Visual Arts

The Modern Art Notes Podcast

Tyler Green

The Modern Art Notes Podcast is a weekly program about visual art. The program features host Tyler Green's conversations with artists, art historians, curators, critics and authors. It is published each Thursday.

Episodes

Photography in Argentina 1850-2010, Jimmie Durham
01:15:28
2017-09-21 04:41:18 UTC 01:15:28
Photography in Argentina 1850-2010, Jimmie Durham

Episode No. 306 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curators Idurre Alonso and Anne Ellegood.

Alonso is the co-curator of "Photography in Argentina, 1850-2010: Contradiction and Continuity" at the J. Paul Getty Museum. It opens this weekend and remains on view through January 28, 2018. The exhibition, which explores themes that emphasize Argentina's history, features nearly 300 works.

On the second segment, Hammer Museum curator Anne Ellegood discusses her exhibition "Jimmie Durham: At the Center of the World." The exhibition, the first US retrospective of Durham's work in 20 years, is at the Walker Art Center through October 7. 

Carolina Miranda on PST: LA/LA, Leyla Cárdenas
01:00:58
2017-09-21 04:41:18 UTC 01:00:58
Carolina Miranda on PST: LA/LA, Leyla Cárdenas

Episode No. 305 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features journalist Carolina Miranda and artist Leyla Cárdenas.

Carolina Miranda is a journalist at the Los Angeles Times. She joins host Tyler Green to preview "Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA," a Getty Foundation-funded series of exhibitions, catalogues and events across southern California.

Cárdenas discusses her recent work, especially Excision (2012), which is included in "Home -- So Different, So Appealing" at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. It is the first PST: LA/LA show to open. Curated by Chon Noriega, Pilar Tompkins Rivas and Mari Carmen Ramirez, it will remain on view through October 15, when it will travel to the Museum of Fine Arts Houston.

Anthony Hernandez
58:55
2017-09-21 04:41:18 UTC 58:55
Anthony Hernandez

Episode No. 304 features a re-air of host Tyler Green's 2016 conversation with Anthony Hernandez.

In two weeks the Milwaukee Art Museum will present one of the best shows of 2016, a retrospective of Anthony Hernandez curated by San Francisco Museum of Modern Art curator Erin O'Toole.

It was Hernandez's first retrospective. His photographs have consistently looked at parts of America, especially parts of Los Angeles, that hide in plain sight. The catalogue was one of last year's best books, especially for the introduction by Robert Adams and a conversation between Hernandez and Lewis Baltz. Milwaukee's presentation of the exhibition opens on September 15 and will be on view through January first, 2018. 

Degas and Millinery
44:44
2017-09-21 04:41:18 UTC 44:44
Degas and Millinery

Episode No. 303 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast is a summer clips episode featuring a previously aired interview with curator Simon Kelly.

Along with Esther Bell, Kelly is the co-curator of "Degas, Impressionism & the Paris Millinery Trade." The exhibition melds the social history of modernizing 19th-century Paris with the ways in which painters, especially Edgar Degas, portrayed one of the city's boomingest industries, the manufacturing and selling of hats. As it turns out, millinery was a gateway into the city, employment and the bourgeoisie for tens of thousands of French women. The exhibition is at San Francisco's Legion of Honor through September 24. It debuted at the Saint Louis Art Museum, where Kelly is a curator. The exhibition's superb catalogue was published by the two museums and DelMonico Prestel. Amazon offers it for $48.

For images of artworks discussed on the program, see Episode No. 280.

No. 302: "Soundtracks" at SFMOMA: Jacqueline Kiyomi Gordon, Amor Muñoz
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2017-09-21 04:41:19 UTC 43:21
No. 302: "Soundtracks" at SFMOMA: Jacqueline Kiyomi Gordon, Amor Muñoz

Episode No. 302 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artists Jacqueline Kiyomi Gordon and Amor Muñoz.

This is the second of two MAN Podcast episodes spotlighting artists in "Soundtracks," a new exhibition at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art that examines the role of sound in art. The show, which was curated by Rudolf Frieling and Tanya Zimbardo, will remain on view through January 1, 2018. It features nearly three dozen artworks that are or include sound.

 

Cristóbal de Villalpando; Bosch and Bouts
53:18
2017-09-21 04:41:19 UTC 53:18
Cristóbal de Villalpando; Bosch and Bouts

Episode No. 301 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curators Ronda Kasl and Rima Girnius.

Along with Jonathan Brown and Clara Bargellini, Metropolitan Museum of Art curator Ronda Kasl is the co-curator of "Cristóbal de Villalpando: Mexican Painter of the Baroque," which is at the Met in New York through October 15. Villalpando is considered one of the two major artists of seventeenth-century New Spain. The Met's small survey of his work features eleven paintings, including Villalpando's 28-feet-high Transfiguration of Jesus (1683), his first masterpiece.

On the second segment, Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art curator Rima Girnius discusses two recently re-attributed paintings in the N-A's collection: Hieronymus Bosch's The Temptation of St. Anthony (about 1500-1510) and Albrecht Bouts's Christ Crowned with Thorns (about 1490-95). The N-A is presenting the paintings and information about the re-attributions in "Rediscovering Hieronymus Bosch and Albrecht Bouts," which is on view in Kansas City through May 27, 2018.

 

Gary Simmons
56:09
2017-09-21 04:41:19 UTC 56:09
Gary Simmons

Episode No. 300 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Gary Simmons.

Gary Simmons's newest installation is on view at the California African American Museum in Los Angeles. Titled "Gary Simmons: Fade to Black," the work is a multi-wall installation in the museum's atrium. The presentation was curated by Naima J. Keith and will remain on view through July 31, 2018.

Over the course of a quarter-century-long career, Simmons has explored how to make the typically invisible visible, often within the context of America's troubled history. In 2002 the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago debuted a mid-career survey of Simmons's work that traveled to SITE Santa Fe and The Studio Museum in Harlem. Simmons has also been featured in solo shows at the Whitney Museum of American Art, MASS MoCA, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Saint Louis Art Museum, MCASD, the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, The Drawing Center in New York and more. Simmons was first a guest on The MAN Podcast in 2013.

During the program MAN Podcast host Tyler Green references this Los Angeles Times video of Simmons working on the installation.

Glenn Ligon, Florine Stettheimer
54:46
2017-09-21 04:41:19 UTC 54:46
Glenn Ligon, Florine Stettheimer

Episode No. 299 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Glenn Ligon and curator Stephen Brown.

Ligon is the curator of "Blue Black" at the Pulitzer Arts Foundation in St. Louis. Informed by the Pulitzer's Ellsworth Kelly wall sculpture Blue Black, the exhibition features more than 50 artworks that use color to address questions related to language, identity and more. The exhibition is on view through October 7. The catalogue of the exhibition is complimentary save the cost of shipping ($7 in the US, $14 abroad). 

Ligon is an artist whose 2011 mid-career survey was organized by the Whitney Museum of American Art and traveled to LACMA and the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth. His work has been featured in solo exhibitions at the Power Plant in Toronto, the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, and the Studio Museum in Harlem. 

On the second segment, curator Stephen Brown discusses his exhibition "Florine Stettheimer: Painting Poetry," which is at The Jewish Museum in New York through September 24. He co-curated  the show with Georgiana Uhlyarik at the Art Gallery of Ontario. The exhibition's catalogue was published by Yale University Press.  

"Soundtracks" at SFMOMA with Bill Fontana and Christina Kubisch
51:23
2017-09-21 04:41:19 UTC 51:23
"Soundtracks" at SFMOMA with Bill Fontana and Christina Kubisch

**In stereo**

Episode No. 298 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features sound artists Bill Fontana and Christina Kubisch.

This is the first of two MAN Podcast episodes spotlighting artists in "Soundtracks," a new exhibition at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art that examines the role of sound in art. The show, which was curated by Rudolf Frieling and Tanya Zimbardo, will remain on view through January 1, 2018. It features nearly three dozen artworks that are or include sound. SFMOMA has built out an extensive digital infrastructure for the show, including an exhibition guide, a catalogue, and interviews with artists such as Jacqueline Kiyomi Gordon, Christina Kubisch, Rafael Lozano-Hemmer, and Richard T. Walker.

This week's MAN Podcast features exhibition artists whose work makes the invisible audible. San Francisco-based artist Bill Fontana has been making what he calls 'sound sculptures' for 40 years. He's exhibited all over the world, including at the Venice Biennale, Madrid's Reina Sofia, London's Tate Modern, New York's Madison Square Park, and more.

Christina Kubisch is a Berlin-area-based composer and artist who works with electromagnetic induction, making both walks for which listeners/viewers wear a special set of headphones and move through a city to hear sounds to which Kubitsch has guided them on a map, and sound sculptures that feature sound related to their physical presence. Kubisch has created dozens of electrical walks all over the world, has been featured in the Venice Biennale, Documenta and in scores of group and solo shows.

 

Richard Deacon, Daniel Heidkamp
01:15:21
2017-09-21 04:41:19 UTC 01:15:21
Richard Deacon, Daniel Heidkamp

Episode No. 297 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artists Richard Deacon and Daniel Heidkamp.

The San Diego Museum of Art is showing "Richard Deacon: What You See Is What You Get," a survey of the artist's career. Curated by Ariel Plotek, it's on view through Sept. 4. The exhibition is accompanied by a catalogue published by the museum. Host Tyler Green and Deacon also mention passages from Deacon's 2014 book of writings, titled "So, If, And, But: Writings 1970-2012."

Throughout a nearly 50-year career as a sculptor, draftsman and print-maker, Deacon has explored form, volume and space with unusual rigor. Much of his work is motivated by the exploration of shapes within shapes, with the tension between the two shapes and the material in which the work is made providing the artwork's activating tension. Deacon's dozens of major exhibitions include a 2014 retrospective at the Tate Britain, and last year the Museum Folkwang in Essen, Germany presented a career-length survey of Deacon's drawings.

On the second segment, Daniel Heidkamp discusses his paintings and the pictures of them on view in "Taking Pictures: Camera Phone Conversations Between Artists" at the Metropolitan Museum of Art's Breuer location. The exhibition was curated by Mia Fineman and is on view through Dec. 17. Heidkamp is showing paintings related to the exhibition at New York's Half Gallery through July 21.

Mexican modernism in "Paint the Revolution," Andrea Chung
01:18:34
2017-09-21 04:41:19 UTC 01:18:34
Mexican modernism in "Paint the Revolution," Andrea Chung

Episode No. 296 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curator Matthew Affron and artist Andrea Chung.

Matthew Affron, a curator at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, is one of the co-curators of "Paint the Revolution: Mexican Modernism, 1910-1950," which is on view at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston through October 1. The exhibition chronicles the history of Mexican modernism at the beginning of the twentieth century and the social, political, and cultural forces that shaped it. Among other critical plaudits, MAN Podcast host Tyler Green named it to his 2016 top ten list.

The curatorial team for the exhibition includes Renato González Mello, Director of the Instituto de Investigaciones Estéticas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Dafne Cruz Porchini, a post-doctoral researcher at the Colegio de México in Mexico City; and Philadelphia Museum of Art curator Mark A. Castro.

On the second segment, Andrea Chung discusses an exhibition of her work titled "You Broke the Ocean in Half to be Here," at the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego. Curated by Jill Dawsey, the exhibition is on view at MCASD's downtown location through August 20.  Chung's work, including an installation she's planning for the forthcoming Prospect ennial, explores the legacies of migration and colonialism in the Caribbean.

Holiday clips: Barkley L. Hendricks
46:07
2017-09-21 04:41:19 UTC 46:07
Holiday clips: Barkley L. Hendricks

Artist Barkley L. Hendricks

Roni Horn
01:02:53
2017-09-21 04:41:19 UTC 01:02:53
Roni Horn

Episode No. 294 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Roni Horn.

The Nasher Sculpture Center in Dallas is showing the first American museum exhibition devoted to Horn's cast glass sculptures. Eight of them are on view in the Nasher's Renzo Piano-designed building through August 20. In New York, Hauser & Wirth is presenting the debut of four new Horns, including the photographic series "The Selected Gifts, (1974-2015)," two series of works on paper, "The Dog's Chorus" (2016), "Th Rose Prblm" (2015), and two recent glass sculptures.

Horn has been mining the intersection of minimalist object making and conceptualism in sculpture, photography and works on paper -- and particularly the relationships between discrete objects -- since the mid-1970s. In 2009 the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York, the Institute of Contemporary Art Boston, the Tate Modern and the Collection Lambert in France surveyed her career in an exhibition titled "Roni Horn, aka Roni Horn." She has had other solo shows at the Art Institute of Chicago, the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris, the Dia Center for the Arts in New York, among others.

Robert Rauschenberg, Ken Ashton
01:07:36
2017-09-21 04:41:19 UTC 01:07:36
Robert Rauschenberg, Ken Ashton

Episode No. 293 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features Museum of Modern Art, New York curator Leah Dickerman and artist Ken Ashton.

See images of art discussed on the program here.

Along with the Tate Modern's Achim Borchardt-Hume, Leah Dickerman is the co-curator of "Robert Rauschenberg: Among Friends," a retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art through September 17. The exhibition features Rauschenberg's early photography, body prints, combines, performances, prints and more. The exhibition catalogue was published by MoMA. Amazon offers it for $34 in paperback and $51 in cloth.

Leah Dickerman is a curator at MoMA. Her previous exhibitions include Inventing Abstraction, 1910-1925," and a 2005-06 dada survey that Dickerman curated while working at the National Gallery of Art.

On the second segment, Ken Ashton discusses his new book "Portsmouth: Collected Saturdays," which is new from Daylight. The book features Ashton's documentation of the deindustrialization and emptying out of Portsmouth, Ohio, a small town on the Ohio River at the southern end of Appalachia. Amazon offers it for $30. Ashton's work is in the collection of institutions such as the Museum of Contemporary Photography in Chicago and the National Gallery of Art.

Spencer Finch, on Sandro Botticelli
01:14:59
2017-09-21 04:41:19 UTC 01:14:59
Spencer Finch, on Sandro Botticelli

Episode No. 292 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Spencer Finch and curator Frederick Ilchman.

See images of art discussed in this week's show here.

Spencer Finch is presenting two new installations at two venues on opposite sides of the United States: His The Western Mystery (2017), a commission from the Seattle Art Museum for its Olympic Sculpture Park, is up through March 3, 2019. At MASS MoCA, Finch's Cosmic Latte (2017) is on view at least through 2018.

Finch's work typically addresses light and its relationship to memory at specific geographic locations, and often specific times. He has fulfilled commissions for and had exhibitions at The Morgan Library, the Rhode Island School of Design, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, the Pulitzer Arts Foundation (then the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts), the Corcoran Gallery of Art and more. His work is in the collections of the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, the Kemper Museum of Art in St. Louis, the Guggenheim and more.

Frederick Ilchman has organized the Museum of Fine Arts Boston's showing of "Botticelli and the Search for the Divine," the largest exhibition of Botticelli paintings ever shown in the United States. The exhibition, which is on view through July 9, includes 15 works by 15th-century Florentine master Sandro Botticelli, as well as works by Filippo Lippi, Antonio del Pollaiuolo, Jacopo del Sellaio and more. The exhibition was co-organized by the MFA Boston and the Muscarelle Museum of Art at the College of William & Mary. Ilchman is the MFA Boston's curator of paintings.

Mark Ruwedel, Jed Morse on Manuel Neri
01:09:05
2017-09-21 04:41:19 UTC 01:09:05
Mark Ruwedel, Jed Morse on Manuel Neri

Episode No. 291 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Mark Ruwedel and curator Jed Morse.

Yossi Milo Gallery in New York is showing "Mark Ruwedel: Hell and Home" through June 24.  The show includes Ruwedel's 'pictures of hell,' an inventory of Western landscapes named for hell or the devil, his pictures of 'home,' of desert homes fighting a losing battle against the ravages of the harsh surrounding environment, and Opportunities Realized, Ruwedel's revisiting of Ed Ruscha's 1970 Real Estate Opportunities, in which Ruwedel photographed how the vacant lots in Ruscha's book were filled in.

Ruwedel's most recent book is "Pictures of Hell," which features essays by Tate curator Simon Baker and Chiara Siravo a historian whose work has examined our concepts of hell. 

Ruwedel is one of America's most honored photographers. In 2014 he won both the Scotiabank Photography Award and a Guggenheim fellowship. His work is in the collections of major museums such as the Metropolitan, the National Gallery of Art, the Tate, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and SFMOMA.

Ruwedel and host Tyler Green refer several times to Ruwedel's 2008 book "Westward the Course of Empire," a classic which looked at what remains in places where railroads once ran across the landscape.

On the second segment, Nasher Sculpture Center curator Jed Morse discusses his museum's recent acquisition of a suite of major Manuel Neri sculptures and works on paper. They are on view at the Nasher through July 16.

Holiday clips: Pipilotti Rist
54:23
2017-09-21 04:41:19 UTC 54:23
Holiday clips: Pipilotti Rist

Episode No. 290 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features a previously aired conversation with artist Pipilotti Rist. 

This summer, the Museum of Fine Arts Houston will exhibit two immersive installations that are new to its collection: Pipilotti Rist's Pixel Forest and Worry Will Vanish. They go on view on June 11 and will remain up through September 17.

Rist, who is based in Zurich, has been the subject of many single-artist museum exhibitions, especially in the last half-decade. Among the museums to give her shows are the Kunsthaus Zurich, the Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art in Seoul, the Hayward in London, the Wexner in Columbus, MoMA in New York and the Pompidou Center in Paris.

Nancy Rubins
59:37
2017-09-21 04:41:19 UTC 59:37
Nancy Rubins

Episode No. 289 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Nancy Rubins. It was recorded live at the Wexner Center for the Arts at The Ohio State University in Columbus.

Rubins is included in "Grey Matters," an exhibition that opens Friday, May 19 at the Wexner. The show, curated by Michael Goodson, features the work of 37 contemporary women artists who have worked in grisaille. It is on view through July 30. The exhibition includes work by past MAN Podcast guests such as Carol Bove, Vija Celmins, Mickalene Thomas, Julie Mehretu, Mary Reid Kelley, Arlene Shechet, Amy Sillman, Xaviera Simmons and Lorna Simpson.

Rubins' often monumental sculpture amalgamates industrially produced objects into strikingly light, sometimes lyrical objects. Her enormous drawings, of built-up graphite on single sheets of paper often installed across multiple walls, are simultaneously minimal and baroque. Rubins has had solo exhibitions at museums such as the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego and the Museum of Modern Art, New York. Her public and institutional commissions include the University of Texas in Austin, MCASD, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, the Albright-Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo, and the Université Paris Diderot in France.

The Kimbell's new Modigliani, the art of Coenties Slip
40:50
2017-09-21 04:41:19 UTC 40:50
The Kimbell's new Modigliani, the art of Coenties Slip

Episode No. 288 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features Kimbell Art Museum director Eric Lee and Menil Collection curator Michelle White.

Lee joins the program to discuss the Kimbell's recent acquisition of a rare Amadeo Modigliani sculpture, Head (c. 1913). Only about 27 Modigliani sculptures survive. Head was a gift from collector Gwendolyn Weiner and is the first modern sculpture in the Kimbell's collection. It is on view now.

Then Michelle White discusses her Menil exhibition "Between Land and Sea: Artists of the Coenties Slip." The show looks at the early work of Chryssa, Robert Indiana, Ellsworth Kelly, Agnes Martin, Lenore Tawney, and Jack Youngerman, all of whom who lived in the Coenties Slip, an East River-adjacent neighborhood set apart from the rest of the Manhattan art world. The exhibition considers moments of communication and influence. It is on view through August 6.

Kellie Jones, Shimon Attie
01:16:15
2017-09-21 04:41:19 UTC 01:16:15
Kellie Jones, Shimon Attie

Episode No. 287 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features historian Kellie Jones and artist Shimon Attie.

Kellie Jones is the author of "South of Pico: African American Artists in Los Angeles in the 1960s and 1970s," which is new from Duke University Press. Amazon offers it for $22.

This is Jones's second major project about art in Los Angeles during the 1960s and 1970s. She also curated "Now Dig This! Art and Black Los Angeles 1960-1980" for the Hammer Museum in 2011. She was a 2016 recipient of a MacArthur Foundation 'Genius Grant,' and teaches art history at Columbia University.

Among the artists featured in Jones's book who have been featured on The Modern Art Notes Podcast are Melvin Edwards and Betye Saar. Curator and historian Yael Lipschutz came on the program to discuss Noah Purifoy on the occasion of LACMA's 2015 retrospective. Also discussed on this week's program: The extensive digital archive for "Now Dig This!" is maintained by the Hammer Museum.

On the second segment, Shimon Attie discusses two new works on view at the Saint Louis Art Museum: The Crossing, an eight-minute video installation that muses on the global refugee crisis via a group of gamblers playing roulette, and Lost in Space (After Huck) a sculptural installation that uses Mark Twain's famous Huckleberry Finn story to give Americans an empathetic gateway into stories of migration and displacement. They're on view in Saint Louis through June 25.

Matisse's studio, Darby English
01:11:24
2017-09-21 04:41:19 UTC 01:11:24
Matisse's studio, Darby English

Episode No. 286 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features historian and curator Ellen McBreen and historian Darby English.

Along with Helen Burnham and Ann Dumas, McBreen is a co-curator of "Matisse in the Studio," which is at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston through July 9. The exhibition examines how objects in Matisse's home and studio informed -- and often ended up in -- his art. These objects include a simple chocolate pot, a tacky chair, an inexpensive glass vase probably made for the tourist market and textiles, such as Kuba cloth. The exhibition includes about 34 paintings, 26 drawings, 11 sculptures, seven cut-outs and about three dozen objects Matisse owned.

From Boston the exhibition will travel to the Royal Academy of Arts in London. Its excellent catalogue, which was published by the MFAB, is available from Amazon for $34.

McBreen is an associate professor of art history at Wheaton College. Her most recent book is "Matisse's Sculpture: The Pinup and the Primitive," which was published by Yale University Press in 2014.

On the second segment, University of Chicago professor Darby English discusses his new book "1971: A Year in the Life of Color." The book, which was published by University of Chicago Press, considers two exhibitions -- Contemporary Black Artists in America at the Whitney Museum of American Art and The DeLuxe Show, a racially integrated exhibition of abstract art presented in a renovated movie theater in Houston's inner-city Fifth Ward. English finds that many black artists of the period were less interested in a specifically so-called "black aesthetic," than they were in cultural interaction across racial lines. He points to color and how these artists used it as a key way in which they engaged other artists.

Hartley in Maine, Alexei Jawlensky
01:18:26
2017-09-21 04:41:19 UTC 01:18:26
Hartley in Maine, Alexei Jawlensky

Episode No. 285 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curators Randall Griffey and Vivian Endicott Barnett.

Along with Elizabeth Finch and Donna M. Cassidy, Griffey is the co-curator of "Marsden Hartley's Maine," which is at the Metropolitan Museum of Art through June 18. The exhibition spotlights Hartley's lifelong engagement with Maine, its residents, coastline, forests and mountains. It includes about 90 paintings and drawings featuring the full range of Hartley's Maine-related work.

From the Met, "Marsden Hartley's Maine" will travel to the Colby College Museum of Art, where it goes on view on July 8. (It will be at Colby during the first weekend of August, when Colby hosts the 2017 Art and Land Conservation Symposium. MAN Podcast host Tyler Green is among the speakers.) The show's strong catalogue was published by the Met. Amazon offers it for $35.

On the second segment, historian and curator Vivian Endicott Barnett discusses her "Alexei Jawlensky" at the Neue Galerie in New York. It features 75 paintings and is the artist's first full museum retrospective in the United States. Jawlensky was a Russian-born expressionist who moved to Munich in 1896 and went on to become an important figure in how central and eastern European artists engaged with early modern art -- and especially with van Gogh, Matisse, fauvism and more. It's on view through May 29.

Easter clips: Early Monet
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2017-09-21 04:41:19 UTC 46:16
Easter clips: Early Monet

The Easter-weekend Episode No. 284 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features a previously-aired conversation with curator George Shackelford.

Shackelford is the curator of "Monet: The Early Years" at the Legion of Honor in San Francisco. The show features about 60 paintings from the first phase of Claude Monet's career, from a painting Monet made in Normandy in 1858 when he was 18 years old, until 1872, when Monet lived in Argenteuil, along the Seine near Paris. The exhibition debuted last winter at the Kimbell Art Museum, where Shackelford is the museum's deputy director. "Monet" is on view in San Francisco through May 29. The show's beautiful catalogue was published by the Kimbell and distributed by Yale University Press.

Liz Glynn, Nina Chanel Abney
01:10:27
2017-09-21 04:41:19 UTC 01:10:27
Liz Glynn, Nina Chanel Abney

Episode No. 283 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artists Liz Glynn and Nina Chanel Abney.

Glynn's "Open House" is on view now in Doris C. Freedman Plaza in New York's Central Park. It was commissioned by the Public Art Fund and will remain through September 24. The work takes as its jumping off point Freedman Plaza's unusual site, the place where democratic Central Park meets corporate midtown meets the aristocratic Upper East Side. Glynn's sculpture highlights the class distinctions that separate the park from the city by referencing a Fifth Avenue interior designed by Gilded Age architect Stanford White. The exhibition was curated by Daniel S. Palmer.

Glynn's work routinely engages history and the way both it and historical objects are considered in the present day. Her work has been presented or exhibited at MOCA in Los Angeles, the New Museum in New York, the deCordova Sculpture Park in Concord, Mass., the Petit Palais in Paris, LACMA, and more. This fall, MASS MoCA will present Glynn's "The Archaeology of Another Possible Future" in the museum's Building Five.

On the second segment, Nina Chanel Abney discusses her work on the occasion of a 10-year survey of her work titled "Nina Chanel Abney: Royal Flush." The exhibition is at the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University through July 16, when it will travel to the Chicago Cultural Center and then to Los Angeles, where it will be jointly presented by the Institute of Contemporary Art -- the institution formerly known as the Santa Monica Museum of Art -- and the California African American Museum. 

Photography East of the Mississippi; Matisse/Diebenkorn
01:02:23
2017-09-21 04:41:19 UTC 01:02:23
Photography East of the Mississippi; Matisse/Diebenkorn

Episode No. 282 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curator Diane Waggoner and curator Katy Rothkopf.

Waggoner is the curator of "East of the Mississippi: Nineteenth-Century American Landscape Photography." For several decades, the story of America's nineteenth-century photographic history has mostly run through the West. Waggoner's exhibition instead looks at how photographers looked at the region between the Mississippi River and the Atlantic Ocean. The exhibition features 175 nineteenth-century photographs, including daguerreotypes, salted paper prints, albumen prints, stereographic prints and even paintings. It's on view at the National Gallery of Art through July 16, when it will travel to the New Orleans Museum of Art. 

On the second segment, Baltimore Museum of Art curator Katy Rothkopf discusses Richard Diebenkorn's 1964 visit to the Soviet Union in the context of "Matisse/Diebenkorn." The exhibition, which Rothkopf co-curated with San Francisco Museum of Modern Art curator Janet Bishop, is on view at SFMOMA through May 29. Bishop discussed "Matisse/Diebenkorn" on Episode No. 266.

On Trump's attempt to eliminate federal arts and humanities programs
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2017-09-21 04:41:19 UTC 55:46
On Trump's attempt to eliminate federal arts and humanities programs

Episode No. 281 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast considers federal arts and humanities funding with Los Angeles Times art critic Christopher Knight and Andrew W. Mellon Foundation executive vice president for programs and research Mariët Westermann.

The National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities make up eight one-thousandths of one percent of the federal budget. Still, in the name of austerity, the Trump White House has targeted the endowments, the Institute of Museum and Library Services and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting for elimination in its first budget. The endowments each received $148 million in appropriations in the federal government's most recent fiscal year, while the IMLS received $230 million and CPB $445 million. Meanwhile, the Trump budget asks for a 10 percent increase in defense spending, a single-year bump of $54 billion -- or 365 times the NEA or NEH's total annual appropriation.

No American art or arts critic has written more about the role of federal arts and humanities funding and especially the national endowments over more years than Christopher Knight. He has been the art critic of the Los Angeles Times since 1989. He is a three-time finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and received the Frank Jewett Mather Award for Distinction in Art Criticism from the College Art Association in 1997. 

On the second segment, Mellon foundation VP Mariët Westermann discusses federal arts and humanities funding from a funder's perspective. Prior to joining Mellon in 2010, was the provost and chief academic officer of New York University Abu Dhabi; director of NYU's Institute of Fine Arts; associate director of research at the Clark Art Institute, and an associate professor at Rutgers University. As a historian of Netherlandish art, Westermann has written books on Jan Steen, Rembrandt, Vermeer and more.

Degas and the Millinery Trade, Matisse and American Art
01:04:41
2017-09-21 04:41:19 UTC 01:04:41
Degas and the Millinery Trade, Matisse and American Art

Episode No. 280 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curators Simon Kelly and Gail Stavitsky.

Along with the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco's Esther Bell, Kelly is the co-curator of "Degas, Impressionism & the Paris Millinery Trade." The exhibition melds the social history of modernizing 19th-century Paris with the ways in which painters, especially Edgar Degas, captured one the city's boomingest industries, the manufacturing and selling of hats, an industry that was a gateway into the city, employment and the bourgeoisie for tens of thousands of French women. The exhibition is at the Saint Louis Art Museum through May 7, when it will travel to San Francisco's Legion of Honor. The exhibition's superb catalogue was published by the two museums and DelMonico Prestel.

On the second segment, Gail Stavitsky discusses "Matisse and American Art," her new exhibition on the impact Matisse's work has had on American artists. The show, which features 65 paintings, sculptures, prints and archival objects is on view at New Jersey's Montclair Art Museum through June 18. Stavitsky curated the show with assistance from John Cauman and Lisa Mintz Messinger. The exhibition catalogue was published by the museum.

Dara Birnbaum, Black Mountain College photography
01:22:12
2017-09-21 04:41:19 UTC 01:22:12
Dara Birnbaum, Black Mountain College photography

Episode No. 279 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Dara Birnbaum and curator Julie J. Thomson.

Dara Birnbaum is included in "Breaking News: Turning the Lens on Mass Media," at the J. Paul Getty Museum. The exhibition examines how artists have used newspapers, magazines and televised news programs to consider media, news and the messages included therein. The exhibition was curated by Arpad Kovacs and will be on view through April 30.

Birnbaum is among the pioneers of video art. Her work often includes pointedly feminist critiques of mass media, including of entertainment and journalism. Retrospectives of her work include "The Dark Matter of Media Light" at SMAK, the Stedelijk Museum voor Actuele Kunst in Ghent, Belgium, and at the Serralves Foundation in Porto, Portugal, and "Dara Birnbaum Retrospective exhibition" at the Kunsthalle Wien in Austria and at the Norrtalje Konsthall in Sweden.

On the second segment, Julie J. Thomson discusses "Begin to See: The Photographers of Black Mountain College." The exhibition surveys photography made at Black Mountain College, including landscapes, documentary work (including of performance), experiments with the medium and more. The exhibition is at the Black Mountain College Museum and Arts Center in Asheville, North Carolina through May 20. 

Kay Rosen, Edme Bouchardon
01:13:03
2017-09-21 04:41:19 UTC 01:13:03
Kay Rosen, Edme Bouchardon

Episode No. 278 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Kay Rosen and curator Anne-Lise Desmas.

The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum opens "Kay Rosen: H Is for House," this weekend. It is Rosen's first solo museum exhibition in the northeast in almost 20 years. It is curated by the Aldrich's Richard Klein. The exhibition will be on view through September 4.

