Careers

My Food Job Rocks!

Adam Yee

There is very little awareness of what the people in the food industry actually do. This stems back to the lack of knowledge and awareness of the range of degree courses and programs available that will equip them for a career in food. My FoodJobRocks! by Adam Yee is the first podcast of its kind that allows listeners to hear directly from people who are in the food industry and have a passion for what they do. They share how they became involved in food and describe what it is they do, plus a few more fun questions just to keep things entertaining. Listen to them here, and stay tuned for a new episode every Monday.

Episodes

Ep. 085- The Food Safety Fanatics Part 1 with Don Schaffner, Distinguished Professor at Rutger's University
49:12
2017-09-27 09:28:25 UTC 49:12
Ep. 085- The Food Safety Fanatics Part 1 with Don Schaffner, Distinguished Professor at Rutger's University

Dr. Don Schaffner is an amazing food safety scientist who’s the best in class. In fact, let me name youa  few of his amazing awards: You can read his amazing biography here

What’s also super cool, is that Don and his co-host Ben do a whole lot of extracurricular activities to promote food safety and one of their favorite things to do is podcasting. For over 4 years, they’re been doing discussions of food safety and post them online for everyone to enjoy and they do have quite a following.

If you are in food safety or are considering food safety, you have to listen to this interview. Don gives you valuable advice on how to really be a star player in food safety and some amazing resources such as Barfblog, Food Safety News, and the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Reports

About Don

Dr. Donald W. Schaffner is Extension Specialist in Food Science and Distinguished Professor at Rutgers University. He has authored more than 150 peer-reviewed publications and educated thousands of Food Industry professionals through short courses and workshops in the United States and around the world.

He is a Fellow of the Institute of Food Technologists and the American Academy of Microbiology. He has served as an Editor for the journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology since 2005.  Dr. Schaffner was the president of the International Association for Food Protection in 2013-2014. In his spare time he co-hosts a food safety podcast at foodsafetytalk.com.

Sponsor - FoodGrads

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

Sponsor - Steviva Ingredients

Has marketing ever asked you to pull a rabbit out of a hat? I know they have with me. They want clean-label sugar reduction because that’s the trend. And in addition to clean label, we need to follow the ever-changing FDA laws, meet low cost parameters AND create a product that tastes EXCELLENT – with no aftertaste issues.

They want us to make magic happen.

Who do they think we are - Houdini?

Let me tell you who the real magicians are. Steviva Ingredients. Steviva has more than two decades of experience in R&D and clean-label sugar reduction in a variety of applications: beverage, baked goods, fillings, frostings, condiments. Give em a call. They’ll create a solution for you. If they can help me, they can help you. Go check them out at stevivaingredients.com.

Housekeeping

If you like what you heard, like us on facebook or write a review on itunes. It helps wonders.

I am also inviting you to sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com. I am doing this new thing called the 5 course meal where I send you 5 pieces of hand picked content and deliver it every Friday morning. Like a meal kit…

If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Knowledge Bombs
  • What is an extension specialist? What are extensions?
  • If you want a career in food science, think about Food Science and Quality because boy we have a lot to do
  • How Don met Darin Detwiler

Official Job title: Distinguished Professor – Distinguished Professor and Extension Specialist How long have you worked in Rutgers?: Over 25 years! Extension course: they’ve always existed, but not widely visible What’s the best skill can you have in Food Safety and Quality: You need to keep learning. The knowledge you have today will be outdated by next year Don’t think what you know today is going to necessarily be known tomorrow. You always have to keep up with new outbreaks and keep on changing your mind What resources do you use to keep you up to date?: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Reports published by the CDC Barfblog: Doug Powell and Ben Chapman. What’s making people barf! Food Safety News by Bill Marler Food Safety Talk with Ben Chapman. 2 PhDs in Food Safety talk about food safety. A director’s commentary of what’s in the food safety news How did Food Safety Talks start?: Howard Stern Terrestrial Radio 100th anniversary of IAFP. NPR people came over and Don met Ben and then they talked and then they made a podcast Dan Benjamin: 5 by 5. How to do podcasting articles How long has Food Safety Talks been on?: 5 years! Why Does Your Food Job Rocks?: I love everything about my job. (Literally everything) What advice can you give a 24 year old on having the achievements that you have?: Give it time, You don’t get ahead on focusing on regrets on the past. It’s just not relevant Don’t focus on the past, focus on the present. Don’t let setbacks set you back. Food Technology: Whole Genome Technology. The radar the CDC is using is getting more sensitive. Also, mimicking norovirus What do you think the biggest challenge the food industry has to face?: Integration of FSMA What’s one thing in the food industry you’d like to know more about?: Why people aren’t complying to rules Favorite Quote: Prediction is very difficult especially about the future. Favorite Book: DiscWorld by Terry Prachett Favorite Kitchen Item: Digital Scale What kind of advice would you give a fresh graduate?: Do the right thing. Life is too short that don’t take food safety and quality seriously. Where can we find you?: Food Safety Talk podcast. Don Schaffner from Rutgers. Bug Counter on twitter. Emails (don’t do emails)

Other Links

Penn State Ice Cream Course Texas A and M Extrusion Course Better Process Control Course Cyclospora Norovirus Preventative Controls Rule: a training is required Produce Safety Rule Supplier Verification Programs Irrigation of Water Provisions of the fresh produce rule Foreign Supplier Training University of Georgia American Greed: Peanut Corporation Story Core (never launched, but we have them at Food Safety Talks) Dr. Darin Detwiler FSMA webinars

Ep. 084 - The Magic of Food Pivoting with Ronald Arceo, founder of foodbox.tv (and other things)
55:25
2017-09-27 09:28:25 UTC 55:25
Ep. 084 - The Magic of Food Pivoting with Ronald Arceo, founder of foodbox.tv (and other things)

This episode is a bit different, and it acts more of a conversation, but it’s a darn good conversation. I met Ronald talking on Shapr, a swipy-like app for business people and just to let you know, I get a lot more meetings on Shapr than the other ones and they’re productive as well.

Ronald has been on TEDEx, he was an ex-magician, has done several media expenditures, web design work, and has a huge passion and curiosity in food

So we talk a lot of cool stuff about food, but also take this as just a casual talk with two very creative people. We try and understand each other, and we do quite well I’d say. Think of this episode a bit differently, not just about the job Ronald has, but also his mindset, or his ability to create, pivot, and entertain.

I’m excited for what Ronald has in stock for us and I hope after your interview, you do too.

About Ronald

Food tech entrepreneur. Online Marketing and Launch Event Specialist & Amateur Magician. ;)

Former Creative Marketing Strategist for The Red Group, LLC.

In my consulting efforts I helped build brands online. More specifically, I consulted companies and coached experts on how to get started in creating their following online through education based marketing.

Some past projects include TEDxCalicoCanyon, MagicMez, The Last Formula, and most recently The Foodbox.

I've been given the opportunity to work with some amazing people over the years. If you'd like to contact me, please don't hesitate to reach out.

Sponsor - FoodGrads

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

Sponsor - Steviva Ingredients

Has marketing ever asked you to pull a rabbit out of a hat? I know they have with me. They want clean-label sugar reduction because that’s the trend. And in addition to clean label, we need to follow the ever-changing FDA laws, meet low cost parameters AND create a product that tastes EXCELLENT – with no aftertaste issues.

They want us to make magic happen.

Who do they think we are - Houdini?

Let me tell you who the real magicians are. Steviva Ingredients. Steviva has more than two decades of experience in R&D and clean-label sugar reduction in a variety of applications: beverage, baked goods, fillings, frostings, condiments. Give em a call. They’ll create a solution for you. If they can help me, they can help you. Go check them out at stevivaingredients.com.

Housekeeping

If you like what you heard, like us on facebook or write a review on itunes. It helps wonders.

I am also inviting you to sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com. I am doing this new thing called the 5 course meal where I send you 5 pieces of hand picked content and deliver it every Friday morning. Like a meal kit…

If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Knowledge Bombs
  • Ronald and Adam’s connection to San Luis Obispo
  • Two tribes in the world of eating: Live to eat, and eat to live
  • The twists and turns for Foodbox
  • Why food farmers are switching to growing more "special" crops
Question Summary

What is Foodbox.tv: We took a pivot and will be focusing on telling the stories and technologies of local food TEDex: Ronald presented at TedEx: Calico Canyon the Human Connection What has magic taught you?: Magic taught me to learn fast. Magic shows a raw emotion that we don’t see often. Magic violates a preconceived notion Favorite Quote: Pain of regret weighs ton, while the pain of discipline weighs ounces Do you have any advice for people who want to do what you do?: You have to love what you do, but you have to be strategic Where can we find you?: fdbx.tv

Other Links

TEDEx Runa Free Conference Call Shapr University Las Vegas San Luis Obispo Cal Poly The Restaurant Coach Blue Apron Plated Soylent Meal Replacement Ketosis Diet 1000 True Fans Articles Book: Sapiens Book: Cooked: A Natural History of Transformation The Magician’s Code – Kindle book Vegan Wrestler makes vegan stuff in Arizona Singh Farms and Meadows Sous Vide Marajuana Herb Water Growth Mindset Luck + Preparedness = Success

 

Ep. 083 - The Food Engineer From Israel with Anton Slavkin, Product Development Engineer at Strauss Group
48:32
2017-09-27 09:28:25 UTC 48:32
Ep. 083 - The Food Engineer From Israel with Anton Slavkin, Product Development Engineer at Strauss Group

Anton found me randomly through linkedin, found my website, and scheduled an interview all in a span in 2 weeks. Oh, did I mention he’s from Israel?

It was absolutely amazing talking to someone my age from across the country and learning about the differences and similarities between how the food industry works. You’ll learn a little bit about the pros and cons of the Israeli university system, a lot about the daily life of a food engineer, and why Israeli's love guacamole.

About Anton

Anton Slavkin is a cheese product development engineer in the Israeli company Strauss Group.

He has worked as a krill oil extraction process engineer in the nutraceuticals company Enzymotec Ltd and as a chocolate and cereal snacks product development engineer in Unilever Israel.

He earned his B.Sc. in Biotechnology and Food Engineering from IIT (Israel Institute of Technology – The Technion).

In his spare time, he enjoys playing the guitar, inventing new homemade recipes (a.k.a cooking) and hiking.

Anton is passionate about making our world a better place by promoting environmental awareness and using current research data for the development of better products.

About Strauss Group

Strauss Group is an international Food & Beverage company that strives to improve people's lives, headquartered in Israel, where we are the largest food company. The company's portfolio includes four businesses: Strauss Coffee B.V., Strauss Israel, Strauss Water, and PepsiCo – Strauss Fresh Dips & Spreads International aligned with two global consumer trends: Health & Wellness and Fun & Indulgence.

Strauss Group is active in 20 countries worldwide in our diverse fields of activity through partnerships with multinationals. The company brings its know-how in Coffee, Water, Chocolate, Dips & Spreads to diverse markets and cultures, making them accessible to people just the way they like them, adapted to local tastes and habits.

Sponsor - FoodGrads

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

Sponsor - Steviva Ingredients

Has marketing ever asked you to pull a rabbit out of a hat? I know they have with me. They want clean-label sugar reduction because that’s the trend. And in addition to clean label, we need to follow the ever-changing FDA laws, meet low cost parameters AND create a product that tastes EXCELLENT – with no aftertaste issues.

They want us to make magic happen.

Who do they think we are - Houdini?

Let me tell you who the real magicians are. Steviva Ingredients. Steviva has more than two decades of experience in R&D and clean-label sugar reduction in a variety of applications: beverage, baked goods, fillings, frostings, condiments. Give em a call. They’ll create a solution for you. If they can help me, they can help you. Go check them out at stevivaingredients.com.

Housekeeping

If you like what you heard, like us on facebook or write a review on itunes. It helps wonders.

I am also inviting you to sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com. I am doing this new thing called the 5 course meal where I send you 5 pieces of hand picked content and deliver it every Friday morning. Like a meal kit…

If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Knowledge Bombs
  • Clean Label and communication all over the world
  • A discussion about food science and perspective and engineering
  • The difference between US and Israel food education
  • Will clean meat be kosher? Well, religion is not science, right?
  • What the heck is red label?

What do you tell people what you do?: I develop new cheese product. I don’t usually use the word Food Engineer unless someone knows what a food engineer is What is a food engineer?: A food scientist who understands engineering and processing concepts Strauss Group: Milk products, cheese products, cold filled dips Do you think people think food scientists get a lot of negative press?: Yes, even in Israel. Steps to be a food scientist in Isreal: All people in Israel must serve in the military. Anton served in the navy. Then studied food engineering in IIT Israel Institute of Technology. Product Developer in Unilever, Food Engineer at Enzymotec (Krill and fish oil) but the company was too small, couldn’t advance. What’s the most important skill you need in your job?: Flexibility. Try to see the bigger picture When you entered your first job, did you feel prepared?: Absolutely not. 90% of the things, you don’t know how to do. You just know a little bit more. What would have been better?: Faculty should be more involved in industry. But it might depend on the institute, or even country. My Food Job Rocks: I can eat, I can eat new things, I can be proud of what I can make What would be your dream job title?: CEO. You get to set the direction of the products Do you have any CEO’s you look up to?: Richard Brandson of Virgin. Steve Jobs of Apple (duh) What do you look for most in a job?: A sense of mission. How do I make the world a better place? Kosher Food Trends and Technology: Lab Grown Meat Clean Meat Biggest Challenge the Food Industry has to face: Negative image of the food industry Are there any companies that are doing a good job at improving food image?: Strauss does a bit Favorite Quote: Hippocratus- Let Food be Thy Medicine and let Medicine be thy food Favorite Food: Avacado – I’m making Guacamole weekly. You can actually grow Avocado in Israel. Any advice for anyone to go into the food industry: Don’t be afraid of following your dreams If you were to tell your freshman self something, what would it be?: Take more engineering classes. Not just food, but more complex chemistry. Why do other disciplines synergize with food engineers?: If you understand both sides, it’s great Anton asks me a question: How did you do this?

Other Links

Frutarom IFF Givaudan Symrise Quark Clean Label and Cost Reduction CE 300 – Ascorbic Acid Job Hopping Red Label – Implemented in Chilie, Israel, USDA Added Sugars delay

Ep. 082 [Bonus] - Adam Yee In The Break Room: Honest Opinions on Careers, Learning, Podcasting, and Mindset
01:23:12
2017-09-27 09:28:25 UTC 01:23:12
Ep. 082 [Bonus] - Adam Yee In The Break Room: Honest Opinions on Careers, Learning, Podcasting, and Mindset

Hey everyone! This is a bonus episode! It's also really long.

Kim from Peas on Moss and I recorded this a long time ago, but I figured I would post this since we've been talking about careers a lot on the podcast/blog.

So I talk a bit less modest in this episode, and maybe I'm a bit too honest this episode. Whether you agree with me on the points I make, I hope you find value in them. If you disagree, then challenge them and tell me what you think.

We talk a lot on all sorts of subjects such as job hopping, resume, the purpose of life, preparedness in a degree, podcasting life, all stuff of that nature.

No sponsors this episode. This one is a freebie.

(warning: we do say "you know" way too much in this interview. Enjoy!)

Housekeeping

If you like what you heard, like us on facebook or write a review on itunes. It helps wonders.

