation from sophomore or junior year teachers. They will know your child the greatest because they have had the most personal interactions.

Senior year teachers and guidance counselors are often not the best choice because they haven’t been able to spend enough one on one time getting to know your child individually.

Scholarships are often recommended more to the students that know the counselor the best. Find a reason to visit your counselor and get to know them!

Someone writing a letter of recommendation should be a person that has evidence of your child:

  • Taking initiative
  • Doing something they didn’t have to do
  • Showing determination
  • Using problem-solving skills

Recommendation letters should come from both the school staff and coaches or supervisors from outside of the school.

Biggest Mistakes that Parents Make

Parents tend to project onto kids what they should be doing. “You can’t put a square peg in a round hole,” explains Schwartz, “Encourage kids to cultivate their own interests and channel those interests down a productive road.” Find a happy medium.

Parents play an important role:

  • Keeping kids on task
  • Helping make decisions
    • Especially financially
  • Develop essay ideas
  • Strategize who to ask for letters of recommendation
  • Standardized test preparation

Schwartz emphasizes, “Make sure you are not forcing a kid down a path they don’t want to go because if they are stubborn and refuse, they end up achieving significantly below their potential in the end.”

Quick Tips

For parents of seniors it is getting down to crunch time. Be sure to get letters of recommendation and begin essays if you haven’t already. Junior year parents can look at last year’s applications for the college or universities you are interested in because they will not change that much. Start planning ahead about the different components so you are ready when applications are due.

Schwartz’s biggest piece of advice is: “Planning ahead, even when it comes to college essay topics. You don’t want to be writing them the night before or the week before. The best essays are written over a period of at least a few weeks so you have time to review and get some distance from it before coming back.”

College application deadlines vary based on the college you are applying to, but it is usually due the November of their senior year.

This needs to be well in process during the junior year of high school because by senior year your child should be writing about their experiences and getting their letters of recommendations. It can’t be done last minute; the more time the better.

LINKS AND RESOURCES

BRAD RECOMMENDS

“PUTTING COLLEGE TO WORK” BY KAT CLOWES, M.B.A. This is a book about the process of college and things to do along the way. Includes the pre-college process, as well as taking advantage of what is available at your college, building a resume, and finding a job. This would be great for parents of high school kids and students to read. It is full of great information to think about the long view of college. Parents should read this so you can help coach your college child to accomplish goals with more intention, making a plan, and doing things on purpose.

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are interested in learning more about scholarships please visit:

www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.

Contact Us to submit a question to our email
Leave us a voicemail message on the computer! (We use questions for future shows because it’s likely other people have the same question.)

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with College Admissions Toolbox.

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The post THCC60 – How to Stand Out When Writing Your College Essay Interview with Steve Schwartz, Professional College Admissions Counselor. appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.

THCC59 – Starting a Business in College Interview with Kate Steadman and Sharon Bui, Frill Clothing Founders
34:31
2017-12-15 14:55:47 UTC 34:31
THCC59 – Starting a Business in College Interview with Kate Steadman and Sharon Bui, Frill Clothing Founders

Kate and Sharon began looking into the apparel industry in high school. They both had a love of sewing and designing starting at a young age. They took a course and completed an internship before going to college and pursing a degree. Their company launched in their junior year of college as a hobby. The business took off and by the time they graduated they rolled right into their full time company. An appearance on “Shark Tank” provided them new opportunities.

”Frill is the one stop sorority shop. Sorority girls can come to us and buy anything they need for any day of sorority recruitment,” explains Sharon. For sorority recruitment, uniformity is important. “We design each of these pieces specifically for each chapter to make sure they are the only chapter at that school wearing that outfit in that exact color,” says Kate. They have also branched into the bridal market to create custom bridesmaid attire.

Kate and Sharon were not able to start paying themselves regularly until after graduation.

Starting a Business in College

There must be a need in the market. “Make sure first and foremost that people are going to buy what you are selling,” stresses Kate. Being an entrepreneur is great, but make sure there is a need you will fill. College is a great time to launch a business because you have professors and other experts in their field available to mentor and assist you.

Colleges are now starting entrepreneurial initiatives and clubs to assist students with having a free office space or to provide resources. Check the Student Center to see what programs and majors are available at your college.

Sharon and Kate’s parents were initially apprehensive about the start of this business. “My mom told me verbatim, “I want to make sure you have a real job and can pay the bills’, but one of the main things we have learned is there are so many aspects and careers that go into each industry,” recalls Kate. Students need to evaluate if they can live on their company salary. Sharon notes, “So many entrepreneurs out there that are really successful first had to pick up a part time job.”

Being on “Shark Tank”

Sharon was a fan of the show and got the idea to apply while still in school, but waited until after they both graduated to submit a video to the casting call in January 2014. “The greatest way this impacted us is it opened a lot of doors to production opportunities,” says Kate. Finding factories to create orders of different styles and colors to fit their needs and minimums was difficult until this episode aired.

Quick Tips for Parents of Entrepreneur Students

Kate and Sharon suggest:

  • It is best for parents to stay out of the way and allow their child the space to create their business.
  • Wait to be contacted about assistance until your child requests it.
  • “A parents’ opinion is always valued,” says Kate, “But it’s about finding a good balance.”

LINKS AND RESOURCES:

  • http://www.frillclothing.com
  • Instagram and Twitter are: Frill Clothing
  • Follow their blogs at:
    • @sarakatestyling
    • @shabui
  • Season 6, Episode 21 of “Shark Tank”
    Clip available via ABCGO:
    http://abc.go.com/shows/shark-tank/video/cant-miss-clips/VDKA0_e43onmf9

THANKS FOR JOINING US!

We are starting a new video series called, “The Scholarship Guide for Busy Parents.” It is going to be 4 videos that are 12 minutes or less complete with cheat sheets and other resources to help you find and win scholarships. If you are interested in learning more about scholarships please visit:

www.tamingthehighcostofcollege.com/scholarships

We’d like to extend an invitation to our listeners to share their feedback and questions. Our website offers a couple of ways for you to share your questions with us, and we’d love to hear from you.

Contact Us to submit a question to our email
Leave us a voicemail message on the computer! (We use questions for future shows because it’s likely other people have the same question.)

If you find our podcasts helpful, please share us on social media and tell your friends.

The bottom line is that we care what you think and want to help you out, so we’d appreciate you reviewing us on iTunes or on Stitcher. And even better, receive automatic updates by subscribing to the show on iTunes or Stitcher.

Brad is not affiliated with Frill Clothing or Shark Tank.

Share

The post THCC59 – Starting a Business in College Interview with Kate Steadman and Sharon Bui, Frill Clothing Founders appeared first on Taming The High Cost of College.