Rosen's text-based works, presented as wall-drawings, paintings and works on paper, use language, words, humor and two-dimensional forms to explore ideas, histories and contemporary life. Rosen's work is in the collection . Her museum exhibitions and installations have included projects at the Aspen (Colo.) Art Museum, the University Art Museum at the University of California, Santa Barbara, The Drawing Center, New York, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles and the Otis College of Art and Design, the MIT List Visual Arts Center, the MCA Chicago and more.

On the second segment, J. Paul Getty Museum curator Anne-Lise Desmas discusses "Bouchardon: Royal Artist of the Enlightenment." The exhibition examines the sculpture and drawings of Edme Bouchardon, who worked as the Royal Artist during the eighteenth-century reign of Louis XV. The exhibition, which Desmas co-curated with Edouard Kopp, is on view through April 2.

Kerry James Marshall (from May, 2016)
01:01:18
2017-09-21 04:41:19 UTC 01:01:18
Kerry James Marshall (from May, 2016)

On March 12, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles opens "Kerry James Marshall: Mastry," the artist's first retrospective. Marshall is one of the most significant chronicler's of the American experience, especially the African-American experience. For 35 years he has worked to add black people and black culture to a Western art historical canon that is mostly built of white faces and stories. The exhibition was curated by Dieter Roelstraete, Helen Molesworth and Ian Alteveer. The exhibition catalogue was published by Skira Rizzoli.

John Singleton Copley, Jimmie Durham
01:23:17
2017-09-21 04:41:19 UTC 01:23:17
John Singleton Copley, Jimmie Durham

Episode No. 276 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features historian and author Jane Kamensky and curator Anne Ellegood.

Kamensky is the author of "A Revolution in Color: The World of John Singleton Copley." The book is a new biography that places one of early America's best and most important artists within the context of the political and revolutionary events of his time -- and details how Copley and his family were actors in them. Amazon offers it for $20 in hardcover and at $16 for Kindle.

Kamensky is a professor of history at Harvard University and the director of the Schlesinger Library. She is a historian of early America and the Atlantic world.

On the second segment, Hammer Museum curator Anne Ellegood discusses her new exhibition "Jimmie Durham: At the Center of the World." Ellegood's retrospective is the first major Durham show in the United States in over 20 years. 

Durham came to prominence as an artist in New York City in the 1980s. His work has consistently addressed questions of identity, colonialism and the inseparability of identity from politics in the United States. The exhibition is on view at the Hammer through May 7, when it will travel to the Walker, the Whitney and to the Remai Modern in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. The show's thorough catalogue was published by DelMonico Prestel.

Medardo Rosso
01:03:46
2017-09-21 04:41:19 UTC 01:03:46
Medardo Rosso

Episode No. 275 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curators Sharon Hecker and Tamara Schenkenberg and was taped live at the Pulitzer Arts Foundation in St. Louis.

Hecker and Schenkenberg are the co-curators of "Medardo Rosso: Experiments in Light and Form," which is at the Pulitzer through May 13. The exhibition is the first broad survey of Rosso's work in an American museum in over fifty years. (In 2014-15 the Center for Italian Modern Art in New York presented this Rosso installation.) It features nearly 100 works, including sculptures, drawings and photographs. The exhibition's catalogue is available for free from the Pulitzer for a $7 PayPal-administered shipping charge.

Rosso is an Italian artist who spent much of his career in France. His sculptures of heads and figures in wax, plaster, and bronze are key pivots between an era of monumental bronze sculpture, realist and impressionist sculpture and ultimately modern art.

Sarah Oppenheimer, Richard Misrach
01:11:08
2017-09-21 04:41:19 UTC 01:11:08
Sarah Oppenheimer, Richard Misrach

Episode No. 274 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artists Sarah Oppenheimer and Richard Misrach.

This weekend the Wexner Center for the Arts at The Ohio State University in Columbus debuts "Sarah Oppenheimer: S-337473," an exhibition of a newly commissioned work developed  for the Wexner's Peter Eisenman-designed building. Oppenheimer created her new work as a two-year-long Wexner Center Artist Residency Award recipient, during which she collaborated with OSU's Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering to develop a patent-pending pivot mechanism that allows this new work to rotate at a 45-degree angle. The exhibition opens on Saturday, February 4 and will be on view through April 16. As soon as images of the new work are available, probably on or around February 7, we'll add them to this post.

Sarah Oppenheimer is an artist who creates installations that engage with both architecture and space. She's previously made work for the Perez Art Museum Miami (on view through April 30), the Kunsthaus Basel, the Rice University Art Gallery, the Queens Museum, and the Saint Louis Art Museum. A project she is developing for Mass MoCA will debut in 2019. Oppenheimer has also created a permanent installation at the Baltimore Museum of Art. Multiple views of all her installations are on her website.

On the second segment, the re-airing of a 2016 segment with Richard Misrach on his "Border Cantos," a book and exhibition on which he has collaborated with Mexican composer and performer Guillermo Galindo. Since 2004, and especially since 2009, Misrach has been making pictures along the 2,000-mile-long United States border with Mexico, the latest investigation of American deserts that make up what Misrach calls his Desert Cantos series. As Misrach traveled the borderlands, he accumulated discarded objects such as water bottles, backpacks, clothing and shotgun shells and turned them over to Galindo, who made that material into instruments and who then performed on them. The book, "Border Cantos," is out from Aperture; Amazon offers it $45, a forty percent discount.

Tony Oursler, American Art during WWI
01:20:31
2017-09-21 04:41:19 UTC 01:20:31
Tony Oursler, American Art during WWI

The Museum of Modern Art is showing Tony Oursler's Imponderable (2015-16), a 90-minute film shown in an immersive, so-called "5-D" environment, as well as archival material related to the film from Oursler's own collection. The film mines Ourlser's interest in experiments in technological advancement that didn't quite work out and occult phenomena to offer a kind of alternative history of modernism. The film is richly informed by Oursler's own life history. His grandfather was Charles Fulton Oursler, a journalist and author who teamed up with Harry Houdini to campaign against fraudulent mediumship. The exhibition was curated by MoMA's Stuart Comer and Erica Papernik-Shimizu. Imponderable is at MoMA through April 16.

Oursler is a multimedia and installation artist whose work often examines and uses new technologies to explore topics such as facial recognition, paranormal phenomena and the relationship between multiple personality disorder and mass media.

On the second segment, historian and curator Anne Classen Knutson discusses "World War I and American Art," which is at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts through April 9. The exhibition looks at how American artists responded to and engaged with the war, both in Europe and in the United States. Knutson co-curated the show with Robert Cozzolino and David Lubin. 

Stanley Whitney
01:08:48
2017-09-21 04:41:19 UTC 01:08:48
Stanley Whitney

Artist Stanley Whitney.

Francis Picabia, John McLaughlin
01:19:17
2017-09-21 04:41:19 UTC 01:19:17
Francis Picabia, John McLaughlin

"Francis Picabia" co-curator Anne Umland, "John McLaughlin" curator Stephanie Barron.

Lorna Simpson
54:01
2017-09-21 04:41:19 UTC 54:01
Lorna Simpson

Artist Lorna Simpson, who is showing new work at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth

Tyler Green's top ten, Minor White
37:30
2017-09-21 04:41:19 UTC 37:30
Tyler Green's top ten, Minor White

MAN Podcast host Tyler Green's 2016 top ten list, curator Paul Martineau on Minor White.

Holiday clips: The Le Nain
44:57
2017-09-21 04:41:19 UTC 44:57
Holiday clips: The Le Nain

Curator and historian C.D. Dickerson.

Pipilotti Rist, Mark Speltz
01:17:15
2017-09-21 04:41:19 UTC 01:17:15
Pipilotti Rist, Mark Speltz

Artist Pipilotti Rist and historian and "North of Dixie: Civil Rights Photography Beyond the South" author Mark Speltz.

Matisse/Diebenkorn, Klimt's Portraits
57:24
2017-09-21 04:41:19 UTC 57:24
Matisse/Diebenkorn, Klimt's Portraits

SFMOMA curator Janet Bishop, art historian Jill Lloyd.

Early Monet, Picasso's Drawings
01:06:06
2017-09-21 04:41:19 UTC 01:06:06
Early Monet, Picasso's Drawings

Curators George Shackelford, David Breslin.

Thanksgiving clips: Richard Misrach
46:14
2017-09-21 04:41:19 UTC 46:14
Thanksgiving clips: Richard Misrach

Artist Richard Misrach

Eduardo Basualdo
47:49
2017-09-21 04:41:19 UTC 47:49
Eduardo Basualdo

Artist Eduardo Basualdo, recorded live at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden.

Art and Education in America After WWII at MCASD, Wexner
01:15:26
2017-09-21 04:41:19 UTC 01:15:26
Art and Education in America After WWII at MCASD, Wexner

Curator Jill Dawsey and artist Martha Rosler; curator Ruth Erickson

Edgar Degas, Richard Serra's "Shift"
01:05:46
2017-09-21 04:41:19 UTC 01:05:46
Edgar Degas, Richard Serra's "Shift"

Historian and curator Henri Loyrette, documentary filmmaker Simone Estrin.

Michael Dean, Julian Onderdonk
42:33
2017-09-21 04:41:19 UTC 42:33
Michael Dean, Julian Onderdonk

Artist Michael Dean and curator Kaylin Weber.

Valentin de Boulogne, early Agnes Martin
01:04:23
2017-09-21 04:41:19 UTC 01:04:23
Valentin de Boulogne, early Agnes Martin

Metropolitan Museum of Art curator Keith Christiansen, author Christina Bryan Rosenberger

Hélio Oiticica, Lexington Camera Club
01:13:43
2017-09-21 04:41:19 UTC 01:13:43
Hélio Oiticica, Lexington Camera Club

Curators Lynn Zelevansky and Brian Sholis

Anthony Hernandez, Karen Hellman
01:17:50
2017-09-21 04:41:19 UTC 01:17:50
Anthony Hernandez, Karen Hellman

Artist Anthony Hernandez (retrospective now at SFMOMA), "Real/Ideal: Photography in France, 1847-1860" curator Karen Hellman.

Photography in Argentina 1850-2010, Jimmie Durham
01:15:28
2017-09-21 13:54:34 UTC 01:15:28
Photography in Argentina 1850-2010, Jimmie Durham

Episode No. 306 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curators Idurre Alonso and Anne Ellegood.

Alonso is the co-curator of "Photography in Argentina, 1850-2010: Contradiction and Continuity" at the J. Paul Getty Museum. It opens this weekend and remains on view through January 28, 2018. The exhibition, which explores themes that emphasize Argentina's history, features nearly 300 works.

On the second segment, Hammer Museum curator Anne Ellegood discusses her exhibition "Jimmie Durham: At the Center of the World." The exhibition, the first US retrospective of Durham's work in 20 years, is at the Walker Art Center through October 7. 

Carolina Miranda on PST: LA/LA, Leyla Cárdenas
01:00:58
2017-09-21 13:54:34 UTC 01:00:58
Carolina Miranda on PST: LA/LA, Leyla Cárdenas

Episode No. 305 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features journalist Carolina Miranda and artist Leyla Cárdenas.

Carolina Miranda is a journalist at the Los Angeles Times. She joins host Tyler Green to preview "Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA," a Getty Foundation-funded series of exhibitions, catalogues and events across southern California.

Cárdenas discusses her recent work, especially Excision (2012), which is included in "Home -- So Different, So Appealing" at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. It is the first PST: LA/LA show to open. Curated by Chon Noriega, Pilar Tompkins Rivas and Mari Carmen Ramirez, it will remain on view through October 15, when it will travel to the Museum of Fine Arts Houston.

Anthony Hernandez
58:55
2017-09-21 13:54:34 UTC 58:55
Anthony Hernandez

Episode No. 304 features a re-air of host Tyler Green's 2016 conversation with Anthony Hernandez.

In two weeks the Milwaukee Art Museum will present one of the best shows of 2016, a retrospective of Anthony Hernandez curated by San Francisco Museum of Modern Art curator Erin O'Toole.

It was Hernandez's first retrospective. His photographs have consistently looked at parts of America, especially parts of Los Angeles, that hide in plain sight. The catalogue was one of last year's best books, especially for the introduction by Robert Adams and a conversation between Hernandez and Lewis Baltz. Milwaukee's presentation of the exhibition opens on September 15 and will be on view through January first, 2018. 

Degas and Millinery
44:44
2017-09-21 13:54:34 UTC 44:44
Degas and Millinery

Episode No. 303 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast is a summer clips episode featuring a previously aired interview with curator Simon Kelly.

Along with Esther Bell, Kelly is the co-curator of "Degas, Impressionism & the Paris Millinery Trade." The exhibition melds the social history of modernizing 19th-century Paris with the ways in which painters, especially Edgar Degas, portrayed one of the city's boomingest industries, the manufacturing and selling of hats. As it turns out, millinery was a gateway into the city, employment and the bourgeoisie for tens of thousands of French women. The exhibition is at San Francisco's Legion of Honor through September 24. It debuted at the Saint Louis Art Museum, where Kelly is a curator. The exhibition's superb catalogue was published by the two museums and DelMonico Prestel. Amazon offers it for $48.

For images of artworks discussed on the program, see Episode No. 280.

No. 302: "Soundtracks" at SFMOMA: Jacqueline Kiyomi Gordon, Amor Muñoz
43:21
2017-09-21 13:54:34 UTC 43:21
No. 302: "Soundtracks" at SFMOMA: Jacqueline Kiyomi Gordon, Amor Muñoz

Episode No. 302 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artists Jacqueline Kiyomi Gordon and Amor Muñoz.

This is the second of two MAN Podcast episodes spotlighting artists in "Soundtracks," a new exhibition at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art that examines the role of sound in art. The show, which was curated by Rudolf Frieling and Tanya Zimbardo, will remain on view through January 1, 2018. It features nearly three dozen artworks that are or include sound.

 

Cristóbal de Villalpando; Bosch and Bouts
53:18
2017-09-21 13:54:34 UTC 53:18
Cristóbal de Villalpando; Bosch and Bouts

Episode No. 301 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curators Ronda Kasl and Rima Girnius.

Along with Jonathan Brown and Clara Bargellini, Metropolitan Museum of Art curator Ronda Kasl is the co-curator of "Cristóbal de Villalpando: Mexican Painter of the Baroque," which is at the Met in New York through October 15. Villalpando is considered one of the two major artists of seventeenth-century New Spain. The Met's small survey of his work features eleven paintings, including Villalpando's 28-feet-high Transfiguration of Jesus (1683), his first masterpiece.

On the second segment, Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art curator Rima Girnius discusses two recently re-attributed paintings in the N-A's collection: Hieronymus Bosch's The Temptation of St. Anthony (about 1500-1510) and Albrecht Bouts's Christ Crowned with Thorns (about 1490-95). The N-A is presenting the paintings and information about the re-attributions in "Rediscovering Hieronymus Bosch and Albrecht Bouts," which is on view in Kansas City through May 27, 2018.

 

Gary Simmons
56:09
2017-09-21 13:54:34 UTC 56:09
Gary Simmons

Episode No. 300 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Gary Simmons.

Gary Simmons's newest installation is on view at the California African American Museum in Los Angeles. Titled "Gary Simmons: Fade to Black," the work is a multi-wall installation in the museum's atrium. The presentation was curated by Naima J. Keith and will remain on view through July 31, 2018.

Over the course of a quarter-century-long career, Simmons has explored how to make the typically invisible visible, often within the context of America's troubled history. In 2002 the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago debuted a mid-career survey of Simmons's work that traveled to SITE Santa Fe and The Studio Museum in Harlem. Simmons has also been featured in solo shows at the Whitney Museum of American Art, MASS MoCA, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Saint Louis Art Museum, MCASD, the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, The Drawing Center in New York and more. Simmons was first a guest on The MAN Podcast in 2013.

During the program MAN Podcast host Tyler Green references this Los Angeles Times video of Simmons working on the installation.

Glenn Ligon, Florine Stettheimer
54:46
2017-09-21 13:54:34 UTC 54:46
Glenn Ligon, Florine Stettheimer

Episode No. 299 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Glenn Ligon and curator Stephen Brown.

Ligon is the curator of "Blue Black" at the Pulitzer Arts Foundation in St. Louis. Informed by the Pulitzer's Ellsworth Kelly wall sculpture Blue Black, the exhibition features more than 50 artworks that use color to address questions related to language, identity and more. The exhibition is on view through October 7. The catalogue of the exhibition is complimentary save the cost of shipping ($7 in the US, $14 abroad). 

Ligon is an artist whose 2011 mid-career survey was organized by the Whitney Museum of American Art and traveled to LACMA and the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth. His work has been featured in solo exhibitions at the Power Plant in Toronto, the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, and the Studio Museum in Harlem. 

On the second segment, curator Stephen Brown discusses his exhibition "Florine Stettheimer: Painting Poetry," which is at The Jewish Museum in New York through September 24. He co-curated  the show with Georgiana Uhlyarik at the Art Gallery of Ontario. The exhibition's catalogue was published by Yale University Press.  

"Soundtracks" at SFMOMA with Bill Fontana and Christina Kubisch
51:23
2017-09-21 13:54:34 UTC 51:23
"Soundtracks" at SFMOMA with Bill Fontana and Christina Kubisch

**In stereo**

Episode No. 298 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features sound artists Bill Fontana and Christina Kubisch.

This is the first of two MAN Podcast episodes spotlighting artists in "Soundtracks," a new exhibition at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art that examines the role of sound in art. The show, which was curated by Rudolf Frieling and Tanya Zimbardo, will remain on view through January 1, 2018. It features nearly three dozen artworks that are or include sound. SFMOMA has built out an extensive digital infrastructure for the show, including an exhibition guide, a catalogue, and interviews with artists such as Jacqueline Kiyomi Gordon, Christina Kubisch, Rafael Lozano-Hemmer, and Richard T. Walker.

This week's MAN Podcast features exhibition artists whose work makes the invisible audible. San Francisco-based artist Bill Fontana has been making what he calls 'sound sculptures' for 40 years. He's exhibited all over the world, including at the Venice Biennale, Madrid's Reina Sofia, London's Tate Modern, New York's Madison Square Park, and more.

Christina Kubisch is a Berlin-area-based composer and artist who works with electromagnetic induction, making both walks for which listeners/viewers wear a special set of headphones and move through a city to hear sounds to which Kubitsch has guided them on a map, and sound sculptures that feature sound related to their physical presence. Kubisch has created dozens of electrical walks all over the world, has been featured in the Venice Biennale, Documenta and in scores of group and solo shows.

 

Richard Deacon, Daniel Heidkamp
01:15:21
2017-09-21 13:54:34 UTC 01:15:21
Richard Deacon, Daniel Heidkamp

Episode No. 297 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artists Richard Deacon and Daniel Heidkamp.

The San Diego Museum of Art is showing "Richard Deacon: What You See Is What You Get," a survey of the artist's career. Curated by Ariel Plotek, it's on view through Sept. 4. The exhibition is accompanied by a catalogue published by the museum. Host Tyler Green and Deacon also mention passages from Deacon's 2014 book of writings, titled "So, If, And, But: Writings 1970-2012."

Throughout a nearly 50-year career as a sculptor, draftsman and print-maker, Deacon has explored form, volume and space with unusual rigor. Much of his work is motivated by the exploration of shapes within shapes, with the tension between the two shapes and the material in which the work is made providing the artwork's activating tension. Deacon's dozens of major exhibitions include a 2014 retrospective at the Tate Britain, and last year the Museum Folkwang in Essen, Germany presented a career-length survey of Deacon's drawings.

On the second segment, Daniel Heidkamp discusses his paintings and the pictures of them on view in "Taking Pictures: Camera Phone Conversations Between Artists" at the Metropolitan Museum of Art's Breuer location. The exhibition was curated by Mia Fineman and is on view through Dec. 17. Heidkamp is showing paintings related to the exhibition at New York's Half Gallery through July 21.

Mexican modernism in "Paint the Revolution," Andrea Chung
01:18:34
2017-09-21 13:54:34 UTC 01:18:34
Mexican modernism in "Paint the Revolution," Andrea Chung

Episode No. 296 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curator Matthew Affron and artist Andrea Chung.

Matthew Affron, a curator at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, is one of the co-curators of "Paint the Revolution: Mexican Modernism, 1910-1950," which is on view at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston through October 1. The exhibition chronicles the history of Mexican modernism at the beginning of the twentieth century and the social, political, and cultural forces that shaped it. Among other critical plaudits, MAN Podcast host Tyler Green named it to his 2016 top ten list.

The curatorial team for the exhibition includes Renato González Mello, Director of the Instituto de Investigaciones Estéticas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Dafne Cruz Porchini, a post-doctoral researcher at the Colegio de México in Mexico City; and Philadelphia Museum of Art curator Mark A. Castro.

On the second segment, Andrea Chung discusses an exhibition of her work titled "You Broke the Ocean in Half to be Here," at the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego. Curated by Jill Dawsey, the exhibition is on view at MCASD's downtown location through August 20.  Chung's work, including an installation she's planning for the forthcoming Prospect ennial, explores the legacies of migration and colonialism in the Caribbean.

Holiday clips: Barkley L. Hendricks
46:07
2017-09-21 13:54:34 UTC 46:07
Holiday clips: Barkley L. Hendricks

Artist Barkley L. Hendricks

Roni Horn
01:02:53
2017-09-21 13:54:34 UTC 01:02:53
Roni Horn

Episode No. 294 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Roni Horn.

The Nasher Sculpture Center in Dallas is showing the first American museum exhibition devoted to Horn's cast glass sculptures. Eight of them are on view in the Nasher's Renzo Piano-designed building through August 20. In New York, Hauser & Wirth is presenting the debut of four new Horns, including the photographic series "The Selected Gifts, (1974-2015)," two series of works on paper, "The Dog's Chorus" (2016), "Th Rose Prblm" (2015), and two recent glass sculptures.

Horn has been mining the intersection of minimalist object making and conceptualism in sculpture, photography and works on paper -- and particularly the relationships between discrete objects -- since the mid-1970s. In 2009 the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York, the Institute of Contemporary Art Boston, the Tate Modern and the Collection Lambert in France surveyed her career in an exhibition titled "Roni Horn, aka Roni Horn." She has had other solo shows at the Art Institute of Chicago, the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris, the Dia Center for the Arts in New York, among others.

Robert Rauschenberg, Ken Ashton
01:07:36
2017-09-21 13:54:34 UTC 01:07:36
Robert Rauschenberg, Ken Ashton

Episode No. 293 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features Museum of Modern Art, New York curator Leah Dickerman and artist Ken Ashton.

See images of art discussed on the program here.

Along with the Tate Modern's Achim Borchardt-Hume, Leah Dickerman is the co-curator of "Robert Rauschenberg: Among Friends," a retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art through September 17. The exhibition features Rauschenberg's early photography, body prints, combines, performances, prints and more. The exhibition catalogue was published by MoMA. Amazon offers it for $34 in paperback and $51 in cloth.

Leah Dickerman is a curator at MoMA. Her previous exhibitions include Inventing Abstraction, 1910-1925," and a 2005-06 dada survey that Dickerman curated while working at the National Gallery of Art.

On the second segment, Ken Ashton discusses his new book "Portsmouth: Collected Saturdays," which is new from Daylight. The book features Ashton's documentation of the deindustrialization and emptying out of Portsmouth, Ohio, a small town on the Ohio River at the southern end of Appalachia. Amazon offers it for $30. Ashton's work is in the collection of institutions such as the Museum of Contemporary Photography in Chicago and the National Gallery of Art.

Spencer Finch, on Sandro Botticelli
01:14:59
2017-09-21 13:54:34 UTC 01:14:59
Spencer Finch, on Sandro Botticelli

Episode No. 292 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Spencer Finch and curator Frederick Ilchman.

See images of art discussed in this week's show here.

Spencer Finch is presenting two new installations at two venues on opposite sides of the United States: His The Western Mystery (2017), a commission from the Seattle Art Museum for its Olympic Sculpture Park, is up through March 3, 2019. At MASS MoCA, Finch's Cosmic Latte (2017) is on view at least through 2018.

Finch's work typically addresses light and its relationship to memory at specific geographic locations, and often specific times. He has fulfilled commissions for and had exhibitions at The Morgan Library, the Rhode Island School of Design, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, the Pulitzer Arts Foundation (then the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts), the Corcoran Gallery of Art and more. His work is in the collections of the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, the Kemper Museum of Art in St. Louis, the Guggenheim and more.

Frederick Ilchman has organized the Museum of Fine Arts Boston's showing of "Botticelli and the Search for the Divine," the largest exhibition of Botticelli paintings ever shown in the United States. The exhibition, which is on view through July 9, includes 15 works by 15th-century Florentine master Sandro Botticelli, as well as works by Filippo Lippi, Antonio del Pollaiuolo, Jacopo del Sellaio and more. The exhibition was co-organized by the MFA Boston and the Muscarelle Museum of Art at the College of William & Mary. Ilchman is the MFA Boston's curator of paintings.

Mark Ruwedel, Jed Morse on Manuel Neri
01:09:05
2017-09-21 13:54:34 UTC 01:09:05
Mark Ruwedel, Jed Morse on Manuel Neri

Episode No. 291 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Mark Ruwedel and curator Jed Morse.

Yossi Milo Gallery in New York is showing "Mark Ruwedel: Hell and Home" through June 24.  The show includes Ruwedel's 'pictures of hell,' an inventory of Western landscapes named for hell or the devil, his pictures of 'home,' of desert homes fighting a losing battle against the ravages of the harsh surrounding environment, and Opportunities Realized, Ruwedel's revisiting of Ed Ruscha's 1970 Real Estate Opportunities, in which Ruwedel photographed how the vacant lots in Ruscha's book were filled in.

Ruwedel's most recent book is "Pictures of Hell," which features essays by Tate curator Simon Baker and Chiara Siravo a historian whose work has examined our concepts of hell. 

Ruwedel is one of America's most honored photographers. In 2014 he won both the Scotiabank Photography Award and a Guggenheim fellowship. His work is in the collections of major museums such as the Metropolitan, the National Gallery of Art, the Tate, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and SFMOMA.

Ruwedel and host Tyler Green refer several times to Ruwedel's 2008 book "Westward the Course of Empire," a classic which looked at what remains in places where railroads once ran across the landscape.

On the second segment, Nasher Sculpture Center curator Jed Morse discusses his museum's recent acquisition of a suite of major Manuel Neri sculptures and works on paper. They are on view at the Nasher through July 16.

Holiday clips: Pipilotti Rist
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2017-09-21 13:54:34 UTC 54:23
Holiday clips: Pipilotti Rist

Episode No. 290 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features a previously aired conversation with artist Pipilotti Rist. 

This summer, the Museum of Fine Arts Houston will exhibit two immersive installations that are new to its collection: Pipilotti Rist's Pixel Forest and Worry Will Vanish. They go on view on June 11 and will remain up through September 17.

Rist, who is based in Zurich, has been the subject of many single-artist museum exhibitions, especially in the last half-decade. Among the museums to give her shows are the Kunsthaus Zurich, the Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art in Seoul, the Hayward in London, the Wexner in Columbus, MoMA in New York and the Pompidou Center in Paris.

Nancy Rubins
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2017-09-21 13:54:34 UTC 59:37
Nancy Rubins

Episode No. 289 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Nancy Rubins. It was recorded live at the Wexner Center for the Arts at The Ohio State University in Columbus.

Rubins is included in "Grey Matters," an exhibition that opens Friday, May 19 at the Wexner. The show, curated by Michael Goodson, features the work of 37 contemporary women artists who have worked in grisaille. It is on view through July 30. The exhibition includes work by past MAN Podcast guests such as Carol Bove, Vija Celmins, Mickalene Thomas, Julie Mehretu, Mary Reid Kelley, Arlene Shechet, Amy Sillman, Xaviera Simmons and Lorna Simpson.

Rubins' often monumental sculpture amalgamates industrially produced objects into strikingly light, sometimes lyrical objects. Her enormous drawings, of built-up graphite on single sheets of paper often installed across multiple walls, are simultaneously minimal and baroque. Rubins has had solo exhibitions at museums such as the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego and the Museum of Modern Art, New York. Her public and institutional commissions include the University of Texas in Austin, MCASD, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, the Albright-Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo, and the Université Paris Diderot in France.

The Kimbell's new Modigliani, the art of Coenties Slip
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2017-09-21 13:54:34 UTC 40:50
The Kimbell's new Modigliani, the art of Coenties Slip

Episode No. 288 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features Kimbell Art Museum director Eric Lee and Menil Collection curator Michelle White.

Lee joins the program to discuss the Kimbell's recent acquisition of a rare Amadeo Modigliani sculpture, Head (c. 1913). Only about 27 Modigliani sculptures survive. Head was a gift from collector Gwendolyn Weiner and is the first modern sculpture in the Kimbell's collection. It is on view now.

Then Michelle White discusses her Menil exhibition "Between Land and Sea: Artists of the Coenties Slip." The show looks at the early work of Chryssa, Robert Indiana, Ellsworth Kelly, Agnes Martin, Lenore Tawney, and Jack Youngerman, all of whom who lived in the Coenties Slip, an East River-adjacent neighborhood set apart from the rest of the Manhattan art world. The exhibition considers moments of communication and influence. It is on view through August 6.

Kellie Jones, Shimon Attie
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2017-09-21 13:54:34 UTC 01:16:15
Kellie Jones, Shimon Attie

Episode No. 287 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features historian Kellie Jones and artist Shimon Attie.

Kellie Jones is the author of "South of Pico: African American Artists in Los Angeles in the 1960s and 1970s," which is new from Duke University Press. Amazon offers it for $22.

This is Jones's second major project about art in Los Angeles during the 1960s and 1970s. She also curated "Now Dig This! Art and Black Los Angeles 1960-1980" for the Hammer Museum in 2011. She was a 2016 recipient of a MacArthur Foundation 'Genius Grant,' and teaches art history at Columbia University.

Among the artists featured in Jones's book who have been featured on The Modern Art Notes Podcast are Melvin Edwards and Betye Saar. Curator and historian Yael Lipschutz came on the program to discuss Noah Purifoy on the occasion of LACMA's 2015 retrospective. Also discussed on this week's program: The extensive digital archive for "Now Dig This!" is maintained by the Hammer Museum.

On the second segment, Shimon Attie discusses two new works on view at the Saint Louis Art Museum: The Crossing, an eight-minute video installation that muses on the global refugee crisis via a group of gamblers playing roulette, and Lost in Space (After Huck) a sculptural installation that uses Mark Twain's famous Huckleberry Finn story to give Americans an empathetic gateway into stories of migration and displacement. They're on view in Saint Louis through June 25.

Matisse's studio, Darby English
01:11:24
2017-09-21 13:54:34 UTC 01:11:24
Matisse's studio, Darby English

Episode No. 286 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features historian and curator Ellen McBreen and historian Darby English.

Along with Helen Burnham and Ann Dumas, McBreen is a co-curator of "Matisse in the Studio," which is at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston through July 9. The exhibition examines how objects in Matisse's home and studio informed -- and often ended up in -- his art. These objects include a simple chocolate pot, a tacky chair, an inexpensive glass vase probably made for the tourist market and textiles, such as Kuba cloth. The exhibition includes about 34 paintings, 26 drawings, 11 sculptures, seven cut-outs and about three dozen objects Matisse owned.

From Boston the exhibition will travel to the Royal Academy of Arts in London. Its excellent catalogue, which was published by the MFAB, is available from Amazon for $34.

McBreen is an associate professor of art history at Wheaton College. Her most recent book is "Matisse's Sculpture: The Pinup and the Primitive," which was published by Yale University Press in 2014.