I am also inviting you to sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com. I am doing this new thing called the 5 course meal where I send you 5 pieces of hand picked content and deliver it every Friday morning. Like a meal kit…

If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Knowledge Bombs
  • How long should you stay at your job and how does that matter?
  • Adam’s track record
  • Storytelling is the best skill ever
  • Discussing ethnic background
  • CV’s and resumes
  • Passion versus Skill
  • How to be prepared for your first job
  • Master’s versus Work Experience
  • Risk versus Failure: Different roles have different values of risk
  • How to answer questions in your job
  • Who to talk to when you don’t know the answer
  • How to deal with greedy people and how to deal with them
  • How to find and identify A players and C players
  • Extroversion versus Introversion
  • How Adam stopped being Shy
  • How people can take advantage of teaching niche jobs
  • Catalysts of Change
What We Talk About

Twin Screw Extrusion Andrea Zeng Leadpage My Department Head’s CV Xennial Millenials ruin everything Little Bets Fiona Salim Impostor Syndrome Myer’s Briggs Kim is an ENTJ Adam is an ENTP Crematory Association How Podcasting Changed My Life Michael Kalanty James Altucher Derek Sivers – Bronze Medalist

Ep. 082 - A Recruiter's Point of View: Inside the Job Searching World with Michael McDonnell, President and Managing Partner at Global Recruiters of Columbia
01:01:11
2017-09-27 09:28:25 UTC 01:01:11
Ep. 082 - A Recruiter's Point of View: Inside the Job Searching World with Michael McDonnell, President and Managing Partner at Global Recruiters of Columbia

How can I describe Michael McDonnell? He is transparent, technical, and full of energy. Not bad for a 25 year old running his own recruitment company.

His job is to reach out and find what food companies are looking for and I have some good news for those of you listening, these people are looking for experts.

I grill Michael on all sorts of crazy questions that I felt like when I looked for a job and Michael answered these like, really well. And I ask questions such as how companies look for rockstars, the benefits of using a recruiter, what an ATS system is and why does everyone use it, and my personal question: how long should someone be in their job? Michael answers all of these with short and direct honesty and I just learned so much from this interview.

So sit back and relax as we look into how recruiting works and how that will benefit you.

Sponsor - FoodGrads

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

Sponsor - Steviva Ingredients

Has marketing ever asked you to pull a rabbit out of a hat? I know they have with me. They want clean-label sugar reduction because that’s the trend. And in addition to clean label, we need to follow the ever-changing FDA laws, meet low cost parameters AND create a product that tastes EXCELLENT – with no aftertaste issues.

They want us to make magic happen. 

Who do they think we are - Houdini?

Let me tell you who the real magicians are. Steviva Ingredients. Steviva has more than two decades of experience in R&D and clean-label sugar reduction in a variety of applications: beverage, baked goods, fillings, frostings, condiments. Give em a call. They’ll create a solution for you. If they can help me, they can help you. Go check them out at stevivaingredients.com.

Housekeeping

If you like what you heard, like us on facebook or write a review on itunes. It helps wonders.

I am also inviting you to sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com. I am doing this new thing called the 5 course meal where I send you 5 pieces of hand picked content and deliver it every Friday morning. Like a meal kit…

If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Knowledge bombs
  • How job hopping is disrupting all the industries
  • How to squeeze things out of people and get really valuable information (through kindness)
  • Mike’s opinion on Whole foods and Amazon
  • Adam’s special gift: getting free food

What do you tell people about you?: I partner with organizations or I make things. I build partnerships and deals. We really work with the company What do you consider a finalist for a search?: Whatever the company specifically wants, but also questioning their initial requirements. We want to exceed those expectations How do you find clients in the food and beverage industry and how do you communicate with them?: It starts with being on the phone. It requires a lot of cold calling. Maybe 100 phone calls to connect with another company. Who do you contact when you cold call?: Our best way is to connect with the Hiring Manager so we can find the right service to find the right people Does everyone want a Rockstar or do they not want a rock star?: Depends. Sales people want a Rockstar. For QA or data based, you might not want someone super extraverted.

Job search tips

Usually, people want the best of the best. Job boards might actually show the best of the worst

“It’s better to be employed than not employed” most people think this but sometimes good people get in unfortunate circumstances A recruiter has a genuine conversation with a hiring manager and really focuses on getting the best fit and exploring options

ATS system- automatic tracking system which is a vetting system that looks for 5 key words. Your resume might not even be looked at another person

Cultural fit is absolutely critical for job success

It takes seconds for people to look at your resume

Job hopping: It’s so easy now and you can increase your salary faster. We don’t know what will happen 10 years from now, but now it’s 2 years.

How long should you stay at your job?: I’d say 5 years.

How did you get you to get to you where you are today?: I’m 24, I’m the youngest owner in my recruiting network. Worked for ConAgra brands (Territory Sales), Shanghai university of finance and economics, military active orders, disctrict manager in training for truck stops. Mentor told me to open a recruiting firm. Basically I had conversations with the right individuals. I have always wanted a job in CPG and in the food industry. What is the most important skill you can have in the food industry?: Flexibility and adaptability. Things are moving so fast that you’ll be left in the dust Common themes between excellent candidates: People who strategically plan their future. This might be through their resume or by just talking to him. My Food Job Rocks: I get to speak with amazing, unique individuals What’s the most interesting conversation you have?: I cold called a famous TV person and gave value. Food Trends and Technology: Adaptable Experts and not so much specialized experts Biggest Problem in the Food Industry: Lots of “foo-foo” going on un terms of claims. Consumer needs to educate themselves. There’s a lot of documents that involve claims What is one thing in the food industry you’d like to know more about?: I’d ask a question: where is the largest need? I’d ask this to 100 people and gather the responses. Favorite Quote: Help enough people to get what they want and the world will give you what they want There are no problems we can solve together and very few problems we can solve ourselves I listen to hour motivationial quotes on youtube Favorite kitchen item: knife. You can change things around and it’s dangerous Favorite book: The Maxwell Daily Reader Do you have any advice for anyone who wants to go into the food industry?: Ask questions. You can open so many doors by asking questions to people. Ask people why do they eat what they eat. What do you eat?: I eat it all. I research a lot on diets but then I eat a lot sometimes. I eat a lot of protein.  What are the common myths about job searching you’d like to dispel?: “There’s no jobs”. As of now, there are tons of jobs. “I’m over qualified” It’s pretty easy to downgrade Where can we find you?: Linkedin McDonnellm2 GRN Columbia.com

Other Links

5 Whys ask Why 5 times Sweets and Snack Expo

 

Ep. 081 - Democratizing Baking Knowledge with Dr. Lin Carson, CEO if Bakerpedia
51:44
2017-09-27 09:28:25 UTC 51:44
Ep. 081 - Democratizing Baking Knowledge with Dr. Lin Carson, CEO if Bakerpedia

Lin Carson is one of those amazing people who will give away knowledge for free. In this case, her amazing technical expertise in the bakery industry has made her able to share this on an awesome website called Bakerpedia. Think of it as Wikipedia, but for bakers!

If you are into bread, especially in a commercial sense, you will absolutely love this interview.

So get ready, for an exciting segment about baking, along with the tips of finding and joining high growth companies, the latest amazing technology in the baking industry, and maybe this episode will inspire you to make a wiki site on your own.

About Lin Carson

A passionate trailblazer who constantly challenges current ways of thinking when it comes to innovation and sustainability in the field of grain science, Dr Lin Carson’s love affair with baking started about 20 years ago when she earned her BSc degree in Food Science & Technology at the Ohio State University. Keen on deepening her knowledge in baking, bread and grain product texture, she went on to earn her MSc then PhD from the Department of Grain Science at Kansas State University.

In 2007, she started the R&D program and baking lab at Wendy's New Bakery Company in Ohio where she managed the team responsible for product development, ingredient and equipment sourcing, analysis equipment and procedures, specification development and commercialization.

Opportunity came knocking in 2013 and Dr Carson took up the position of Director of Technical Services at Dave's Killer Bread (DKB) in Portland, OR. There, she oversaw food safety, quality, co-manufacturing and R&D procedures.

Her experience heading the R&D departments at two of America’s leading food brands was invaluable and was how she discovered a huge gap in technical information sharing.

When she’s not running BAKERpedia, Dr Carson serves as Treasurer on the Board of Directors at the American Society of Baking, a role she has held since 2007. One of her notable achievements is spearheading the Product Development Competition that aims to identify and reward innovative thinking in commercial baking processes.

Aside from all things bakery, Dr Carson is married with three boys and is a self-proclaimed health nut. She trains regularly for Triathlons as a hobby with a transition goal of under 1 minute.

About BAKERpedia

A year later, armed with knowledge, conviction and sheer guts, Dr Carson launched BAKERpedia with the ultimate aim of strengthening the entire baking ecosystem, allowing ideas to thrive, improving efficiencies and encouraging opportunities for growth.

Today, as the world’s only FREE and comprehensive online technical resource for the commercial baking industry, BAKERpedia is used by commercial bakers, ingredient sellers, equipment suppliers and baking entrepreneurs who have easy access to the answers they need to make informed decisions daily.

This Episode is Sponsored by Foodgrads

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion–there’s something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

[New] This Episode is Also Sponsored by Steviva Ingredients

Hey everyone, we have a new sponsor on the podcast and I am happy to introduce you guys to the wonderful people at Steviva, a sweetener company in Oregon. If you want to hear more about this amazing company, listen to episode 72 with their CEO Thom King. What’s really cool about Steviva is that they are changing their whole company into something bigger and better and I love telling the story of how this will happen. As we progress, we plan to go through the process of Steviva’s transformation and inform you on what this amazing company can do for you.

For more information about Steviva, go to http://www.stevivaingredients.com/

Housekeeping

If you like what you heard, like us on facebook or write a review on itunes. It helps wonders.

I am also inviting you to sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com. I am doing this new thing called the 5 course meal where I send you 5 pieces of hand picked content and deliver it every Friday morning. Like a meal kit…

If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Knowledge Bombs
  • Why baking is complicated versus other areas of food
  • Being in Operations versus in the Lab
  • A discussion about clean label and skilled labor
Question Summary

One sentence: I’m the CEO of Bakerpedia.com . A free resource on baking technology How Bakerpedia happened: Food Science Degree, Grain Science Degree, running technical teams in the bakery industry, had an idea, found a gap, worked 2 years without any pay to get it off the ground What do you consider a growing company?: To be really aggressive, have double digit growth percentage a year. Can any company at any size be a growing company?: Great people make growth happen. Big companies just have a harder time getting great people What have you taught your team to be great at their jobs?: Mainly technical skills and basic knowledge of the baking industry. Be open to learn more and more Where do you gather your technical knowledge?: On the job training, courses, AIB, etc. You have to be on the job. Was it hard to make Bakerpedia?: Not at all. Launching is really easy. The most challenging thing: How to monetize My Food Job Rocks: I get to learn something different from different bakers every time and bake amazing bread. Consulting arm: Lin works with 2 high growth clients. That’s enough for her Food trends and Technology: Rapid Hydration. A high seed sprayer. Patent: Rapido-jet When can we expect these new bakery innovations to happen?: Biggest factor is cost. Equipment can last a very long time. Some mixers can last 30 to 40 years. What is something in the food industry you’d like to know more about?: Why aren’t companies cleaning up their labels? Why are they fighting to change their ingredients? The technology is there. Job Hopping: You can’t change that. You have to identify good leaders How do you identify good leaders?: Your network needs to be large. Many years of experience. Do you have a question on how to identify good leaders?: No Who inspired you to get into food?: My father owned a food brokerage and I hung out in their kitchen Favorite Quote: The only way to discover the limits of the possible is to go beyond the limits and test the impossible. Arthur C Clark: Scifi Writer Favorite Book: David and Goliath – Malcolm Gladwell also does Revisionist Gladwell Favorite Kitchen Item: Table Top Hobart Version Favorite Food: Bread. I am on this 90 loaves in 90 day journey. Check eatbread90.com Favorite bread: An imported Australian bread with a peral flour Do you have any advice for people wanting to go to the food industry?: Go ahead, we need you! A lot of startups do not have food scientists on their teams. How do we contact you?: If you want inspiration as a working mother, connect with me on facebook. You need to be passionate about what you do. Once you have enough passion, it doesn’t feel like work.

Links

AIB facility in Kansas Cracker Training Course Kansas State University Grain Science Wendy’s Dave’s Killer Bread Bakeryconcepts.net Why are manhole covers round? eatbread90.com

Ep. 080 - An Overview of Ideation to Commercialization
41:30
2017-09-27 09:28:25 UTC 41:30
Ep. 080 - An Overview of Ideation to Commercialization

An Overview of Ideation to Commercialization

This episode is going to be a bit different than other episodes. Most episodes were reflection based or stuff about my life but I guess I might have ran out of things to talk about in my life. At least for now.

So in this episode, I’m going to talk about the life cycle of a product, how an idea forms, goes through the gauntlet and then commercialized to make tens of thousands of something you've created.

Along the way, I’ll give you some tips on how to make this process faster, or who you have to deal with to succeed in this aspect.

Most people in a food company don’t know the whole process. Those that do either learn from a startup or force themselves to get involved. I’m the latter. After a recent project where it’s finally launching, I now have full confidence in how a product is made.

There are a ton of moving parts and I hope that this episode will break down and show you how to actually make a food product from idea to selling it to millions.

This Episode is Sponsored by Foodgrads

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion–there’s something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

[New] This Episode is Also Sponsored by Steviva Ingredients

Hey everyone, we have a new sponsor on the podcast and I am happy to introduce you guys to the wonderful people at Steviva, a sweetener company in Oregon. If you want to hear more about this amazing company, listen to episode 72 with their CEO Thom King. What’s really cool about Steviva is that they are changing their whole company into something bigger and better and I love telling the story of how this will happen. As we progress, we plan to go through the process of Steviva’s transformation and inform you on what this amazing company can do for you.

For more information about Steviva, go to http://www.stevivaingredients.com/

Housekeeping

If you like what you heard, like us on facebook or write a review on itunes. It helps wonders.

I am also inviting you to sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com. I am doing this new thing called the 5 course meal where I send you 5 pieces of hand picked content and deliver it every Friday morning. Like a meal kit…

If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Transcript Ideation

There are two types of areas where ideas come from: external or internal.

External ideas are based off of market research, or what’s currently selling, or even as simple as “this product exists, but it has x problem, let’s invent a product that doesn’t have x problem”. Most of the time, people in the marketing department develop something called a competitive or gap analysis which lists 5 to 10 of the top selling product’s strengths and weaknesses.

An easy way to develop an idea is to just look at a competitive analysis and increase the positive attributes by like 20% and then also remove anything negative.

One example is if I did a competitive analysis about protein bars and I see that the max protein bar is 20 grams  of protein and uses sucralose, I could probably be “innovative” and sell a protein bar with 24 grams of protein and no sucralose. Though most companies would balk at the idea that this is the way they “innovate”, when you boil it down, it’s pretty much that.

Another method of ideation is internal and this takes a high amount of intuition and out-of-the-box thinking. This is an extremely hard type of innovation that is based off of finding the cutting edge of innovation and thinking differently. Only a few people have the talent of connecting the dots, but if you feel like you do, then go for it.