On the second segment, University of Chicago professor Darby English discusses his new book "1971: A Year in the Life of Color." The book, which was published by University of Chicago Press, considers two exhibitions -- Contemporary Black Artists in America at the Whitney Museum of American Art and The DeLuxe Show, a racially integrated exhibition of abstract art presented in a renovated movie theater in Houston's inner-city Fifth Ward. English finds that many black artists of the period were less interested in a specifically so-called "black aesthetic," than they were in cultural interaction across racial lines. He points to color and how these artists used it as a key way in which they engaged other artists.

Hartley in Maine, Alexei Jawlensky
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2017-09-21 13:54:34 UTC 01:18:26
Hartley in Maine, Alexei Jawlensky

Episode No. 285 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curators Randall Griffey and Vivian Endicott Barnett.

Along with Elizabeth Finch and Donna M. Cassidy, Griffey is the co-curator of "Marsden Hartley's Maine," which is at the Metropolitan Museum of Art through June 18. The exhibition spotlights Hartley's lifelong engagement with Maine, its residents, coastline, forests and mountains. It includes about 90 paintings and drawings featuring the full range of Hartley's Maine-related work.

From the Met, "Marsden Hartley's Maine" will travel to the Colby College Museum of Art, where it goes on view on July 8. (It will be at Colby during the first weekend of August, when Colby hosts the 2017 Art and Land Conservation Symposium. MAN Podcast host Tyler Green is among the speakers.) The show's strong catalogue was published by the Met. Amazon offers it for $35.

On the second segment, historian and curator Vivian Endicott Barnett discusses her "Alexei Jawlensky" at the Neue Galerie in New York. It features 75 paintings and is the artist's first full museum retrospective in the United States. Jawlensky was a Russian-born expressionist who moved to Munich in 1896 and went on to become an important figure in how central and eastern European artists engaged with early modern art -- and especially with van Gogh, Matisse, fauvism and more. It's on view through May 29.

Easter clips: Early Monet
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2017-09-21 13:54:34 UTC 46:16
Easter clips: Early Monet

The Easter-weekend Episode No. 284 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features a previously-aired conversation with curator George Shackelford.

Shackelford is the curator of "Monet: The Early Years" at the Legion of Honor in San Francisco. The show features about 60 paintings from the first phase of Claude Monet's career, from a painting Monet made in Normandy in 1858 when he was 18 years old, until 1872, when Monet lived in Argenteuil, along the Seine near Paris. The exhibition debuted last winter at the Kimbell Art Museum, where Shackelford is the museum's deputy director. "Monet" is on view in San Francisco through May 29. The show's beautiful catalogue was published by the Kimbell and distributed by Yale University Press.

Liz Glynn, Nina Chanel Abney
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2017-09-21 13:54:34 UTC 01:10:27
Liz Glynn, Nina Chanel Abney

Episode No. 283 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artists Liz Glynn and Nina Chanel Abney.

Glynn's "Open House" is on view now in Doris C. Freedman Plaza in New York's Central Park. It was commissioned by the Public Art Fund and will remain through September 24. The work takes as its jumping off point Freedman Plaza's unusual site, the place where democratic Central Park meets corporate midtown meets the aristocratic Upper East Side. Glynn's sculpture highlights the class distinctions that separate the park from the city by referencing a Fifth Avenue interior designed by Gilded Age architect Stanford White. The exhibition was curated by Daniel S. Palmer.

Glynn's work routinely engages history and the way both it and historical objects are considered in the present day. Her work has been presented or exhibited at MOCA in Los Angeles, the New Museum in New York, the deCordova Sculpture Park in Concord, Mass., the Petit Palais in Paris, LACMA, and more. This fall, MASS MoCA will present Glynn's "The Archaeology of Another Possible Future" in the museum's Building Five.

On the second segment, Nina Chanel Abney discusses her work on the occasion of a 10-year survey of her work titled "Nina Chanel Abney: Royal Flush." The exhibition is at the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University through July 16, when it will travel to the Chicago Cultural Center and then to Los Angeles, where it will be jointly presented by the Institute of Contemporary Art -- the institution formerly known as the Santa Monica Museum of Art -- and the California African American Museum. 

Photography East of the Mississippi; Matisse/Diebenkorn
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2017-09-21 13:54:34 UTC 01:02:23
Photography East of the Mississippi; Matisse/Diebenkorn

Episode No. 282 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curator Diane Waggoner and curator Katy Rothkopf.

Waggoner is the curator of "East of the Mississippi: Nineteenth-Century American Landscape Photography." For several decades, the story of America's nineteenth-century photographic history has mostly run through the West. Waggoner's exhibition instead looks at how photographers looked at the region between the Mississippi River and the Atlantic Ocean. The exhibition features 175 nineteenth-century photographs, including daguerreotypes, salted paper prints, albumen prints, stereographic prints and even paintings. It's on view at the National Gallery of Art through July 16, when it will travel to the New Orleans Museum of Art. 

On the second segment, Baltimore Museum of Art curator Katy Rothkopf discusses Richard Diebenkorn's 1964 visit to the Soviet Union in the context of "Matisse/Diebenkorn." The exhibition, which Rothkopf co-curated with San Francisco Museum of Modern Art curator Janet Bishop, is on view at SFMOMA through May 29. Bishop discussed "Matisse/Diebenkorn" on Episode No. 266.

On Trump's attempt to eliminate federal arts and humanities programs
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2017-09-21 13:54:34 UTC 55:46
On Trump's attempt to eliminate federal arts and humanities programs

Episode No. 281 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast considers federal arts and humanities funding with Los Angeles Times art critic Christopher Knight and Andrew W. Mellon Foundation executive vice president for programs and research Mariët Westermann.

The National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities make up eight one-thousandths of one percent of the federal budget. Still, in the name of austerity, the Trump White House has targeted the endowments, the Institute of Museum and Library Services and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting for elimination in its first budget. The endowments each received $148 million in appropriations in the federal government's most recent fiscal year, while the IMLS received $230 million and CPB $445 million. Meanwhile, the Trump budget asks for a 10 percent increase in defense spending, a single-year bump of $54 billion -- or 365 times the NEA or NEH's total annual appropriation.

No American art or arts critic has written more about the role of federal arts and humanities funding and especially the national endowments over more years than Christopher Knight. He has been the art critic of the Los Angeles Times since 1989. He is a three-time finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and received the Frank Jewett Mather Award for Distinction in Art Criticism from the College Art Association in 1997. 

On the second segment, Mellon foundation VP Mariët Westermann discusses federal arts and humanities funding from a funder's perspective. Prior to joining Mellon in 2010, was the provost and chief academic officer of New York University Abu Dhabi; director of NYU's Institute of Fine Arts; associate director of research at the Clark Art Institute, and an associate professor at Rutgers University. As a historian of Netherlandish art, Westermann has written books on Jan Steen, Rembrandt, Vermeer and more.

Degas and the Millinery Trade, Matisse and American Art
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2017-09-21 13:54:34 UTC 01:04:41
Degas and the Millinery Trade, Matisse and American Art

Episode No. 280 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curators Simon Kelly and Gail Stavitsky.

Along with the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco's Esther Bell, Kelly is the co-curator of "Degas, Impressionism & the Paris Millinery Trade." The exhibition melds the social history of modernizing 19th-century Paris with the ways in which painters, especially Edgar Degas, captured one the city's boomingest industries, the manufacturing and selling of hats, an industry that was a gateway into the city, employment and the bourgeoisie for tens of thousands of French women. The exhibition is at the Saint Louis Art Museum through May 7, when it will travel to San Francisco's Legion of Honor. The exhibition's superb catalogue was published by the two museums and DelMonico Prestel.

On the second segment, Gail Stavitsky discusses "Matisse and American Art," her new exhibition on the impact Matisse's work has had on American artists. The show, which features 65 paintings, sculptures, prints and archival objects is on view at New Jersey's Montclair Art Museum through June 18. Stavitsky curated the show with assistance from John Cauman and Lisa Mintz Messinger. The exhibition catalogue was published by the museum.

Dara Birnbaum, Black Mountain College photography
01:22:12
2017-09-21 13:54:34 UTC 01:22:12
Dara Birnbaum, Black Mountain College photography

Episode No. 279 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Dara Birnbaum and curator Julie J. Thomson.

Dara Birnbaum is included in "Breaking News: Turning the Lens on Mass Media," at the J. Paul Getty Museum. The exhibition examines how artists have used newspapers, magazines and televised news programs to consider media, news and the messages included therein. The exhibition was curated by Arpad Kovacs and will be on view through April 30.

Birnbaum is among the pioneers of video art. Her work often includes pointedly feminist critiques of mass media, including of entertainment and journalism. Retrospectives of her work include "The Dark Matter of Media Light" at SMAK, the Stedelijk Museum voor Actuele Kunst in Ghent, Belgium, and at the Serralves Foundation in Porto, Portugal, and "Dara Birnbaum Retrospective exhibition" at the Kunsthalle Wien in Austria and at the Norrtalje Konsthall in Sweden.

On the second segment, Julie J. Thomson discusses "Begin to See: The Photographers of Black Mountain College." The exhibition surveys photography made at Black Mountain College, including landscapes, documentary work (including of performance), experiments with the medium and more. The exhibition is at the Black Mountain College Museum and Arts Center in Asheville, North Carolina through May 20. 

Kay Rosen, Edme Bouchardon
01:13:03
2017-09-21 13:54:34 UTC 01:13:03
Kay Rosen, Edme Bouchardon

Episode No. 278 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Kay Rosen and curator Anne-Lise Desmas.

The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum opens "Kay Rosen: H Is for House," this weekend. It is Rosen's first solo museum exhibition in the northeast in almost 20 years. It is curated by the Aldrich's Richard Klein. The exhibition will be on view through September 4.

Rosen's text-based works, presented as wall-drawings, paintings and works on paper, use language, words, humor and two-dimensional forms to explore ideas, histories and contemporary life. Rosen's work is in the collection . Her museum exhibitions and installations have included projects at the Aspen (Colo.) Art Museum, the University Art Museum at the University of California, Santa Barbara, The Drawing Center, New York, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles and the Otis College of Art and Design, the MIT List Visual Arts Center, the MCA Chicago and more.

On the second segment, J. Paul Getty Museum curator Anne-Lise Desmas discusses "Bouchardon: Royal Artist of the Enlightenment." The exhibition examines the sculpture and drawings of Edme Bouchardon, who worked as the Royal Artist during the eighteenth-century reign of Louis XV. The exhibition, which Desmas co-curated with Edouard Kopp, is on view through April 2.

Kerry James Marshall (from May, 2016)
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2017-09-21 13:54:34 UTC 01:01:18
Kerry James Marshall (from May, 2016)

On March 12, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles opens "Kerry James Marshall: Mastry," the artist's first retrospective. Marshall is one of the most significant chronicler's of the American experience, especially the African-American experience. For 35 years he has worked to add black people and black culture to a Western art historical canon that is mostly built of white faces and stories. The exhibition was curated by Dieter Roelstraete, Helen Molesworth and Ian Alteveer. The exhibition catalogue was published by Skira Rizzoli.

John Singleton Copley, Jimmie Durham
01:23:17
2017-09-21 13:54:34 UTC 01:23:17
John Singleton Copley, Jimmie Durham

Episode No. 276 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features historian and author Jane Kamensky and curator Anne Ellegood.

Kamensky is the author of "A Revolution in Color: The World of John Singleton Copley." The book is a new biography that places one of early America's best and most important artists within the context of the political and revolutionary events of his time -- and details how Copley and his family were actors in them. Amazon offers it for $20 in hardcover and at $16 for Kindle.

Kamensky is a professor of history at Harvard University and the director of the Schlesinger Library. She is a historian of early America and the Atlantic world.

On the second segment, Hammer Museum curator Anne Ellegood discusses her new exhibition "Jimmie Durham: At the Center of the World." Ellegood's retrospective is the first major Durham show in the United States in over 20 years. 

Durham came to prominence as an artist in New York City in the 1980s. His work has consistently addressed questions of identity, colonialism and the inseparability of identity from politics in the United States. The exhibition is on view at the Hammer through May 7, when it will travel to the Walker, the Whitney and to the Remai Modern in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. The show's thorough catalogue was published by DelMonico Prestel.

Medardo Rosso
01:03:46
2017-09-21 13:54:34 UTC 01:03:46
Medardo Rosso

Episode No. 275 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curators Sharon Hecker and Tamara Schenkenberg and was taped live at the Pulitzer Arts Foundation in St. Louis.

Hecker and Schenkenberg are the co-curators of "Medardo Rosso: Experiments in Light and Form," which is at the Pulitzer through May 13. The exhibition is the first broad survey of Rosso's work in an American museum in over fifty years. (In 2014-15 the Center for Italian Modern Art in New York presented this Rosso installation.) It features nearly 100 works, including sculptures, drawings and photographs. The exhibition's catalogue is available for free from the Pulitzer for a $7 PayPal-administered shipping charge.

Rosso is an Italian artist who spent much of his career in France. His sculptures of heads and figures in wax, plaster, and bronze are key pivots between an era of monumental bronze sculpture, realist and impressionist sculpture and ultimately modern art.

Sarah Oppenheimer, Richard Misrach
01:11:08
2017-09-21 13:54:34 UTC 01:11:08
Sarah Oppenheimer, Richard Misrach

Episode No. 274 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artists Sarah Oppenheimer and Richard Misrach.

This weekend the Wexner Center for the Arts at The Ohio State University in Columbus debuts "Sarah Oppenheimer: S-337473," an exhibition of a newly commissioned work developed  for the Wexner's Peter Eisenman-designed building. Oppenheimer created her new work as a two-year-long Wexner Center Artist Residency Award recipient, during which she collaborated with OSU's Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering to develop a patent-pending pivot mechanism that allows this new work to rotate at a 45-degree angle. The exhibition opens on Saturday, February 4 and will be on view through April 16. As soon as images of the new work are available, probably on or around February 7, we'll add them to this post.

Sarah Oppenheimer is an artist who creates installations that engage with both architecture and space. She's previously made work for the Perez Art Museum Miami (on view through April 30), the Kunsthaus Basel, the Rice University Art Gallery, the Queens Museum, and the Saint Louis Art Museum. A project she is developing for Mass MoCA will debut in 2019. Oppenheimer has also created a permanent installation at the Baltimore Museum of Art. Multiple views of all her installations are on her website.

On the second segment, the re-airing of a 2016 segment with Richard Misrach on his "Border Cantos," a book and exhibition on which he has collaborated with Mexican composer and performer Guillermo Galindo. Since 2004, and especially since 2009, Misrach has been making pictures along the 2,000-mile-long United States border with Mexico, the latest investigation of American deserts that make up what Misrach calls his Desert Cantos series. As Misrach traveled the borderlands, he accumulated discarded objects such as water bottles, backpacks, clothing and shotgun shells and turned them over to Galindo, who made that material into instruments and who then performed on them. The book, "Border Cantos," is out from Aperture; Amazon offers it $45, a forty percent discount.

Tony Oursler, American Art during WWI
01:20:31
2017-09-21 13:54:34 UTC 01:20:31
Tony Oursler, American Art during WWI

The Museum of Modern Art is showing Tony Oursler's Imponderable (2015-16), a 90-minute film shown in an immersive, so-called "5-D" environment, as well as archival material related to the film from Oursler's own collection. The film mines Ourlser's interest in experiments in technological advancement that didn't quite work out and occult phenomena to offer a kind of alternative history of modernism. The film is richly informed by Oursler's own life history. His grandfather was Charles Fulton Oursler, a journalist and author who teamed up with Harry Houdini to campaign against fraudulent mediumship. The exhibition was curated by MoMA's Stuart Comer and Erica Papernik-Shimizu. Imponderable is at MoMA through April 16.

Oursler is a multimedia and installation artist whose work often examines and uses new technologies to explore topics such as facial recognition, paranormal phenomena and the relationship between multiple personality disorder and mass media.

On the second segment, historian and curator Anne Classen Knutson discusses "World War I and American Art," which is at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts through April 9. The exhibition looks at how American artists responded to and engaged with the war, both in Europe and in the United States. Knutson co-curated the show with Robert Cozzolino and David Lubin. 

Stanley Whitney
01:08:48
2017-09-21 13:54:34 UTC 01:08:48
Stanley Whitney

Artist Stanley Whitney.

Francis Picabia, John McLaughlin
01:19:17
2017-09-21 13:54:34 UTC 01:19:17
Francis Picabia, John McLaughlin

"Francis Picabia" co-curator Anne Umland, "John McLaughlin" curator Stephanie Barron.

Lorna Simpson
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2017-09-21 13:54:34 UTC 54:01
Lorna Simpson

Artist Lorna Simpson, who is showing new work at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth

Tyler Green's top ten, Minor White
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2017-09-21 13:54:34 UTC 37:30
Tyler Green's top ten, Minor White

MAN Podcast host Tyler Green's 2016 top ten list, curator Paul Martineau on Minor White.

Holiday clips: The Le Nain
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2017-09-21 13:54:34 UTC 44:57
Holiday clips: The Le Nain

Curator and historian C.D. Dickerson.

Pipilotti Rist, Mark Speltz
01:17:15
2017-09-21 13:54:34 UTC 01:17:15
Pipilotti Rist, Mark Speltz

Artist Pipilotti Rist and historian and "North of Dixie: Civil Rights Photography Beyond the South" author Mark Speltz.

Matisse/Diebenkorn, Klimt's Portraits
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2017-09-21 13:54:34 UTC 57:24
Matisse/Diebenkorn, Klimt's Portraits

SFMOMA curator Janet Bishop, art historian Jill Lloyd.

Early Monet, Picasso's Drawings
01:06:06
2017-09-21 13:54:34 UTC 01:06:06
Early Monet, Picasso's Drawings

Curators George Shackelford, David Breslin.

Thanksgiving clips: Richard Misrach
46:14
2017-09-21 13:54:34 UTC 46:14
Thanksgiving clips: Richard Misrach

Artist Richard Misrach

Eduardo Basualdo
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2017-09-21 13:54:34 UTC 47:49
Eduardo Basualdo

Artist Eduardo Basualdo, recorded live at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden.

Art and Education in America After WWII at MCASD, Wexner
01:15:26
2017-09-21 13:54:34 UTC 01:15:26
Art and Education in America After WWII at MCASD, Wexner

Curator Jill Dawsey and artist Martha Rosler; curator Ruth Erickson

Edgar Degas, Richard Serra's "Shift"
01:05:46
2017-09-21 13:54:34 UTC 01:05:46
Edgar Degas, Richard Serra's "Shift"

Historian and curator Henri Loyrette, documentary filmmaker Simone Estrin.

Michael Dean, Julian Onderdonk
42:33
2017-09-21 13:54:34 UTC 42:33
Michael Dean, Julian Onderdonk

Artist Michael Dean and curator Kaylin Weber.

Valentin de Boulogne, early Agnes Martin
01:04:23
2017-09-21 13:54:34 UTC 01:04:23
Valentin de Boulogne, early Agnes Martin

Metropolitan Museum of Art curator Keith Christiansen, author Christina Bryan Rosenberger

Hélio Oiticica, Lexington Camera Club
01:13:43
2017-09-21 13:54:34 UTC 01:13:43
Hélio Oiticica, Lexington Camera Club

Curators Lynn Zelevansky and Brian Sholis

Anthony Hernandez, Karen Hellman
01:17:50
2017-09-21 13:54:34 UTC 01:17:50
Anthony Hernandez, Karen Hellman

Artist Anthony Hernandez (retrospective now at SFMOMA), "Real/Ideal: Photography in France, 1847-1860" curator Karen Hellman.

Emmet Gowin
01:15:46
2017-09-22 13:58:04 UTC 01:15:46
Emmet Gowin

Episode No. 307 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Emmet Gowin. 

Gowin's "Mariposas Nocturnas: Moths of Central and South America, a Study in Beauty and Diversity" is just out from Princeton University Press. The book features photographs of hundreds of moths that Gowin has made in Central and South America over the last 15 years. The book includes essays by Terry Tempest Williams and Gowin. Amazon offers it for $41.

Gowin will show related work in "Here on Earth Now -- Notes from the Field" in an exhibition that opens on Sept. 28 at New York's Pace/MacGill Gallery. It will remain on view through Jan. 6, 2018.

See images of this week's program here.

Photography in Argentina 1850-2010, Jimmie Durham
01:15:28
2017-09-22 13:58:04 UTC 01:15:28
Photography in Argentina 1850-2010, Jimmie Durham

Episode No. 306 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curators Idurre Alonso and Anne Ellegood.

Alonso is the co-curator of "Photography in Argentina, 1850-2010: Contradiction and Continuity" at the J. Paul Getty Museum. It opens this weekend and remains on view through January 28, 2018. The exhibition, which explores themes that emphasize Argentina's history, features nearly 300 works.

On the second segment, Hammer Museum curator Anne Ellegood discusses her exhibition "Jimmie Durham: At the Center of the World." The exhibition, the first US retrospective of Durham's work in 20 years, is at the Walker Art Center through October 7. 

Carolina Miranda on PST: LA/LA, Leyla Cárdenas
01:00:58
2017-09-22 13:58:04 UTC 01:00:58
Carolina Miranda on PST: LA/LA, Leyla Cárdenas

Episode No. 305 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features journalist Carolina Miranda and artist Leyla Cárdenas.

Carolina Miranda is a journalist at the Los Angeles Times. She joins host Tyler Green to preview "Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA," a Getty Foundation-funded series of exhibitions, catalogues and events across southern California.

Cárdenas discusses her recent work, especially Excision (2012), which is included in "Home -- So Different, So Appealing" at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. It is the first PST: LA/LA show to open. Curated by Chon Noriega, Pilar Tompkins Rivas and Mari Carmen Ramirez, it will remain on view through October 15, when it will travel to the Museum of Fine Arts Houston.

Anthony Hernandez
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2017-09-22 13:58:04 UTC 58:55
Anthony Hernandez

Episode No. 304 features a re-air of host Tyler Green's 2016 conversation with Anthony Hernandez.

In two weeks the Milwaukee Art Museum will present one of the best shows of 2016, a retrospective of Anthony Hernandez curated by San Francisco Museum of Modern Art curator Erin O'Toole.

It was Hernandez's first retrospective. His photographs have consistently looked at parts of America, especially parts of Los Angeles, that hide in plain sight. The catalogue was one of last year's best books, especially for the introduction by Robert Adams and a conversation between Hernandez and Lewis Baltz. Milwaukee's presentation of the exhibition opens on September 15 and will be on view through January first, 2018. 

Degas and Millinery
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Degas and Millinery

Episode No. 303 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast is a summer clips episode featuring a previously aired interview with curator Simon Kelly.

Along with Esther Bell, Kelly is the co-curator of "Degas, Impressionism & the Paris Millinery Trade." The exhibition melds the social history of modernizing 19th-century Paris with the ways in which painters, especially Edgar Degas, portrayed one of the city's boomingest industries, the manufacturing and selling of hats. As it turns out, millinery was a gateway into the city, employment and the bourgeoisie for tens of thousands of French women. The exhibition is at San Francisco's Legion of Honor through September 24. It debuted at the Saint Louis Art Museum, where Kelly is a curator. The exhibition's superb catalogue was published by the two museums and DelMonico Prestel. Amazon offers it for $48.

For images of artworks discussed on the program, see Episode No. 280.

No. 302: "Soundtracks" at SFMOMA: Jacqueline Kiyomi Gordon, Amor Muñoz
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2017-09-22 13:58:04 UTC 43:21
No. 302: "Soundtracks" at SFMOMA: Jacqueline Kiyomi Gordon, Amor Muñoz

Episode No. 302 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artists Jacqueline Kiyomi Gordon and Amor Muñoz.

This is the second of two MAN Podcast episodes spotlighting artists in "Soundtracks," a new exhibition at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art that examines the role of sound in art. The show, which was curated by Rudolf Frieling and Tanya Zimbardo, will remain on view through January 1, 2018. It features nearly three dozen artworks that are or include sound.

 

Cristóbal de Villalpando; Bosch and Bouts
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2017-09-22 13:58:04 UTC 53:18
Cristóbal de Villalpando; Bosch and Bouts

Episode No. 301 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curators Ronda Kasl and Rima Girnius.

Along with Jonathan Brown and Clara Bargellini, Metropolitan Museum of Art curator Ronda Kasl is the co-curator of "Cristóbal de Villalpando: Mexican Painter of the Baroque," which is at the Met in New York through October 15. Villalpando is considered one of the two major artists of seventeenth-century New Spain. The Met's small survey of his work features eleven paintings, including Villalpando's 28-feet-high Transfiguration of Jesus (1683), his first masterpiece.

On the second segment, Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art curator Rima Girnius discusses two recently re-attributed paintings in the N-A's collection: Hieronymus Bosch's The Temptation of St. Anthony (about 1500-1510) and Albrecht Bouts's Christ Crowned with Thorns (about 1490-95). The N-A is presenting the paintings and information about the re-attributions in "Rediscovering Hieronymus Bosch and Albrecht Bouts," which is on view in Kansas City through May 27, 2018.

 

Gary Simmons
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2017-09-22 13:58:04 UTC 56:09
Gary Simmons

Episode No. 300 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Gary Simmons.

Gary Simmons's newest installation is on view at the California African American Museum in Los Angeles. Titled "Gary Simmons: Fade to Black," the work is a multi-wall installation in the museum's atrium. The presentation was curated by Naima J. Keith and will remain on view through July 31, 2018.

Over the course of a quarter-century-long career, Simmons has explored how to make the typically invisible visible, often within the context of America's troubled history. In 2002 the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago debuted a mid-career survey of Simmons's work that traveled to SITE Santa Fe and The Studio Museum in Harlem. Simmons has also been featured in solo shows at the Whitney Museum of American Art, MASS MoCA, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Saint Louis Art Museum, MCASD, the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, The Drawing Center in New York and more. Simmons was first a guest on The MAN Podcast in 2013.

During the program MAN Podcast host Tyler Green references this Los Angeles Times video of Simmons working on the installation.

Glenn Ligon, Florine Stettheimer
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2017-09-22 13:58:04 UTC 54:46
Glenn Ligon, Florine Stettheimer

Episode No. 299 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Glenn Ligon and curator Stephen Brown.

Ligon is the curator of "Blue Black" at the Pulitzer Arts Foundation in St. Louis. Informed by the Pulitzer's Ellsworth Kelly wall sculpture Blue Black, the exhibition features more than 50 artworks that use color to address questions related to language, identity and more. The exhibition is on view through October 7. The catalogue of the exhibition is complimentary save the cost of shipping ($7 in the US, $14 abroad). 

Ligon is an artist whose 2011 mid-career survey was organized by the Whitney Museum of American Art and traveled to LACMA and the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth. His work has been featured in solo exhibitions at the Power Plant in Toronto, the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, and the Studio Museum in Harlem. 

On the second segment, curator Stephen Brown discusses his exhibition "Florine Stettheimer: Painting Poetry," which is at The Jewish Museum in New York through September 24. He co-curated  the show with Georgiana Uhlyarik at the Art Gallery of Ontario. The exhibition's catalogue was published by Yale University Press.  

"Soundtracks" at SFMOMA with Bill Fontana and Christina Kubisch
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2017-09-22 13:58:04 UTC 51:23
"Soundtracks" at SFMOMA with Bill Fontana and Christina Kubisch

**In stereo**

Episode No. 298 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features sound artists Bill Fontana and Christina Kubisch.

This is the first of two MAN Podcast episodes spotlighting artists in "Soundtracks," a new exhibition at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art that examines the role of sound in art. The show, which was curated by Rudolf Frieling and Tanya Zimbardo, will remain on view through January 1, 2018. It features nearly three dozen artworks that are or include sound. SFMOMA has built out an extensive digital infrastructure for the show, including an exhibition guide, a catalogue, and interviews with artists such as Jacqueline Kiyomi Gordon, Christina Kubisch, Rafael Lozano-Hemmer, and Richard T. Walker.

This week's MAN Podcast features exhibition artists whose work makes the invisible audible. San Francisco-based artist Bill Fontana has been making what he calls 'sound sculptures' for 40 years. He's exhibited all over the world, including at the Venice Biennale, Madrid's Reina Sofia, London's Tate Modern, New York's Madison Square Park, and more.

Christina Kubisch is a Berlin-area-based composer and artist who works with electromagnetic induction, making both walks for which listeners/viewers wear a special set of headphones and move through a city to hear sounds to which Kubitsch has guided them on a map, and sound sculptures that feature sound related to their physical presence. Kubisch has created dozens of electrical walks all over the world, has been featured in the Venice Biennale, Documenta and in scores of group and solo shows.

 

Richard Deacon, Daniel Heidkamp
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2017-09-22 13:58:04 UTC 01:15:21
Richard Deacon, Daniel Heidkamp

Episode No. 297 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artists Richard Deacon and Daniel Heidkamp.

The San Diego Museum of Art is showing "Richard Deacon: What You See Is What You Get," a survey of the artist's career. Curated by Ariel Plotek, it's on view through Sept. 4. The exhibition is accompanied by a catalogue published by the museum. Host Tyler Green and Deacon also mention passages from Deacon's 2014 book of writings, titled "So, If, And, But: Writings 1970-2012."

Throughout a nearly 50-year career as a sculptor, draftsman and print-maker, Deacon has explored form, volume and space with unusual rigor. Much of his work is motivated by the exploration of shapes within shapes, with the tension between the two shapes and the material in which the work is made providing the artwork's activating tension. Deacon's dozens of major exhibitions include a 2014 retrospective at the Tate Britain, and last year the Museum Folkwang in Essen, Germany presented a career-length survey of Deacon's drawings.

On the second segment, Daniel Heidkamp discusses his paintings and the pictures of them on view in "Taking Pictures: Camera Phone Conversations Between Artists" at the Metropolitan Museum of Art's Breuer location. The exhibition was curated by Mia Fineman and is on view through Dec. 17. Heidkamp is showing paintings related to the exhibition at New York's Half Gallery through July 21.

Mexican modernism in "Paint the Revolution," Andrea Chung
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2017-09-22 13:58:04 UTC 01:18:34
Mexican modernism in "Paint the Revolution," Andrea Chung

Episode No. 296 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curator Matthew Affron and artist Andrea Chung.

Matthew Affron, a curator at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, is one of the co-curators of "Paint the Revolution: Mexican Modernism, 1910-1950," which is on view at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston through October 1. The exhibition chronicles the history of Mexican modernism at the beginning of the twentieth century and the social, political, and cultural forces that shaped it. Among other critical plaudits, MAN Podcast host Tyler Green named it to his 2016 top ten list.

The curatorial team for the exhibition includes Renato González Mello, Director of the Instituto de Investigaciones Estéticas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Dafne Cruz Porchini, a post-doctoral researcher at the Colegio de México in Mexico City; and Philadelphia Museum of Art curator Mark A. Castro.

On the second segment, Andrea Chung discusses an exhibition of her work titled "You Broke the Ocean in Half to be Here," at the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego. Curated by Jill Dawsey, the exhibition is on view at MCASD's downtown location through August 20.  Chung's work, including an installation she's planning for the forthcoming Prospect ennial, explores the legacies of migration and colonialism in the Caribbean.

Holiday clips: Barkley L. Hendricks
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2017-09-22 13:58:04 UTC 46:07
Holiday clips: Barkley L. Hendricks

Artist Barkley L. Hendricks

Roni Horn
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2017-09-22 13:58:04 UTC 01:02:53
Roni Horn

Episode No. 294 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Roni Horn.

The Nasher Sculpture Center in Dallas is showing the first American museum exhibition devoted to Horn's cast glass sculptures. Eight of them are on view in the Nasher's Renzo Piano-designed building through August 20. In New York, Hauser & Wirth is presenting the debut of four new Horns, including the photographic series "The Selected Gifts, (1974-2015)," two series of works on paper, "The Dog's Chorus" (2016), "Th Rose Prblm" (2015), and two recent glass sculptures.

Horn has been mining the intersection of minimalist object making and conceptualism in sculpture, photography and works on paper -- and particularly the relationships between discrete objects -- since the mid-1970s. In 2009 the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York, the Institute of Contemporary Art Boston, the Tate Modern and the Collection Lambert in France surveyed her career in an exhibition titled "Roni Horn, aka Roni Horn." She has had other solo shows at the Art Institute of Chicago, the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris, the Dia Center for the Arts in New York, among others.

Robert Rauschenberg, Ken Ashton
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2017-09-22 13:58:04 UTC 01:07:36
Robert Rauschenberg, Ken Ashton

Episode No. 293 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features Museum of Modern Art, New York curator Leah Dickerman and artist Ken Ashton.

See images of art discussed on the program here.

Along with the Tate Modern's Achim Borchardt-Hume, Leah Dickerman is the co-curator of "Robert Rauschenberg: Among Friends," a retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art through September 17. The exhibition features Rauschenberg's early photography, body prints, combines, performances, prints and more. The exhibition catalogue was published by MoMA. Amazon offers it for $34 in paperback and $51 in cloth.

Leah Dickerman is a curator at MoMA. Her previous exhibitions include Inventing Abstraction, 1910-1925," and a 2005-06 dada survey that Dickerman curated while working at the National Gallery of Art.

On the second segment, Ken Ashton discusses his new book "Portsmouth: Collected Saturdays," which is new from Daylight. The book features Ashton's documentation of the deindustrialization and emptying out of Portsmouth, Ohio, a small town on the Ohio River at the southern end of Appalachia. Amazon offers it for $30. Ashton's work is in the collection of institutions such as the Museum of Contemporary Photography in Chicago and the National Gallery of Art.

Spencer Finch, on Sandro Botticelli
01:14:59
2017-09-22 13:58:04 UTC 01:14:59
Spencer Finch, on Sandro Botticelli

Episode No. 292 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Spencer Finch and curator Frederick Ilchman.

See images of art discussed in this week's show here.

Spencer Finch is presenting two new installations at two venues on opposite sides of the United States: His The Western Mystery (2017), a commission from the Seattle Art Museum for its Olympic Sculpture Park, is up through March 3, 2019. At MASS MoCA, Finch's Cosmic Latte (2017) is on view at least through 2018.

Finch's work typically addresses light and its relationship to memory at specific geographic locations, and often specific times. He has fulfilled commissions for and had exhibitions at The Morgan Library, the Rhode Island School of Design, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, the Pulitzer Arts Foundation (then the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts), the Corcoran Gallery of Art and more. His work is in the collections of the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, the Kemper Museum of Art in St. Louis, the Guggenheim and more.

Frederick Ilchman has organized the Museum of Fine Arts Boston's showing of "Botticelli and the Search for the Divine," the largest exhibition of Botticelli paintings ever shown in the United States. The exhibition, which is on view through July 9, includes 15 works by 15th-century Florentine master Sandro Botticelli, as well as works by Filippo Lippi, Antonio del Pollaiuolo, Jacopo del Sellaio and more. The exhibition was co-organized by the MFA Boston and the Muscarelle Museum of Art at the College of William & Mary. Ilchman is the MFA Boston's curator of paintings.

Mark Ruwedel, Jed Morse on Manuel Neri
01:09:05
2017-09-22 13:58:04 UTC 01:09:05
Mark Ruwedel, Jed Morse on Manuel Neri

Episode No. 291 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Mark Ruwedel and curator Jed Morse.

Yossi Milo Gallery in New York is showing "Mark Ruwedel: Hell and Home" through June 24.  The show includes Ruwedel's 'pictures of hell,' an inventory of Western landscapes named for hell or the devil, his pictures of 'home,' of desert homes fighting a losing battle against the ravages of the harsh surrounding environment, and Opportunities Realized, Ruwedel's revisiting of Ed Ruscha's 1970 Real Estate Opportunities, in which Ruwedel photographed how the vacant lots in Ruscha's book were filled in.

Ruwedel's most recent book is "Pictures of Hell," which features essays by Tate curator Simon Baker and Chiara Siravo a historian whose work has examined our concepts of hell. 

Ruwedel is one of America's most honored photographers. In 2014 he won both the Scotiabank Photography Award and a Guggenheim fellowship. His work is in the collections of major museums such as the Metropolitan, the National Gallery of Art, the Tate, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and SFMOMA.

Ruwedel and host Tyler Green refer several times to Ruwedel's 2008 book "Westward the Course of Empire," a classic which looked at what remains in places where railroads once ran across the landscape.

On the second segment, Nasher Sculpture Center curator Jed Morse discusses his museum's recent acquisition of a suite of major Manuel Neri sculptures and works on paper. They are on view at the Nasher through July 16.

Holiday clips: Pipilotti Rist
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2017-09-22 13:58:04 UTC 54:23
Holiday clips: Pipilotti Rist

Episode No. 290 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features a previously aired conversation with artist Pipilotti Rist. 

This summer, the Museum of Fine Arts Houston will exhibit two immersive installations that are new to its collection: Pipilotti Rist's Pixel Forest and Worry Will Vanish. They go on view on June 11 and will remain up through September 17.

Rist, who is based in Zurich, has been the subject of many single-artist museum exhibitions, especially in the last half-decade. Among the museums to give her shows are the Kunsthaus Zurich, the Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art in Seoul, the Hayward in London, the Wexner in Columbus, MoMA in New York and the Pompidou Center in Paris.

Nancy Rubins
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2017-09-22 13:58:04 UTC 59:37
Nancy Rubins

Episode No. 289 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Nancy Rubins. It was recorded live at the Wexner Center for the Arts at The Ohio State University in Columbus.

Rubins is included in "Grey Matters," an exhibition that opens Friday, May 19 at the Wexner. The show, curated by Michael Goodson, features the work of 37 contemporary women artists who have worked in grisaille. It is on view through July 30. The exhibition includes work by past MAN Podcast guests such as Carol Bove, Vija Celmins, Mickalene Thomas, Julie Mehretu, Mary Reid Kelley, Arlene Shechet, Amy Sillman, Xaviera Simmons and Lorna Simpson.

Rubins' often monumental sculpture amalgamates industrially produced objects into strikingly light, sometimes lyrical objects. Her enormous drawings, of built-up graphite on single sheets of paper often installed across multiple walls, are simultaneously minimal and baroque. Rubins has had solo exhibitions at museums such as the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego and the Museum of Modern Art, New York. Her public and institutional commissions include the University of Texas in Austin, MCASD, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, the Albright-Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo, and the Université Paris Diderot in France.

The Kimbell's new Modigliani, the art of Coenties Slip
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2017-09-22 13:58:04 UTC 40:50
The Kimbell's new Modigliani, the art of Coenties Slip

Episode No. 288 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features Kimbell Art Museum director Eric Lee and Menil Collection curator Michelle White.

Lee joins the program to discuss the Kimbell's recent acquisition of a rare Amadeo Modigliani sculpture, Head (c. 1913). Only about 27 Modigliani sculptures survive. Head was a gift from collector Gwendolyn Weiner and is the first modern sculpture in the Kimbell's collection. It is on view now.

Then Michelle White discusses her Menil exhibition "Between Land and Sea: Artists of the Coenties Slip." The show looks at the early work of Chryssa, Robert Indiana, Ellsworth Kelly, Agnes Martin, Lenore Tawney, and Jack Youngerman, all of whom who lived in the Coenties Slip, an East River-adjacent neighborhood set apart from the rest of the Manhattan art world. The exhibition considers moments of communication and influence. It is on view through August 6.

Kellie Jones, Shimon Attie
01:16:15
2017-09-22 13:58:04 UTC 01:16:15
Kellie Jones, Shimon Attie

Episode No. 287 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features historian Kellie Jones and artist Shimon Attie.

Kellie Jones is the author of "South of Pico: African American Artists in Los Angeles in the 1960s and 1970s," which is new from Duke University Press. Amazon offers it for $22.

This is Jones's second major project about art in Los Angeles during the 1960s and 1970s. She also curated "Now Dig This! Art and Black Los Angeles 1960-1980" for the Hammer Museum in 2011. She was a 2016 recipient of a MacArthur Foundation 'Genius Grant,' and teaches art history at Columbia University.

Among the artists featured in Jones's book who have been featured on The Modern Art Notes Podcast are Melvin Edwards and Betye Saar. Curator and historian Yael Lipschutz came on the program to discuss Noah Purifoy on the occasion of LACMA's 2015 retrospective. Also discussed on this week's program: The extensive digital archive for "Now Dig This!" is maintained by the Hammer Museum.

On the second segment, Shimon Attie discusses two new works on view at the Saint Louis Art Museum: The Crossing, an eight-minute video installation that muses on the global refugee crisis via a group of gamblers playing roulette, and Lost in Space (After Huck) a sculptural installation that uses Mark Twain's famous Huckleberry Finn story to give Americans an empathetic gateway into stories of migration and displacement. They're on view in Saint Louis through June 25.

Matisse's studio, Darby English
01:11:24
2017-09-22 13:58:04 UTC 01:11:24
Matisse's studio, Darby English

Episode No. 286 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features historian and curator Ellen McBreen and historian Darby English.

Along with Helen Burnham and Ann Dumas, McBreen is a co-curator of "Matisse in the Studio," which is at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston through July 9. The exhibition examines how objects in Matisse's home and studio informed -- and often ended up in -- his art. These objects include a simple chocolate pot, a tacky chair, an inexpensive glass vase probably made for the tourist market and textiles, such as Kuba cloth. The exhibition includes about 34 paintings, 26 drawings, 11 sculptures, seven cut-outs and about three dozen objects Matisse owned.

From Boston the exhibition will travel to the Royal Academy of Arts in London. Its excellent catalogue, which was published by the MFAB, is available from Amazon for $34.

McBreen is an associate professor of art history at Wheaton College. Her most recent book is "Matisse's Sculpture: The Pinup and the Primitive," which was published by Yale University Press in 2014.

On the second segment, University of Chicago professor Darby English discusses his new book "1971: A Year in the Life of Color." The book, which was published by University of Chicago Press, considers two exhibitions -- Contemporary Black Artists in America at the Whitney Museum of American Art and The DeLuxe Show, a racially integrated exhibition of abstract art presented in a renovated movie theater in Houston's inner-city Fifth Ward. English finds that many black artists of the period were less interested in a specifically so-called "black aesthetic," than they were in cultural interaction across racial lines. He points to color and how these artists used it as a key way in which they engaged other artists.

Hartley in Maine, Alexei Jawlensky
01:18:26
2017-09-22 13:58:04 UTC 01:18:26
Hartley in Maine, Alexei Jawlensky

Episode No. 285 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curators Randall Griffey and Vivian Endicott Barnett.

Along with Elizabeth Finch and Donna M. Cassidy, Griffey is the co-curator of "Marsden Hartley's Maine," which is at the Metropolitan Museum of Art through June 18. The exhibition spotlights Hartley's lifelong engagement with Maine, its residents, coastline, forests and mountains. It includes about 90 paintings and drawings featuring the full range of Hartley's Maine-related work.

From the Met, "Marsden Hartley's Maine" will travel to the Colby College Museum of Art, where it goes on view on July 8. (It will be at Colby during the first weekend of August, when Colby hosts the 2017 Art and Land Conservation Symposium. MAN Podcast host Tyler Green is among the speakers.) The show's strong catalogue was published by the Met. Amazon offers it for $35.

On the second segment, historian and curator Vivian Endicott Barnett discusses her "Alexei Jawlensky" at the Neue Galerie in New York. It features 75 paintings and is the artist's first full museum retrospective in the United States. Jawlensky was a Russian-born expressionist who moved to Munich in 1896 and went on to become an important figure in how central and eastern European artists engaged with early modern art -- and especially with van Gogh, Matisse, fauvism and more. It's on view through May 29.

Easter clips: Early Monet
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2017-09-22 13:58:04 UTC 46:16
Easter clips: Early Monet

The Easter-weekend Episode No. 284 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features a previously-aired conversation with curator George Shackelford.

Shackelford is the curator of "Monet: The Early Years" at the Legion of Honor in San Francisco. The show features about 60 paintings from the first phase of Claude Monet's career, from a painting Monet made in Normandy in 1858 when he was 18 years old, until 1872, when Monet lived in Argenteuil, along the Seine near Paris. The exhibition debuted last winter at the Kimbell Art Museum, where Shackelford is the museum's deputy director. "Monet" is on view in San Francisco through May 29. The show's beautiful catalogue was published by the Kimbell and distributed by Yale University Press.

Liz Glynn, Nina Chanel Abney
01:10:27
2017-09-22 13:58:04 UTC 01:10:27
Liz Glynn, Nina Chanel Abney

Episode No. 283 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artists Liz Glynn and Nina Chanel Abney.

Glynn's "Open House" is on view now in Doris C. Freedman Plaza in New York's Central Park. It was commissioned by the Public Art Fund and will remain through September 24. The work takes as its jumping off point Freedman Plaza's unusual site, the place where democratic Central Park meets corporate midtown meets the aristocratic Upper East Side. Glynn's sculpture highlights the class distinctions that separate the park from the city by referencing a Fifth Avenue interior designed by Gilded Age architect Stanford White. The exhibition was curated by Daniel S. Palmer.

Glynn's work routinely engages history and the way both it and historical objects are considered in the present day. Her work has been presented or exhibited at MOCA in Los Angeles, the New Museum in New York, the deCordova Sculpture Park in Concord, Mass., the Petit Palais in Paris, LACMA, and more. This fall, MASS MoCA will present Glynn's "The Archaeology of Another Possible Future" in the museum's Building Five.

On the second segment, Nina Chanel Abney discusses her work on the occasion of a 10-year survey of her work titled "Nina Chanel Abney: Royal Flush." The exhibition is at the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University through July 16, when it will travel to the Chicago Cultural Center and then to Los Angeles, where it will be jointly presented by the Institute of Contemporary Art -- the institution formerly known as the Santa Monica Museum of Art -- and the California African American Museum. 

Photography East of the Mississippi; Matisse/Diebenkorn
01:02:23
2017-09-22 13:58:04 UTC 01:02:23
Photography East of the Mississippi; Matisse/Diebenkorn

Episode No. 282 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curator Diane Waggoner and curator Katy Rothkopf.

Waggoner is the curator of "East of the Mississippi: Nineteenth-Century American Landscape Photography." For several decades, the story of America's nineteenth-century photographic history has mostly run through the West. Waggoner's exhibition instead looks at how photographers looked at the region between the Mississippi River and the Atlantic Ocean. The exhibition features 175 nineteenth-century photographs, including daguerreotypes, salted paper prints, albumen prints, stereographic prints and even paintings. It's on view at the National Gallery of Art through July 16, when it will travel to the New Orleans Museum of Art. 

On the second segment, Baltimore Museum of Art curator Katy Rothkopf discusses Richard Diebenkorn's 1964 visit to the Soviet Union in the context of "Matisse/Diebenkorn." The exhibition, which Rothkopf co-curated with San Francisco Museum of Modern Art curator Janet Bishop, is on view at SFMOMA through May 29. Bishop discussed "Matisse/Diebenkorn" on Episode No. 266.

On Trump's attempt to eliminate federal arts and humanities programs
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2017-09-22 13:58:04 UTC 55:46
On Trump's attempt to eliminate federal arts and humanities programs

Episode No. 281 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast considers federal arts and humanities funding with Los Angeles Times art critic Christopher Knight and Andrew W. Mellon Foundation executive vice president for programs and research Mariët Westermann.

The National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities make up eight one-thousandths of one percent of the federal budget. Still, in the name of austerity, the Trump White House has targeted the endowments, the Institute of Museum and Library Services and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting for elimination in its first budget. The endowments each received $148 million in appropriations in the federal government's most recent fiscal year, while the IMLS received $230 million and CPB $445 million. Meanwhile, the Trump budget asks for a 10 percent increase in defense spending, a single-year bump of $54 billion -- or 365 times the NEA or NEH's total annual appropriation.

No American art or arts critic has written more about the role of federal arts and humanities funding and especially the national endowments over more years than Christopher Knight. He has been the art critic of the Los Angeles Times since 1989. He is a three-time finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and received the Frank Jewett Mather Award for Distinction in Art Criticism from the College Art Association in 1997. 

On the second segment, Mellon foundation VP Mariët Westermann discusses federal arts and humanities funding from a funder's perspective. Prior to joining Mellon in 2010, was the provost and chief academic officer of New York University Abu Dhabi; director of NYU's Institute of Fine Arts; associate director of research at the Clark Art Institute, and an associate professor at Rutgers University. As a historian of Netherlandish art, Westermann has written books on Jan Steen, Rembrandt, Vermeer and more.

Degas and the Millinery Trade, Matisse and American Art
01:04:41
2017-09-22 13:58:04 UTC 01:04:41
Degas and the Millinery Trade, Matisse and American Art

Episode No. 280 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curators Simon Kelly and Gail Stavitsky.

Along with the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco's Esther Bell, Kelly is the co-curator of "Degas, Impressionism & the Paris Millinery Trade." The exhibition melds the social history of modernizing 19th-century Paris with the ways in which painters, especially Edgar Degas, captured one the city's boomingest industries, the manufacturing and selling of hats, an industry that was a gateway into the city, employment and the bourgeoisie for tens of thousands of French women. The exhibition is at the Saint Louis Art Museum through May 7, when it will travel to San Francisco's Legion of Honor. The exhibition's superb catalogue was published by the two museums and DelMonico Prestel.

On the second segment, Gail Stavitsky discusses "Matisse and American Art," her new exhibition on the impact Matisse's work has had on American artists. The show, which features 65 paintings, sculptures, prints and archival objects is on view at New Jersey's Montclair Art Museum through June 18. Stavitsky curated the show with assistance from John Cauman and Lisa Mintz Messinger. The exhibition catalogue was published by the museum.

Dara Birnbaum, Black Mountain College photography
01:22:12
2017-09-22 13:58:04 UTC 01:22:12
Dara Birnbaum, Black Mountain College photography

Episode No. 279 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Dara Birnbaum and curator Julie J. Thomson.

Dara Birnbaum is included in "Breaking News: Turning the Lens on Mass Media," at the J. Paul Getty Museum. The exhibition examines how artists have used newspapers, magazines and televised news programs to consider media, news and the messages included therein. The exhibition was curated by Arpad Kovacs and will be on view through April 30.

Birnbaum is among the pioneers of video art. Her work often includes pointedly feminist critiques of mass media, including of entertainment and journalism. Retrospectives of her work include "The Dark Matter of Media Light" at SMAK, the Stedelijk Museum voor Actuele Kunst in Ghent, Belgium, and at the Serralves Foundation in Porto, Portugal, and "Dara Birnbaum Retrospective exhibition" at the Kunsthalle Wien in Austria and at the Norrtalje Konsthall in Sweden.

On the second segment, Julie J. Thomson discusses "Begin to See: The Photographers of Black Mountain College." The exhibition surveys photography made at Black Mountain College, including landscapes, documentary work (including of performance), experiments with the medium and more. The exhibition is at the Black Mountain College Museum and Arts Center in Asheville, North Carolina through May 20. 

Kay Rosen, Edme Bouchardon
01:13:03
2017-09-22 13:58:04 UTC 01:13:03
Kay Rosen, Edme Bouchardon

Episode No. 278 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Kay Rosen and curator Anne-Lise Desmas.

The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum opens "Kay Rosen: H Is for House," this weekend. It is Rosen's first solo museum exhibition in the northeast in almost 20 years. It is curated by the Aldrich's Richard Klein. The exhibition will be on view through September 4.

Rosen's text-based works, presented as wall-drawings, paintings and works on paper, use language, words, humor and two-dimensional forms to explore ideas, histories and contemporary life. Rosen's work is in the collection . Her museum exhibitions and installations have included projects at the Aspen (Colo.) Art Museum, the University Art Museum at the University of California, Santa Barbara, The Drawing Center, New York, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles and the Otis College of Art and Design, the MIT List Visual Arts Center, the MCA Chicago and more.

On the second segment, J. Paul Getty Museum curator Anne-Lise Desmas discusses "Bouchardon: Royal Artist of the Enlightenment." The exhibition examines the sculpture and drawings of Edme Bouchardon, who worked as the Royal Artist during the eighteenth-century reign of Louis XV. The exhibition, which Desmas co-curated with Edouard Kopp, is on view through April 2.

Kerry James Marshall (from May, 2016)
01:01:18
2017-09-22 13:58:04 UTC 01:01:18
Kerry James Marshall (from May, 2016)

On March 12, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles opens "Kerry James Marshall: Mastry," the artist's first retrospective. Marshall is one of the most significant chronicler's of the American experience, especially the African-American experience. For 35 years he has worked to add black people and black culture to a Western art historical canon that is mostly built of white faces and stories. The exhibition was curated by Dieter Roelstraete, Helen Molesworth and Ian Alteveer. The exhibition catalogue was published by Skira Rizzoli.

John Singleton Copley, Jimmie Durham
01:23:17
2017-09-22 13:58:04 UTC 01:23:17
John Singleton Copley, Jimmie Durham

Episode No. 276 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features historian and author Jane Kamensky and curator Anne Ellegood.

Kamensky is the author of "A Revolution in Color: The World of John Singleton Copley." The book is a new biography that places one of early America's best and most important artists within the context of the political and revolutionary events of his time -- and details how Copley and his family were actors in them. Amazon offers it for $20 in hardcover and at $16 for Kindle.

Kamensky is a professor of history at Harvard University and the director of the Schlesinger Library. She is a historian of early America and the Atlantic world.

On the second segment, Hammer Museum curator Anne Ellegood discusses her new exhibition "Jimmie Durham: At the Center of the World." Ellegood's retrospective is the first major Durham show in the United States in over 20 years. 

Durham came to prominence as an artist in New York City in the 1980s. His work has consistently addressed questions of identity, colonialism and the inseparability of identity from politics in the United States. The exhibition is on view at the Hammer through May 7, when it will travel to the Walker, the Whitney and to the Remai Modern in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. The show's thorough catalogue was published by DelMonico Prestel.

Medardo Rosso
01:03:46
2017-09-22 13:58:04 UTC 01:03:46
Medardo Rosso

Episode No. 275 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curators Sharon Hecker and Tamara Schenkenberg and was taped live at the Pulitzer Arts Foundation in St. Louis.

Hecker and Schenkenberg are the co-curators of "Medardo Rosso: Experiments in Light and Form," which is at the Pulitzer through May 13. The exhibition is the first broad survey of Rosso's work in an American museum in over fifty years. (In 2014-15 the Center for Italian Modern Art in New York presented this Rosso installation.) It features nearly 100 works, including sculptures, drawings and photographs. The exhibition's catalogue is available for free from the Pulitzer for a $7 PayPal-administered shipping charge.

Rosso is an Italian artist who spent much of his career in France. His sculptures of heads and figures in wax, plaster, and bronze are key pivots between an era of monumental bronze sculpture, realist and impressionist sculpture and ultimately modern art.

Sarah Oppenheimer, Richard Misrach
01:11:08
2017-09-22 13:58:04 UTC 01:11:08
Sarah Oppenheimer, Richard Misrach

Episode No. 274 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artists Sarah Oppenheimer and Richard Misrach.

This weekend the Wexner Center for the Arts at The Ohio State University in Columbus debuts "Sarah Oppenheimer: S-337473," an exhibition of a newly commissioned work developed  for the Wexner's Peter Eisenman-designed building. Oppenheimer created her new work as a two-year-long Wexner Center Artist Residency Award recipient, during which she collaborated with OSU's Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering to develop a patent-pending pivot mechanism that allows this new work to rotate at a 45-degree angle. The exhibition opens on Saturday, February 4 and will be on view through April 16. As soon as images of the new work are available, probably on or around February 7, we'll add them to this post.

Sarah Oppenheimer is an artist who creates installations that engage with both architecture and space. She's previously made work for the Perez Art Museum Miami (on view through April 30), the Kunsthaus Basel, the Rice University Art Gallery, the Queens Museum, and the Saint Louis Art Museum. A project she is developing for Mass MoCA will debut in 2019. Oppenheimer has also created a permanent installation at the Baltimore Museum of Art. Multiple views of all her installations are on her website.

On the second segment, the re-airing of a 2016 segment with Richard Misrach on his "Border Cantos," a book and exhibition on which he has collaborated with Mexican composer and performer Guillermo Galindo. Since 2004, and especially since 2009, Misrach has been making pictures along the 2,000-mile-long United States border with Mexico, the latest investigation of American deserts that make up what Misrach calls his Desert Cantos series. As Misrach traveled the borderlands, he accumulated discarded objects such as water bottles, backpacks, clothing and shotgun shells and turned them over to Galindo, who made that material into instruments and who then performed on them. The book, "Border Cantos," is out from Aperture; Amazon offers it $45, a forty percent discount.

Tony Oursler, American Art during WWI
01:20:31
2017-09-22 13:58:04 UTC 01:20:31
Tony Oursler, American Art during WWI

The Museum of Modern Art is showing Tony Oursler's Imponderable (2015-16), a 90-minute film shown in an immersive, so-called "5-D" environment, as well as archival material related to the film from Oursler's own collection. The film mines Ourlser's interest in experiments in technological advancement that didn't quite work out and occult phenomena to offer a kind of alternative history of modernism. The film is richly informed by Oursler's own life history. His grandfather was Charles Fulton Oursler, a journalist and author who teamed up with Harry Houdini to campaign against fraudulent mediumship. The exhibition was curated by MoMA's Stuart Comer and Erica Papernik-Shimizu. Imponderable is at MoMA through April 16.

Oursler is a multimedia and installation artist whose work often examines and uses new technologies to explore topics such as facial recognition, paranormal phenomena and the relationship between multiple personality disorder and mass media.

On the second segment, historian and curator Anne Classen Knutson discusses "World War I and American Art," which is at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts through April 9. The exhibition looks at how American artists responded to and engaged with the war, both in Europe and in the United States. Knutson co-curated the show with Robert Cozzolino and David Lubin. 

Stanley Whitney
01:08:48
2017-09-22 13:58:04 UTC 01:08:48
Stanley Whitney

Artist Stanley Whitney.

Francis Picabia, John McLaughlin
01:19:17
2017-09-22 13:58:04 UTC 01:19:17
Francis Picabia, John McLaughlin

"Francis Picabia" co-curator Anne Umland, "John McLaughlin" curator Stephanie Barron.

Lorna Simpson
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2017-09-22 13:58:05 UTC 54:01
Lorna Simpson

Artist Lorna Simpson, who is showing new work at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth

Tyler Green's top ten, Minor White
37:30
2017-09-22 13:58:05 UTC 37:30
Tyler Green's top ten, Minor White

MAN Podcast host Tyler Green's 2016 top ten list, curator Paul Martineau on Minor White.

Holiday clips: The Le Nain
44:57
2017-09-22 13:58:05 UTC 44:57
Holiday clips: The Le Nain

Curator and historian C.D. Dickerson.

Pipilotti Rist, Mark Speltz
01:17:15
2017-09-22 13:58:05 UTC 01:17:15
Pipilotti Rist, Mark Speltz

Artist Pipilotti Rist and historian and "North of Dixie: Civil Rights Photography Beyond the South" author Mark Speltz.

Matisse/Diebenkorn, Klimt's Portraits
57:24
2017-09-22 13:58:05 UTC 57:24
Matisse/Diebenkorn, Klimt's Portraits

SFMOMA curator Janet Bishop, art historian Jill Lloyd.

Early Monet, Picasso's Drawings
01:06:06
2017-09-22 13:58:05 UTC 01:06:06
Early Monet, Picasso's Drawings

Curators George Shackelford, David Breslin.

Thanksgiving clips: Richard Misrach
46:14
2017-09-22 13:58:05 UTC 46:14
Thanksgiving clips: Richard Misrach

Artist Richard Misrach

Eduardo Basualdo
47:49
2017-09-22 13:58:05 UTC 47:49
Eduardo Basualdo

Artist Eduardo Basualdo, recorded live at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden.

Art and Education in America After WWII at MCASD, Wexner
01:15:26
2017-09-22 13:58:05 UTC 01:15:26
Art and Education in America After WWII at MCASD, Wexner

Curator Jill Dawsey and artist Martha Rosler; curator Ruth Erickson

Edgar Degas, Richard Serra's "Shift"
01:05:46
2017-09-22 13:58:05 UTC 01:05:46
Edgar Degas, Richard Serra's "Shift"

Historian and curator Henri Loyrette, documentary filmmaker Simone Estrin.

Michael Dean, Julian Onderdonk
42:33
2017-09-22 13:58:05 UTC 42:33
Michael Dean, Julian Onderdonk

Artist Michael Dean and curator Kaylin Weber.

Valentin de Boulogne, early Agnes Martin
01:04:23
2017-09-22 13:58:05 UTC 01:04:23
Valentin de Boulogne, early Agnes Martin

Metropolitan Museum of Art curator Keith Christiansen, author Christina Bryan Rosenberger

Hélio Oiticica, Lexington Camera Club
01:13:43
2017-09-22 13:58:05 UTC 01:13:43
Hélio Oiticica, Lexington Camera Club

Curators Lynn Zelevansky and Brian Sholis

Emmet Gowin
01:15:46
2017-09-23 00:40:51 UTC 01:15:46
Emmet Gowin

Episode No. 307 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Emmet Gowin. 

Gowin's "Mariposas Nocturnas: Moths of Central and South America, a Study in Beauty and Diversity" is just out from Princeton University Press. The book features photographs of hundreds of moths that Gowin has made in Central and South America over the last 15 years. The book includes essays by Terry Tempest Williams and Gowin. Amazon offers it for $41.

Gowin will show related work in "Here on Earth Now -- Notes from the Field" in an exhibition that opens on Sept. 28 at New York's Pace/MacGill Gallery. It will remain on view through Jan. 6, 2018.

See images of this week's program here.

Photography in Argentina 1850-2010, Jimmie Durham
01:15:28
2017-09-23 00:40:51 UTC 01:15:28
Photography in Argentina 1850-2010, Jimmie Durham

Episode No. 306 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curators Idurre Alonso and Anne Ellegood.

Alonso is the co-curator of "Photography in Argentina, 1850-2010: Contradiction and Continuity" at the J. Paul Getty Museum. It opens this weekend and remains on view through January 28, 2018. The exhibition, which explores themes that emphasize Argentina's history, features nearly 300 works.

On the second segment, Hammer Museum curator Anne Ellegood discusses her exhibition "Jimmie Durham: At the Center of the World." The exhibition, the first US retrospective of Durham's work in 20 years, is at the Walker Art Center through October 7. 

Carolina Miranda on PST: LA/LA, Leyla Cárdenas
01:00:58
2017-09-23 00:40:51 UTC 01:00:58
Carolina Miranda on PST: LA/LA, Leyla Cárdenas

Episode No. 305 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features journalist Carolina Miranda and artist Leyla Cárdenas.

Carolina Miranda is a journalist at the Los Angeles Times. She joins host Tyler Green to preview "Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA," a Getty Foundation-funded series of exhibitions, catalogues and events across southern California.