Again, I want to stress how hard and risky this is. The bigger the company, the more people are going to think you are insane for even bringing it up. But what do they know? They don’t know food as much as you do right?

The best example I have in this situation is Apple (of course). Innovation doesn’t have to be completely new, but it has to be so out of the box people think you’re insane. For example, no headphone jack? That’s insane! Why would they do that? I’m not a tech expert, but that is one example, of an internally inspired innovation.

Another food related example is taco bell. In my podcast, I talk about the naked chicken chalupa a lot because I am so amazed that taco bell made a taco shell out of fried chicken. No average company would ever think about doing that.

So ideas are great but convincing a whole team that an idea is great is the fun part.

Most ideas come from founders or marketing. Depending on the company, research and development is involved, but not as often as you think. They’re the experts and they know their customers, so they are in charge with their ideas. As a product developer, you should respect that.

But idea approval is messy and there are several ways of doing this. So how do you validate an idea? The biggest toolset in your arsenal is data. Collecting data that your idea will work out is the best way to prove that this idea is legit, but event that has its downfall. Most really innovative ideas might not even come to fruition because it’s so ahead of their time, or the method of collecting data is wrong.

In all due respect, the best way of having an idea be approved by a body just takes a charismatic person who knows how to push the right buttons and convince someone that their idea will make a lot of money. I know this isn’t what most people want to hear, but that’s the way most crazy ideas happen, and also the most terrible mistakes.

This is a really specific type of company culture: the culture of accepting ideas. Most companies say ideas come from anywhere, but most companies don’t implement it. All that is true is that the chain of command is really long and eventually, a product has to reach someone at the top and they have to stamp their mark of approval. Good luck!

Pre- Commercialization

So an idea gets approved and then what? You have to then do the work to make the product tangible to the manufacturing team, whether this manufacturing team is a copacker or owned by your company.

This includes a variety of steps which mainly includes making optimal prototypes and gathering documentation on what the ingredients are. Again, different companies have different methods but the big idea is, you have to develop a good recipe that is easily reproducible and make sure it doesn’t kill or sue anyone.

So for me, developing a prototype is the fun part and there are tons of ways to do it. If you are under nutritional barriers such as it has to be under this amount of calories or must have this much protein, then it’s best to start doing the nutritional data analysis first than to go in the kitchen and go to town. A good prototype has to go through a vetting process and there are many ways to do it, but all of them involve having someone taste your product. In small companies, maybe you just need a couple of people who like it. In big companies, maybe 20 to 50 people have to like the taste before validating your product can be brought up to a higher being.

This higher being is what I liked to call, a judge. Someone who has the authority to approve or disaspprove your hard work. In some cases, this is the marketing department, or the executive, or the founder of a company.

The more data you have where people actually like your product, the more you can convince the “judge” to approve your product. Most rational people will approve something if the majority of people like it, even if he or she doesn’t. But that’s not always the case. Sometimes, the judge will say “I don’t like this, I wish it has this, this this, and you have to go back to the lab and try again.

Barely anyone gets it right the first time. Some ideas go through 100s of iterations and still get scrapped. But that’s the life of a product developer.

So let’s say you convince marketing and the “judge” that your prototype is awesome? It’s going to be very important to eventually get documents of all of these ingredients and archive them. For me, this is the worst part of the job, but it is a necessary evil. There are some innovations in the pipe line to make this easier, like RogoHub, but it will be a very long time before everyone is on board.

Getting documents usually involves getting proof from a sales person about the ingredients you put into your food. For example, you need the nutrition facts. If your product is gluten free, then you need a certificate verifying it’s gluten. If it’s Non-GMO, you have to get a statement, but maybe you even need a certificate. Ideally, your boss should have a good system to gather, sort, and archive docuemtns so in case of any outbreak, you’ll be ready to pull out the source. If you don’t have something like this, start one.

In some companies, this task is shared among product development, quality assurance, and regulatory or maybe just one of them.

This is serious stuff and is going to be super important in the future.

Do note, in most companies, this is the sole purpose of a product developer, or a person in research and development who develops new products. If you had to focus on one thing in the corporate behemoth, this is where you should be the expert at.

Commercialization

Once pre-commercialization passes, then you go into the complex world of commercialization which now involves almost every department working together to complete a timeline. This includes planning, inventory, transportation, packaging, labels, product marketing, procurement, product development, regulatory, and quality assurance, oh, and generally, a Project Manager is in charge of it too.

So it works like this: the “Judge” approves of a product in pre-commercialization, and then the company has to make a huge investment to actually make the product. Planning has to make the forcast oh how many will sell, inventory has to make sure there’s enough room in the warehouse and develop systems to track the product, transportation has to coordinate moving the product everywhere, packaging has to develop or confirm the packaging used is correct, labels has to design something pretty and compliant, product marketing monitors if everything’s ok, product developers get blamed for everything, regulatory makes sure we have all of the doohickies to pass it thoggh the boarders (if necessary), and quality assurance makes sure we have all of the specs necessary to document in case we get into trouble.

You see this sort of ecosystem sprout out that depending on the company, is either treated as a harmonious beautiful, collaboration, or like Game of Thrones in which a lot of unexpected drama happens either internally in the company, or externally say, a factory mishap or a communication error.

So commercialization takes a tremendously long time just because of so many people and professions are collaborating together. Technically, you’re going to do the least amount of work here but that might not always be the case. You now take on the role of someone who verifies things such as factory manufacturing reports, and how labels writes things on the level. If you have the confidence, you also become an authority figure on the product (though marketing might fight you for it).

The best way to handle commercialization is not only be an expert at what you do (creating great products) but also be a great communicator with all of the clashing personalities, and the clashing professions.

In general, the time frame from commercialization starts with a forecast which goes into motion. If you don’t have a forecast, then well, better just throw money in the pot and see what happens. A Label file gets circulated around departments that all departments confirm around. Your job here is to verify they are using the right ingredients, the right claims, and the right label. That’s about all. Marketing copy or what ugly color they use to represent your products has nothing to do with you.

During this time, we communicate with the manufacturer. The manufacturer sends replicate samples of the formula to cross check if communication between formulas is ok. Usually, a triangle sensory test is used to make sure no one can statistically tell the difference between the two products. between corporate and procurement gets a pilot protocol in motion. A pilot is a test run with the manufacturer to make sure they can actually run the lab sample. A pilot is a big step for a small investment. It tests everything about communicating with the contract manufacturer. It tests their mettle in gathering ingredients, communicating with the corporate team, and most importantly, confirms that the product can be made and tastes relatively the same compared to your formula sheet. Packaging is also important, and are usually packaged in blank film or white stocked depending on the product.

After the pilot sample is approved (byt the way, you’ll have 100s of samples to give away), procurement initiates the production run which takes about 6 to 10 weeks at minimum before starting production.

Post- Commercialization

For a product developer, not much goes on here. Quality assurance usually takes the reigns and deals with some check list stuff. However, it is important to keep track of how well your product is doing. You can always ask planning or marketing for the digits.

However, now since your product has launched, there are so many other things that can go wrong and all of them focus on either cost reduction or raw material issues. Things that are very hard for a product developer to predict.

Cost reduction involves changing one ingredient with another, usually cheaper ingredient. Cheap doesn’t mean lower quality, over time, things get cheaper due to technological advancements. Low cost projects are usually due to high volume and a bunch of other stuff I don’t really focus on.

Raw material issues involve a supplier completely running out of a material and everyone panics. Issues like this are terrible because sometimes the material is so unique or there is a shortage in the world in general. Purchasing will hound you to find a replacement and then there is no replacement because there is no substitute! Whatever.

So what separates good product developers from great product developers?

Well, it’s a simple answer. How far do you want to understand the process? Do you just want to do your thing?

From the people I’ve interviewed, and the people I’ve asked for advice, understanding the complexities of turning your idea into something people buy and eat is one of the keystones to becoming a great product developer.

But you actually can’t be an expert at everything.

The best product developers are the ones who can communicate and understand the process, and have the confidence to convince people that they know what they are doing. They are the ones who can convince marketing on the challenges of making something, or can work with a manufacturer to make their formula a reality. It’s getting info from various sources on what’s running out so you can prepare to kake changes or subsitutution.

To summarize, a good product developer knows not only their role, but how to communicate their role to others.

The more you understand the process, the more autonomous you can be, and the more you know what you’re actually talking about. Yes, it’s a daunting step to know how all of this works, but you don’t become great in your own bubble.

 

Ep. 079 - Tips on Growing Food Businesses with Elliot Begoun, Principal of the Intertwine Group
50:23
2017-09-27 09:28:25 UTC 50:23
Ep. 079 - Tips on Growing Food Businesses with Elliot Begoun, Principal of the Intertwine Group

Elliot Begoun is the Principal of The Intertwine Group, which a practice focused on helping emerging food and beverage brands grow. He works with clients to design and execute customized route-to-market and go-to-market strategies that build velocity, gain distribution, and win share of stomach. His articles appear in publications such as the Huffington Post, SmartBrief, and FoodDive.

Elliot has had a lot of experience in the food industry. 25 years to be exact and he knows what makes good companies tick. His knowledge about marketing, supply chain and retail management astound me and I hope they do for you too.

In this episode, be prepared to learn how to be a successful food company, our predictions in the grocery space, and the common obstacles brands struggle with, and how to over come this obstacles

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion–there’s something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

Housekeeping

If you like what you heard, like us on facebook or write a review on itunes. It helps wonders.

I am also inviting you to sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com. I am doing this new thing called the 5 course meal where I send you 5 pieces of hand picked content and deliver it every Friday morning. Like a meal kit…

If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Knowledge Bombs

- When to share information versus asking for money - What Elliot describes as being a food lifer - Why entreprenuers should focus on what the grocery industry will become in 5 years

Question Summary

Sentence or less: I help emerging food and beverage brands grow How do you network?: It’s more about establishing relationship. How do you establish trust?: Go all in and help someone when asked What do you do?: I’m a principal. I understand and analyze emerging businesses and make them grow How did you get to where you are today?: Almost went to law school, so he got into general management at a small restaurant franchise, Bon Vorong, Graduate School, Shamrock Foods for 18 years, Foster Farms, then Intertwine Did you find an MBA useful?: I got more self-confidence and I absorb information better, but it’s debatable What skill do you need to be a successful food company?: You have to learn how to listen. You also have to learn how to be a problem solver My Food Job Rocks: I get to be part of a lot of companies and I love seeing them in stores Food Trends and Technology: Meal kits and how to bring amazing foods to busy families The biggest challenge the food industry needs to face: How are we going to feed 9 billion people? Are there any companies that are changing the food system?: There are lots of companies doing it in different ways. For example, dairy farms collecting methane and ugly fruit What is one thing in the food industry you’d like to know more about?: After 28 years, I still have no idea what it’s about Who inspired you to get into food?: Restaurant management job: it was offered to me. On my next job, I got a mentor and she taught me everything. Then I got into retail and it was like a real fun puzzle. Favorite Book: A More Beautiful Question My Quote: The quality of your life is determined by the quality of your questions. — Dr. John Demartini What do you think new brands struggle with the most?: Distribution philosophy. Build a compelling argument for your consumers to buy your products again and again and again to build velocity What is your advice for funding?: Make money first Do you have advice for anyone who wants to go into the food industry?: Run! Just kidding: The food industry is enormous. Go somewhere where you can make a difference. Also. Learn! How to reach Elliot: www.theintertwinegroup.com ; elliot@theintertwinegroup.com

Other Links (we link Elliot's Articles Here)

Food Dive Huffington Post Aldi’s Lidl Fancy Food Show

 

Ep. 078 – How to Spice Up Your Product Development with Jessica Goldstein, Spice Girl at Nu Spice
51:04
2017-09-27 09:28:25 UTC 51:04
Ep. 078 – How to Spice Up Your Product Development with Jessica Goldstein, Spice Girl at Nu Spice

While scrolling through some linkedin folks I found Jessica Goldstein’s lecture she did at the RCA. About a week before, one of my friends sent me a link to her and said she might be good to interview. So I did.

Jessica is part of the Nu Spice family business, with her partner in crime being her father. She’s grown up in the food industry all of her life but she first decided to work in an electronics firm’s marketing company. But after a few weeks, she hated it and decided to go all in for the food industry. That means hustling small buisnesses, reading the USDA Standards and Labeling guideline page to page, and enjoying and analyzing every part of her food.

One of my favorite things about Jessica is her ability to describe flavors in such a way, that both the technical minded and the culinary minded would just melt. You’ll hear a couple of great food descriptions within this interview such as when I ask her what she had for dinner yesterday. Hope you enjoy it as much as I do.

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

Housekeeping

If you like what you heard, like us on facebook or write a review on itunes. It helps wonders.

I am also inviting you to sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com. I am doing this new thing called the 5 course meal where I send you 5 pieces of hand picked content and deliver it every Friday morning. Like a meal kit…

If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Knowledge Bombs
  • How Jessica went from marketing to food
  • The dynamic between Jessica and her father in the family business
  • How Jessica learns and keeps learning about food science
Question Summary

The influences in how to where you got to where you are today: Grandfather owned food business in New York, Grandpa sold it, father worked in food industry and then bought it. Jessica decided to step in and modernized the business after she hated her marketing job Popular in Cuba: no Cubano's, after the age of seven, people don’t eat dairy What do you tell people when you first meet them?: I play with your food, I design flavor profiles for food manufacturers Education: Jessica has a masters in food science and bachelors in creative writing and psychology Nu Spice’s niche: medium sized meat manufacturers who want to develop new flavors Important Skills for developing: Know the customer’s consumer. Whole foods customer has a different perspective than Food City How did you learn food science vocabulary?: My suppliers educate me. Also learning to educate people on this vocabulary Important skills for selling: It’s a people business. People buy from people that they like Food Trends and Technology: Veggie Burgers, Safeway launches Beyond Meat burgers Who is feeding the world?: Monsanto (despite their controversy) is feeding the world in poor places Food trends: Northern African flavors, stews, Horesus hue – Paprika paste, savory, fermentation such as sriracha and miso Favorite Book: Modernist Cuisine. You can download it on a tablet Be creative and innovation is everywhere What was the most amazing thing you ate last?: Stuffed Artichoke Butterflies Advice in the food industry: You need to love food

Other Links

RCA Conference James Calvetti Meats Nu Products Seasoning Company or Nu Spice – Family owned business Hoboken, New Jersey LG Electronics Marketing Department Thai Basil Sweet Basil Red basil USDA Standards and Labeling Guidelines book Bone Marrow and bread Bone Marrow in Hawaii where you take a shot in the bone Life is too short to eat the same thing twice Standards of Identity Top-Note

Ep. 077 - Going Bananas for Fair Trade with Kim Chackal, Sales Manager at Equifruit
43:15
2017-09-27 09:28:25 UTC 43:15
Ep. 077 - Going Bananas for Fair Trade with Kim Chackal, Sales Manager at Equifruit

This episode is all about Fair Trade, you’ll not only learn about Equifruit’s focus on bananas, but also what other products can be fair trade, awesome resources in the fair-trade industry, and things of that nature.

Kim herself is an expert salesperson. Ever since she was 18 years old, she learned to go out and sell, and we talk over her expert techniques and here’s a secret… it’s all about perspective.