Cárdenas discusses her recent work, especially Excision (2012), which is included in "Home -- So Different, So Appealing" at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. It is the first PST: LA/LA show to open. Curated by Chon Noriega, Pilar Tompkins Rivas and Mari Carmen Ramirez, it will remain on view through October 15, when it will travel to the Museum of Fine Arts Houston.

Anthony Hernandez
58:55
2017-09-23 00:40:51 UTC 58:55
Anthony Hernandez

Episode No. 304 features a re-air of host Tyler Green's 2016 conversation with Anthony Hernandez.

In two weeks the Milwaukee Art Museum will present one of the best shows of 2016, a retrospective of Anthony Hernandez curated by San Francisco Museum of Modern Art curator Erin O'Toole.

It was Hernandez's first retrospective. His photographs have consistently looked at parts of America, especially parts of Los Angeles, that hide in plain sight. The catalogue was one of last year's best books, especially for the introduction by Robert Adams and a conversation between Hernandez and Lewis Baltz. Milwaukee's presentation of the exhibition opens on September 15 and will be on view through January first, 2018. 

Degas and Millinery
44:44
2017-09-23 00:40:51 UTC 44:44
Degas and Millinery

Episode No. 303 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast is a summer clips episode featuring a previously aired interview with curator Simon Kelly.

Along with Esther Bell, Kelly is the co-curator of "Degas, Impressionism & the Paris Millinery Trade." The exhibition melds the social history of modernizing 19th-century Paris with the ways in which painters, especially Edgar Degas, portrayed one of the city's boomingest industries, the manufacturing and selling of hats. As it turns out, millinery was a gateway into the city, employment and the bourgeoisie for tens of thousands of French women. The exhibition is at San Francisco's Legion of Honor through September 24. It debuted at the Saint Louis Art Museum, where Kelly is a curator. The exhibition's superb catalogue was published by the two museums and DelMonico Prestel. Amazon offers it for $48.

For images of artworks discussed on the program, see Episode No. 280.

No. 302: "Soundtracks" at SFMOMA: Jacqueline Kiyomi Gordon, Amor Muñoz
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2017-09-23 00:40:51 UTC 43:21
No. 302: "Soundtracks" at SFMOMA: Jacqueline Kiyomi Gordon, Amor Muñoz

Episode No. 302 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artists Jacqueline Kiyomi Gordon and Amor Muñoz.

This is the second of two MAN Podcast episodes spotlighting artists in "Soundtracks," a new exhibition at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art that examines the role of sound in art. The show, which was curated by Rudolf Frieling and Tanya Zimbardo, will remain on view through January 1, 2018. It features nearly three dozen artworks that are or include sound.

 

Cristóbal de Villalpando; Bosch and Bouts
53:18
2017-09-23 00:40:51 UTC 53:18
Cristóbal de Villalpando; Bosch and Bouts

Episode No. 301 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curators Ronda Kasl and Rima Girnius.

Along with Jonathan Brown and Clara Bargellini, Metropolitan Museum of Art curator Ronda Kasl is the co-curator of "Cristóbal de Villalpando: Mexican Painter of the Baroque," which is at the Met in New York through October 15. Villalpando is considered one of the two major artists of seventeenth-century New Spain. The Met's small survey of his work features eleven paintings, including Villalpando's 28-feet-high Transfiguration of Jesus (1683), his first masterpiece.

On the second segment, Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art curator Rima Girnius discusses two recently re-attributed paintings in the N-A's collection: Hieronymus Bosch's The Temptation of St. Anthony (about 1500-1510) and Albrecht Bouts's Christ Crowned with Thorns (about 1490-95). The N-A is presenting the paintings and information about the re-attributions in "Rediscovering Hieronymus Bosch and Albrecht Bouts," which is on view in Kansas City through May 27, 2018.

 

Gary Simmons
56:09
2017-09-23 00:40:51 UTC 56:09
Gary Simmons

Episode No. 300 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Gary Simmons.

Gary Simmons's newest installation is on view at the California African American Museum in Los Angeles. Titled "Gary Simmons: Fade to Black," the work is a multi-wall installation in the museum's atrium. The presentation was curated by Naima J. Keith and will remain on view through July 31, 2018.

Over the course of a quarter-century-long career, Simmons has explored how to make the typically invisible visible, often within the context of America's troubled history. In 2002 the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago debuted a mid-career survey of Simmons's work that traveled to SITE Santa Fe and The Studio Museum in Harlem. Simmons has also been featured in solo shows at the Whitney Museum of American Art, MASS MoCA, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Saint Louis Art Museum, MCASD, the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, The Drawing Center in New York and more. Simmons was first a guest on The MAN Podcast in 2013.

During the program MAN Podcast host Tyler Green references this Los Angeles Times video of Simmons working on the installation.

Glenn Ligon, Florine Stettheimer
54:46
2017-09-23 00:40:51 UTC 54:46
Glenn Ligon, Florine Stettheimer

Episode No. 299 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Glenn Ligon and curator Stephen Brown.

Ligon is the curator of "Blue Black" at the Pulitzer Arts Foundation in St. Louis. Informed by the Pulitzer's Ellsworth Kelly wall sculpture Blue Black, the exhibition features more than 50 artworks that use color to address questions related to language, identity and more. The exhibition is on view through October 7. The catalogue of the exhibition is complimentary save the cost of shipping ($7 in the US, $14 abroad). 

Ligon is an artist whose 2011 mid-career survey was organized by the Whitney Museum of American Art and traveled to LACMA and the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth. His work has been featured in solo exhibitions at the Power Plant in Toronto, the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, and the Studio Museum in Harlem. 

On the second segment, curator Stephen Brown discusses his exhibition "Florine Stettheimer: Painting Poetry," which is at The Jewish Museum in New York through September 24. He co-curated  the show with Georgiana Uhlyarik at the Art Gallery of Ontario. The exhibition's catalogue was published by Yale University Press.  

"Soundtracks" at SFMOMA with Bill Fontana and Christina Kubisch
51:23
2017-09-23 00:40:51 UTC 51:23
"Soundtracks" at SFMOMA with Bill Fontana and Christina Kubisch

**In stereo**

Episode No. 298 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features sound artists Bill Fontana and Christina Kubisch.

This is the first of two MAN Podcast episodes spotlighting artists in "Soundtracks," a new exhibition at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art that examines the role of sound in art. The show, which was curated by Rudolf Frieling and Tanya Zimbardo, will remain on view through January 1, 2018. It features nearly three dozen artworks that are or include sound. SFMOMA has built out an extensive digital infrastructure for the show, including an exhibition guide, a catalogue, and interviews with artists such as Jacqueline Kiyomi Gordon, Christina Kubisch, Rafael Lozano-Hemmer, and Richard T. Walker.

This week's MAN Podcast features exhibition artists whose work makes the invisible audible. San Francisco-based artist Bill Fontana has been making what he calls 'sound sculptures' for 40 years. He's exhibited all over the world, including at the Venice Biennale, Madrid's Reina Sofia, London's Tate Modern, New York's Madison Square Park, and more.

Christina Kubisch is a Berlin-area-based composer and artist who works with electromagnetic induction, making both walks for which listeners/viewers wear a special set of headphones and move through a city to hear sounds to which Kubitsch has guided them on a map, and sound sculptures that feature sound related to their physical presence. Kubisch has created dozens of electrical walks all over the world, has been featured in the Venice Biennale, Documenta and in scores of group and solo shows.

 

Richard Deacon, Daniel Heidkamp
01:15:21
2017-09-23 00:40:51 UTC 01:15:21
Richard Deacon, Daniel Heidkamp

Episode No. 297 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artists Richard Deacon and Daniel Heidkamp.

The San Diego Museum of Art is showing "Richard Deacon: What You See Is What You Get," a survey of the artist's career. Curated by Ariel Plotek, it's on view through Sept. 4. The exhibition is accompanied by a catalogue published by the museum. Host Tyler Green and Deacon also mention passages from Deacon's 2014 book of writings, titled "So, If, And, But: Writings 1970-2012."

Throughout a nearly 50-year career as a sculptor, draftsman and print-maker, Deacon has explored form, volume and space with unusual rigor. Much of his work is motivated by the exploration of shapes within shapes, with the tension between the two shapes and the material in which the work is made providing the artwork's activating tension. Deacon's dozens of major exhibitions include a 2014 retrospective at the Tate Britain, and last year the Museum Folkwang in Essen, Germany presented a career-length survey of Deacon's drawings.

On the second segment, Daniel Heidkamp discusses his paintings and the pictures of them on view in "Taking Pictures: Camera Phone Conversations Between Artists" at the Metropolitan Museum of Art's Breuer location. The exhibition was curated by Mia Fineman and is on view through Dec. 17. Heidkamp is showing paintings related to the exhibition at New York's Half Gallery through July 21.

Mexican modernism in "Paint the Revolution," Andrea Chung
01:18:34
2017-09-23 00:40:51 UTC 01:18:34
Mexican modernism in "Paint the Revolution," Andrea Chung

Episode No. 296 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curator Matthew Affron and artist Andrea Chung.

Matthew Affron, a curator at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, is one of the co-curators of "Paint the Revolution: Mexican Modernism, 1910-1950," which is on view at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston through October 1. The exhibition chronicles the history of Mexican modernism at the beginning of the twentieth century and the social, political, and cultural forces that shaped it. Among other critical plaudits, MAN Podcast host Tyler Green named it to his 2016 top ten list.

The curatorial team for the exhibition includes Renato González Mello, Director of the Instituto de Investigaciones Estéticas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Dafne Cruz Porchini, a post-doctoral researcher at the Colegio de México in Mexico City; and Philadelphia Museum of Art curator Mark A. Castro.

On the second segment, Andrea Chung discusses an exhibition of her work titled "You Broke the Ocean in Half to be Here," at the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego. Curated by Jill Dawsey, the exhibition is on view at MCASD's downtown location through August 20.  Chung's work, including an installation she's planning for the forthcoming Prospect ennial, explores the legacies of migration and colonialism in the Caribbean.

Holiday clips: Barkley L. Hendricks
46:07
2017-09-23 00:40:51 UTC 46:07
Holiday clips: Barkley L. Hendricks

Artist Barkley L. Hendricks

Roni Horn
01:02:53
2017-09-23 00:40:51 UTC 01:02:53
Roni Horn

Episode No. 294 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Roni Horn.

The Nasher Sculpture Center in Dallas is showing the first American museum exhibition devoted to Horn's cast glass sculptures. Eight of them are on view in the Nasher's Renzo Piano-designed building through August 20. In New York, Hauser & Wirth is presenting the debut of four new Horns, including the photographic series "The Selected Gifts, (1974-2015)," two series of works on paper, "The Dog's Chorus" (2016), "Th Rose Prblm" (2015), and two recent glass sculptures.

Horn has been mining the intersection of minimalist object making and conceptualism in sculpture, photography and works on paper -- and particularly the relationships between discrete objects -- since the mid-1970s. In 2009 the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York, the Institute of Contemporary Art Boston, the Tate Modern and the Collection Lambert in France surveyed her career in an exhibition titled "Roni Horn, aka Roni Horn." She has had other solo shows at the Art Institute of Chicago, the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris, the Dia Center for the Arts in New York, among others.

Robert Rauschenberg, Ken Ashton
01:07:36
2017-09-23 00:40:51 UTC 01:07:36
Robert Rauschenberg, Ken Ashton

Episode No. 293 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features Museum of Modern Art, New York curator Leah Dickerman and artist Ken Ashton.

See images of art discussed on the program here.

Along with the Tate Modern's Achim Borchardt-Hume, Leah Dickerman is the co-curator of "Robert Rauschenberg: Among Friends," a retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art through September 17. The exhibition features Rauschenberg's early photography, body prints, combines, performances, prints and more. The exhibition catalogue was published by MoMA. Amazon offers it for $34 in paperback and $51 in cloth.

Leah Dickerman is a curator at MoMA. Her previous exhibitions include Inventing Abstraction, 1910-1925," and a 2005-06 dada survey that Dickerman curated while working at the National Gallery of Art.

On the second segment, Ken Ashton discusses his new book "Portsmouth: Collected Saturdays," which is new from Daylight. The book features Ashton's documentation of the deindustrialization and emptying out of Portsmouth, Ohio, a small town on the Ohio River at the southern end of Appalachia. Amazon offers it for $30. Ashton's work is in the collection of institutions such as the Museum of Contemporary Photography in Chicago and the National Gallery of Art.

Spencer Finch, on Sandro Botticelli
01:14:59
2017-09-23 00:40:51 UTC 01:14:59
Spencer Finch, on Sandro Botticelli

Episode No. 292 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Spencer Finch and curator Frederick Ilchman.

See images of art discussed in this week's show here.

Spencer Finch is presenting two new installations at two venues on opposite sides of the United States: His The Western Mystery (2017), a commission from the Seattle Art Museum for its Olympic Sculpture Park, is up through March 3, 2019. At MASS MoCA, Finch's Cosmic Latte (2017) is on view at least through 2018.

Finch's work typically addresses light and its relationship to memory at specific geographic locations, and often specific times. He has fulfilled commissions for and had exhibitions at The Morgan Library, the Rhode Island School of Design, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, the Pulitzer Arts Foundation (then the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts), the Corcoran Gallery of Art and more. His work is in the collections of the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, the Kemper Museum of Art in St. Louis, the Guggenheim and more.

Frederick Ilchman has organized the Museum of Fine Arts Boston's showing of "Botticelli and the Search for the Divine," the largest exhibition of Botticelli paintings ever shown in the United States. The exhibition, which is on view through July 9, includes 15 works by 15th-century Florentine master Sandro Botticelli, as well as works by Filippo Lippi, Antonio del Pollaiuolo, Jacopo del Sellaio and more. The exhibition was co-organized by the MFA Boston and the Muscarelle Museum of Art at the College of William & Mary. Ilchman is the MFA Boston's curator of paintings.

Mark Ruwedel, Jed Morse on Manuel Neri
01:09:05
2017-09-23 00:40:51 UTC 01:09:05
Mark Ruwedel, Jed Morse on Manuel Neri

Episode No. 291 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Mark Ruwedel and curator Jed Morse.

Yossi Milo Gallery in New York is showing "Mark Ruwedel: Hell and Home" through June 24.  The show includes Ruwedel's 'pictures of hell,' an inventory of Western landscapes named for hell or the devil, his pictures of 'home,' of desert homes fighting a losing battle against the ravages of the harsh surrounding environment, and Opportunities Realized, Ruwedel's revisiting of Ed Ruscha's 1970 Real Estate Opportunities, in which Ruwedel photographed how the vacant lots in Ruscha's book were filled in.

Ruwedel's most recent book is "Pictures of Hell," which features essays by Tate curator Simon Baker and Chiara Siravo a historian whose work has examined our concepts of hell. 

Ruwedel is one of America's most honored photographers. In 2014 he won both the Scotiabank Photography Award and a Guggenheim fellowship. His work is in the collections of major museums such as the Metropolitan, the National Gallery of Art, the Tate, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and SFMOMA.

Ruwedel and host Tyler Green refer several times to Ruwedel's 2008 book "Westward the Course of Empire," a classic which looked at what remains in places where railroads once ran across the landscape.

On the second segment, Nasher Sculpture Center curator Jed Morse discusses his museum's recent acquisition of a suite of major Manuel Neri sculptures and works on paper. They are on view at the Nasher through July 16.

Holiday clips: Pipilotti Rist
54:23
2017-09-23 00:40:51 UTC 54:23
Holiday clips: Pipilotti Rist

Episode No. 290 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features a previously aired conversation with artist Pipilotti Rist. 

This summer, the Museum of Fine Arts Houston will exhibit two immersive installations that are new to its collection: Pipilotti Rist's Pixel Forest and Worry Will Vanish. They go on view on June 11 and will remain up through September 17.

Rist, who is based in Zurich, has been the subject of many single-artist museum exhibitions, especially in the last half-decade. Among the museums to give her shows are the Kunsthaus Zurich, the Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art in Seoul, the Hayward in London, the Wexner in Columbus, MoMA in New York and the Pompidou Center in Paris.

Nancy Rubins
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2017-09-23 00:40:51 UTC 59:37
Nancy Rubins

Episode No. 289 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Nancy Rubins. It was recorded live at the Wexner Center for the Arts at The Ohio State University in Columbus.

Rubins is included in "Grey Matters," an exhibition that opens Friday, May 19 at the Wexner. The show, curated by Michael Goodson, features the work of 37 contemporary women artists who have worked in grisaille. It is on view through July 30. The exhibition includes work by past MAN Podcast guests such as Carol Bove, Vija Celmins, Mickalene Thomas, Julie Mehretu, Mary Reid Kelley, Arlene Shechet, Amy Sillman, Xaviera Simmons and Lorna Simpson.

Rubins' often monumental sculpture amalgamates industrially produced objects into strikingly light, sometimes lyrical objects. Her enormous drawings, of built-up graphite on single sheets of paper often installed across multiple walls, are simultaneously minimal and baroque. Rubins has had solo exhibitions at museums such as the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego and the Museum of Modern Art, New York. Her public and institutional commissions include the University of Texas in Austin, MCASD, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, the Albright-Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo, and the Université Paris Diderot in France.

The Kimbell's new Modigliani, the art of Coenties Slip
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2017-09-23 00:40:51 UTC 40:50
The Kimbell's new Modigliani, the art of Coenties Slip

Episode No. 288 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features Kimbell Art Museum director Eric Lee and Menil Collection curator Michelle White.

Lee joins the program to discuss the Kimbell's recent acquisition of a rare Amadeo Modigliani sculpture, Head (c. 1913). Only about 27 Modigliani sculptures survive. Head was a gift from collector Gwendolyn Weiner and is the first modern sculpture in the Kimbell's collection. It is on view now.

Then Michelle White discusses her Menil exhibition "Between Land and Sea: Artists of the Coenties Slip." The show looks at the early work of Chryssa, Robert Indiana, Ellsworth Kelly, Agnes Martin, Lenore Tawney, and Jack Youngerman, all of whom who lived in the Coenties Slip, an East River-adjacent neighborhood set apart from the rest of the Manhattan art world. The exhibition considers moments of communication and influence. It is on view through August 6.

Kellie Jones, Shimon Attie
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2017-09-23 00:40:51 UTC 01:16:15
Kellie Jones, Shimon Attie

Episode No. 287 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features historian Kellie Jones and artist Shimon Attie.

Kellie Jones is the author of "South of Pico: African American Artists in Los Angeles in the 1960s and 1970s," which is new from Duke University Press. Amazon offers it for $22.

This is Jones's second major project about art in Los Angeles during the 1960s and 1970s. She also curated "Now Dig This! Art and Black Los Angeles 1960-1980" for the Hammer Museum in 2011. She was a 2016 recipient of a MacArthur Foundation 'Genius Grant,' and teaches art history at Columbia University.

Among the artists featured in Jones's book who have been featured on The Modern Art Notes Podcast are Melvin Edwards and Betye Saar. Curator and historian Yael Lipschutz came on the program to discuss Noah Purifoy on the occasion of LACMA's 2015 retrospective. Also discussed on this week's program: The extensive digital archive for "Now Dig This!" is maintained by the Hammer Museum.

On the second segment, Shimon Attie discusses two new works on view at the Saint Louis Art Museum: The Crossing, an eight-minute video installation that muses on the global refugee crisis via a group of gamblers playing roulette, and Lost in Space (After Huck) a sculptural installation that uses Mark Twain's famous Huckleberry Finn story to give Americans an empathetic gateway into stories of migration and displacement. They're on view in Saint Louis through June 25.

Matisse's studio, Darby English
01:11:24
2017-09-23 00:40:51 UTC 01:11:24
Matisse's studio, Darby English

Episode No. 286 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features historian and curator Ellen McBreen and historian Darby English.

Along with Helen Burnham and Ann Dumas, McBreen is a co-curator of "Matisse in the Studio," which is at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston through July 9. The exhibition examines how objects in Matisse's home and studio informed -- and often ended up in -- his art. These objects include a simple chocolate pot, a tacky chair, an inexpensive glass vase probably made for the tourist market and textiles, such as Kuba cloth. The exhibition includes about 34 paintings, 26 drawings, 11 sculptures, seven cut-outs and about three dozen objects Matisse owned.

From Boston the exhibition will travel to the Royal Academy of Arts in London. Its excellent catalogue, which was published by the MFAB, is available from Amazon for $34.

McBreen is an associate professor of art history at Wheaton College. Her most recent book is "Matisse's Sculpture: The Pinup and the Primitive," which was published by Yale University Press in 2014.

On the second segment, University of Chicago professor Darby English discusses his new book "1971: A Year in the Life of Color." The book, which was published by University of Chicago Press, considers two exhibitions -- Contemporary Black Artists in America at the Whitney Museum of American Art and The DeLuxe Show, a racially integrated exhibition of abstract art presented in a renovated movie theater in Houston's inner-city Fifth Ward. English finds that many black artists of the period were less interested in a specifically so-called "black aesthetic," than they were in cultural interaction across racial lines. He points to color and how these artists used it as a key way in which they engaged other artists.

Hartley in Maine, Alexei Jawlensky
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2017-09-23 00:40:51 UTC 01:18:26
Hartley in Maine, Alexei Jawlensky

Episode No. 285 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curators Randall Griffey and Vivian Endicott Barnett.

Along with Elizabeth Finch and Donna M. Cassidy, Griffey is the co-curator of "Marsden Hartley's Maine," which is at the Metropolitan Museum of Art through June 18. The exhibition spotlights Hartley's lifelong engagement with Maine, its residents, coastline, forests and mountains. It includes about 90 paintings and drawings featuring the full range of Hartley's Maine-related work.

From the Met, "Marsden Hartley's Maine" will travel to the Colby College Museum of Art, where it goes on view on July 8. (It will be at Colby during the first weekend of August, when Colby hosts the 2017 Art and Land Conservation Symposium. MAN Podcast host Tyler Green is among the speakers.) The show's strong catalogue was published by the Met. Amazon offers it for $35.

On the second segment, historian and curator Vivian Endicott Barnett discusses her "Alexei Jawlensky" at the Neue Galerie in New York. It features 75 paintings and is the artist's first full museum retrospective in the United States. Jawlensky was a Russian-born expressionist who moved to Munich in 1896 and went on to become an important figure in how central and eastern European artists engaged with early modern art -- and especially with van Gogh, Matisse, fauvism and more. It's on view through May 29.

Easter clips: Early Monet
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2017-09-23 00:40:51 UTC 46:16
Easter clips: Early Monet

The Easter-weekend Episode No. 284 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features a previously-aired conversation with curator George Shackelford.

Shackelford is the curator of "Monet: The Early Years" at the Legion of Honor in San Francisco. The show features about 60 paintings from the first phase of Claude Monet's career, from a painting Monet made in Normandy in 1858 when he was 18 years old, until 1872, when Monet lived in Argenteuil, along the Seine near Paris. The exhibition debuted last winter at the Kimbell Art Museum, where Shackelford is the museum's deputy director. "Monet" is on view in San Francisco through May 29. The show's beautiful catalogue was published by the Kimbell and distributed by Yale University Press.

Liz Glynn, Nina Chanel Abney
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2017-09-23 00:40:51 UTC 01:10:27
Liz Glynn, Nina Chanel Abney

Episode No. 283 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artists Liz Glynn and Nina Chanel Abney.

Glynn's "Open House" is on view now in Doris C. Freedman Plaza in New York's Central Park. It was commissioned by the Public Art Fund and will remain through September 24. The work takes as its jumping off point Freedman Plaza's unusual site, the place where democratic Central Park meets corporate midtown meets the aristocratic Upper East Side. Glynn's sculpture highlights the class distinctions that separate the park from the city by referencing a Fifth Avenue interior designed by Gilded Age architect Stanford White. The exhibition was curated by Daniel S. Palmer.

Glynn's work routinely engages history and the way both it and historical objects are considered in the present day. Her work has been presented or exhibited at MOCA in Los Angeles, the New Museum in New York, the deCordova Sculpture Park in Concord, Mass., the Petit Palais in Paris, LACMA, and more. This fall, MASS MoCA will present Glynn's "The Archaeology of Another Possible Future" in the museum's Building Five.

On the second segment, Nina Chanel Abney discusses her work on the occasion of a 10-year survey of her work titled "Nina Chanel Abney: Royal Flush." The exhibition is at the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University through July 16, when it will travel to the Chicago Cultural Center and then to Los Angeles, where it will be jointly presented by the Institute of Contemporary Art -- the institution formerly known as the Santa Monica Museum of Art -- and the California African American Museum. 

Photography East of the Mississippi; Matisse/Diebenkorn
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2017-09-23 00:40:51 UTC 01:02:23
Photography East of the Mississippi; Matisse/Diebenkorn

Episode No. 282 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curator Diane Waggoner and curator Katy Rothkopf.

Waggoner is the curator of "East of the Mississippi: Nineteenth-Century American Landscape Photography." For several decades, the story of America's nineteenth-century photographic history has mostly run through the West. Waggoner's exhibition instead looks at how photographers looked at the region between the Mississippi River and the Atlantic Ocean. The exhibition features 175 nineteenth-century photographs, including daguerreotypes, salted paper prints, albumen prints, stereographic prints and even paintings. It's on view at the National Gallery of Art through July 16, when it will travel to the New Orleans Museum of Art. 

On the second segment, Baltimore Museum of Art curator Katy Rothkopf discusses Richard Diebenkorn's 1964 visit to the Soviet Union in the context of "Matisse/Diebenkorn." The exhibition, which Rothkopf co-curated with San Francisco Museum of Modern Art curator Janet Bishop, is on view at SFMOMA through May 29. Bishop discussed "Matisse/Diebenkorn" on Episode No. 266.

On Trump's attempt to eliminate federal arts and humanities programs
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2017-09-23 00:40:51 UTC 55:46
On Trump's attempt to eliminate federal arts and humanities programs

Episode No. 281 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast considers federal arts and humanities funding with Los Angeles Times art critic Christopher Knight and Andrew W. Mellon Foundation executive vice president for programs and research Mariët Westermann.

The National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities make up eight one-thousandths of one percent of the federal budget. Still, in the name of austerity, the Trump White House has targeted the endowments, the Institute of Museum and Library Services and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting for elimination in its first budget. The endowments each received $148 million in appropriations in the federal government's most recent fiscal year, while the IMLS received $230 million and CPB $445 million. Meanwhile, the Trump budget asks for a 10 percent increase in defense spending, a single-year bump of $54 billion -- or 365 times the NEA or NEH's total annual appropriation.

No American art or arts critic has written more about the role of federal arts and humanities funding and especially the national endowments over more years than Christopher Knight. He has been the art critic of the Los Angeles Times since 1989. He is a three-time finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and received the Frank Jewett Mather Award for Distinction in Art Criticism from the College Art Association in 1997. 

On the second segment, Mellon foundation VP Mariët Westermann discusses federal arts and humanities funding from a funder's perspective. Prior to joining Mellon in 2010, was the provost and chief academic officer of New York University Abu Dhabi; director of NYU's Institute of Fine Arts; associate director of research at the Clark Art Institute, and an associate professor at Rutgers University. As a historian of Netherlandish art, Westermann has written books on Jan Steen, Rembrandt, Vermeer and more.

Degas and the Millinery Trade, Matisse and American Art
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2017-09-23 00:40:51 UTC 01:04:41
Degas and the Millinery Trade, Matisse and American Art

Episode No. 280 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curators Simon Kelly and Gail Stavitsky.

Along with the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco's Esther Bell, Kelly is the co-curator of "Degas, Impressionism & the Paris Millinery Trade." The exhibition melds the social history of modernizing 19th-century Paris with the ways in which painters, especially Edgar Degas, captured one the city's boomingest industries, the manufacturing and selling of hats, an industry that was a gateway into the city, employment and the bourgeoisie for tens of thousands of French women. The exhibition is at the Saint Louis Art Museum through May 7, when it will travel to San Francisco's Legion of Honor. The exhibition's superb catalogue was published by the two museums and DelMonico Prestel.

On the second segment, Gail Stavitsky discusses "Matisse and American Art," her new exhibition on the impact Matisse's work has had on American artists. The show, which features 65 paintings, sculptures, prints and archival objects is on view at New Jersey's Montclair Art Museum through June 18. Stavitsky curated the show with assistance from John Cauman and Lisa Mintz Messinger. The exhibition catalogue was published by the museum.

Dara Birnbaum, Black Mountain College photography
01:22:12
2017-09-23 00:40:51 UTC 01:22:12
Dara Birnbaum, Black Mountain College photography

Episode No. 279 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Dara Birnbaum and curator Julie J. Thomson.

Dara Birnbaum is included in "Breaking News: Turning the Lens on Mass Media," at the J. Paul Getty Museum. The exhibition examines how artists have used newspapers, magazines and televised news programs to consider media, news and the messages included therein. The exhibition was curated by Arpad Kovacs and will be on view through April 30.

Birnbaum is among the pioneers of video art. Her work often includes pointedly feminist critiques of mass media, including of entertainment and journalism. Retrospectives of her work include "The Dark Matter of Media Light" at SMAK, the Stedelijk Museum voor Actuele Kunst in Ghent, Belgium, and at the Serralves Foundation in Porto, Portugal, and "Dara Birnbaum Retrospective exhibition" at the Kunsthalle Wien in Austria and at the Norrtalje Konsthall in Sweden.

On the second segment, Julie J. Thomson discusses "Begin to See: The Photographers of Black Mountain College." The exhibition surveys photography made at Black Mountain College, including landscapes, documentary work (including of performance), experiments with the medium and more. The exhibition is at the Black Mountain College Museum and Arts Center in Asheville, North Carolina through May 20. 

Kay Rosen, Edme Bouchardon
01:13:03
2017-09-23 00:40:51 UTC 01:13:03
Kay Rosen, Edme Bouchardon

Episode No. 278 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Kay Rosen and curator Anne-Lise Desmas.

The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum opens "Kay Rosen: H Is for House," this weekend. It is Rosen's first solo museum exhibition in the northeast in almost 20 years. It is curated by the Aldrich's Richard Klein. The exhibition will be on view through September 4.

Rosen's text-based works, presented as wall-drawings, paintings and works on paper, use language, words, humor and two-dimensional forms to explore ideas, histories and contemporary life. Rosen's work is in the collection . Her museum exhibitions and installations have included projects at the Aspen (Colo.) Art Museum, the University Art Museum at the University of California, Santa Barbara, The Drawing Center, New York, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles and the Otis College of Art and Design, the MIT List Visual Arts Center, the MCA Chicago and more.

On the second segment, J. Paul Getty Museum curator Anne-Lise Desmas discusses "Bouchardon: Royal Artist of the Enlightenment." The exhibition examines the sculpture and drawings of Edme Bouchardon, who worked as the Royal Artist during the eighteenth-century reign of Louis XV. The exhibition, which Desmas co-curated with Edouard Kopp, is on view through April 2.

Kerry James Marshall (from May, 2016)
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2017-09-23 00:40:51 UTC 01:01:18
Kerry James Marshall (from May, 2016)

On March 12, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles opens "Kerry James Marshall: Mastry," the artist's first retrospective. Marshall is one of the most significant chronicler's of the American experience, especially the African-American experience. For 35 years he has worked to add black people and black culture to a Western art historical canon that is mostly built of white faces and stories. The exhibition was curated by Dieter Roelstraete, Helen Molesworth and Ian Alteveer. The exhibition catalogue was published by Skira Rizzoli.

John Singleton Copley, Jimmie Durham
01:23:17
2017-09-23 00:40:51 UTC 01:23:17
John Singleton Copley, Jimmie Durham

Episode No. 276 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features historian and author Jane Kamensky and curator Anne Ellegood.

Kamensky is the author of "A Revolution in Color: The World of John Singleton Copley." The book is a new biography that places one of early America's best and most important artists within the context of the political and revolutionary events of his time -- and details how Copley and his family were actors in them. Amazon offers it for $20 in hardcover and at $16 for Kindle.

Kamensky is a professor of history at Harvard University and the director of the Schlesinger Library. She is a historian of early America and the Atlantic world.

On the second segment, Hammer Museum curator Anne Ellegood discusses her new exhibition "Jimmie Durham: At the Center of the World." Ellegood's retrospective is the first major Durham show in the United States in over 20 years. 

Durham came to prominence as an artist in New York City in the 1980s. His work has consistently addressed questions of identity, colonialism and the inseparability of identity from politics in the United States. The exhibition is on view at the Hammer through May 7, when it will travel to the Walker, the Whitney and to the Remai Modern in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. The show's thorough catalogue was published by DelMonico Prestel.

Medardo Rosso
01:03:46
2017-09-23 00:40:51 UTC 01:03:46
Medardo Rosso

Episode No. 275 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curators Sharon Hecker and Tamara Schenkenberg and was taped live at the Pulitzer Arts Foundation in St. Louis.

Hecker and Schenkenberg are the co-curators of "Medardo Rosso: Experiments in Light and Form," which is at the Pulitzer through May 13. The exhibition is the first broad survey of Rosso's work in an American museum in over fifty years. (In 2014-15 the Center for Italian Modern Art in New York presented this Rosso installation.) It features nearly 100 works, including sculptures, drawings and photographs. The exhibition's catalogue is available for free from the Pulitzer for a $7 PayPal-administered shipping charge.

Rosso is an Italian artist who spent much of his career in France. His sculptures of heads and figures in wax, plaster, and bronze are key pivots between an era of monumental bronze sculpture, realist and impressionist sculpture and ultimately modern art.

Sarah Oppenheimer, Richard Misrach
01:11:08
2017-09-23 00:40:51 UTC 01:11:08
Sarah Oppenheimer, Richard Misrach

Episode No. 274 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artists Sarah Oppenheimer and Richard Misrach.

This weekend the Wexner Center for the Arts at The Ohio State University in Columbus debuts "Sarah Oppenheimer: S-337473," an exhibition of a newly commissioned work developed  for the Wexner's Peter Eisenman-designed building. Oppenheimer created her new work as a two-year-long Wexner Center Artist Residency Award recipient, during which she collaborated with OSU's Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering to develop a patent-pending pivot mechanism that allows this new work to rotate at a 45-degree angle. The exhibition opens on Saturday, February 4 and will be on view through April 16. As soon as images of the new work are available, probably on or around February 7, we'll add them to this post.

Sarah Oppenheimer is an artist who creates installations that engage with both architecture and space. She's previously made work for the Perez Art Museum Miami (on view through April 30), the Kunsthaus Basel, the Rice University Art Gallery, the Queens Museum, and the Saint Louis Art Museum. A project she is developing for Mass MoCA will debut in 2019. Oppenheimer has also created a permanent installation at the Baltimore Museum of Art. Multiple views of all her installations are on her website.

On the second segment, the re-airing of a 2016 segment with Richard Misrach on his "Border Cantos," a book and exhibition on which he has collaborated with Mexican composer and performer Guillermo Galindo. Since 2004, and especially since 2009, Misrach has been making pictures along the 2,000-mile-long United States border with Mexico, the latest investigation of American deserts that make up what Misrach calls his Desert Cantos series. As Misrach traveled the borderlands, he accumulated discarded objects such as water bottles, backpacks, clothing and shotgun shells and turned them over to Galindo, who made that material into instruments and who then performed on them. The book, "Border Cantos," is out from Aperture; Amazon offers it $45, a forty percent discount.

Tony Oursler, American Art during WWI
01:20:31
2017-09-23 00:40:51 UTC 01:20:31
Tony Oursler, American Art during WWI

The Museum of Modern Art is showing Tony Oursler's Imponderable (2015-16), a 90-minute film shown in an immersive, so-called "5-D" environment, as well as archival material related to the film from Oursler's own collection. The film mines Ourlser's interest in experiments in technological advancement that didn't quite work out and occult phenomena to offer a kind of alternative history of modernism. The film is richly informed by Oursler's own life history. His grandfather was Charles Fulton Oursler, a journalist and author who teamed up with Harry Houdini to campaign against fraudulent mediumship. The exhibition was curated by MoMA's Stuart Comer and Erica Papernik-Shimizu. Imponderable is at MoMA through April 16.

Oursler is a multimedia and installation artist whose work often examines and uses new technologies to explore topics such as facial recognition, paranormal phenomena and the relationship between multiple personality disorder and mass media.

On the second segment, historian and curator Anne Classen Knutson discusses "World War I and American Art," which is at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts through April 9. The exhibition looks at how American artists responded to and engaged with the war, both in Europe and in the United States. Knutson co-curated the show with Robert Cozzolino and David Lubin. 

Stanley Whitney
01:08:48
2017-09-23 00:40:51 UTC 01:08:48
Stanley Whitney

Artist Stanley Whitney.

Francis Picabia, John McLaughlin
01:19:17
2017-09-23 00:40:51 UTC 01:19:17
Francis Picabia, John McLaughlin

"Francis Picabia" co-curator Anne Umland, "John McLaughlin" curator Stephanie Barron.

Lorna Simpson
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2017-09-23 00:40:51 UTC 54:01
Lorna Simpson

Artist Lorna Simpson, who is showing new work at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth

Tyler Green's top ten, Minor White
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2017-09-23 00:40:51 UTC 37:30
Tyler Green's top ten, Minor White

MAN Podcast host Tyler Green's 2016 top ten list, curator Paul Martineau on Minor White.

Holiday clips: The Le Nain
44:57
2017-09-23 00:40:51 UTC 44:57
Holiday clips: The Le Nain

Curator and historian C.D. Dickerson.

Pipilotti Rist, Mark Speltz
01:17:15
2017-09-23 00:40:51 UTC 01:17:15
Pipilotti Rist, Mark Speltz

Artist Pipilotti Rist and historian and "North of Dixie: Civil Rights Photography Beyond the South" author Mark Speltz.

Matisse/Diebenkorn, Klimt's Portraits
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2017-09-23 00:40:51 UTC 57:24
Matisse/Diebenkorn, Klimt's Portraits

SFMOMA curator Janet Bishop, art historian Jill Lloyd.

Early Monet, Picasso's Drawings
01:06:06
2017-09-23 00:40:51 UTC 01:06:06
Early Monet, Picasso's Drawings

Curators George Shackelford, David Breslin.

Thanksgiving clips: Richard Misrach
46:14
2017-09-23 00:40:51 UTC 46:14
Thanksgiving clips: Richard Misrach

Artist Richard Misrach

Eduardo Basualdo
47:49
2017-09-23 00:40:51 UTC 47:49
Eduardo Basualdo

Artist Eduardo Basualdo, recorded live at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden.

Art and Education in America After WWII at MCASD, Wexner
01:15:26
2017-09-23 00:40:51 UTC 01:15:26
Art and Education in America After WWII at MCASD, Wexner

Curator Jill Dawsey and artist Martha Rosler; curator Ruth Erickson

Edgar Degas, Richard Serra's "Shift"
01:05:46
2017-09-23 00:40:51 UTC 01:05:46
Edgar Degas, Richard Serra's "Shift"

Historian and curator Henri Loyrette, documentary filmmaker Simone Estrin.

Michael Dean, Julian Onderdonk
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2017-09-23 00:40:51 UTC 42:33
Michael Dean, Julian Onderdonk

Artist Michael Dean and curator Kaylin Weber.

Valentin de Boulogne, early Agnes Martin
01:04:23
2017-09-23 00:40:51 UTC 01:04:23
Valentin de Boulogne, early Agnes Martin

Metropolitan Museum of Art curator Keith Christiansen, author Christina Bryan Rosenberger

Hélio Oiticica, Lexington Camera Club
01:13:43
2017-09-23 00:40:51 UTC 01:13:43
Hélio Oiticica, Lexington Camera Club

Curators Lynn Zelevansky and Brian Sholis

"Radical Women," and "Casanova"
01:11:47
2017-10-05 04:30:53 UTC 01:11:47
"Radical Women," and "Casanova"

Episode No. 308 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curators Cecelia Fajardo-Hill and Frederick Ilchman.

Along with Andrea Giunta, Fajardo-Hill is a curator of "Radical Women: Latin American Art, 1960-1985," one of the headline shows of the Getty Foundation-funded "Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA" series of exhibitions. The show is the first survey of art made by women in Latin America and US-born Chicanas and Latinas during the sixties, seventies and early eighties. It includes about 116 artists from 15 countries, including Lygia Pape, Zilia Sánchez and Ana Mendieta.

The show will be at the Hammer through December 31. The catalogue is a strikingly thorough English-language source. It was published by DelMonico Prestel. Amazon offers it for $43.

On the second segment, MFA Boston curator Frederick Ilchman discusses "Casanova: The Seduction of Europe," a broad look at the over-the-top luxury of European art and decorative arts in the pre-French Revolution decades. It's on view at the Kimbell Art Museum through December 31. The show is built around the famed Giacomo Casanova, a courtier, lothario and schemester whose memoir provides one of the best insights to an era in which those at the top of society milked their countries for wealth and prestige, leavin little for others. The exhibition was co-curated by Ilchman, the National Gallery's C.D. Dickerson (who started work on the show while he was at the Kimbell), and the Clark's Esther Bell. The exhibition catalogue, which was published by the MFA Boston, is one of the best art books of the year. Amazon lists it for $38.

Emmet Gowin
01:15:46
2017-10-05 04:30:53 UTC 01:15:46
Emmet Gowin

Episode No. 307 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Emmet Gowin. 

Gowin's "Mariposas Nocturnas: Moths of Central and South America, a Study in Beauty and Diversity" is just out from Princeton University Press. The book features photographs of hundreds of moths that Gowin has made in Central and South America over the last 15 years. The book includes essays by Terry Tempest Williams and Gowin. Amazon offers it for $41.

Gowin will show related work in "Here on Earth Now -- Notes from the Field" in an exhibition that opens on Sept. 28 at New York's Pace/MacGill Gallery. It will remain on view through Jan. 6, 2018.

See images of this week's program here.

Photography in Argentina 1850-2010, Jimmie Durham
01:15:28
2017-10-05 04:30:53 UTC 01:15:28
Photography in Argentina 1850-2010, Jimmie Durham

Episode No. 306 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curators Idurre Alonso and Anne Ellegood.

Alonso is the co-curator of "Photography in Argentina, 1850-2010: Contradiction and Continuity" at the J. Paul Getty Museum. It opens this weekend and remains on view through January 28, 2018. The exhibition, which explores themes that emphasize Argentina's history, features nearly 300 works.

On the second segment, Hammer Museum curator Anne Ellegood discusses her exhibition "Jimmie Durham: At the Center of the World." The exhibition, the first US retrospective of Durham's work in 20 years, is at the Walker Art Center through October 7. 

Carolina Miranda on PST: LA/LA, Leyla Cárdenas
01:00:58
2017-10-05 04:30:53 UTC 01:00:58
Carolina Miranda on PST: LA/LA, Leyla Cárdenas

Episode No. 305 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features journalist Carolina Miranda and artist Leyla Cárdenas.

Carolina Miranda is a journalist at the Los Angeles Times. She joins host Tyler Green to preview "Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA," a Getty Foundation-funded series of exhibitions, catalogues and events across southern California.

Cárdenas discusses her recent work, especially Excision (2012), which is included in "Home -- So Different, So Appealing" at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. It is the first PST: LA/LA show to open. Curated by Chon Noriega, Pilar Tompkins Rivas and Mari Carmen Ramirez, it will remain on view through October 15, when it will travel to the Museum of Fine Arts Houston.

Anthony Hernandez
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2017-10-05 04:30:53 UTC 58:55
Anthony Hernandez

Episode No. 304 features a re-air of host Tyler Green's 2016 conversation with Anthony Hernandez.

In two weeks the Milwaukee Art Museum will present one of the best shows of 2016, a retrospective of Anthony Hernandez curated by San Francisco Museum of Modern Art curator Erin O'Toole.

It was Hernandez's first retrospective. His photographs have consistently looked at parts of America, especially parts of Los Angeles, that hide in plain sight. The catalogue was one of last year's best books, especially for the introduction by Robert Adams and a conversation between Hernandez and Lewis Baltz. Milwaukee's presentation of the exhibition opens on September 15 and will be on view through January first, 2018. 

Degas and Millinery
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Degas and Millinery

Episode No. 303 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast is a summer clips episode featuring a previously aired interview with curator Simon Kelly.

Along with Esther Bell, Kelly is the co-curator of "Degas, Impressionism & the Paris Millinery Trade." The exhibition melds the social history of modernizing 19th-century Paris with the ways in which painters, especially Edgar Degas, portrayed one of the city's boomingest industries, the manufacturing and selling of hats. As it turns out, millinery was a gateway into the city, employment and the bourgeoisie for tens of thousands of French women. The exhibition is at San Francisco's Legion of Honor through September 24. It debuted at the Saint Louis Art Museum, where Kelly is a curator. The exhibition's superb catalogue was published by the two museums and DelMonico Prestel. Amazon offers it for $48.

For images of artworks discussed on the program, see Episode No. 280.

No. 302: "Soundtracks" at SFMOMA: Jacqueline Kiyomi Gordon, Amor Muñoz
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2017-10-05 04:30:53 UTC 43:21
No. 302: "Soundtracks" at SFMOMA: Jacqueline Kiyomi Gordon, Amor Muñoz

Episode No. 302 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artists Jacqueline Kiyomi Gordon and Amor Muñoz.

This is the second of two MAN Podcast episodes spotlighting artists in "Soundtracks," a new exhibition at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art that examines the role of sound in art. The show, which was curated by Rudolf Frieling and Tanya Zimbardo, will remain on view through January 1, 2018. It features nearly three dozen artworks that are or include sound.

 

Cristóbal de Villalpando; Bosch and Bouts
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2017-10-05 04:30:53 UTC 53:18
Cristóbal de Villalpando; Bosch and Bouts

Episode No. 301 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curators Ronda Kasl and Rima Girnius.

Along with Jonathan Brown and Clara Bargellini, Metropolitan Museum of Art curator Ronda Kasl is the co-curator of "Cristóbal de Villalpando: Mexican Painter of the Baroque," which is at the Met in New York through October 15. Villalpando is considered one of the two major artists of seventeenth-century New Spain. The Met's small survey of his work features eleven paintings, including Villalpando's 28-feet-high Transfiguration of Jesus (1683), his first masterpiece.

On the second segment, Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art curator Rima Girnius discusses two recently re-attributed paintings in the N-A's collection: Hieronymus Bosch's The Temptation of St. Anthony (about 1500-1510) and Albrecht Bouts's Christ Crowned with Thorns (about 1490-95). The N-A is presenting the paintings and information about the re-attributions in "Rediscovering Hieronymus Bosch and Albrecht Bouts," which is on view in Kansas City through May 27, 2018.

 

Gary Simmons
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2017-10-05 04:30:53 UTC 56:09
Gary Simmons

Episode No. 300 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Gary Simmons.

Gary Simmons's newest installation is on view at the California African American Museum in Los Angeles. Titled "Gary Simmons: Fade to Black," the work is a multi-wall installation in the museum's atrium. The presentation was curated by Naima J. Keith and will remain on view through July 31, 2018.

Over the course of a quarter-century-long career, Simmons has explored how to make the typically invisible visible, often within the context of America's troubled history. In 2002 the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago debuted a mid-career survey of Simmons's work that traveled to SITE Santa Fe and The Studio Museum in Harlem. Simmons has also been featured in solo shows at the Whitney Museum of American Art, MASS MoCA, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Saint Louis Art Museum, MCASD, the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, The Drawing Center in New York and more. Simmons was first a guest on The MAN Podcast in 2013.

During the program MAN Podcast host Tyler Green references this Los Angeles Times video of Simmons working on the installation.

Glenn Ligon, Florine Stettheimer
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2017-10-05 04:30:53 UTC 54:46
Glenn Ligon, Florine Stettheimer

Episode No. 299 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Glenn Ligon and curator Stephen Brown.

Ligon is the curator of "Blue Black" at the Pulitzer Arts Foundation in St. Louis. Informed by the Pulitzer's Ellsworth Kelly wall sculpture Blue Black, the exhibition features more than 50 artworks that use color to address questions related to language, identity and more. The exhibition is on view through October 7. The catalogue of the exhibition is complimentary save the cost of shipping ($7 in the US, $14 abroad). 

Ligon is an artist whose 2011 mid-career survey was organized by the Whitney Museum of American Art and traveled to LACMA and the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth. His work has been featured in solo exhibitions at the Power Plant in Toronto, the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, and the Studio Museum in Harlem. 

On the second segment, curator Stephen Brown discusses his exhibition "Florine Stettheimer: Painting Poetry," which is at The Jewish Museum in New York through September 24. He co-curated  the show with Georgiana Uhlyarik at the Art Gallery of Ontario. The exhibition's catalogue was published by Yale University Press.  

"Soundtracks" at SFMOMA with Bill Fontana and Christina Kubisch
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2017-10-05 04:30:53 UTC 51:23
"Soundtracks" at SFMOMA with Bill Fontana and Christina Kubisch

**In stereo**

Episode No. 298 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features sound artists Bill Fontana and Christina Kubisch.

This is the first of two MAN Podcast episodes spotlighting artists in "Soundtracks," a new exhibition at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art that examines the role of sound in art. The show, which was curated by Rudolf Frieling and Tanya Zimbardo, will remain on view through January 1, 2018. It features nearly three dozen artworks that are or include sound. SFMOMA has built out an extensive digital infrastructure for the show, including an exhibition guide, a catalogue, and interviews with artists such as Jacqueline Kiyomi Gordon, Christina Kubisch, Rafael Lozano-Hemmer, and Richard T. Walker.

This week's MAN Podcast features exhibition artists whose work makes the invisible audible. San Francisco-based artist Bill Fontana has been making what he calls 'sound sculptures' for 40 years. He's exhibited all over the world, including at the Venice Biennale, Madrid's Reina Sofia, London's Tate Modern, New York's Madison Square Park, and more.

Christina Kubisch is a Berlin-area-based composer and artist who works with electromagnetic induction, making both walks for which listeners/viewers wear a special set of headphones and move through a city to hear sounds to which Kubitsch has guided them on a map, and sound sculptures that feature sound related to their physical presence. Kubisch has created dozens of electrical walks all over the world, has been featured in the Venice Biennale, Documenta and in scores of group and solo shows.

 

Richard Deacon, Daniel Heidkamp
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2017-10-05 04:30:53 UTC 01:15:21
Richard Deacon, Daniel Heidkamp

Episode No. 297 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artists Richard Deacon and Daniel Heidkamp.

The San Diego Museum of Art is showing "Richard Deacon: What You See Is What You Get," a survey of the artist's career. Curated by Ariel Plotek, it's on view through Sept. 4. The exhibition is accompanied by a catalogue published by the museum. Host Tyler Green and Deacon also mention passages from Deacon's 2014 book of writings, titled "So, If, And, But: Writings 1970-2012."

Throughout a nearly 50-year career as a sculptor, draftsman and print-maker, Deacon has explored form, volume and space with unusual rigor. Much of his work is motivated by the exploration of shapes within shapes, with the tension between the two shapes and the material in which the work is made providing the artwork's activating tension. Deacon's dozens of major exhibitions include a 2014 retrospective at the Tate Britain, and last year the Museum Folkwang in Essen, Germany presented a career-length survey of Deacon's drawings.

On the second segment, Daniel Heidkamp discusses his paintings and the pictures of them on view in "Taking Pictures: Camera Phone Conversations Between Artists" at the Metropolitan Museum of Art's Breuer location. The exhibition was curated by Mia Fineman and is on view through Dec. 17. Heidkamp is showing paintings related to the exhibition at New York's Half Gallery through July 21.

Mexican modernism in "Paint the Revolution," Andrea Chung
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2017-10-05 04:30:53 UTC 01:18:34
Mexican modernism in "Paint the Revolution," Andrea Chung

Episode No. 296 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curator Matthew Affron and artist Andrea Chung.

Matthew Affron, a curator at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, is one of the co-curators of "Paint the Revolution: Mexican Modernism, 1910-1950," which is on view at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston through October 1. The exhibition chronicles the history of Mexican modernism at the beginning of the twentieth century and the social, political, and cultural forces that shaped it. Among other critical plaudits, MAN Podcast host Tyler Green named it to his 2016 top ten list.

The curatorial team for the exhibition includes Renato González Mello, Director of the Instituto de Investigaciones Estéticas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Dafne Cruz Porchini, a post-doctoral researcher at the Colegio de México in Mexico City; and Philadelphia Museum of Art curator Mark A. Castro.

On the second segment, Andrea Chung discusses an exhibition of her work titled "You Broke the Ocean in Half to be Here," at the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego. Curated by Jill Dawsey, the exhibition is on view at MCASD's downtown location through August 20.  Chung's work, including an installation she's planning for the forthcoming Prospect ennial, explores the legacies of migration and colonialism in the Caribbean.

Holiday clips: Barkley L. Hendricks
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Holiday clips: Barkley L. Hendricks

Artist Barkley L. Hendricks

Roni Horn
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2017-10-05 04:30:53 UTC 01:02:53
Roni Horn

Episode No. 294 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Roni Horn.

The Nasher Sculpture Center in Dallas is showing the first American museum exhibition devoted to Horn's cast glass sculptures. Eight of them are on view in the Nasher's Renzo Piano-designed building through August 20. In New York, Hauser & Wirth is presenting the debut of four new Horns, including the photographic series "The Selected Gifts, (1974-2015)," two series of works on paper, "The Dog's Chorus" (2016), "Th Rose Prblm" (2015), and two recent glass sculptures.

Horn has been mining the intersection of minimalist object making and conceptualism in sculpture, photography and works on paper -- and particularly the relationships between discrete objects -- since the mid-1970s. In 2009 the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York, the Institute of Contemporary Art Boston, the Tate Modern and the Collection Lambert in France surveyed her career in an exhibition titled "Roni Horn, aka Roni Horn." She has had other solo shows at the Art Institute of Chicago, the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris, the Dia Center for the Arts in New York, among others.

Robert Rauschenberg, Ken Ashton
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2017-10-05 04:30:53 UTC 01:07:36
Robert Rauschenberg, Ken Ashton

Episode No. 293 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features Museum of Modern Art, New York curator Leah Dickerman and artist Ken Ashton.

See images of art discussed on the program here.

Along with the Tate Modern's Achim Borchardt-Hume, Leah Dickerman is the co-curator of "Robert Rauschenberg: Among Friends," a retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art through September 17. The exhibition features Rauschenberg's early photography, body prints, combines, performances, prints and more. The exhibition catalogue was published by MoMA. Amazon offers it for $34 in paperback and $51 in cloth.

Leah Dickerman is a curator at MoMA. Her previous exhibitions include Inventing Abstraction, 1910-1925," and a 2005-06 dada survey that Dickerman curated while working at the National Gallery of Art.

On the second segment, Ken Ashton discusses his new book "Portsmouth: Collected Saturdays," which is new from Daylight. The book features Ashton's documentation of the deindustrialization and emptying out of Portsmouth, Ohio, a small town on the Ohio River at the southern end of Appalachia. Amazon offers it for $30. Ashton's work is in the collection of institutions such as the Museum of Contemporary Photography in Chicago and the National Gallery of Art.

Spencer Finch, on Sandro Botticelli
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2017-10-05 04:30:53 UTC 01:14:59
Spencer Finch, on Sandro Botticelli

Episode No. 292 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Spencer Finch and curator Frederick Ilchman.

See images of art discussed in this week's show here.

Spencer Finch is presenting two new installations at two venues on opposite sides of the United States: His The Western Mystery (2017), a commission from the Seattle Art Museum for its Olympic Sculpture Park, is up through March 3, 2019. At MASS MoCA, Finch's Cosmic Latte (2017) is on view at least through 2018.

Finch's work typically addresses light and its relationship to memory at specific geographic locations, and often specific times. He has fulfilled commissions for and had exhibitions at The Morgan Library, the Rhode Island School of Design, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, the Pulitzer Arts Foundation (then the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts), the Corcoran Gallery of Art and more. His work is in the collections of the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, the Kemper Museum of Art in St. Louis, the Guggenheim and more.

Frederick Ilchman has organized the Museum of Fine Arts Boston's showing of "Botticelli and the Search for the Divine," the largest exhibition of Botticelli paintings ever shown in the United States. The exhibition, which is on view through July 9, includes 15 works by 15th-century Florentine master Sandro Botticelli, as well as works by Filippo Lippi, Antonio del Pollaiuolo, Jacopo del Sellaio and more. The exhibition was co-organized by the MFA Boston and the Muscarelle Museum of Art at the College of William & Mary. Ilchman is the MFA Boston's curator of paintings.

Mark Ruwedel, Jed Morse on Manuel Neri
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2017-10-05 04:30:53 UTC 01:09:05
Mark Ruwedel, Jed Morse on Manuel Neri

Episode No. 291 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Mark Ruwedel and curator Jed Morse.

Yossi Milo Gallery in New York is showing "Mark Ruwedel: Hell and Home" through June 24.  The show includes Ruwedel's 'pictures of hell,' an inventory of Western landscapes named for hell or the devil, his pictures of 'home,' of desert homes fighting a losing battle against the ravages of the harsh surrounding environment, and Opportunities Realized, Ruwedel's revisiting of Ed Ruscha's 1970 Real Estate Opportunities, in which Ruwedel photographed how the vacant lots in Ruscha's book were filled in.

Ruwedel's most recent book is "Pictures of Hell," which features essays by Tate curator Simon Baker and Chiara Siravo a historian whose work has examined our concepts of hell. 

Ruwedel is one of America's most honored photographers. In 2014 he won both the Scotiabank Photography Award and a Guggenheim fellowship. His work is in the collections of major museums such as the Metropolitan, the National Gallery of Art, the Tate, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and SFMOMA.

Ruwedel and host Tyler Green refer several times to Ruwedel's 2008 book "Westward the Course of Empire," a classic which looked at what remains in places where railroads once ran across the landscape.

On the second segment, Nasher Sculpture Center curator Jed Morse discusses his museum's recent acquisition of a suite of major Manuel Neri sculptures and works on paper. They are on view at the Nasher through July 16.

Holiday clips: Pipilotti Rist
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2017-10-05 04:30:53 UTC 54:23
Holiday clips: Pipilotti Rist

Episode No. 290 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features a previously aired conversation with artist Pipilotti Rist. 

This summer, the Museum of Fine Arts Houston will exhibit two immersive installations that are new to its collection: Pipilotti Rist's Pixel Forest and Worry Will Vanish. They go on view on June 11 and will remain up through September 17.

Rist, who is based in Zurich, has been the subject of many single-artist museum exhibitions, especially in the last half-decade. Among the museums to give her shows are the Kunsthaus Zurich, the Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art in Seoul, the Hayward in London, the Wexner in Columbus, MoMA in New York and the Pompidou Center in Paris.

Nancy Rubins
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2017-10-05 04:30:53 UTC 59:37
Nancy Rubins

Episode No. 289 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Nancy Rubins. It was recorded live at the Wexner Center for the Arts at The Ohio State University in Columbus.

Rubins is included in "Grey Matters," an exhibition that opens Friday, May 19 at the Wexner. The show, curated by Michael Goodson, features the work of 37 contemporary women artists who have worked in grisaille. It is on view through July 30. The exhibition includes work by past MAN Podcast guests such as Carol Bove, Vija Celmins, Mickalene Thomas, Julie Mehretu, Mary Reid Kelley, Arlene Shechet, Amy Sillman, Xaviera Simmons and Lorna Simpson.

Rubins' often monumental sculpture amalgamates industrially produced objects into strikingly light, sometimes lyrical objects. Her enormous drawings, of built-up graphite on single sheets of paper often installed across multiple walls, are simultaneously minimal and baroque. Rubins has had solo exhibitions at museums such as the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego and the Museum of Modern Art, New York. Her public and institutional commissions include the University of Texas in Austin, MCASD, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, the Albright-Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo, and the Université Paris Diderot in France.

The Kimbell's new Modigliani, the art of Coenties Slip
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2017-10-05 04:30:53 UTC 40:50
The Kimbell's new Modigliani, the art of Coenties Slip

Episode No. 288 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features Kimbell Art Museum director Eric Lee and Menil Collection curator Michelle White.

Lee joins the program to discuss the Kimbell's recent acquisition of a rare Amadeo Modigliani sculpture, Head (c. 1913). Only about 27 Modigliani sculptures survive. Head was a gift from collector Gwendolyn Weiner and is the first modern sculpture in the Kimbell's collection. It is on view now.

Then Michelle White discusses her Menil exhibition "Between Land and Sea: Artists of the Coenties Slip." The show looks at the early work of Chryssa, Robert Indiana, Ellsworth Kelly, Agnes Martin, Lenore Tawney, and Jack Youngerman, all of whom who lived in the Coenties Slip, an East River-adjacent neighborhood set apart from the rest of the Manhattan art world. The exhibition considers moments of communication and influence. It is on view through August 6.

Kellie Jones, Shimon Attie
01:16:15
2017-10-05 04:30:53 UTC 01:16:15
Kellie Jones, Shimon Attie

Episode No. 287 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features historian Kellie Jones and artist Shimon Attie.

Kellie Jones is the author of "South of Pico: African American Artists in Los Angeles in the 1960s and 1970s," which is new from Duke University Press. Amazon offers it for $22.

This is Jones's second major project about art in Los Angeles during the 1960s and 1970s. She also curated "Now Dig This! Art and Black Los Angeles 1960-1980" for the Hammer Museum in 2011. She was a 2016 recipient of a MacArthur Foundation 'Genius Grant,' and teaches art history at Columbia University.

Among the artists featured in Jones's book who have been featured on The Modern Art Notes Podcast are Melvin Edwards and Betye Saar. Curator and historian Yael Lipschutz came on the program to discuss Noah Purifoy on the occasion of LACMA's 2015 retrospective. Also discussed on this week's program: The extensive digital archive for "Now Dig This!" is maintained by the Hammer Museum.

On the second segment, Shimon Attie discusses two new works on view at the Saint Louis Art Museum: The Crossing, an eight-minute video installation that muses on the global refugee crisis via a group of gamblers playing roulette, and Lost in Space (After Huck) a sculptural installation that uses Mark Twain's famous Huckleberry Finn story to give Americans an empathetic gateway into stories of migration and displacement. They're on view in Saint Louis through June 25.

Matisse's studio, Darby English
01:11:24
2017-10-05 04:30:53 UTC 01:11:24
Matisse's studio, Darby English

Episode No. 286 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features historian and curator Ellen McBreen and historian Darby English.

Along with Helen Burnham and Ann Dumas, McBreen is a co-curator of "Matisse in the Studio," which is at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston through July 9. The exhibition examines how objects in Matisse's home and studio informed -- and often ended up in -- his art. These objects include a simple chocolate pot, a tacky chair, an inexpensive glass vase probably made for the tourist market and textiles, such as Kuba cloth. The exhibition includes about 34 paintings, 26 drawings, 11 sculptures, seven cut-outs and about three dozen objects Matisse owned.

From Boston the exhibition will travel to the Royal Academy of Arts in London. Its excellent catalogue, which was published by the MFAB, is available from Amazon for $34.

McBreen is an associate professor of art history at Wheaton College. Her most recent book is "Matisse's Sculpture: The Pinup and the Primitive," which was published by Yale University Press in 2014.