Also to note is Kim’s philosophy in life. She’s had so many jobs but because she loved what she did, and that opened more and more opportunities in her life. Something to think about.

So in this episode, you’ll learn where bananas come from, how a diamond ring can be fair trade, and how to be an amazing sales person

About Kim

Kim is a native Montrealer with a passion for all things food.  She graduated from Concordia University with a degree in Psychology and pursued further education at St. Pius X Culinary Institute, where she attained a diploma in French cuisine.  Kim has worked in sales from the start of her career: restaurant, retail, spa industry, catering and now, Fairtrade bananas!

Kim joined Equifruit as sales manager in late 2014.  After nearly 15 years of sales experience, she wanted to be more connected on a social justice level.  She loves the challenge of convincing Canadian customers to put farmers first.  Kim brings to the table relentless optimism, contagious enthusiasm and an irrevocable passion for fair trade.

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

Housekeeping

If you like what you heard, like us on facebook or write a review on itunes. It helps wonders.

I am also inviting you to sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com. I am doing this new thing called the 5 course meal where I send you 5 pieces of hand picked content and deliver it every Friday morning. Like a meal kit…

If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Knowledge Bombs
  • Where fair trade bananas come from
  • How everything can be fair trade
  • How fair trade funds farmer’s kids with money
Question Summary

What do you tell people you do?: Exotic fair trade fruit saleswoman. A light intro on fair trade Fair Trade: Doing business on fair terms. The producer gets paid properly. When I was 18 years old: Sales as B2B. Cold calling. Selling a product from door to door How did you put yourself out there when finding your next gig?: Social media How to be a good sales person: A really good salesperson reads people well. Everything from the tone of your voice to the language Does good sales people come from books or experience?: It might be more innate than you think. You can develop a salesperson, but you have to be perceptive. An introvert can be a salesperson Food Trends and Technologies: Purchasing habits of Bananas. People are buying products because of the value of the products Where do you find your sales research?: Canadian Government Websites Who inspired you to get into food?: My family Career path: I study the things I find interesting. You have to love what you do, but there will be challenges. Ask the questions: what would you do for free? Or what excites you? Kitchen Item: I’m a knife snob. I have to carry my knives for vacation Advice for a Sales Job: Ask to be paired to an expert salesperson Favorite Food: Salad and fresh fruits. I would wait for the seasons to enjoy my fruit Advice about life: It’s more important to love what you do because it opens up amazing opportunity. You’ll be a happier human being. Equifruit.com Equifruit Twitter Equifruit Instagram Equifruit facebook Equifruit linkedin

Other Links

Fairtrade Canada Fairtrade.net Canadian Fairtrade network Guelph Organic Tradeshows Canadian Produce Marketing Association Fair Trade Chocolate, Sugar, Tea Fair Trade cotton shirt Fairtrade Diamond Ring Farm and Food Care BA Psychology Concordian University Saint Pious the 10th – Culinary School Catering Company Fighting the Banana Wars Harriett Lam Social introvert Good survey about personalities Neilson

 

Ep. 076 - How to Be A Food Lawyer with Cesare Varallo, Independent Food Lawyer and owner at foodlawlatest.com
54:40
2017-09-27 09:28:25 UTC 54:40
Ep. 076 - How to Be A Food Lawyer with Cesare Varallo, Independent Food Lawyer and owner at foodlawlatest.com

Food Law is one of those topics I fell asleep at in college. But it wasn’t until working in the industry did I find just how important it really is.

If you’ve been a fan of this podcast, you might have heard my frustrations learning about how the Europeans deal with GMOs. If you’re a first time listener, I’ll talk about it again.

But Ceasare Varallo is the man when it comes to making me excited about food law. He’s a lawyer in Italy who focuses on such things as food fraud, regulatory compliance, and communicating crises.

This is an amazing interview all about being a food lawyer. You’ll learn how to get a job in regulatory, how to get people to trust you as an expert and the amazing food technologies Cesare’s really into. One in particular that I haven’t heard of until recently… block chain technology

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

If you like what you heard, like us on facebook or write a review on itunes. It helps wonders.

I am also inviting you to sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com. I am doing this new thing called the 5 course meal where I send you 5 pieces of hand picked content and deliver it every Friday morning. Like a meal kit…

If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Knowledge Bombs
  • Ceasare’s work is three fold: food safety, regulatory, and managing communication
  • How Ceasare found his niche in food law
  • Why regulatory is getting more and more important
  • The interesting things about food marketing
  • How to learn more about food regulatory
Question Summary

Introduction in a sentence or less?: I’m a food lawyer. I help food companies to reach the compliance Cesare started with commodities at first and then went to more complicated things later Steps it took to get to where you are today: Criminal lawyer, switched law firm and found food clients. Noticed about the specific type of advice Foodlawlatest.com

Blogging advice If you have good content, it will be successful Avoid scandal or “fake news”, give useful facts Interacting with your audience is super important

What’s the most important skill you need for your job?: How you communicate and interact with people How do you get people to trust you more?: A blog with good content is a sign of trust, facts are a sign of trust, showing that you really know what you’re talking about. Keep on delivering good content and make them comfortable.The customer today is much more informed Customers are reading more food labels and are willing to spend good, safe, tasty and authentic food. Food Technology: Smart Agriculture, Drones, Artificial Intelligence to spot food safety issues, block chains, Block Chain: Technology used to secure the financial transactions: bitcoins/ cryptocurrency. Will help food fraud a lot. Biggest Challenge the food industry needs to face: Fraudulence and trust. Big companies are not trusted. Local is more trusted. A small minority has a lot of power What is something you would like to know more about?: Marketing. How much work it takes to do marketing campaigns. How do you make things Viral? Favorite Book: Lord of the Rings Favorite Quote: Winston Churchill: success consists of going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm Favorite Kitchen Item: My favorite dish is risotto so I like a really big wooden spoon

If anyone wanted a job in regulatory, what should they study on their own?: You can find many courses in food law in United States. California and New York has plenty Study the objective official source depending on countries. Common websites. FDA website, Code of Federal Regulations Not so simple in Europe: 26 countries with deviations Independent blogs can work too

Advice getting into the food regulatory industry: Get your hands dirty. You can’t imagine the complexity with regulatory issues. It’s more about how you approach the problem Where can we find you?: Foodlawlatest@gmail.com

Other Links

Foodlawlatest.com Baby formula scandal Olive Oil Book: Extra Virginity Anti-Vaxxers “We don’t trust science but everyone is eating supplements” Viral Marketing Coca-cola put names on the cans, and they monitor and test everything Food Marketing Nerds Podcast

Ep. 075 - A Recruiter's Point of View: How to Unearth New Opportunities with Bob Pudlock, Recruiter at Gulf Stream Search
01:03:29
2017-09-27 09:28:25 UTC 01:03:29
Ep. 075 - A Recruiter's Point of View: How to Unearth New Opportunities with Bob Pudlock, Recruiter at Gulf Stream Search

What’s the point of a food industry podcast if I can’t help you with your careers?

That’s why I’ve actually taken a liking on interviewing recruiters because recruiters know the best way to get a job.

Bob Pudlock is one of those people. He is an independent recruiter who knows his stuff. Taking an unconventional route, Bob went into recruiting because companies would pay him top dollar to recruit. Yep, one sentence solidified his career.

Bob has a lot of practical advice in the show such as how to make 100% use of job interviews when you have to pay for your own flight, the power of long-term networking, and one of my favorite topics, which is better? Factory experience or a master’s degree?

Shownotes: http://myfoodjobrocks.com/075Bob

About Bob Pudlock

Bob Pudlock is the owner and President of Gulf Stream Search, an executive search firm that works with companies in the food and nutritional supplement industries to identify, assess and capture top talent for their organizations.

Bob has been in the search industry for 17 years - he has placed individuals all throughout the US and Caribbean at all levels - most of the positions he fills are in R&D, Quality, Sales/Marketing, and Plant Operations throughout the US - he works with venture capital firms that focus on the food industry, start-ups, as well as established brands in the food and supplement industries.

Bob grew up in Cleveland, OH and attended John Carroll University where he played on the golf team.  He moved to South Florida in 2011 and is active outdoors with running, swimming, stand-up paddle board racing, fishing and bicycling.

5 top reasons My Food Job Rocks

1. I can work from anywhere - I conduct nearly all of my work via phone, email, and video.

2. I choose what companies, searches, and candidates I work with.

3. I make my own hours - I work as much or as little as I like - although my business demands a lot of my time, I still have the flexibility and control over my schedule to do the things I enjoy outside with the people close to me.

4. I control my income.

5. I get to work with up and coming talent in the food industry and I also get to work with companies that are changing the way we look at nutrition and health in general.  I get to work with people that are truly making a difference in the world.

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

 

If you like what you heard, like us on facebook or set a review on itunes. It helps wonders. If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Knowledge Bombs
  • How to make the most of paying to fly to a job interview
  • Why you should go to hiring managers and not HR
  • How even the smallest talks can be impactful
  • The value of factory experience
  • The many factors about the lack of free labor
Question Summary

Sentence or less: I identify or recruit top talent in the food industry What do you do specifically?: 2 things: companies go to him to find people and he finds great people I focus on relationships and connecting What was the time you talked to someone who didn’t accept the job at the time?: I try to open up to people to imagine the possibilities. I try to set more expectations. What’s the best advice for growing your network?: Throw your net wide, not deep The best thing about your job: The journey of hiring Steps it took to get to where you are today: Ohio, Private schools, good at sports, underachiever, didn’t think what would happen when he grew up, golf coach, training salesmen, “Bob, we will pay you top dollar to find salespeople”, pet food recruiting, then expanded to more - Sometimes it’s ok not to know what you’re going to do What’s the most common theme between excellent candidates?: For young people: curiosity for learning and getting to really understand all the different steps on the product development cycle What is more valuable? Masters experience or Factory experience?: Factory experience. It can’t be replaced or supplemented at a later date. For many people, most people want to do different things Why Does Your Food Job Rock?: It’s all about the journey. Also, I work for myself and I get to have control over who I work with What is Bob’s Win Rate (Hired versus not hired): Average is 10-15 interviews for one hire. Bob has had impressive numbers. The secret is understand what the company is looking for Food Trends and Technologies: The blurred lines between mainstream food and nutrition What is the biggest challenge the food industry needs to face?: Skilled labor. Some reasons: we put our manufacturing plants in the middle of nowhere, lobbying to reduce regulations for hiring skilled labor. Favorite Quote: The Man in the Arena. Favorite Book: Oh the Places You’ll Go Favorite Kitchen Utensil: Utensils that are not utensils Advice on the food industry: If you’re going technical, get a degree. Think of other degrees like Masters or MBAs What is a common myth that you’d like to dispel about job hunting?: The best resume doesn’t always win Where can we find you?: Gulf Stream Search. Email: bob.pudlock@gulfstreamsearch.com Phone number: 561-450-9490

Other Links

Hiring Manager – Someone who requests a new employee H1B Visa

Ep. 074 – How to Get a Job at the FDA with Steve Gendel, Vice President, Division Food Allergens at IEH Laboratories
45:21
2017-09-27 09:28:25 UTC 45:21
Ep. 074 – How to Get a Job at the FDA with Steve Gendel, Vice President, Division Food Allergens at IEH Laboratories

Steve Gendel has worked in the FDA for 25 years and this guy has had an amazing career doing so.

He’s been involved in the latest and greatest technologies ranging from early stage GMOs, Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act, and of course, our favorite one right now, FSMA.

The best part of this episode is the very practical and real advice he give son how to get a job at the FDA. Of course, it’s a special mix of fiscal year luck, and who you know. He tells you the best places to meet people in the FDA, where the FDA usually works at (which of course, it’s not easy find), and when to start asking your contacts if there are positions open.

 http://myfoodjobrocks.com/074Steven

About Steven M. Gendel, Ph.D.

Dr. Gendel works to ensure safe food for everyone through education, consulting, and support of food manufacturers and organizations of all sizes as the Vice President, Division of Food Allergens, IEH Laboratories and Consulting Group. This includes facilitating compliance with the rules issued under the Food Safety Modernization Act, and supporting the development of Hazard Assessments and Food Safety Plans. He applies a scientifically sound approach to allergen control and testing, and to resolving compliance issues.  He is a Food Safety Preventive Control Alliance Preventive Controls Lead Trainer, a Certified Food Scientist, and an experienced speaker.  Previously he was the Food Allergen Coordinator for the US Food and Drug Administration where he lead policy initiatives, the development of regulatory documents, and assisted in enforcement activities.  He has over 25 years of experience in food safety science and policy and over 90 techincal publications. He held postdoctoral positions at Harvard University and the University of Toronto and was on the faculty of the Department of Genetics at Iowa State University before joining the FDA.

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

Knowledge Bombs
  • Steve talks about why he stayed in the FDA for 25 years
  • How the FDA is funded
  • What the FDA controls
  • What Steve thinks has the best food safety programs
  • The best advice on how to get into the FDA
  • When to start looking for a FDA job
Question Summary

One sentence or less: I’m a food safety scientist. My job is the next thing you eat will not kill you Best thing about your job: I feel like I’m really making the world safer Step to get to where you are today: Undergraduate degree in engineering in KS Western reserve , Graduate in UC Irvine in biology, Department of Genetics in Iowa University, met someone at FDA which was now Institute of Food Safety and Health, stay with the FDA for 25 years, now a consultant

What is the difference between the FDA then and now?: A lot of external factors shape the projects such as consumer, laws and regulations, and new congressional turnover The hot topic before you left: FSMA is coming into effect (well…. Maybe not anymore) Most important skill you can have in food safety: Flexibility. Food safety is a very integrative type of field. There are a lot of pieces in Food Safety.

Projects Steve was involved in:

  • Potential allergens in GMOs (back when it was new)
  • Risk analysis modeling
  • Joint project between FDA and Health Canada about Soft-cheeses and L.monocytogenes
  • Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act. Thresholds for Allergens
  • Lead author of an allergen threshold report
  • Helped with FSMA’s preventative control

New Food Trends and Tech: Advanced Genome Technologies. Can be a great tool to understand pathogens. It helps you understand where they come from and then we can do that Biggest Challenge the Food Industry has to face: Transparency. Mainly asking “why” One thing you’d like to know more about: How companies invest in food safety and food safety program Favorite Quote: To err is human but to really mess up, you need a computer Favorite Food: Grilled Cheese Sandwich. Sharp Cheddar, Swiss Cheese, Artisanal Food What Advice Would You Give TO Work In The FDA: At this particular time in history, it’s hard to say. However, meet people in the FDA. It’s who you know. How to meet FDA people: Scientific Conferences. Local meetings at IFT and IAFP, American Chem Society, Society of Toxicology, talk to them, they will know others who do. USAjobs.com Office of Regulatory Affairs. There are District Offices. Contact the Deputy Director of that office Commissioner’s Fellowship ORISE- Oakridge CIFSAN – Centers for Food Safety in Universities that work collaboratively. Can get graduate or postdoc positions Fiscal Year for the Federal Government: Begins October 1st, ends October 1st. But start looking now How to find Steve: linkedin

Other Links

Ep. 031 - Tiffany Lau Myrian Zboraj – Quality Assurance Magazine GATTACA Walmart Costco

 

Ep. 073 - The Importance of Food Safety with Dr. Darin Detwiler, Assistant Dean at Northeastern University College of Professional Studies
01:00:15
2017-09-27 09:28:25 UTC 01:00:15
Ep. 073 - The Importance of Food Safety with Dr. Darin Detwiler, Assistant Dean at Northeastern University College of Professional Studies

Darin’s son died of an E.coli outbreak and he has spent the last 25 years devoting his life to making the world a safer place.

Within the last 25 years, he’s become a Doctorate in Law and Policy where his main focus is to implement Food Policy. He’s talked with doctors, scientists, law makers, and graduate students into fighting for food safety. In his spare time, he comforts people who have gone through the same troubles as he has, and shares their stories.

Darin does a great job weaving intricate stories to give you the sense of importance in Food safety, which includes aspects of history, humanity and Chipotle.

A serious note for this interview: This is a very dense and emotional conversation of food safety. Darin really cares about what he does, and by the end of the episode, I hope you have a renewed sense of importance in food safety.

About Darin 

Dr. Darin Detwiler is the Assistant Dean and a Professor of Food Policy at Northeastern University College of Professional Studies, Boston, MA.  He is a food industry consultant, columnist, and frequent speaker at events across the country and beyond.  

He is coincidentally going to be on American Greed (yes, that's his voice) this week 

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

Knowledge Bombs
  • Why deadly foodborne illnesses spikes during the summer months, which causes a bad experience in Thanksgiving
  • The stories behind statistics. Focus on the stories.
  • How the FDA has changed in the last 25 years
  • How people being lazy can cause massive damage
  • How history impacts food policy
  • Everyone has a role to play in food safety
  • Understanding the cause and effect in food safety
  • Why Darin chooses Academia to do Food Safety
  • How Darin balances out food industry stories and family stories and the differences between them
  • How Darin’s perception of food safety has changed over time
  • The lack of Ethics in the Peanut outbreak
  • We talk smack about Chipotle
  • I’m as old as Chipotle
Key Summary

How Darin has improved Food Safety: 1992 – operating a nuclear reactor, supported the USDA on food safety, went back to university and taught for 15 years in forensic science, Doctorate in Law and Policy and focus was on implementing food policy, Two reasons why food safety fails: They don’t understand or they don’t care. Maybe we need to teach people earlier. Most Food Safety folly is based on greed My Food Job Rocks: Food affects everyone and we connect to it on all aspects of life What advice do you give people to excel at what they do?: If you see things and you don’t take action, or won’t eat your own product, ask questions. Be a self-advocate. Why did Chipotle fail their food safety protocols?: Failure to invest in safety. The system needs work, but their response is textbook What should Chipotle should have done to be better?: They can’t fix the past

Other Links

Stop Foodborne Illnesses Jack-in-The-Box E.coli outbreak 1993 Food Fraud: Big in Europe Bioterrorism Upton Sinclair – The Jungle Peanut Outbreak Chipotle Outbreak Contact: d.detwiler@neu.edu Quality Assurance Magazine

Ep. 072 [Bonus] - A Coffee Chat with the Best CEO I Know with Thom King, CEO of Steviva
25:16
2017-09-27 09:28:25 UTC 25:16
Ep. 072 [Bonus] - A Coffee Chat with the Best CEO I Know with Thom King, CEO of Steviva

I usually do a pre-interview with my guest, to kind of explain what we do, if they listen to the show, and stuff like that. However Thom’s pre-interview was so good that I had to share it.

Think of this as an episode where I invite an old friend out to coffee to see what’s going on with his life. Thom is an amazing person who reminds me a lot of Derek Sivers.

Thom is also a guest who loves to swear so I edited a few things so the itunes police doesn’t get me.

So you’re going to learn a bit about documentation, and also some great podcasts that Thom listens to. Also, the really awesome perks Thom has built up in Stevivia’s office. There is a reason for that. If you want a full reason, listen at myfoodjobrocks.com/072Thom

Enjoy!

Key Takeaways
  • The importance of documentation
  • Thom’s investment in employee happiness
  • How to have employees talk to you
Other Links

Non-GMO in Europe Louis Hows – School of Greatness Tom Bilyeu - Impact Theory Mixergy Tom Bilyeu Tim Ferriss Show Kale Chips Healthy Crunch How I Built This One Question You Would Like to be Asked?: Why do you do what you do? Weird things in Steviva’s office: Tomato’s and chickens, food Friday

Ep. 072 - Starting a Sweetener Company in a Garage and Growing to More than $10 Million with Thom King, CEO of Steviva
52:32
2017-09-27 09:28:25 UTC 52:32
Ep. 072 - Starting a Sweetener Company in a Garage and Growing to More than $10 Million with Thom King, CEO of Steviva

 

Thom King is probably the best CEO I’ve ever had the chance to talk to. He’s fun, innovative, and he just loves his job and the people he works with.

I had a great hour and a half talk with him on my lunch break and had to find an excuse when I got back to work. This interview is that good.

Where to start from this interview… whether you’re a young professional, an old soul, or a struggling entrepreneur, Thom will give you advice on all aspects of your career.

You’ll learn how to deal with conflict in the work place, the touching reasons why Thom loves his job, the amazing first stage of stevia and the growth of the brand, and at the end of the segment, the power of having a good idea and working hard so that everyone knows you’re the best.

Remember: I am currently recording this at my hotel at IFT. Just saying, I’ll be there until Wednesday. If you’re available, I’d love to meet you. Just email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

If you like what you heard, like us on facebook or set a review on itunes. It helps wonders. If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

 

About Thom King

Part CEO, part personal development wonk and part biohacker info geek, Thom is a self-confessed serial entrepreneur. While his favorite book list contains many success-oriented and personal-development classics, the classic definition of achieving success (e.g., making a lot of money) is not what inspires or motivates Thom. He follows more of a “you aren’t doing well unless you’re also doing some good” line of thinking. Thom’s company has been built around the simple principle of “do the right thing.”

Knowledge Bombs

- How to deal with conflict in the work place - Literally the birth of Stevia - How to get triple digit growth 3 years in a row - Some methods to understand people - Thom’s interesting hobby and how he makes them - How to validate a good idea

Question Summary

Elevator Pitch: A sweetner that doesn’t affect blood sugar levels that became an ingredient company Favorite thing to do as a CEO: Make my employees cry with tears of joy; Be appreciative with your employees What do you think you do in a day?: Manage personalities How many people are in your company?: 32 people How do you deal with conflict?: Clashing is a function of a breakdown in communication; I learn about the problem, and get to a common ground People who get under your skin: Imagine them as a six year old child Steps it took: Thom met Jim while doing radio, he tasted Stevia, made Stevia extract in a  garage Steviva was born in 1992 2008 – Stevia was given provisional GRAS status, moving Thom’s company to Food Ever since 2015, Steviva has experienced triple digit growth Metabolic disease: Obesity, diabetes Why did you start a food company and what keeps you going?: Getting rid of metabolic disease is my why Most important skill you can have in the industry: integrity. Constantly improve your product. Integrity is a service to makea  good product. Food trends and technologies: Probiotics and fermentation Thom makes his own probiotics and uses an 11 strain fiber What is one thing you’d like to know more about?: Hydrocolloids, thickening agents Example: thai chilli sauce, jam, etc Favorite Quote: Tony Robbins: Anything is possible and it’s up to you to make it probable Favorite Book: Right now is Tools of Titan Favorite Kitchen Item: Sous Vide Favorite Food: Spaghetti and Meatballs Any Advice for starting your own business: listen to Gary Vee’s Podcast. You grind and grind and grind and grind some more This is the best time in the world ever to start a business Low entry points for validating your idea: social media and crowd funding One thing you’d like to know about starting your business: more knowledge about Accounting What’s next for Steviva: Moving to another facility. Quadrupalling the size of our R+D lab Steviva: twitter, Instagram, etc info@steviva.com --> direct it to Thom!

Other Links

Steviva Nextiva brand – Stevia infused agave nectar Marrakesh Spice Provencal Anise Maple syrup Masala Chai Spice DE 42 High fructose corn syrup Jim May – Founder of Wisdom Naturals DISC test – Analyzing human needs for all employees Polyols/Erythritol FDA rulings on fiber Jerusalem Artichoke Chicory Root IMOs Custom Probiotics Glendale Los Angeles Flowbee- vaccum haircut Ketogenic diet Exogenous ketones

Ep. 071 - How to Find Good People and Great Companies with Steve MacIntyre, Director of People and Culture at Vibrant Health Products
46:46
2017-09-27 09:28:25 UTC 46:46
Ep. 071 - How to Find Good People and Great Companies with Steve MacIntyre, Director of People and Culture at Vibrant Health Products

I am fortunate to interview Steve MacIntyre, as he brings a new perspective compared to the standard guests we interview here. He is the first Human Resource professional, and the only one I know who is really passionate about his industry.

Like many of our guests, Steve’s career path involved a lot of twists, and turns, and ultimately, a lot of leaps of faiths. From the army, to health and safety, to eventually, human resources, you can really feel how Steve has kind of gone with the flow in his career.

As a HR professional, Steve brings some amazing advice in this interview which will help you become a much better professional.

We give you some tricks on how to take advantage of networking, make the most of taking an expert to coffee, and igniting your intellectual curiosity

About Steve MacIntyre

An energetic, results-focused HR professional who directly contributes to a high performance culture by creating an employee oriented climate and implementing progressive and consistent people management practices that emphasize engagement, integrity, productivity and consistency.

Provides sound advice and guidance on human resources issues to leaders enabling our business to attract, retain, and engage great people who are inspired by superior results.

About Vibrant Health Products

Our story finds its humble beginnings in the Okanagan Valley in British Columbia, where Brad Brousson began using his mother’s recipe to bake sprouted grain bread for guests at a wellness resort. In 1989, Stan and Kathy Smith partnered with Brad to form Vibrant Health Products, sharing Brad’s passion for health and wellness.

Over the years, the company has expanded to include three brands: Silver Hills Bakery, One Degree Organic Foods, and Little Northern Bakehouse. But the company remains family-owned and operated. And the same homemade quality that began in Brad’s kitchen is still present in each loaf of bread, bagel, and bun we bake.

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

If you like what you heard, like us on facebook or set a review on itunes. It helps wonders. If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Knowledge Bombs

- Why being a HR professional in the food industry is different compared to any other industry - How to be transparent and getting into the culture of transparency - How Steve used networking to excel at his job - Why Steve left his first job because of the products they made - How to get the most value out of a coffee interview - How to encourage people to demonstrate intellectual curiosity

Question Summary

Sentence or less: Senior level HR practitioner for the food industry Why do you like the food industry: Food is something we all share. It's more intimate What is the best thing about your job?: Hiring people, and give young professionals their first opportunity Describe the steps it took to get to where you are today: I was in the army, electrician apprenticeship, laid off, food business is hiring electricians, health and safety committee, HR director asked him to take over and he loved it Required HR: Chartered Professional in Human Resources (Canada)  or SPHR (US) What should more people do to be good at their job?: Network with people who do what you do and do what you want to do.  Be intellectually curious My Food Job rocks: I get to be part of this movement Food Trends and Technologies: Sustainability, Whole Foods One thing in the food industry you’d like to know more about?: Marketing. How do we influence you to buy our stuff? Advice Going Into The Food Industry: Call me! But seriously, I love talking to passionate people. How do you find good candidates?: I’m looking for energy How can we reach you?: Through linkedin

Other Links

Gardeen Flexitarian Give and Take

Ep. 070 - A Year in Review
27:19
2017-09-27 09:28:25 UTC 27:19
Ep. 070 - A Year in Review

 

If you like what you heard, like us on facebook or set a review on itunes. It helps wonders. If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Manuscript

Looking at my calendar, I saw that this podcast actually started in June.

It’s felt like a long time. A lot of things have happened while creating this podcast. I met some incredible people, collaborated with geniuses, and made my connections with my friends unbreakably strong.

Other than that, a total of 15,000 people have downloaded the podcast, averaging 215 listens per episode. For me, I’m happy with this.

So in this episode I just wanted to really flesh out the events that made this podcast for what it was today, and how it slowly transformed. From the independent website, graduate student series, to why I am changing some of my questions, I want to tell you just how fun it was making this thing and where we’re planning to go next.

Let’s being

Beginnings

Have I told this story before? Maybe only to my guests, or with my friends.

When I first moved to Phoenix, I became obsessed with Podcasts, almost about the same time I started hating my job, which you can listen about in episode 60, which was around the time I wanted to find a way out.

I noticed that sure, listening to music was fun, but it wasn’t productive. So I started listening to audio books which I borrowed form the Phoenix library. Soon it evolved into podcasts.

My first podcasts I listened to often were Smart Passive Income and Entrepreneur on Fire. I’d consider these entry-level because they are indeed inspiring stories with a little bit of tactical knowledge. This went on for about a year.

In maybe January 2016, I read an article by Tim Ferriss about how he started his podcast. Through his write up, I found it was pretty easy to do. For example, the equipment was dirt cheap, and the barrier to entry is pretty good.

About a month later, Nicole posted the fated article about how the food industry is hiring people at a declining rate and everything kind of clicked.

The lesson here is really about this simple equation, that opportunity + preparedness = luck is something that resonates with me when I do projects.

If I didn’t listen to podcasts, or read how to do them, I would never had had the opportunity to work with Nicole. There are many other factors in how this started up that made it worked as well.

For example, Foodgrads was a startup, so they were flexible and willing to support me in this venture. Though they didn’t give me initial capital, the power of just getting a thumbs up is more than enough justification to get started with the podcast so I set aside $1000 dollars and went to town. I would provide the episodes, and they would provide the website that I could post on.

I bought equipment recommended by Tim Ferriss including this microphone. I downloaded Audacity, and then I bought a course called Podcaster’s Paradise. This course was created by John Lee Dumas from Entrepreneur on Fire. I subscribed for about 3 months and learned a lot of technical tidbits in not only on how to use Audacity, but how to structure my podcast from getting guests to sending thank you notes. It also gave me some amazing tools such as calendly.com and libsyn.

I also found the facebook group they had extremely supportive and that’s also where I met Kim from Peas On Moss, who started her podcast the same time as I did.

So starting that, I now had to get guests. First up was Nicole and Juliette from Foodgrads as they were the ones hosting it on their website, so it just seemed right. Then I got Trevor Fast, Brian Chau, and Taryn Yee, while on a work trip to California. I literally scheduled time to meet and record. It was really fun!

I remember doing the dumbest thing while doing Trevor’s interview. I thought the room was too noisy so I thought we could do it in the office. We ended up doing the interview in a cramped, noisy room where chocolate was being refined. Editing that was a pain.

So you keep going. Episode 6 was my most valuable guest being Dr. Howard Moskowitz in more ways than one. This one was a stroke of luck I had no idea how I got him on the show. I just connected on linkeidn, he sends me a bunch of stuff and I asked him to be on the podcast. That’s so cool!

I realized then, that the ability to ask someone to be on a podcast is an extremely valuable tool. For one, it gives you a very legitimate excuse on inviting, and talking to people you want to talk to, and

I would say about 70% of my podcasts have guests I personally contacted, 10% are from people who sign up to be interviewed randomly and another 20% are referred to by either previous guests or friends.

My biggest tips for finding great guests is pretty simple, especially for people on linkedin.