On the second segment, University of Chicago professor Darby English discusses his new book "1971: A Year in the Life of Color." The book, which was published by University of Chicago Press, considers two exhibitions -- Contemporary Black Artists in America at the Whitney Museum of American Art and The DeLuxe Show, a racially integrated exhibition of abstract art presented in a renovated movie theater in Houston's inner-city Fifth Ward. English finds that many black artists of the period were less interested in a specifically so-called "black aesthetic," than they were in cultural interaction across racial lines. He points to color and how these artists used it as a key way in which they engaged other artists.

Hartley in Maine, Alexei Jawlensky
01:18:26
2017-10-05 04:30:53 UTC 01:18:26
Hartley in Maine, Alexei Jawlensky

Episode No. 285 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curators Randall Griffey and Vivian Endicott Barnett.

Along with Elizabeth Finch and Donna M. Cassidy, Griffey is the co-curator of "Marsden Hartley's Maine," which is at the Metropolitan Museum of Art through June 18. The exhibition spotlights Hartley's lifelong engagement with Maine, its residents, coastline, forests and mountains. It includes about 90 paintings and drawings featuring the full range of Hartley's Maine-related work.

From the Met, "Marsden Hartley's Maine" will travel to the Colby College Museum of Art, where it goes on view on July 8. (It will be at Colby during the first weekend of August, when Colby hosts the 2017 Art and Land Conservation Symposium. MAN Podcast host Tyler Green is among the speakers.) The show's strong catalogue was published by the Met. Amazon offers it for $35.

On the second segment, historian and curator Vivian Endicott Barnett discusses her "Alexei Jawlensky" at the Neue Galerie in New York. It features 75 paintings and is the artist's first full museum retrospective in the United States. Jawlensky was a Russian-born expressionist who moved to Munich in 1896 and went on to become an important figure in how central and eastern European artists engaged with early modern art -- and especially with van Gogh, Matisse, fauvism and more. It's on view through May 29.

Easter clips: Early Monet
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2017-10-05 04:30:53 UTC 46:16
Easter clips: Early Monet

The Easter-weekend Episode No. 284 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features a previously-aired conversation with curator George Shackelford.

Shackelford is the curator of "Monet: The Early Years" at the Legion of Honor in San Francisco. The show features about 60 paintings from the first phase of Claude Monet's career, from a painting Monet made in Normandy in 1858 when he was 18 years old, until 1872, when Monet lived in Argenteuil, along the Seine near Paris. The exhibition debuted last winter at the Kimbell Art Museum, where Shackelford is the museum's deputy director. "Monet" is on view in San Francisco through May 29. The show's beautiful catalogue was published by the Kimbell and distributed by Yale University Press.

Liz Glynn, Nina Chanel Abney
01:10:27
2017-10-05 04:30:53 UTC 01:10:27
Liz Glynn, Nina Chanel Abney

Episode No. 283 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artists Liz Glynn and Nina Chanel Abney.

Glynn's "Open House" is on view now in Doris C. Freedman Plaza in New York's Central Park. It was commissioned by the Public Art Fund and will remain through September 24. The work takes as its jumping off point Freedman Plaza's unusual site, the place where democratic Central Park meets corporate midtown meets the aristocratic Upper East Side. Glynn's sculpture highlights the class distinctions that separate the park from the city by referencing a Fifth Avenue interior designed by Gilded Age architect Stanford White. The exhibition was curated by Daniel S. Palmer.

Glynn's work routinely engages history and the way both it and historical objects are considered in the present day. Her work has been presented or exhibited at MOCA in Los Angeles, the New Museum in New York, the deCordova Sculpture Park in Concord, Mass., the Petit Palais in Paris, LACMA, and more. This fall, MASS MoCA will present Glynn's "The Archaeology of Another Possible Future" in the museum's Building Five.

On the second segment, Nina Chanel Abney discusses her work on the occasion of a 10-year survey of her work titled "Nina Chanel Abney: Royal Flush." The exhibition is at the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University through July 16, when it will travel to the Chicago Cultural Center and then to Los Angeles, where it will be jointly presented by the Institute of Contemporary Art -- the institution formerly known as the Santa Monica Museum of Art -- and the California African American Museum. 

Photography East of the Mississippi; Matisse/Diebenkorn
01:02:23
2017-10-05 04:30:53 UTC 01:02:23
Photography East of the Mississippi; Matisse/Diebenkorn

Episode No. 282 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curator Diane Waggoner and curator Katy Rothkopf.

Waggoner is the curator of "East of the Mississippi: Nineteenth-Century American Landscape Photography." For several decades, the story of America's nineteenth-century photographic history has mostly run through the West. Waggoner's exhibition instead looks at how photographers looked at the region between the Mississippi River and the Atlantic Ocean. The exhibition features 175 nineteenth-century photographs, including daguerreotypes, salted paper prints, albumen prints, stereographic prints and even paintings. It's on view at the National Gallery of Art through July 16, when it will travel to the New Orleans Museum of Art. 

On the second segment, Baltimore Museum of Art curator Katy Rothkopf discusses Richard Diebenkorn's 1964 visit to the Soviet Union in the context of "Matisse/Diebenkorn." The exhibition, which Rothkopf co-curated with San Francisco Museum of Modern Art curator Janet Bishop, is on view at SFMOMA through May 29. Bishop discussed "Matisse/Diebenkorn" on Episode No. 266.

On Trump's attempt to eliminate federal arts and humanities programs
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2017-10-05 04:30:53 UTC 55:46
On Trump's attempt to eliminate federal arts and humanities programs

Episode No. 281 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast considers federal arts and humanities funding with Los Angeles Times art critic Christopher Knight and Andrew W. Mellon Foundation executive vice president for programs and research Mariët Westermann.

The National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities make up eight one-thousandths of one percent of the federal budget. Still, in the name of austerity, the Trump White House has targeted the endowments, the Institute of Museum and Library Services and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting for elimination in its first budget. The endowments each received $148 million in appropriations in the federal government's most recent fiscal year, while the IMLS received $230 million and CPB $445 million. Meanwhile, the Trump budget asks for a 10 percent increase in defense spending, a single-year bump of $54 billion -- or 365 times the NEA or NEH's total annual appropriation.

No American art or arts critic has written more about the role of federal arts and humanities funding and especially the national endowments over more years than Christopher Knight. He has been the art critic of the Los Angeles Times since 1989. He is a three-time finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and received the Frank Jewett Mather Award for Distinction in Art Criticism from the College Art Association in 1997. 

On the second segment, Mellon foundation VP Mariët Westermann discusses federal arts and humanities funding from a funder's perspective. Prior to joining Mellon in 2010, was the provost and chief academic officer of New York University Abu Dhabi; director of NYU's Institute of Fine Arts; associate director of research at the Clark Art Institute, and an associate professor at Rutgers University. As a historian of Netherlandish art, Westermann has written books on Jan Steen, Rembrandt, Vermeer and more.

Degas and the Millinery Trade, Matisse and American Art
01:04:41
2017-10-05 04:30:53 UTC 01:04:41
Degas and the Millinery Trade, Matisse and American Art

Episode No. 280 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curators Simon Kelly and Gail Stavitsky.

Along with the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco's Esther Bell, Kelly is the co-curator of "Degas, Impressionism & the Paris Millinery Trade." The exhibition melds the social history of modernizing 19th-century Paris with the ways in which painters, especially Edgar Degas, captured one the city's boomingest industries, the manufacturing and selling of hats, an industry that was a gateway into the city, employment and the bourgeoisie for tens of thousands of French women. The exhibition is at the Saint Louis Art Museum through May 7, when it will travel to San Francisco's Legion of Honor. The exhibition's superb catalogue was published by the two museums and DelMonico Prestel.

On the second segment, Gail Stavitsky discusses "Matisse and American Art," her new exhibition on the impact Matisse's work has had on American artists. The show, which features 65 paintings, sculptures, prints and archival objects is on view at New Jersey's Montclair Art Museum through June 18. Stavitsky curated the show with assistance from John Cauman and Lisa Mintz Messinger. The exhibition catalogue was published by the museum.

Dara Birnbaum, Black Mountain College photography
01:22:12
2017-10-05 04:30:53 UTC 01:22:12
Dara Birnbaum, Black Mountain College photography

Episode No. 279 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Dara Birnbaum and curator Julie J. Thomson.

Dara Birnbaum is included in "Breaking News: Turning the Lens on Mass Media," at the J. Paul Getty Museum. The exhibition examines how artists have used newspapers, magazines and televised news programs to consider media, news and the messages included therein. The exhibition was curated by Arpad Kovacs and will be on view through April 30.

Birnbaum is among the pioneers of video art. Her work often includes pointedly feminist critiques of mass media, including of entertainment and journalism. Retrospectives of her work include "The Dark Matter of Media Light" at SMAK, the Stedelijk Museum voor Actuele Kunst in Ghent, Belgium, and at the Serralves Foundation in Porto, Portugal, and "Dara Birnbaum Retrospective exhibition" at the Kunsthalle Wien in Austria and at the Norrtalje Konsthall in Sweden.

On the second segment, Julie J. Thomson discusses "Begin to See: The Photographers of Black Mountain College." The exhibition surveys photography made at Black Mountain College, including landscapes, documentary work (including of performance), experiments with the medium and more. The exhibition is at the Black Mountain College Museum and Arts Center in Asheville, North Carolina through May 20. 

Kay Rosen, Edme Bouchardon
01:13:03
2017-10-05 04:30:53 UTC 01:13:03
Kay Rosen, Edme Bouchardon

Episode No. 278 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Kay Rosen and curator Anne-Lise Desmas.

The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum opens "Kay Rosen: H Is for House," this weekend. It is Rosen's first solo museum exhibition in the northeast in almost 20 years. It is curated by the Aldrich's Richard Klein. The exhibition will be on view through September 4.

Rosen's text-based works, presented as wall-drawings, paintings and works on paper, use language, words, humor and two-dimensional forms to explore ideas, histories and contemporary life. Rosen's work is in the collection . Her museum exhibitions and installations have included projects at the Aspen (Colo.) Art Museum, the University Art Museum at the University of California, Santa Barbara, The Drawing Center, New York, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles and the Otis College of Art and Design, the MIT List Visual Arts Center, the MCA Chicago and more.

On the second segment, J. Paul Getty Museum curator Anne-Lise Desmas discusses "Bouchardon: Royal Artist of the Enlightenment." The exhibition examines the sculpture and drawings of Edme Bouchardon, who worked as the Royal Artist during the eighteenth-century reign of Louis XV. The exhibition, which Desmas co-curated with Edouard Kopp, is on view through April 2.

Kerry James Marshall (from May, 2016)
01:01:18
2017-10-05 04:30:53 UTC 01:01:18
Kerry James Marshall (from May, 2016)

On March 12, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles opens "Kerry James Marshall: Mastry," the artist's first retrospective. Marshall is one of the most significant chronicler's of the American experience, especially the African-American experience. For 35 years he has worked to add black people and black culture to a Western art historical canon that is mostly built of white faces and stories. The exhibition was curated by Dieter Roelstraete, Helen Molesworth and Ian Alteveer. The exhibition catalogue was published by Skira Rizzoli.

John Singleton Copley, Jimmie Durham
01:23:17
2017-10-05 04:30:53 UTC 01:23:17
John Singleton Copley, Jimmie Durham

Episode No. 276 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features historian and author Jane Kamensky and curator Anne Ellegood.

Kamensky is the author of "A Revolution in Color: The World of John Singleton Copley." The book is a new biography that places one of early America's best and most important artists within the context of the political and revolutionary events of his time -- and details how Copley and his family were actors in them. Amazon offers it for $20 in hardcover and at $16 for Kindle.

Kamensky is a professor of history at Harvard University and the director of the Schlesinger Library. She is a historian of early America and the Atlantic world.

On the second segment, Hammer Museum curator Anne Ellegood discusses her new exhibition "Jimmie Durham: At the Center of the World." Ellegood's retrospective is the first major Durham show in the United States in over 20 years. 

Durham came to prominence as an artist in New York City in the 1980s. His work has consistently addressed questions of identity, colonialism and the inseparability of identity from politics in the United States. The exhibition is on view at the Hammer through May 7, when it will travel to the Walker, the Whitney and to the Remai Modern in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. The show's thorough catalogue was published by DelMonico Prestel.

Medardo Rosso
01:03:46
2017-10-05 04:30:53 UTC 01:03:46
Medardo Rosso

Episode No. 275 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curators Sharon Hecker and Tamara Schenkenberg and was taped live at the Pulitzer Arts Foundation in St. Louis.

Hecker and Schenkenberg are the co-curators of "Medardo Rosso: Experiments in Light and Form," which is at the Pulitzer through May 13. The exhibition is the first broad survey of Rosso's work in an American museum in over fifty years. (In 2014-15 the Center for Italian Modern Art in New York presented this Rosso installation.) It features nearly 100 works, including sculptures, drawings and photographs. The exhibition's catalogue is available for free from the Pulitzer for a $7 PayPal-administered shipping charge.

Rosso is an Italian artist who spent much of his career in France. His sculptures of heads and figures in wax, plaster, and bronze are key pivots between an era of monumental bronze sculpture, realist and impressionist sculpture and ultimately modern art.

Sarah Oppenheimer, Richard Misrach
01:11:08
2017-10-05 04:30:53 UTC 01:11:08
Sarah Oppenheimer, Richard Misrach

Episode No. 274 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artists Sarah Oppenheimer and Richard Misrach.

This weekend the Wexner Center for the Arts at The Ohio State University in Columbus debuts "Sarah Oppenheimer: S-337473," an exhibition of a newly commissioned work developed  for the Wexner's Peter Eisenman-designed building. Oppenheimer created her new work as a two-year-long Wexner Center Artist Residency Award recipient, during which she collaborated with OSU's Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering to develop a patent-pending pivot mechanism that allows this new work to rotate at a 45-degree angle. The exhibition opens on Saturday, February 4 and will be on view through April 16. As soon as images of the new work are available, probably on or around February 7, we'll add them to this post.

Sarah Oppenheimer is an artist who creates installations that engage with both architecture and space. She's previously made work for the Perez Art Museum Miami (on view through April 30), the Kunsthaus Basel, the Rice University Art Gallery, the Queens Museum, and the Saint Louis Art Museum. A project she is developing for Mass MoCA will debut in 2019. Oppenheimer has also created a permanent installation at the Baltimore Museum of Art. Multiple views of all her installations are on her website.

On the second segment, the re-airing of a 2016 segment with Richard Misrach on his "Border Cantos," a book and exhibition on which he has collaborated with Mexican composer and performer Guillermo Galindo. Since 2004, and especially since 2009, Misrach has been making pictures along the 2,000-mile-long United States border with Mexico, the latest investigation of American deserts that make up what Misrach calls his Desert Cantos series. As Misrach traveled the borderlands, he accumulated discarded objects such as water bottles, backpacks, clothing and shotgun shells and turned them over to Galindo, who made that material into instruments and who then performed on them. The book, "Border Cantos," is out from Aperture; Amazon offers it $45, a forty percent discount.

Tony Oursler, American Art during WWI
01:20:31
2017-10-05 04:30:53 UTC 01:20:31
Tony Oursler, American Art during WWI

The Museum of Modern Art is showing Tony Oursler's Imponderable (2015-16), a 90-minute film shown in an immersive, so-called "5-D" environment, as well as archival material related to the film from Oursler's own collection. The film mines Ourlser's interest in experiments in technological advancement that didn't quite work out and occult phenomena to offer a kind of alternative history of modernism. The film is richly informed by Oursler's own life history. His grandfather was Charles Fulton Oursler, a journalist and author who teamed up with Harry Houdini to campaign against fraudulent mediumship. The exhibition was curated by MoMA's Stuart Comer and Erica Papernik-Shimizu. Imponderable is at MoMA through April 16.

Oursler is a multimedia and installation artist whose work often examines and uses new technologies to explore topics such as facial recognition, paranormal phenomena and the relationship between multiple personality disorder and mass media.

On the second segment, historian and curator Anne Classen Knutson discusses "World War I and American Art," which is at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts through April 9. The exhibition looks at how American artists responded to and engaged with the war, both in Europe and in the United States. Knutson co-curated the show with Robert Cozzolino and David Lubin. 

Stanley Whitney
01:08:48
2017-10-05 04:30:53 UTC 01:08:48
Stanley Whitney

Artist Stanley Whitney.

Francis Picabia, John McLaughlin
01:19:17
2017-10-05 04:30:53 UTC 01:19:17
Francis Picabia, John McLaughlin

"Francis Picabia" co-curator Anne Umland, "John McLaughlin" curator Stephanie Barron.

Lorna Simpson
54:01
2017-10-05 04:30:53 UTC 54:01
Lorna Simpson

Artist Lorna Simpson, who is showing new work at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth

Tyler Green's top ten, Minor White
37:30
2017-10-05 04:30:53 UTC 37:30
Tyler Green's top ten, Minor White

MAN Podcast host Tyler Green's 2016 top ten list, curator Paul Martineau on Minor White.

Holiday clips: The Le Nain
44:57
2017-10-05 04:30:53 UTC 44:57
Holiday clips: The Le Nain

Curator and historian C.D. Dickerson.

Pipilotti Rist, Mark Speltz
01:17:15
2017-10-05 04:30:53 UTC 01:17:15
Pipilotti Rist, Mark Speltz

Artist Pipilotti Rist and historian and "North of Dixie: Civil Rights Photography Beyond the South" author Mark Speltz.

Matisse/Diebenkorn, Klimt's Portraits
57:24
2017-10-05 04:30:54 UTC 57:24
Matisse/Diebenkorn, Klimt's Portraits

SFMOMA curator Janet Bishop, art historian Jill Lloyd.

Early Monet, Picasso's Drawings
01:06:06
2017-10-05 04:30:54 UTC 01:06:06
Early Monet, Picasso's Drawings

Curators George Shackelford, David Breslin.

Thanksgiving clips: Richard Misrach
46:14
2017-10-05 04:30:54 UTC 46:14
Thanksgiving clips: Richard Misrach

Artist Richard Misrach

Eduardo Basualdo
47:49
2017-10-05 04:30:54 UTC 47:49
Eduardo Basualdo

Artist Eduardo Basualdo, recorded live at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden.

Art and Education in America After WWII at MCASD, Wexner
01:15:26
2017-10-05 04:30:54 UTC 01:15:26
Art and Education in America After WWII at MCASD, Wexner

Curator Jill Dawsey and artist Martha Rosler; curator Ruth Erickson

Edgar Degas, Richard Serra's "Shift"
01:05:46
2017-10-05 04:30:54 UTC 01:05:46
Edgar Degas, Richard Serra's "Shift"

Historian and curator Henri Loyrette, documentary filmmaker Simone Estrin.

Michael Dean, Julian Onderdonk
42:33
2017-10-05 04:30:54 UTC 42:33
Michael Dean, Julian Onderdonk

Artist Michael Dean and curator Kaylin Weber.

Valentin de Boulogne, early Agnes Martin
01:04:23
2017-10-05 04:30:54 UTC 01:04:23
Valentin de Boulogne, early Agnes Martin

Metropolitan Museum of Art curator Keith Christiansen, author Christina Bryan Rosenberger

Mark Dion, Anicka Yi
01:16:13
2017-10-09 09:41:10 UTC 01:16:13
Mark Dion, Anicka Yi

Episode No. 309 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artists Mark Dion and Anicka Yi.

This weekend, the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston opens "Mark Dion: Misadventures of a 21st-Century Naturalist," a survey of over 20 years of Dion sculptures, installations and drawings. The exhibition, which was curated by Ruth Erickson with Jessica Hong, is on view through January 1, 2018. The exhibition catalogue, published by the ICA and Yale University Press, is one of the best art books of 2017. Amazon offers it for $48.

Dion works at the intersection of art, natural history, history and anthropology. His work examines and often critiques humanity's approach to nature, landscape and science through witty address of scientific methodologies and installations that often have roots in Victorian-era presentation.

Dion has fulfilled commissions and had exhibitions at museums all over the world, including the Museum of Modern Art, the Tate, and the British Museum of Natural History in London. He is also a co-director of Mildred's Lane, a visual art education and residency program in Beach Lake, Pennsylvania.

On the second segment, Anicka Yi. She is included in "Trigger: Gender as a Tool and a Weapon" at the New Museum. The exhibition, which was curated by Johanna Burton with Sara O'Keeffe and Natalie Bell, looks at gender in the context of America's national political crisis. It is on view through January 21, 2018. The exhibition catalogue was published by the New Museum. Amazon offers it for $40.

"Radical Women," and "Casanova"
01:11:47
2017-10-09 09:41:11 UTC 01:11:47
"Radical Women," and "Casanova"

Episode No. 308 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curators Cecelia Fajardo-Hill and Frederick Ilchman.

Along with Andrea Giunta, Fajardo-Hill is a curator of "Radical Women: Latin American Art, 1960-1985," one of the headline shows of the Getty Foundation-funded "Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA" series of exhibitions. The show is the first survey of art made by women in Latin America and US-born Chicanas and Latinas during the sixties, seventies and early eighties. It includes about 116 artists from 15 countries, including Lygia Pape, Zilia Sánchez and Ana Mendieta.

The show will be at the Hammer through December 31. The catalogue is a strikingly thorough English-language source. It was published by DelMonico Prestel. Amazon offers it for $43.

On the second segment, MFA Boston curator Frederick Ilchman discusses "Casanova: The Seduction of Europe," a broad look at the over-the-top luxury of European art and decorative arts in the pre-French Revolution decades. It's on view at the Kimbell Art Museum through December 31. The show is built around the famed Giacomo Casanova, a courtier, lothario and schemester whose memoir provides one of the best insights to an era in which those at the top of society milked their countries for wealth and prestige, leavin little for others. The exhibition was co-curated by Ilchman, the National Gallery's C.D. Dickerson (who started work on the show while he was at the Kimbell), and the Clark's Esther Bell. The exhibition catalogue, which was published by the MFA Boston, is one of the best art books of the year. Amazon lists it for $38.

Emmet Gowin
01:15:46
2017-10-09 09:41:12 UTC 01:15:46
Emmet Gowin

Episode No. 307 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Emmet Gowin. 

Gowin's "Mariposas Nocturnas: Moths of Central and South America, a Study in Beauty and Diversity" is just out from Princeton University Press. The book features photographs of hundreds of moths that Gowin has made in Central and South America over the last 15 years. The book includes essays by Terry Tempest Williams and Gowin. Amazon offers it for $41.

Gowin will show related work in "Here on Earth Now -- Notes from the Field" in an exhibition that opens on Sept. 28 at New York's Pace/MacGill Gallery. It will remain on view through Jan. 6, 2018.

See images of this week's program here.

Photography in Argentina 1850-2010, Jimmie Durham
01:15:28
2017-10-09 09:41:12 UTC 01:15:28
Photography in Argentina 1850-2010, Jimmie Durham

Episode No. 306 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curators Idurre Alonso and Anne Ellegood.

Alonso is the co-curator of "Photography in Argentina, 1850-2010: Contradiction and Continuity" at the J. Paul Getty Museum. It opens this weekend and remains on view through January 28, 2018. The exhibition, which explores themes that emphasize Argentina's history, features nearly 300 works.

On the second segment, Hammer Museum curator Anne Ellegood discusses her exhibition "Jimmie Durham: At the Center of the World." The exhibition, the first US retrospective of Durham's work in 20 years, is at the Walker Art Center through October 7. 

Carolina Miranda on PST: LA/LA, Leyla Cárdenas
01:00:58
2017-10-09 09:41:13 UTC 01:00:58
Carolina Miranda on PST: LA/LA, Leyla Cárdenas

Episode No. 305 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features journalist Carolina Miranda and artist Leyla Cárdenas.

Carolina Miranda is a journalist at the Los Angeles Times. She joins host Tyler Green to preview "Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA," a Getty Foundation-funded series of exhibitions, catalogues and events across southern California.

Cárdenas discusses her recent work, especially Excision (2012), which is included in "Home -- So Different, So Appealing" at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. It is the first PST: LA/LA show to open. Curated by Chon Noriega, Pilar Tompkins Rivas and Mari Carmen Ramirez, it will remain on view through October 15, when it will travel to the Museum of Fine Arts Houston.

Anthony Hernandez
58:55
2017-10-09 09:41:14 UTC 58:55
Anthony Hernandez

Episode No. 304 features a re-air of host Tyler Green's 2016 conversation with Anthony Hernandez.

In two weeks the Milwaukee Art Museum will present one of the best shows of 2016, a retrospective of Anthony Hernandez curated by San Francisco Museum of Modern Art curator Erin O'Toole.

It was Hernandez's first retrospective. His photographs have consistently looked at parts of America, especially parts of Los Angeles, that hide in plain sight. The catalogue was one of last year's best books, especially for the introduction by Robert Adams and a conversation between Hernandez and Lewis Baltz. Milwaukee's presentation of the exhibition opens on September 15 and will be on view through January first, 2018. 

Degas and Millinery
44:44
2017-10-09 09:41:15 UTC 44:44
Degas and Millinery

Episode No. 303 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast is a summer clips episode featuring a previously aired interview with curator Simon Kelly.

Along with Esther Bell, Kelly is the co-curator of "Degas, Impressionism & the Paris Millinery Trade." The exhibition melds the social history of modernizing 19th-century Paris with the ways in which painters, especially Edgar Degas, portrayed one of the city's boomingest industries, the manufacturing and selling of hats. As it turns out, millinery was a gateway into the city, employment and the bourgeoisie for tens of thousands of French women. The exhibition is at San Francisco's Legion of Honor through September 24. It debuted at the Saint Louis Art Museum, where Kelly is a curator. The exhibition's superb catalogue was published by the two museums and DelMonico Prestel. Amazon offers it for $48.

For images of artworks discussed on the program, see Episode No. 280.

No. 302: "Soundtracks" at SFMOMA: Jacqueline Kiyomi Gordon, Amor Muñoz
43:21
2017-10-09 09:41:16 UTC 43:21
No. 302: "Soundtracks" at SFMOMA: Jacqueline Kiyomi Gordon, Amor Muñoz

Episode No. 302 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artists Jacqueline Kiyomi Gordon and Amor Muñoz.

This is the second of two MAN Podcast episodes spotlighting artists in "Soundtracks," a new exhibition at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art that examines the role of sound in art. The show, which was curated by Rudolf Frieling and Tanya Zimbardo, will remain on view through January 1, 2018. It features nearly three dozen artworks that are or include sound.

 

Cristóbal de Villalpando; Bosch and Bouts
53:18
2017-10-09 09:41:17 UTC 53:18
Cristóbal de Villalpando; Bosch and Bouts

Episode No. 301 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curators Ronda Kasl and Rima Girnius.

Along with Jonathan Brown and Clara Bargellini, Metropolitan Museum of Art curator Ronda Kasl is the co-curator of "Cristóbal de Villalpando: Mexican Painter of the Baroque," which is at the Met in New York through October 15. Villalpando is considered one of the two major artists of seventeenth-century New Spain. The Met's small survey of his work features eleven paintings, including Villalpando's 28-feet-high Transfiguration of Jesus (1683), his first masterpiece.

On the second segment, Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art curator Rima Girnius discusses two recently re-attributed paintings in the N-A's collection: Hieronymus Bosch's The Temptation of St. Anthony (about 1500-1510) and Albrecht Bouts's Christ Crowned with Thorns (about 1490-95). The N-A is presenting the paintings and information about the re-attributions in "Rediscovering Hieronymus Bosch and Albrecht Bouts," which is on view in Kansas City through May 27, 2018.

 

Gary Simmons
56:09
2017-10-09 09:41:18 UTC 56:09
Gary Simmons

Episode No. 300 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Gary Simmons.

Gary Simmons's newest installation is on view at the California African American Museum in Los Angeles. Titled "Gary Simmons: Fade to Black," the work is a multi-wall installation in the museum's atrium. The presentation was curated by Naima J. Keith and will remain on view through July 31, 2018.

Over the course of a quarter-century-long career, Simmons has explored how to make the typically invisible visible, often within the context of America's troubled history. In 2002 the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago debuted a mid-career survey of Simmons's work that traveled to SITE Santa Fe and The Studio Museum in Harlem. Simmons has also been featured in solo shows at the Whitney Museum of American Art, MASS MoCA, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Saint Louis Art Museum, MCASD, the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, The Drawing Center in New York and more. Simmons was first a guest on The MAN Podcast in 2013.

During the program MAN Podcast host Tyler Green references this Los Angeles Times video of Simmons working on the installation.

Glenn Ligon, Florine Stettheimer
54:46
2017-10-09 09:41:19 UTC 54:46
Glenn Ligon, Florine Stettheimer

Episode No. 299 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Glenn Ligon and curator Stephen Brown.

Ligon is the curator of "Blue Black" at the Pulitzer Arts Foundation in St. Louis. Informed by the Pulitzer's Ellsworth Kelly wall sculpture Blue Black, the exhibition features more than 50 artworks that use color to address questions related to language, identity and more. The exhibition is on view through October 7. The catalogue of the exhibition is complimentary save the cost of shipping ($7 in the US, $14 abroad). 

Ligon is an artist whose 2011 mid-career survey was organized by the Whitney Museum of American Art and traveled to LACMA and the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth. His work has been featured in solo exhibitions at the Power Plant in Toronto, the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, and the Studio Museum in Harlem. 

On the second segment, curator Stephen Brown discusses his exhibition "Florine Stettheimer: Painting Poetry," which is at The Jewish Museum in New York through September 24. He co-curated  the show with Georgiana Uhlyarik at the Art Gallery of Ontario. The exhibition's catalogue was published by Yale University Press.  

"Soundtracks" at SFMOMA with Bill Fontana and Christina Kubisch
51:23
2017-10-09 09:41:20 UTC 51:23
"Soundtracks" at SFMOMA with Bill Fontana and Christina Kubisch

**In stereo**

Episode No. 298 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features sound artists Bill Fontana and Christina Kubisch.

This is the first of two MAN Podcast episodes spotlighting artists in "Soundtracks," a new exhibition at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art that examines the role of sound in art. The show, which was curated by Rudolf Frieling and Tanya Zimbardo, will remain on view through January 1, 2018. It features nearly three dozen artworks that are or include sound. SFMOMA has built out an extensive digital infrastructure for the show, including an exhibition guide, a catalogue, and interviews with artists such as Jacqueline Kiyomi Gordon, Christina Kubisch, Rafael Lozano-Hemmer, and Richard T. Walker.

This week's MAN Podcast features exhibition artists whose work makes the invisible audible. San Francisco-based artist Bill Fontana has been making what he calls 'sound sculptures' for 40 years. He's exhibited all over the world, including at the Venice Biennale, Madrid's Reina Sofia, London's Tate Modern, New York's Madison Square Park, and more.

Christina Kubisch is a Berlin-area-based composer and artist who works with electromagnetic induction, making both walks for which listeners/viewers wear a special set of headphones and move through a city to hear sounds to which Kubitsch has guided them on a map, and sound sculptures that feature sound related to their physical presence. Kubisch has created dozens of electrical walks all over the world, has been featured in the Venice Biennale, Documenta and in scores of group and solo shows.

 

Richard Deacon, Daniel Heidkamp
01:15:21
2017-10-09 09:41:20 UTC 01:15:21
Richard Deacon, Daniel Heidkamp

Episode No. 297 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artists Richard Deacon and Daniel Heidkamp.

The San Diego Museum of Art is showing "Richard Deacon: What You See Is What You Get," a survey of the artist's career. Curated by Ariel Plotek, it's on view through Sept. 4. The exhibition is accompanied by a catalogue published by the museum. Host Tyler Green and Deacon also mention passages from Deacon's 2014 book of writings, titled "So, If, And, But: Writings 1970-2012."