For one, if they post a lot, it’s more likely they would like to be on the show. There are only a few exceptions I’ve had with this.

People who are going to launch something, whether it’s a book or new product, are especially willing to talk about it as well. This is how I got Ali Bouzari on the show, for instance.

Connectors, whether self-proclaimed are not have their perks too. Rochelle Boucher, for example, knew a ton of people and supported me in huge amounts getting guests that came to her Miele location. I returned the favor with my own resources.

After my recent talk with Alex Oesterle from Food Marketing Nerds, I found that he has a very different way of contacting. A bit more professional, which I might want to dive in the future.

He goes through PR firms or PR departments to get amazing guests from the marketing department. I’ve only had a couple of guests been blocked by denying permission, which I actually find kind of, a strange and outdated practice, but I understand.

But the method I use works, I have absolutely no problem finding guests and I actually realized that I don’t need big shots on my podcasts. I actually really enjoy interviewing fresh, inspiring graduates. Some recent examples like Jon Weber and Louis Edmond, who both just got their jobs, were extremely satisfying to talk to just because of their passionate outlook in life and I wouldn’t have it any other way.

So this brings me to another topic about what you want your podcast to represent. This means knowing your audience, and catering to that audience.

Overall, the message and structure for My Food  Job Rocks is a pretty simple one: explore different food jobs, dive in a little bit of their history, and explore their viewpoints on current events such as technology or current events. At the end, we cool down and talk about books, quotes, and favorite foods.

The questions we’ve designed for our show is pretty standard, but testing certain questions has made the process a lot of fun.

One of the questions I’ve changed was “what is a standard day like?”

I used this question in the beginning, but all I got was “every day is different!” So I changed this question and worded it in multiple different ways. Sometimes I say “what’s the most exciting part of your job?” or “what’s the worst?” some of my personal favorites include asking the process of how to make a certain food such as with Jocelyn Ngo or Haley Richardson. By diving into a subject filled with enigma versus a standard routine, in usually generates more excitement.

One of the other questions I’ve had a good time playing around with is “what do you think are the important skills you need in your job?”.

My favorite answer to this question is from Tiffany Tong from Canada’s Smartest Kitchen, where she said adaptability. After she did a beautiful explanation of the word, I dug deeper. “How do you become more adaptable?”

I guess the trend and evolution of the questions I ask is more about “how can I make this podcast more exciting/unique, and what type of tactical and actionable advice can I give to my audience?”

Next topic is in regards to why we split off from Foodgrads initially, around episode 16:

Well, I wanted more control and a certain person who was there at the time didn’t want that. Eventually, they had to approach to let me go.

I’m bad at assuming things, so I’ll leave it as: I grew too big for their nest so I had to leave. With a mix of disappointment, support from my friends, and admittedly, utter rage, I decided to make my own website to host my podcast.

I still had a weekly podcast so I had to make a website fast.

Luckily, this wasn’t just a start-from-scratch bang my head against the wall. Ever since I started hating my job, I dabbled into website design. I made my first “successful” website called Az Asian Food Review. Where I reviewed Asian food in phoenix.

I had to pay for a theme dedicated to podcasting (which in hindsight, I never used that feature) and a pretty good front page function.

Building the website was actually one of the most exhilarating I’ve done for this project and I am really proud of the website I made.

Using my skills from Canva, and my website experience, I made a website for maybe under $150 dollars that I could use as my playground.

And looking back, I used it as a playground very well.

Evolving the shownotes, making a blogging section for my own personal use, and recently, hosting another person’s content made this website a proud accomplishment.

Eventually, I made a deal with Foodgrads to work with them. Yes, it was awkward at first, but both Nicole and I supported each other. I actually had a huge internal debate not to do it because of an ego issue on my end, but that was a dumb, childish reason. The main reason is really, we can’t do this alone. If we’re split now, there is no way to conquer the industry. I need Nicole to be a powerhouse distribution force in the future, and she needs my high quality content to satisfy her readers.

Two lessons appear from this: don’t burn bridges, and don’t give up. I could have easily been extremely hot headed and aggressive in this scenario, and let my ego do the talking, but I had to bite my tongue. It’s paid off.

Another thing is consistency. If you really want to make this not a hobby, you need to be consistent with your episodes. Too many people get burnt out or just lose motivation on doing a weekly podcast.

What actually happened was I liked interviewing so much I ended up having so many episodes, I had to open the flood gates and launch 2 episodes a week. I was so hard to switch to 1 but I realized that two episodes a week really took a toll on my life. Luckily, I had Veronica Hislop save me with her willingness to provide awesome content with her blog posts.

So I want to wrap this whole thing up into a lessons learned scenario.

Both podcasting and website design were once small interests, that later became hobbies and then actually became revenue generating.

Yes, I made my initial investment back 5 times over. Some were direct requests, others were from referrals from guests. Not only that, but certain guests have contacted me for other projects and what’s coming in the next couple of years is really something.

At the end of the day, the biggest lesson I have for you is to just start doing something an hour a day. It can be researching, or reading, or just gathering information.

Eventually, a seed will be planted into your mind. When the opportunity strikes, you’ll be prepared.

As maybe you could tell from this episode, most of the opportunities I was given was

So the best place to invest a minimal amount of skill? I’ll give you two resources where you can find a skill and then have the opportunity to dig deeper.

Entreprenuer Podcasts

The SPI podcast by Pat Flynn is probably the best resource to find a collection of people who are making income in unconventional ways. This was actually one of the avenues I’ve used to another area of interest which ended up being a bad investment but that’s another story.

You can probably find things similar to SPI by typing in entrepreneur podcast in your favorite search engine. Other search terms you can use is Bootstrapping, and built.

Recently, Reid Hoffman’s Masters of Scale has been one of the best things I’ve ever listened to so if you’re going for it, you gotta listen to his stuff.

And

Facebook sponsored webinars

If you’re like me, a bunch of people are now pitching their “free webinar” facebook ad on my feed constantly.

Maybe it’s because I like stuff that attracts those adds to me…

Anyways, you should try it out. You’ll only invest one hour of your time.

But be careful! These types of webinars will always try and sell you something. It’s just their design. Whether you buy or not, is up to you. However, as a disclaimer, I buy maybe 20% of products that I see in webinars.

The point in exploring different avenues is to eventually find something where you can utilize the skill. The demand or timeline will be your bridge from interest to skill.

The power of having your back against the wall, you’ll be surprised in what you could get done.

Have a website to build in a week when someone lets you go? Time to get serious.

This is actually what I’m kind of missing now, the stuff I’m doing is awesome, but I need a sense of urgency to kick me in the butt. Apparently, it’s just my personality.

So where is this podcast heading in the future?

I don’t know. My goal is 100 episodes. Judging by the rate of this, we’ll be there in January.

With more than 50 interviews under my belt, I think it’s time to push a little bit on wrapping up the content in a nice little bow and send it to people who would find value in it such as professors, career consolers, or whatever.

I think I can put a little more oomph in sharing the content to others who might want to take the food industry as a career path.

Overall I have to tell you, I’m in this for the long run. Not just the podcast, but the connections I’ve made with every guest on the show is extremely valuable and every time I see their names or faces, I remember of the pieces of gold within their interview. Every podcast guest has taught me so much about just how passionate people are in their job. Whether it’s young professional’s eagerness to learn or the startup CEOs who hustle and works her butt off 24/7 but are fueled with endless energy, those are the guests that keep me going.

The next set of episodes are absolutely amazing. And there’s a lot more variety too. More food safety guests thanks to Marian Zboraj, editor for a Food Safety magazine. She gave me some absolutely amazing people in that sector.

What else, more sales reps, where I go more into what makes a good salesman, and the best CEO I’ve ever met.

There’s just so much coming up, that I always look forward to trying something new.

Thank you to everyone who’s been with me this past year. Thank you to all of our listeners, to all of our supporters, whether financially or emotionally. I don’t know what’s coming next, but things are building and as long as we’re in this together, we can do anything.

 

Ep. 069 - An Opportunity in the Indian Food Industry with Shyamoli Gramopadhye, Food Technologist at DairiConcepts
42:27
2017-09-27 09:28:25 UTC 42:27
Ep. 069 - An Opportunity in the Indian Food Industry with Shyamoli Gramopadhye, Food Technologist at DairiConcepts

Today we have Shyamoli Gramopadhye a food technologist at Dairy Concepts where she solves the technical problems of her clients in the cheese and cheese powder industry. Shyamoli is actually a very supportive writer for Foodgrads and writes articles on the site.

This episode has a lot of info about India’s food scene. Not just the culinary aspect, but the industry aspect as well! Shyamoli is highly passionate in this aspect and is learning as much as she can in the United States, where she will hopefully bring it back to India some day.

Other tidbits in the episode include: the power of creative freedom, curiosity, and we sprinkle in a few great book recommendations throughout the episode.

About Shyamoli

I'm a Food Technologist in the Innovation Department at DairiConcepts. I'm extremely passionate about all aspects of food and my latest achievement in the food world is being an Elite Squad Yelper!

About DairiConcepts

As a comprehensive solution specialist, DairiConcepts offers an extensive line of cheese- and dairy-based powders, seasoning blends, concentrated pastes, flavor enhancers and hard Italian cheeses. With industry-leading expertise in clean label formulation and manufacturing, our custom ingredients can accommodate your specific flavor profiles and label claims, as well as broaden dairy-flavored ingredients into new dimensions of taste and functionality.

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dietitians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

If you like what you heard, like us on facebook or set a review on itunes. It helps wonders. If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Key Takeaways

- Research versus business and how it works in industry - Shyamoli’s experience with her mother’s food business - Shyamoli and my discussion about farming

Question Summary

What do you tell people in a sentence or less?: I’m a food technologist What specifically do you do?: Food technologist for Dairy Concepts. They are a support system and test flavors Dairy Concepts: Cheese and cheese powder company Favorite thing to do at your job?: A mixture of science and business. I can see both sides and see how my research affects the money Career Path: My mom is in the food industry, undergraduate degree in biotechnology, subject that talked about food industry, went to get a masters Reason why I went to the US: To study food science and bring it back to India. There’s no food innovation in India The most important skill you need for your job?: Curiosity How should you spark your curiosity?: You definitively have to be in a field that interests you. Read more, keep your eyes open My Food Job Rocks: I can learn so much about food and use it to start something new What Business would you want to start?: A farmer space where people can come see what it takes to farm. The Future of Food: The Third Plate by Dan Garber What do you look for most in a job?: Creative Freedom Is it a cultural thing?: Yes Food Technology: Plant Based food such as lentils Biggest Challenge: How broken the food system is Who is doing a good job fixing it?: Hampton Creek, Kashi, Larabars Favorite Kitchen Item: Muffin Mold for portion control Favorite Book: The Voluntourist by Ken Budd Favorite Food: Pani Puri Food Media: Food Dive, Food Rush If you were to tell a food science class right now, what would it be?: Talk to people and don’t hesitate to talk to experts The more people talk to people, the more we can dismiss miscommunication

Other Links

Foodgrads.com Procurement Indian Organic Farming Chef’s Table Fair Trade Chocolate Beard Wine Chocolate by Simran Sethi Endangered Species Craft Chocolate

Ep. 068 - How to Use Podcasting for Food Marketing with Alex Oesterle, Ideation Director of Bluebear Creative
45:40
2017-09-27 09:28:25 UTC 45:40
Ep. 068 - How to Use Podcasting for Food Marketing with Alex Oesterle, Ideation Director of Bluebear Creative

We have quite a unique guest today. Alex Oesterle co-owns his own creative agency, Blue Bear Creative in Boulder, Colorado. His client base is food companies where he creates marketing campaigns for food companies that target the good old millennial population.

What’s great about Alex is that he also hosts his own podcast. He created Food Marketing Nerds, a podcast focusing solely on food marketing professionals. So of course, we talk a lot about podcasting and how it benefitted our professional lives. We also discuss what makes a good podcast and how to get guests.

If you want to get started with Alex’s podcast, I suggest checking out these three episodes.

Other than that, if you are interested in marketing, or branding, this podcast brings a lot of really good strategies on the table. For example, so many different marketing strategies including snapchat, Tasty videos, and choosing your niche

If you like what you heard, like us on facebook or set a review on itunes. It helps wonders. If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

Key Takeaways
  • Why Boulder, Colorado is an amazing food entrepreneur place
  • Why mellenials don’t like “Why mellenials” articles
  • Why Alex and I love Podcasting
  • How snap chat is used in the food media space?
  • Really interesting discussion about Wendy’s social media strategy
Question Summary

What is Blue Bear Creative?: We are a creative agency that focuses on millennials in the creative agency What is the best thing about your job?: The creative work What is the worst thing about your job?: The admin work Steps: College at CU Boulder, various job and internships at Qudoba, worked at restaurants in college, went into Finance, did Finance in startups, met cofounder and their skills aligned How do millennials like to be marketed?: They don’t like to be in a statistic. Example: Pepsi Ad Why Did you Make A Podcast?: To capture knowledge in how to make us better than our job How has podcasting benefitted you and your brand?: Personally, it’s shown me how to be successful and I get to see different marketing strategies How do you usually contact guests?: We reach out to brands that are really cool (I use linkedin) What do you think makes a great interview podcast?: Being able to spitball and roll with ideas and knowledge in the industry. Have the hosts do their research. I look for tactical information What Brands are Killing it Right Now?: Justin’s Nut Butter, all of Alex’s guests, Chick-Fil-E, Taco Bell What Food Technologies are Really Exciting you Right Now?: Messaging and tracking data Tasty Style Videos Rogue Wendy’s Account As a business, what is one thing in the food industry you’d like to know more about?: How a big food company without outside help made it Favorite Book: Malcom Gladwell’s Blink Favorite Quote: Man in the Arena

It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat.

Any advice about starting a Creative Agency: Start small. Have a specialty or expertise What’s next and where can we find you?: Continue to grow. We’re growing.

Other Links

Blue Bear Creative Website Denver Colorado Boulder is the Silicon Valley of Natural Products Boulder Chip brand Expo West Naturally Boulder Time Article about Millennials Fat Burning Man Podcast Throwing Shade Audible Food Marketing Nerds Denver Convention Center: Blue Bear Statue

Ep. 067- How Gummies Work with Jonathon Weber, R and D Technologist at Herbaland Naturals
36:14
2017-09-27 09:28:25 UTC 36:14
Ep. 067- How Gummies Work with Jonathon Weber, R and D Technologist at Herbaland Naturals

Today we have Jonathon Weber on the show, a young professional who works at Herbaland Naturals, a gummy company in Vancouver, Canada.

Jonathon just graduated but he’s worked for so many companies! He also has chef experience, and now he’s a food technologist. This guy is really passionate on what he does. If you are currently in college. Really listen to the part about how he gets internships

Other gems in this episode, is that you learn a little bit about the gummy industry, learn how to hustle in college and do internships for small companies, and Jonathon and I geek out about ethnic food which includes talking about Dominican food, Banh Mi sandwiches, monte cristo sandwiches, and my spring fling, gochujang

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

Key Takeaways

- Why Jonathon changed his route in food science - How Jonathon got 3 internships while in college - Jonathon and my talk about ideation to commercialization - Our discussion on a lot of different ethnic food

Question Summary

Pitch Question: I’m a food technologist in the gummy industry What’s the best thing about your job?: I solve problems Did you learn about gummies in school?: No, I learned it at work Pre-gel How would you tell a freshman how to make gummies?: It’s simple: a matrix, a sugar and water. Everything else can alter it like pH or other sugars can change it When finding these internships, how did you find them?: I had to cold call them and ask to join, and asked to grow together Most Important Skill Do You Need For you Job?: Organic Chemistry and people skills What Would Be Your Dream Job title?: Culinary Cowboys What do you look for most in a  job?: Room for growth, is there support? Are they open minded? Small Companies are cool because you wear so many different hats Food Trends and Technology: Plant based everything Biggest challenge the food industry has to face?: The food we’re making is sustainable Who inspired you to get into food?: My mother Favorite meal from my mom: Braised beef and beans (recipe here) Favorite Book: The Count of Monte Cristo Favorite Quote: Keep growing, exploring, have fun, learn something new every day, and above all, be yourself Favorite Kitchen Knife: My mercer Tips for sharpening knives: practice. Use a sharpening stone Favorite Food: Banh Mi Weird stuff in Banh Mi Any advice to get into the food industry: Work hard, never give up, be active, network, try new things, taste everything If you were to tell one thing about your freshman self, what would it be?: follow your instincts, ask more questions, spend more time with professors, and you have to be having fun

Other Links

Soda Scientist Haley Richardson Niagara College culinary and food technology Culinary Scientists Provisions Food Company Savory Cookies and Condiments Black River Juice Co – Ontario Ideation to Commercilization Pea protein gummy Plant based burger that bleeds Plant based fried chicken Monte Cristo Knife sharpening stone Vancouver Hoisin Sauce Gochujang Siracha

Ep. 066 - School Food Supply Chain with Sapna Thottahil, Supply Chain Specialist at School Food Focus
45:50
2017-09-27 09:28:25 UTC 45:50
Ep. 066 - School Food Supply Chain with Sapna Thottahil, Supply Chain Specialist at School Food Focus

I am so excited to have Sapna Thottahil join me today.

Sapna has an amazing background. From her early days in food waste to her fullbright scholarship Indian Organic Farming, Sapna is very passionate on the current issues in food that are just starting to get our attention.

With a  good heart, she now has a job as a Supply Chain Specialist at School Food Focus where she manages the supply chain for all ingredients that goes to feed schools in California.

So not only do we discuss one of the most important (yet not well talked about) careers in the food industry, but we also get into a lot of other really cool things such as whether to buy local, or fair trade, the cool things happening in the school food space, and an excellent tip on how to make your own vanilla extract.

hat’s the end of the show everyone, if you like what you heard, like us on facebook or set a review on itunes. It helps wonders. If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

About Sapna

This excerpt was copied from her website

Sapna E. Thottathil, PhD is a first generation Indian American and the author of India’s Organic Farming Revolution: What it Means for Our Global Food System. She is passionate about finding solutions to global health and environmental problems and has over 10 years of experience in international development, environmental resource management, and food and agriculture.

Sapna is currently a Supply Chain Specialist at School Food Focus, where she develops opportunities with food companies interested in supplying better K-12 public school food.

She has worked on environmental policy and climate change for multiple organizations, including the Environmental Protection Agency and Health Care Without Harm, and has contributed to several articles on sustainable meat procurement, featured in Civil Eats and the American Journal of Public Health.

She earned her BA from the University of Chicago, where she was awarded the Udall Scholarship for environmental leadership, before going on to receive an MSc from Oxford University and a PhD in Geography from the University of California at Berkeley, where she was the recipient of a Fulbright fellowship. She currently sits on the Board of Pesticide Action Network, serves as a Council Member for Oakland Food Policy Council, is on the National Advisory Council for the Women, Food and Agriculture Network, and is a Health Equity Expert with the Center for Global Policy Solutions. 

In her spare time, she enjoys cooking, gardening, hiking, identifying wildflowers and birds, and relearning how to play the piano. She is also working on another book.

Sapna lives in Oakland, California with her husband and son.

Key Takeaways
  • What Supply Chain does
  • Our discussion on buying local versus buying fair trade
  • Why cafeterias are starting to cook raw chicken
  • Sapna’s top 3 spices
Question Summary

What is your definition of Supply Chain?: Logistics between production and consumption Do you buy fair trade or local?: Farmers all around need our support Steps to get to where you are today: Office of Solid Waste to Oxford University in England, UC Berkeley PhD, Fullbright Scholarship to India, published a book, School food procurement What Claims do you look for on School Food Focus: Healthy ingredients, ingredient guide is posted on school food focus What should young people be doing for their job?: Never stop learning What unusual class did you take to help you at your job?: Science and Environmental Issues My Food Job Rocks: I work for a mission focused organization with people who want to change the world Food Trends and Technology: Cafeterias are buying raw chicken and cooking it in house. Transparency in food Challenges in the Food Industry: Food Waste and ironically people are hungry. Supply Chain is full of inefficiencies Who is doing a good job fixing this?: Plant based food companies How do you get on Non-Profit Boards?: It’s like applying for a job. Networking and know the right people Who Inspired You to get into food?: Consumers and my mother Favorite Kitchen Item: Spices. Spice Cabinet Top 3 Spices: Coriander, basil, vanilla Vanilla extract tip: Cheap vodka, great vanilla beans Any advice for anyone going into the food industry: Read on the sector, Check out these really cool podcasts (MFJR), Network, What’s next?: Sapna is making a new book Sapna kerala at wordpress.com

Other Links

School Food Focus Raw Materials Distributors Pesticide Action Network Food Miles Fair Trade Cal Poly Chocolates Value-added goods Kerala India Southern Indian Cuisine Civil Eats Comfood

 

Ep. 065 - From Chef to Consultant: How to Find and Implement Culinary Trends with Dan Follese, Owner of Follese Culinary Consulting
44:18
2017-09-27 09:28:25 UTC 44:18
Ep. 065 - From Chef to Consultant: How to Find and Implement Culinary Trends with Dan Follese, Owner of Follese Culinary Consulting

In this episode we have Dan Follese, the owner of Follese Culinary Consulting, where he goes to clients with the latest trends and brings new innovative concepts to life.

Dan’s main clients are fast food companies and we go through a lot of talk about how he views new trends and his opinion on certain fast food restaurants. For example: a debate on which is better: taco bell or Chipotle.

But this is a really fun episode. Dan is a wealth of knowledge and we talk about amazing resources to make you more innovative. For example, he’s told me research programs I’ve never thought of, how to communicate better as a food science person, and just his experiences as a chef, food photographer, and consultant were really a treat to hear.

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

About Dan

With nearly 30 years in the business of preparing food, Chef Dan has forged his own path to create a robust background unlike any others. Chef Dan brings vision of collaboration, innovation and on trend concepts steeped in classic culinary ideology that will make your consumers crave more. An extremely motivated and detail-oriented culinary professional with diverse and progressive experience in multiple environments. Chef Dan has prepared white cloth gourmet meals for celebrities, appearances on “Best of Wine & Food” TV Food Network, collaborates alongside food scientists, converts recipes to formulas for mass production, leads nationwide food trend tours, directly supports onsite sales & has created some of today’s biggest LTO’s. Having worked directly with some of the largest food manufacturers he understands the necessities in food production. A Minnesota native Chef Dan has worked and traveled his way around the globe. Spending nearly thirty years in South Florida where he met his wife. They have settled down for the simple life of Green Bay, Wisconsin where they raise their family. Chef Dan’s passion for food and beverage will translate into your Gold Standard of success

Key Takeaways

- The Big 3 Fast food empires - Olive Garden used to make their own pasta - Why we need Cheese Experts - The sad story about people stealing steaks in restaurants - Dan’s opinion on taco’s à Taco Bell versus Chipotle

Question Summary

What do you tell them in a sentence or less: I create concepts out of food products for mass or restaurant chains. I work for all sorts of companies including start ups and kitchen manufacturers Background: Chef, Johnson and Wales, Food Styling and Photography How long did you get into full-time consulting?: Most people in the culinary field don’t know about commercialization. Culinary schools are now teaching food science How to Start Consulting: Answer good basic, culinary trade information Most food has already existed, but you have to evaluate how the customer will react to it What should young people do to be good at their job?: You have to do what you love Why are restaurant fail rates so high?: The dream and glamour can go to your head Staff steal steaks from restaurants all the time My Food Job Rocks: I get to experiment with new food ideas and implement them to large companies How to Find and implement new trends:

Look at local markets See the hottest restaurants on yelp and see what they do More importantly, what appeals to me?

How to train sales people on new products: Demonstrate the simplicity of the product. The top 3 items comparing why it’s different, very basic applications Most Food Scientists don’t want to be customer facing Food Trends and Technology: Health and Wellness: Gluten-Free Biggest Challenge the Food Industry has to face: Food Safety One thing in the food industry you’d like to know about?: Food Science!; Cannabis in the Food Industry Inspired to Get into Food: A Restaurant Job in high school How do you get promoted?: Be someone to show up for any task asked for them. The spirit. Favorite Book: Le Repertoire De La Cuisine Favorite Quote: If there's time to lean there’s time to clean Favorite Food: My wife says pizza but I say Chimichanga Taco Bell vs Chipotle Any advice for anyone in the food industry?: Love food What’s Next? Where can we find you?: Trade Shows Expo West IFT17 I go and represent customers

Kitchen Aid stand mixer Data-Central Technomics Mintel Smoked Gouda Arby’s Smoked Gouda special Snacking Innovation Summit – Food Navigator McDonalds Burger King Wendy’s Big Mac into 3 different version Culinology Cargill American Cheese Jackfruit Sunflower Seeds and Butter Pea Protein Whey protein Naked Chicken Chalupa

Ep. 064 - Tips for Writing a Great Food Book with Susie Wyshak, Author of Good Food, Great Business
49:36
2017-09-27 09:28:25 UTC 49:36
Ep. 064 - Tips for Writing a Great Food Book with Susie Wyshak, Author of Good Food, Great Business

It was an honor interviewing Susie Wyshak, author of Good Food Great Business as she shows us so many useful tips on how to start a food business and how to write a book.

I actually was able to meet Susie for a brief time during my trip to the Fancy Food Show, which we talk about during the episode. She even signed my copy of Good Food Great Business and you can see it in the show notes.

If you haven’t read the book and you are looking to start a food business, I highly suggest this one. It’s so good! From personal experience, I found the resources so valuable, the format really easy to follow, and the examples are superb.

Other little gems in this episode includes great tips and tribulations of writing a book, me showing off my food science knowledge, and Susie’s thoughts on robots in the future.

About Susie Susie Wyshak is the author of Good Food, Great Business: How to Take Your Artisan Food Concept From Idea to Marketplace and Chocolate Chip Cookie School, for kids. She blogs about trends at FoodStarter.com and offers strategy and naming services to sustainable food entrepreneurs, local food shops and other small businesses. Key Takeaways
  • Why Susie’s book is amazing
  • Why she decided to make a book and some tips on doing it
  • What Susie thinks of robots
  • Adam talks about food science and inulin
Question Summary

Educational Background: MBA in Marketing

Tips on writing a book How did you contact people for info?: I just asked them! But I had a strong network Do you think the industry is small?: Yes, but it’s just like any industry What is the hardest thing about writing a book?: Books are linear and writing about a non-linear process is very challenging How long did it take you to write the book?: Always had the idea, met Chronicle books the following year, then took a couple years. Having deadlines will get you to focus. It’s like doing a Marathon. Be flexible and not be frustrated.Edits were mainly about Clarifying and explaining things. Thanks to her publisher What has been the benefit of publishing the book?: I can do what I wanted and work who I wanted to work with What would you eat for a month straight?: Lebanese Grape leaves stuffed with rice and lamb Do you have any advice for writing a book: Read a book about writing books

My Food Job Rocks: I can help people and I have a community Food Trends and Technology: Single serving on-the-go foods What do you feel nailed single-serve foods?: That’s It – 2 piece fruits Biggest challenge in the food industry: immigration and food waste Susie’s thought on robots: It’s complicated and conflicting. We need to think through it. What’s one thing in the food industry would you like to know more about?: food processing Who inspired you to get into food?: An appreciation to small farmers Favorite Book: Harold McGee On Food and Cooking What would you eat for a month straight?: Lebanese Grape leaves stuffed with rice and lamb Do you have any advice for writing a book: Read a book about writing books What’s Next?: A new book about a grocery store, going to the Natural Products Expo Where can we find you?: Susie@foodstarter.com What other food shows do you recommend? Fancy Food Show – Winter Summer New Hope Natural Products Expo – LA and Baltimore Candy Association Specialty Coffee Association

Other Links

Fancy Food Show Hummus Stir – Top food pick Portable coffee tablet – tierra nueva Good Food Great Business Foodzie – Marketplace for Artisan food Pierto’s Principle: 80 / 20 rule Foodstarter.com – Susie’s own website New Amazon Store Meal Kits Chipotle Chicory Root - Inulin Food Safety Modernization Act The Joy of Cooking Alice Medrich Baking with Julia Scissors that have two knife blades Microplane Zester Coffee Grinder Spice Grinder

Ep. 063 - Taste Everything! with Tiffany Tong, Strategic initiatives Lead at Canada's Smartest Kitchen
37:38
2017-09-27 09:28:25 UTC 37:38
Ep. 063 - Taste Everything! with Tiffany Tong, Strategic initiatives Lead at Canada's Smartest Kitchen

We have a great guest today as Tiffany Tong, Strategic Initiatives lead at Canada’s Smartest Kitchen, enters the scene and brings with her an amazing story about doing what you should do, versus doing what you want to do.

See, Tiffany didn’t start in food. Not for a long time. She was actually in the ever stable and lucrative oil and gas industry. Her switch to food seemed easy on paper, but as we dive deeper in the interview, you realize that the journey had its challenges. I really appreciate Tiffany for sharing her story, and along with that, we talk a lot about how to strategize your company’s target clients, how to apprentice for a celebrity chef, and some really cool food jobs we found on the internet. Like… Chief Adventure Officer

About Tiffany

An insatiable learner, Tiffany's background ranges from supply chain management and organizational change management in the oil and gas industry to food media. To compliment her Bachelor of Commerce in Business Process Management, Tiffany received a Culinary Arts diploma from the Northern Alberta Institute of Technology. As the Food Media Developer for one of Canada's best-known chefs, she managed the production of two cookbooks, including the recipe development. As the newest member of the Canada's Smartest Kitchen team, Tiffany brings a unique blend of business and culinary experience combined with creativity and energy.

About Canada's Smartest Kitchen

For food companies of all sizes, Canada’s Smartest Kitchen’s team of chefs and scientists develop customized solutions to create better tasting food products tested by consumers. Their proprietary SMART Advantage Process for food product development supports startups and multinationals alike with a customizable suite of services that can inject value at any stage in a product’s pathway to market. 