Throughout a nearly 50-year career as a sculptor, draftsman and print-maker, Deacon has explored form, volume and space with unusual rigor. Much of his work is motivated by the exploration of shapes within shapes, with the tension between the two shapes and the material in which the work is made providing the artwork's activating tension. Deacon's dozens of major exhibitions include a 2014 retrospective at the Tate Britain, and last year the Museum Folkwang in Essen, Germany presented a career-length survey of Deacon's drawings.

On the second segment, Daniel Heidkamp discusses his paintings and the pictures of them on view in "Taking Pictures: Camera Phone Conversations Between Artists" at the Metropolitan Museum of Art's Breuer location. The exhibition was curated by Mia Fineman and is on view through Dec. 17. Heidkamp is showing paintings related to the exhibition at New York's Half Gallery through July 21.

Mexican modernism in "Paint the Revolution," Andrea Chung
01:18:34
2017-10-09 09:41:22 UTC 01:18:34
Mexican modernism in "Paint the Revolution," Andrea Chung

Episode No. 296 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curator Matthew Affron and artist Andrea Chung.

Matthew Affron, a curator at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, is one of the co-curators of "Paint the Revolution: Mexican Modernism, 1910-1950," which is on view at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston through October 1. The exhibition chronicles the history of Mexican modernism at the beginning of the twentieth century and the social, political, and cultural forces that shaped it. Among other critical plaudits, MAN Podcast host Tyler Green named it to his 2016 top ten list.

The curatorial team for the exhibition includes Renato González Mello, Director of the Instituto de Investigaciones Estéticas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Dafne Cruz Porchini, a post-doctoral researcher at the Colegio de México in Mexico City; and Philadelphia Museum of Art curator Mark A. Castro.

On the second segment, Andrea Chung discusses an exhibition of her work titled "You Broke the Ocean in Half to be Here," at the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego. Curated by Jill Dawsey, the exhibition is on view at MCASD's downtown location through August 20.  Chung's work, including an installation she's planning for the forthcoming Prospect ennial, explores the legacies of migration and colonialism in the Caribbean.

Holiday clips: Barkley L. Hendricks
46:07
2017-10-09 09:41:23 UTC 46:07
Holiday clips: Barkley L. Hendricks

Artist Barkley L. Hendricks

Roni Horn
01:02:53
2017-10-09 09:41:23 UTC 01:02:53
Roni Horn

Episode No. 294 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Roni Horn.

The Nasher Sculpture Center in Dallas is showing the first American museum exhibition devoted to Horn's cast glass sculptures. Eight of them are on view in the Nasher's Renzo Piano-designed building through August 20. In New York, Hauser & Wirth is presenting the debut of four new Horns, including the photographic series "The Selected Gifts, (1974-2015)," two series of works on paper, "The Dog's Chorus" (2016), "Th Rose Prblm" (2015), and two recent glass sculptures.

Horn has been mining the intersection of minimalist object making and conceptualism in sculpture, photography and works on paper -- and particularly the relationships between discrete objects -- since the mid-1970s. In 2009 the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York, the Institute of Contemporary Art Boston, the Tate Modern and the Collection Lambert in France surveyed her career in an exhibition titled "Roni Horn, aka Roni Horn." She has had other solo shows at the Art Institute of Chicago, the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris, the Dia Center for the Arts in New York, among others.

Robert Rauschenberg, Ken Ashton
01:07:36
2017-10-09 09:41:24 UTC 01:07:36
Robert Rauschenberg, Ken Ashton

Episode No. 293 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features Museum of Modern Art, New York curator Leah Dickerman and artist Ken Ashton.

See images of art discussed on the program here.

Along with the Tate Modern's Achim Borchardt-Hume, Leah Dickerman is the co-curator of "Robert Rauschenberg: Among Friends," a retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art through September 17. The exhibition features Rauschenberg's early photography, body prints, combines, performances, prints and more. The exhibition catalogue was published by MoMA. Amazon offers it for $34 in paperback and $51 in cloth.

Leah Dickerman is a curator at MoMA. Her previous exhibitions include Inventing Abstraction, 1910-1925," and a 2005-06 dada survey that Dickerman curated while working at the National Gallery of Art.

On the second segment, Ken Ashton discusses his new book "Portsmouth: Collected Saturdays," which is new from Daylight. The book features Ashton's documentation of the deindustrialization and emptying out of Portsmouth, Ohio, a small town on the Ohio River at the southern end of Appalachia. Amazon offers it for $30. Ashton's work is in the collection of institutions such as the Museum of Contemporary Photography in Chicago and the National Gallery of Art.

Spencer Finch, on Sandro Botticelli
01:14:59
2017-10-09 09:41:25 UTC 01:14:59
Spencer Finch, on Sandro Botticelli

Episode No. 292 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Spencer Finch and curator Frederick Ilchman.

See images of art discussed in this week's show here.

Spencer Finch is presenting two new installations at two venues on opposite sides of the United States: His The Western Mystery (2017), a commission from the Seattle Art Museum for its Olympic Sculpture Park, is up through March 3, 2019. At MASS MoCA, Finch's Cosmic Latte (2017) is on view at least through 2018.

Finch's work typically addresses light and its relationship to memory at specific geographic locations, and often specific times. He has fulfilled commissions for and had exhibitions at The Morgan Library, the Rhode Island School of Design, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, the Pulitzer Arts Foundation (then the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts), the Corcoran Gallery of Art and more. His work is in the collections of the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, the Kemper Museum of Art in St. Louis, the Guggenheim and more.

Frederick Ilchman has organized the Museum of Fine Arts Boston's showing of "Botticelli and the Search for the Divine," the largest exhibition of Botticelli paintings ever shown in the United States. The exhibition, which is on view through July 9, includes 15 works by 15th-century Florentine master Sandro Botticelli, as well as works by Filippo Lippi, Antonio del Pollaiuolo, Jacopo del Sellaio and more. The exhibition was co-organized by the MFA Boston and the Muscarelle Museum of Art at the College of William & Mary. Ilchman is the MFA Boston's curator of paintings.

Mark Ruwedel, Jed Morse on Manuel Neri
01:09:05
2017-10-09 09:41:26 UTC 01:09:05
Mark Ruwedel, Jed Morse on Manuel Neri

Episode No. 291 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Mark Ruwedel and curator Jed Morse.

Yossi Milo Gallery in New York is showing "Mark Ruwedel: Hell and Home" through June 24.  The show includes Ruwedel's 'pictures of hell,' an inventory of Western landscapes named for hell or the devil, his pictures of 'home,' of desert homes fighting a losing battle against the ravages of the harsh surrounding environment, and Opportunities Realized, Ruwedel's revisiting of Ed Ruscha's 1970 Real Estate Opportunities, in which Ruwedel photographed how the vacant lots in Ruscha's book were filled in.

Ruwedel's most recent book is "Pictures of Hell," which features essays by Tate curator Simon Baker and Chiara Siravo a historian whose work has examined our concepts of hell. 

Ruwedel is one of America's most honored photographers. In 2014 he won both the Scotiabank Photography Award and a Guggenheim fellowship. His work is in the collections of major museums such as the Metropolitan, the National Gallery of Art, the Tate, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and SFMOMA.

Ruwedel and host Tyler Green refer several times to Ruwedel's 2008 book "Westward the Course of Empire," a classic which looked at what remains in places where railroads once ran across the landscape.

On the second segment, Nasher Sculpture Center curator Jed Morse discusses his museum's recent acquisition of a suite of major Manuel Neri sculptures and works on paper. They are on view at the Nasher through July 16.

Holiday clips: Pipilotti Rist
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2017-10-09 09:41:27 UTC 54:23
Holiday clips: Pipilotti Rist

Episode No. 290 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features a previously aired conversation with artist Pipilotti Rist. 

This summer, the Museum of Fine Arts Houston will exhibit two immersive installations that are new to its collection: Pipilotti Rist's Pixel Forest and Worry Will Vanish. They go on view on June 11 and will remain up through September 17.

Rist, who is based in Zurich, has been the subject of many single-artist museum exhibitions, especially in the last half-decade. Among the museums to give her shows are the Kunsthaus Zurich, the Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art in Seoul, the Hayward in London, the Wexner in Columbus, MoMA in New York and the Pompidou Center in Paris.

Nancy Rubins
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2017-10-09 09:41:28 UTC 59:37
Nancy Rubins

Episode No. 289 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Nancy Rubins. It was recorded live at the Wexner Center for the Arts at The Ohio State University in Columbus.

Rubins is included in "Grey Matters," an exhibition that opens Friday, May 19 at the Wexner. The show, curated by Michael Goodson, features the work of 37 contemporary women artists who have worked in grisaille. It is on view through July 30. The exhibition includes work by past MAN Podcast guests such as Carol Bove, Vija Celmins, Mickalene Thomas, Julie Mehretu, Mary Reid Kelley, Arlene Shechet, Amy Sillman, Xaviera Simmons and Lorna Simpson.

Rubins' often monumental sculpture amalgamates industrially produced objects into strikingly light, sometimes lyrical objects. Her enormous drawings, of built-up graphite on single sheets of paper often installed across multiple walls, are simultaneously minimal and baroque. Rubins has had solo exhibitions at museums such as the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego and the Museum of Modern Art, New York. Her public and institutional commissions include the University of Texas in Austin, MCASD, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, the Albright-Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo, and the Université Paris Diderot in France.

The Kimbell's new Modigliani, the art of Coenties Slip
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2017-10-09 09:41:29 UTC 40:50
The Kimbell's new Modigliani, the art of Coenties Slip

Episode No. 288 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features Kimbell Art Museum director Eric Lee and Menil Collection curator Michelle White.

Lee joins the program to discuss the Kimbell's recent acquisition of a rare Amadeo Modigliani sculpture, Head (c. 1913). Only about 27 Modigliani sculptures survive. Head was a gift from collector Gwendolyn Weiner and is the first modern sculpture in the Kimbell's collection. It is on view now.

Then Michelle White discusses her Menil exhibition "Between Land and Sea: Artists of the Coenties Slip." The show looks at the early work of Chryssa, Robert Indiana, Ellsworth Kelly, Agnes Martin, Lenore Tawney, and Jack Youngerman, all of whom who lived in the Coenties Slip, an East River-adjacent neighborhood set apart from the rest of the Manhattan art world. The exhibition considers moments of communication and influence. It is on view through August 6.

Kellie Jones, Shimon Attie
01:16:15
2017-10-09 09:41:30 UTC 01:16:15
Kellie Jones, Shimon Attie

Episode No. 287 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features historian Kellie Jones and artist Shimon Attie.

Kellie Jones is the author of "South of Pico: African American Artists in Los Angeles in the 1960s and 1970s," which is new from Duke University Press. Amazon offers it for $22.

This is Jones's second major project about art in Los Angeles during the 1960s and 1970s. She also curated "Now Dig This! Art and Black Los Angeles 1960-1980" for the Hammer Museum in 2011. She was a 2016 recipient of a MacArthur Foundation 'Genius Grant,' and teaches art history at Columbia University.

Among the artists featured in Jones's book who have been featured on The Modern Art Notes Podcast are Melvin Edwards and Betye Saar. Curator and historian Yael Lipschutz came on the program to discuss Noah Purifoy on the occasion of LACMA's 2015 retrospective. Also discussed on this week's program: The extensive digital archive for "Now Dig This!" is maintained by the Hammer Museum.

On the second segment, Shimon Attie discusses two new works on view at the Saint Louis Art Museum: The Crossing, an eight-minute video installation that muses on the global refugee crisis via a group of gamblers playing roulette, and Lost in Space (After Huck) a sculptural installation that uses Mark Twain's famous Huckleberry Finn story to give Americans an empathetic gateway into stories of migration and displacement. They're on view in Saint Louis through June 25.

Matisse's studio, Darby English
01:11:24
2017-10-09 09:41:31 UTC 01:11:24
Matisse's studio, Darby English

Episode No. 286 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features historian and curator Ellen McBreen and historian Darby English.

Along with Helen Burnham and Ann Dumas, McBreen is a co-curator of "Matisse in the Studio," which is at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston through July 9. The exhibition examines how objects in Matisse's home and studio informed -- and often ended up in -- his art. These objects include a simple chocolate pot, a tacky chair, an inexpensive glass vase probably made for the tourist market and textiles, such as Kuba cloth. The exhibition includes about 34 paintings, 26 drawings, 11 sculptures, seven cut-outs and about three dozen objects Matisse owned.

From Boston the exhibition will travel to the Royal Academy of Arts in London. Its excellent catalogue, which was published by the MFAB, is available from Amazon for $34.

McBreen is an associate professor of art history at Wheaton College. Her most recent book is "Matisse's Sculpture: The Pinup and the Primitive," which was published by Yale University Press in 2014.

On the second segment, University of Chicago professor Darby English discusses his new book "1971: A Year in the Life of Color." The book, which was published by University of Chicago Press, considers two exhibitions -- Contemporary Black Artists in America at the Whitney Museum of American Art and The DeLuxe Show, a racially integrated exhibition of abstract art presented in a renovated movie theater in Houston's inner-city Fifth Ward. English finds that many black artists of the period were less interested in a specifically so-called "black aesthetic," than they were in cultural interaction across racial lines. He points to color and how these artists used it as a key way in which they engaged other artists.

Hartley in Maine, Alexei Jawlensky
01:18:26
2017-10-09 09:41:32 UTC 01:18:26
Hartley in Maine, Alexei Jawlensky

Episode No. 285 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curators Randall Griffey and Vivian Endicott Barnett.

Along with Elizabeth Finch and Donna M. Cassidy, Griffey is the co-curator of "Marsden Hartley's Maine," which is at the Metropolitan Museum of Art through June 18. The exhibition spotlights Hartley's lifelong engagement with Maine, its residents, coastline, forests and mountains. It includes about 90 paintings and drawings featuring the full range of Hartley's Maine-related work.

From the Met, "Marsden Hartley's Maine" will travel to the Colby College Museum of Art, where it goes on view on July 8. (It will be at Colby during the first weekend of August, when Colby hosts the 2017 Art and Land Conservation Symposium. MAN Podcast host Tyler Green is among the speakers.) The show's strong catalogue was published by the Met. Amazon offers it for $35.

On the second segment, historian and curator Vivian Endicott Barnett discusses her "Alexei Jawlensky" at the Neue Galerie in New York. It features 75 paintings and is the artist's first full museum retrospective in the United States. Jawlensky was a Russian-born expressionist who moved to Munich in 1896 and went on to become an important figure in how central and eastern European artists engaged with early modern art -- and especially with van Gogh, Matisse, fauvism and more. It's on view through May 29.

Easter clips: Early Monet
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2017-10-09 09:41:34 UTC 46:16
Easter clips: Early Monet

The Easter-weekend Episode No. 284 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features a previously-aired conversation with curator George Shackelford.

Shackelford is the curator of "Monet: The Early Years" at the Legion of Honor in San Francisco. The show features about 60 paintings from the first phase of Claude Monet's career, from a painting Monet made in Normandy in 1858 when he was 18 years old, until 1872, when Monet lived in Argenteuil, along the Seine near Paris. The exhibition debuted last winter at the Kimbell Art Museum, where Shackelford is the museum's deputy director. "Monet" is on view in San Francisco through May 29. The show's beautiful catalogue was published by the Kimbell and distributed by Yale University Press.

Liz Glynn, Nina Chanel Abney
01:10:27
2017-10-09 09:41:34 UTC 01:10:27
Liz Glynn, Nina Chanel Abney

Episode No. 283 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artists Liz Glynn and Nina Chanel Abney.

Glynn's "Open House" is on view now in Doris C. Freedman Plaza in New York's Central Park. It was commissioned by the Public Art Fund and will remain through September 24. The work takes as its jumping off point Freedman Plaza's unusual site, the place where democratic Central Park meets corporate midtown meets the aristocratic Upper East Side. Glynn's sculpture highlights the class distinctions that separate the park from the city by referencing a Fifth Avenue interior designed by Gilded Age architect Stanford White. The exhibition was curated by Daniel S. Palmer.

Glynn's work routinely engages history and the way both it and historical objects are considered in the present day. Her work has been presented or exhibited at MOCA in Los Angeles, the New Museum in New York, the deCordova Sculpture Park in Concord, Mass., the Petit Palais in Paris, LACMA, and more. This fall, MASS MoCA will present Glynn's "The Archaeology of Another Possible Future" in the museum's Building Five.

On the second segment, Nina Chanel Abney discusses her work on the occasion of a 10-year survey of her work titled "Nina Chanel Abney: Royal Flush." The exhibition is at the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University through July 16, when it will travel to the Chicago Cultural Center and then to Los Angeles, where it will be jointly presented by the Institute of Contemporary Art -- the institution formerly known as the Santa Monica Museum of Art -- and the California African American Museum. 

Photography East of the Mississippi; Matisse/Diebenkorn
01:02:23
2017-10-09 09:41:35 UTC 01:02:23
Photography East of the Mississippi; Matisse/Diebenkorn

Episode No. 282 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curator Diane Waggoner and curator Katy Rothkopf.

Waggoner is the curator of "East of the Mississippi: Nineteenth-Century American Landscape Photography." For several decades, the story of America's nineteenth-century photographic history has mostly run through the West. Waggoner's exhibition instead looks at how photographers looked at the region between the Mississippi River and the Atlantic Ocean. The exhibition features 175 nineteenth-century photographs, including daguerreotypes, salted paper prints, albumen prints, stereographic prints and even paintings. It's on view at the National Gallery of Art through July 16, when it will travel to the New Orleans Museum of Art. 

On the second segment, Baltimore Museum of Art curator Katy Rothkopf discusses Richard Diebenkorn's 1964 visit to the Soviet Union in the context of "Matisse/Diebenkorn." The exhibition, which Rothkopf co-curated with San Francisco Museum of Modern Art curator Janet Bishop, is on view at SFMOMA through May 29. Bishop discussed "Matisse/Diebenkorn" on Episode No. 266.

On Trump's attempt to eliminate federal arts and humanities programs
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2017-10-09 09:41:36 UTC 55:46
On Trump's attempt to eliminate federal arts and humanities programs

Episode No. 281 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast considers federal arts and humanities funding with Los Angeles Times art critic Christopher Knight and Andrew W. Mellon Foundation executive vice president for programs and research Mariët Westermann.

The National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities make up eight one-thousandths of one percent of the federal budget. Still, in the name of austerity, the Trump White House has targeted the endowments, the Institute of Museum and Library Services and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting for elimination in its first budget. The endowments each received $148 million in appropriations in the federal government's most recent fiscal year, while the IMLS received $230 million and CPB $445 million. Meanwhile, the Trump budget asks for a 10 percent increase in defense spending, a single-year bump of $54 billion -- or 365 times the NEA or NEH's total annual appropriation.

No American art or arts critic has written more about the role of federal arts and humanities funding and especially the national endowments over more years than Christopher Knight. He has been the art critic of the Los Angeles Times since 1989. He is a three-time finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and received the Frank Jewett Mather Award for Distinction in Art Criticism from the College Art Association in 1997. 

On the second segment, Mellon foundation VP Mariët Westermann discusses federal arts and humanities funding from a funder's perspective. Prior to joining Mellon in 2010, was the provost and chief academic officer of New York University Abu Dhabi; director of NYU's Institute of Fine Arts; associate director of research at the Clark Art Institute, and an associate professor at Rutgers University. As a historian of Netherlandish art, Westermann has written books on Jan Steen, Rembrandt, Vermeer and more.

Degas and the Millinery Trade, Matisse and American Art
01:04:41
2017-10-09 09:41:37 UTC 01:04:41
Degas and the Millinery Trade, Matisse and American Art

Episode No. 280 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curators Simon Kelly and Gail Stavitsky.

Along with the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco's Esther Bell, Kelly is the co-curator of "Degas, Impressionism & the Paris Millinery Trade." The exhibition melds the social history of modernizing 19th-century Paris with the ways in which painters, especially Edgar Degas, captured one the city's boomingest industries, the manufacturing and selling of hats, an industry that was a gateway into the city, employment and the bourgeoisie for tens of thousands of French women. The exhibition is at the Saint Louis Art Museum through May 7, when it will travel to San Francisco's Legion of Honor. The exhibition's superb catalogue was published by the two museums and DelMonico Prestel.

On the second segment, Gail Stavitsky discusses "Matisse and American Art," her new exhibition on the impact Matisse's work has had on American artists. The show, which features 65 paintings, sculptures, prints and archival objects is on view at New Jersey's Montclair Art Museum through June 18. Stavitsky curated the show with assistance from John Cauman and Lisa Mintz Messinger. The exhibition catalogue was published by the museum.

Dara Birnbaum, Black Mountain College photography
01:22:12
2017-10-09 09:41:38 UTC 01:22:12
Dara Birnbaum, Black Mountain College photography

Episode No. 279 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Dara Birnbaum and curator Julie J. Thomson.

Dara Birnbaum is included in "Breaking News: Turning the Lens on Mass Media," at the J. Paul Getty Museum. The exhibition examines how artists have used newspapers, magazines and televised news programs to consider media, news and the messages included therein. The exhibition was curated by Arpad Kovacs and will be on view through April 30.

Birnbaum is among the pioneers of video art. Her work often includes pointedly feminist critiques of mass media, including of entertainment and journalism. Retrospectives of her work include "The Dark Matter of Media Light" at SMAK, the Stedelijk Museum voor Actuele Kunst in Ghent, Belgium, and at the Serralves Foundation in Porto, Portugal, and "Dara Birnbaum Retrospective exhibition" at the Kunsthalle Wien in Austria and at the Norrtalje Konsthall in Sweden.

On the second segment, Julie J. Thomson discusses "Begin to See: The Photographers of Black Mountain College." The exhibition surveys photography made at Black Mountain College, including landscapes, documentary work (including of performance), experiments with the medium and more. The exhibition is at the Black Mountain College Museum and Arts Center in Asheville, North Carolina through May 20. 

Kay Rosen, Edme Bouchardon
01:13:03
2017-10-09 09:41:38 UTC 01:13:03
Kay Rosen, Edme Bouchardon

Episode No. 278 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Kay Rosen and curator Anne-Lise Desmas.

The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum opens "Kay Rosen: H Is for House," this weekend. It is Rosen's first solo museum exhibition in the northeast in almost 20 years. It is curated by the Aldrich's Richard Klein. The exhibition will be on view through September 4.

Rosen's text-based works, presented as wall-drawings, paintings and works on paper, use language, words, humor and two-dimensional forms to explore ideas, histories and contemporary life. Rosen's work is in the collection . Her museum exhibitions and installations have included projects at the Aspen (Colo.) Art Museum, the University Art Museum at the University of California, Santa Barbara, The Drawing Center, New York, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles and the Otis College of Art and Design, the MIT List Visual Arts Center, the MCA Chicago and more.

On the second segment, J. Paul Getty Museum curator Anne-Lise Desmas discusses "Bouchardon: Royal Artist of the Enlightenment." The exhibition examines the sculpture and drawings of Edme Bouchardon, who worked as the Royal Artist during the eighteenth-century reign of Louis XV. The exhibition, which Desmas co-curated with Edouard Kopp, is on view through April 2.

Kerry James Marshall (from May, 2016)
01:01:18
2017-10-09 09:41:40 UTC 01:01:18
Kerry James Marshall (from May, 2016)

On March 12, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles opens "Kerry James Marshall: Mastry," the artist's first retrospective. Marshall is one of the most significant chronicler's of the American experience, especially the African-American experience. For 35 years he has worked to add black people and black culture to a Western art historical canon that is mostly built of white faces and stories. The exhibition was curated by Dieter Roelstraete, Helen Molesworth and Ian Alteveer. The exhibition catalogue was published by Skira Rizzoli.

John Singleton Copley, Jimmie Durham
01:23:17
2017-10-09 09:41:41 UTC 01:23:17
John Singleton Copley, Jimmie Durham

Episode No. 276 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features historian and author Jane Kamensky and curator Anne Ellegood.

Kamensky is the author of "A Revolution in Color: The World of John Singleton Copley." The book is a new biography that places one of early America's best and most important artists within the context of the political and revolutionary events of his time -- and details how Copley and his family were actors in them. Amazon offers it for $20 in hardcover and at $16 for Kindle.

Kamensky is a professor of history at Harvard University and the director of the Schlesinger Library. She is a historian of early America and the Atlantic world.

On the second segment, Hammer Museum curator Anne Ellegood discusses her new exhibition "Jimmie Durham: At the Center of the World." Ellegood's retrospective is the first major Durham show in the United States in over 20 years. 

Durham came to prominence as an artist in New York City in the 1980s. His work has consistently addressed questions of identity, colonialism and the inseparability of identity from politics in the United States. The exhibition is on view at the Hammer through May 7, when it will travel to the Walker, the Whitney and to the Remai Modern in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. The show's thorough catalogue was published by DelMonico Prestel.

Medardo Rosso
01:03:46
2017-10-09 09:41:41 UTC 01:03:46
Medardo Rosso

Episode No. 275 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curators Sharon Hecker and Tamara Schenkenberg and was taped live at the Pulitzer Arts Foundation in St. Louis.

Hecker and Schenkenberg are the co-curators of "Medardo Rosso: Experiments in Light and Form," which is at the Pulitzer through May 13. The exhibition is the first broad survey of Rosso's work in an American museum in over fifty years. (In 2014-15 the Center for Italian Modern Art in New York presented this Rosso installation.) It features nearly 100 works, including sculptures, drawings and photographs. The exhibition's catalogue is available for free from the Pulitzer for a $7 PayPal-administered shipping charge.

Rosso is an Italian artist who spent much of his career in France. His sculptures of heads and figures in wax, plaster, and bronze are key pivots between an era of monumental bronze sculpture, realist and impressionist sculpture and ultimately modern art.

Sarah Oppenheimer, Richard Misrach
01:11:08
2017-10-09 09:41:42 UTC 01:11:08
Sarah Oppenheimer, Richard Misrach

Episode No. 274 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artists Sarah Oppenheimer and Richard Misrach.

This weekend the Wexner Center for the Arts at The Ohio State University in Columbus debuts "Sarah Oppenheimer: S-337473," an exhibition of a newly commissioned work developed  for the Wexner's Peter Eisenman-designed building. Oppenheimer created her new work as a two-year-long Wexner Center Artist Residency Award recipient, during which she collaborated with OSU's Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering to develop a patent-pending pivot mechanism that allows this new work to rotate at a 45-degree angle. The exhibition opens on Saturday, February 4 and will be on view through April 16. As soon as images of the new work are available, probably on or around February 7, we'll add them to this post.

Sarah Oppenheimer is an artist who creates installations that engage with both architecture and space. She's previously made work for the Perez Art Museum Miami (on view through April 30), the Kunsthaus Basel, the Rice University Art Gallery, the Queens Museum, and the Saint Louis Art Museum. A project she is developing for Mass MoCA will debut in 2019. Oppenheimer has also created a permanent installation at the Baltimore Museum of Art. Multiple views of all her installations are on her website.

On the second segment, the re-airing of a 2016 segment with Richard Misrach on his "Border Cantos," a book and exhibition on which he has collaborated with Mexican composer and performer Guillermo Galindo. Since 2004, and especially since 2009, Misrach has been making pictures along the 2,000-mile-long United States border with Mexico, the latest investigation of American deserts that make up what Misrach calls his Desert Cantos series. As Misrach traveled the borderlands, he accumulated discarded objects such as water bottles, backpacks, clothing and shotgun shells and turned them over to Galindo, who made that material into instruments and who then performed on them. The book, "Border Cantos," is out from Aperture; Amazon offers it $45, a forty percent discount.

Tony Oursler, American Art during WWI
01:20:31
2017-10-09 09:41:43 UTC 01:20:31
Tony Oursler, American Art during WWI

The Museum of Modern Art is showing Tony Oursler's Imponderable (2015-16), a 90-minute film shown in an immersive, so-called "5-D" environment, as well as archival material related to the film from Oursler's own collection. The film mines Ourlser's interest in experiments in technological advancement that didn't quite work out and occult phenomena to offer a kind of alternative history of modernism. The film is richly informed by Oursler's own life history. His grandfather was Charles Fulton Oursler, a journalist and author who teamed up with Harry Houdini to campaign against fraudulent mediumship. The exhibition was curated by MoMA's Stuart Comer and Erica Papernik-Shimizu. Imponderable is at MoMA through April 16.

Oursler is a multimedia and installation artist whose work often examines and uses new technologies to explore topics such as facial recognition, paranormal phenomena and the relationship between multiple personality disorder and mass media.

On the second segment, historian and curator Anne Classen Knutson discusses "World War I and American Art," which is at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts through April 9. The exhibition looks at how American artists responded to and engaged with the war, both in Europe and in the United States. Knutson co-curated the show with Robert Cozzolino and David Lubin. 

Stanley Whitney
01:08:48
2017-10-09 09:41:44 UTC 01:08:48
Stanley Whitney

Artist Stanley Whitney.

Francis Picabia, John McLaughlin
01:19:17
2017-10-09 09:41:45 UTC 01:19:17
Francis Picabia, John McLaughlin

"Francis Picabia" co-curator Anne Umland, "John McLaughlin" curator Stephanie Barron.

Lorna Simpson
54:01
2017-10-09 09:41:45 UTC 54:01
Lorna Simpson

Artist Lorna Simpson, who is showing new work at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth

Tyler Green's top ten, Minor White
37:30
2017-10-09 09:41:46 UTC 37:30
Tyler Green's top ten, Minor White

MAN Podcast host Tyler Green's 2016 top ten list, curator Paul Martineau on Minor White.

Holiday clips: The Le Nain
44:57
2017-10-09 09:41:47 UTC 44:57
Holiday clips: The Le Nain

Curator and historian C.D. Dickerson.

Pipilotti Rist, Mark Speltz
01:17:15
2017-10-09 09:41:48 UTC 01:17:15
Pipilotti Rist, Mark Speltz

Artist Pipilotti Rist and historian and "North of Dixie: Civil Rights Photography Beyond the South" author Mark Speltz.

Matisse/Diebenkorn, Klimt's Portraits
57:24
2017-10-09 09:41:49 UTC 57:24
Matisse/Diebenkorn, Klimt's Portraits

SFMOMA curator Janet Bishop, art historian Jill Lloyd.

Early Monet, Picasso's Drawings
01:06:06
2017-10-09 09:41:50 UTC 01:06:06
Early Monet, Picasso's Drawings

Curators George Shackelford, David Breslin.

Thanksgiving clips: Richard Misrach
46:14
2017-10-09 09:41:51 UTC 46:14
Thanksgiving clips: Richard Misrach

Artist Richard Misrach

Eduardo Basualdo
47:49
2017-10-09 09:41:51 UTC 47:49
Eduardo Basualdo

Artist Eduardo Basualdo, recorded live at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden.

Art and Education in America After WWII at MCASD, Wexner
01:15:26
2017-10-09 09:41:52 UTC 01:15:26
Art and Education in America After WWII at MCASD, Wexner

Curator Jill Dawsey and artist Martha Rosler; curator Ruth Erickson

Edgar Degas, Richard Serra's "Shift"
01:05:46
2017-10-09 09:41:53 UTC 01:05:46
Edgar Degas, Richard Serra's "Shift"

Historian and curator Henri Loyrette, documentary filmmaker Simone Estrin.

Michael Dean, Julian Onderdonk
42:33
2017-10-09 09:41:54 UTC 42:33
Michael Dean, Julian Onderdonk

Artist Michael Dean and curator Kaylin Weber.