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. You’ll see an amazing new website in Spring 2017. Just go to foodgrads.com

That’s the end of the show everyone, if you like what you heard, like us on facebook or set a review on itunes. It helps wonders. If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Key Takeaways
  • How Tiffany rebranded the company and found out their 4 major client bases
  • How volunteering landed her a gig with a celebrity chef
  • Tiffany’s great resources for food tech and food jobs
Question Summary

One Sentence or less: I have a very fancy title Title: Strategic Initiatives Lead at Canada’s Smartest Kitchen How do people visit you?: Referrals, website What does a Strategic Lead do?: Big ticket items such as funding applications, rebranding, service line extensions and expansions Seafood companies Functional Foods Innovative Ingredient Suppliers Artisan Producers Career Timeline: Business Bachelors of Commerce at University of Calgary, to Supply Chain Oil and Gas, then organizational change management Northern Alberta Institute of Technology, to culinary arts, Moved to the Island to apprentice with Chef Michael Smith as a food media developer, How did you apprentice with Chef Michael Smith?: I found a post on the internet. And I volunteered at a trade show with a TV personality. Most Important Skill for your job?: Adaptability. There is something new every day How do you become more adaptable?: The ability to be ok with not knowing. Be ok with the uncomfortable and come in with a fresh set of eyes. Worst Thing You’ve Tasted In Your Job: Bugs Best Thing You’ve Tasted In Your Job: Prime Rib Dream Job Title: Not really a job title, but opportunities. What Do You Think Makes a Good Job?: Good learning opportunity and to be involved in everything Food Technologies: Food and Future Collab Biggest Challenge: Our Food System Who Inspired you to get into food?: I’ve always loved food. The people who supported me were my parents and partner Favorite Quote: Henry David Thoreau Quotes. If you have built castles in the air, your work need not be lost; that is where they should be. Now put the foundations under them. What does that mean to you?: Dream big Favorite Food: Japanese food, Chinese food, Pizza, Bahn Mi Advice for anyone in your field?: Taste everything, do it with an open mind If you were to tell yourself something in the past: Trust your gut. The right thing to do versus what you love to do

Other Links

Bluechip – big clients Good Food Jobs Website Chief Adventure Officer Omnivore's Dilemma Mike Lee – Future Earth 3 sisters Corn, Squash, Beans Pulses

Ep. 062 - From Chef to Food Scientist: Sticking to your Dreams with Louis Edmond, Food Technologist at Advanced Pierre Foods
37:24
2017-09-27 09:28:25 UTC 37:24
Ep. 062 - From Chef to Food Scientist: Sticking to your Dreams with Louis Edmond, Food Technologist at Advanced Pierre Foods

Louis Edmond is an extremely inspiring fellow. He has loved food his whole life and decided to be a chef, until he realized that the chef isn’t the most stable job in the world. Then he dived into the world of food science in his final semester. Though he didn’t get a food science job, he worked darn hard until 6 years later, he applied for his masters, and now works as a food technologist at Advanced Pierre Foods.

Louis’ strength is the ability to tell quite inspiring stories and he really loosens up in the final minutes of the interview, where he reminisces about his amazing week in culinary camp in high school.

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. You’ll see an amazing new website in Spring 2017. Just go to foodgrads.com

If you like what you heard, like us on facebook or set a review on itunes. It helps wonders. If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Key Takeaways 

 

  • How Louis found out about Food Science and kept chasing it
  • Our discussion on a focus on customer relationship when it comes to product development
  • Why we love innovation
  • A discussion on Cardemum and Star Anise
Question Summary

One Sentence or less: I create and develop new products for food manufacturers Where will we find the food you make?: Lots of store brands, fast fixin’s brands Favorite Thing About Your Job: I’m still learning about meat processing and I love learning Can You Describe The Steps of Your Career?: Culinary School, Had a food product development class in his final semester, looked into R+D Chef, Movie Set Catering Work. Hospital, Graduate School University of Georgia, Internship at McCormick, New Orleans What is the most important skill for your job?: Foodservice mindset: how is it going to be handled, used and consumed? Who is that person? Think of who the end-user is My goal: Is to develop the next biggest trend Dream Job: To be an executive What do you look for most in a job?: Innovation and the ability to grow and develop Examples: McCormick Food Technology: Plant based meats; Ethnic food backgrounds such as India Biggest Challenge the Food Industry has to face: How to transition from simple and clean to process Who is doing the best job advocating this?: Panera Who inspired you to get into food?: My Grandmother. A Culinary Camp in Georgia. Bombshell quote: If you can do anything, every day, all day for free, what would it be? Quote: Be the change you want to see in the world; Teach a man how to fish, he’ll learn how to fish forever Book: The Aladdin Factor. “I don’t have a problem asking because I already don’t have it”. Mindset by Carol Dweck Favorite Food: Bayona (New Orleans) – Smoked Duck and Cashew and Pepper Jelly Sandwich and Shrimp Susan Spicer If You were to tell your freshmen self something, what would it be?: Be more patient in going after your goals. Great things have developed with patience.

Other Links

Research Chef Advanced Pierre Foods – Meat Division Fried Chicken Nugget Process Ketogenic diet Fancy Food Show in San Francisco Cardamom Sriracha Gochujang Best Thing I Ever Ate

 

Ep. 061 - Living and Breathing Healthy Kale Chips, with Julie Bernarski, Founder and President of the Healthy Crunch Group
40:39
2017-09-27 09:28:25 UTC 40:39
Ep. 061 - Living and Breathing Healthy Kale Chips, with Julie Bernarski, Founder and President of the Healthy Crunch Group

Today we have Julie Bernarski, Founder and President of the Healthy Crunch Company

Julie’s company makes an amazing Kale Chip product and she was so nice she sent me a whole box of it!

 

In my opinion, these are the biggest, most satisfying kale chips I’ve ever eaten. The flavors are crazy innovative and the kale is a nice, dark green.

Though we talk a lot about the product on the podcast, I feel the best takeaway advice for this product is specifically helpful if you are thinking of starting a product based business. Though the best giveaway is to love your product, also love your competitor’s products. And the more research you do with your competitors, the more of an advantage you have.

Other than that, Julie does an amazing job talking about how to Network and she lists all of the associations she’s a part of. Most of these associations are women leadership and food related. And this is an important piece of advice: that you should specialize where you network.

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. You’ll see an amazing new website in Spring 2017. Just go to foodgrads.com

Key Takeaways
  • The secret ingredient to great food
  • How you can improve an existing brand with your own vision
  • How a great team means everything
  • Why Julie’s team go to yoga conferences
  • Healthy Crunch is focused on food safety
Question Summary

Product: Artisan Kale Chips, Free of all major allergens Tagline:Free of everything you don’t want, full of everything you do want Steps in her career: Registered Dietitican to Unilever doing Regulatory (food claims, formulations) to Culinary School at New York City, worked in different restaurants, went to Toronto and wanted to start her own food business. Julie started small, and gathered interest fast

Best ways to network: Be a go getter and be confident on your product. Know your product and don’t be shy. Go to food industry events Women in food industry management Canadian women in food Home Economist Association Also: Always carry samples, live and breathe this, you give your sample to everyone and eventually it connects

Why you should buy Julie’s kale chips: Big, crunchy, and school safe Marketing strategy: Marketing team, has amazing promotional material Most powerful marketing tool: Instagram and trade shows (demos). You get to talk with the customer Trade Shows in Canada: Gourmet Food and Wine Show Why Does Your Food Job Rock?: I do so many things every day. From marketing, to production, to trade shows to convincing buyers to buy my stuff Food Trends You’re Excited About: Getting rid of all major allergens. There’s a whole row in a grocery store that’s free of all major allergens What’s the biggest thing the food industry has to face?: Food costs are going up What is one thing you’d like to know more about?: How to scale up and be efficient Who inspired you to get into food?: My parents. They worked hard. Jamie Oliver too. Julie would like to work with him Favorite Book: I collect cookbooks all over the world Favorite Kitchen Tool: Plastic Cutting Boards One Meal to Eat for a Month Straight: A nice, roasted salmon Salmon Skin Advice for starting your own food company: Do your research. Know your category inside and out. Make a document of every kale chip in the world. Advice for researching: Google. Go talk to retail stores and trade shows. Talk, talk talk! What’s Next?: 2 new flavors (cucumber dill, mango jalapeno), launching into the US Spring 2017 Email: hello@healthycrunch.com healthycrunch.com

Other Links

Sunflower seeds (no allergen) Culinary School at New York City Natural Gourmet Institute Coconut Curry Loblaws Nitrogen Flush

Ep. 060 - On Changing Jobs
28:28
2017-09-27 09:28:25 UTC 28:28
Ep. 060 - On Changing Jobs

Some housekeeping items before we get into this episode.

We will be going back to one episode a week starting at episode 61 to focus more time on website improvements and writing. I was fortunate to have a young food science student named Veronica Hislop reach out to me. Working together, we collaborated to make a sort of flavor article series. Check out Flavor Investigator Veronica Hislop dive into the very mysterious world of flavors, which if you are in industry, this might be beneficial for you.

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students/recent graduates and employers. With a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians or R&D to Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. You’ll see an amazing new website in Spring 2017. Just go to foodgrads.com

Transcript

Today we are going to dive into the topic about switching jobs.

We as young people are in a weird situation when the topic of changing jobs pops up. Especially when you have career job and you want to switch to another career job. This is mainly because well, the people who give advice to you about switching jobs lived in a world of pensions and loyalty. Is loyalty dead in the corporate world? I’d say yes, but that’s my opinion.

I’ve helped a couple of friends walk though this transition and they talk about the questions like “people are going to see me as a job hopper” “

The best part is, I’ve done this exact same thing! I switched jobs and so have so many of our guests! Andrea Zeng, Tiffany Lau, Jocelyn Ngo, Kimber Lew to name a few. In fact, the people I mentioned had less than or around 2 years’ experience before they hopped to a different job.

So in this episode, I am going to walk through my experience in switching jobs in a lot more detail than what I’ve done before. Hopefully, I’ll be able to relieve some stress if you’re deciding to jump ship.

-------

My first job was at a granola bar factory. Then it made dog food, then it made fruit bars and then it didn’t. I don’t know what they do now.

In hindsight, the job was really tough but it solidified my work ethic and skill set.

The job paid very well and I learned a ton. With the amount of overtime I was working, I made a lot of money!

But overtime comes at a cost. It usually means no social life, or you’re too tired to do anything.

So why did I leave? A combination of things. For one, the job I applied to while working was my dream job. Something I wanted in college. Also, I really didn’t like waking up at 4:30 am and working 10 hour shifts. I think a big part (in hindsight) was my manager.

Probably the tipping point was when I disobeyed my manager and left on a vacation I had planned. It was just a day, but things didn’t go very well.

When I came back, I was taken into the office with the HR Manager and well, we had a talk. Basically, I was assigned to something called a Performance Improvement Program which is the scariest thing on earth. Basically, you have 30 days of constant monitoring to shape up or get let go.

According to the internet, the chance of actually getting fired from this is high. Some even say it’s a death sentence and you’re just biding time. So I looked for new jobs.

I won’t get into too much detail about this, but I was able to change my mindset about work and became more positive and listened to criticism. Overall, I completed the Pip program and got a bonus. Nice. However, this also showed a giant red flag: that loyalty is dead.

During my exit interview, I deduced that the PIP was basically made to figure out what the heck I was doing at this job. No one really knew my role so I didn’t do much. Once the PIP was in place, they gave me more supervisor duties with none of the credit. And that was red flag number two.

Every time I had a bad day, like managing an entire factory line by myself (even the maintenance program) or clean 100 gallons of hot syrup in a 90 degree room, I looked up jobs and just kept searching.

People were also leaving (or wanted to leave) left and right. Work got increasingly frustrating because people had their heads up their butts. But now I’m just ranting. Red flag number 3

So I hustled a bit harder. I applied to more jobs even out of state and started to volunteer at a local artisan food shop to see if I can potentially start something (I actually sold spices there for a while)

Eventually, I got a call from my current company. However, my first phone interview with my now-current manager went horribly wrong.

So I pioneered the dog biscuit line with like, 2 people. Oh, and if someone went to the dog food line, they couldn’t go back to the granola bar line., that includes Maintenance. So when something goes wrong, maintenance was very hard to reach and convince to go there. And of course, something goes wrong.

Let’s see, I came in at 4:30 am today and my phone interview was at 4pm. I thought I could make it right? Well, murphy’s law sliced through me and I had to stay for 14 hours fixing that line with minimal help.

I had to reschedule the phone interview. Luckily,  my current manager had experience with factory work so he sympathized with me and that might have also been another reason why I got the job. More on that later.

Either way, I wanted to cry that night. It was one of those days that you hated your job and wanted to run away forever. Luckily, I haven’t had one of those days in a long time.

It took about 2 months to filter through the interview process with Isagenix due to a couple of schedule conflicts on both our ends. It felt like years. I was actually in a business trip learning how to make crackers when I got the job offer. My old company was investing heavily in me to lead a new line and sent me to trainings and factory work to become a master of crackers.

So this is the dilemma: the company is investing so heavily in me that means I should stay? It’s a good rational, and a debate I had with my mentors.

The two roads were both very promising when you look at it in a bird’s eye view. I am not sure what was the biggest reason I decided to accept Isagenix. I would be sacrificing a higher pay, and a specialized skill in return for a stable office job and not much traveling (so they say as I’m writing this on a plane in Montreal).

Then I remembered the red flags and how I got that Performance Improvement Plan… as I said before kids, loyalty is dead.

After accepting the job offer, I had to wait 2 weeks back in Phoenix to get all of the paperwork scanned so I was am legitimate person. Being at my old company was brutally slow and I’ve noticed some hostility on the R+D end and the production end building up. Well, just gave me more reason to leave. After a hostile email from the head of R+D, the HR lady wanted to talk to me on how that was inappropriate of her and then I said I was leaving.

There was no counter offer, but my quality manager friend told me she was pretty upset. In fact, there were about 5 people who left in a two month span so the Phoenix plant has started to show its scars.

During the exit interview (where you need to be brutally honest on why the company sucks… which I didn’t do) I really just said that I wanted to develop products and she realized that too. However, we did have a long discussion on my manager (who apparently got fired).

My quality manager best friend congratulated me and so did some other people. The manager I worked under said maybe two words to me, and that was mainly business related. Most of the people who didn’t like me were like this.

And so after that, I bought like, 50 boxes of delicious factory cookies and went to San Luis Obispo for some weird reason.

I started my new job next week and in hindsight, I should have waited longer and enjoyed a nice vacation but I was actually excited to start my job!

I worked in Leclerc for about 1 and a half years and now it’s about 1 and a half years in isagenix. I can tell you this: I have never had a bad day at work working here. If I ever did have a bad day, I think of the worst day at the factory and shrug and smile. The hours are nice, the coworkers are very friendly and the opportunity to advance is a lot easier than in my old job.

I get to create great products and have freedom own hat to develop. I get to travel to conferences, factories, and trainings all over North America to learn how to be a better food scientist. I absolutely love it.

This was the best decision I’ve ever made.

Overall, the biggest source of advice I’ve gotten was from a combination of mentors and my dad. It’s your life, you need to realize that your whole life is NOT about the company. It’s about you.

If you get a job offer to a new company, it’s hard to embrace the change but of everyone I’ve talked to about changing jobs, it’s been worth it.

For me, changing jobs allowed me to have a much better work life balance. I also travel to really cool places and eat really good food while I’m there. The dense amount of experience I got form manufacturing gave me a useful perspective and I was able to use the skills from my previous job to become an awesome product developer.

Will Isagenix drop me? Possibly. There have been instances where I’ve messed up but the great thing about companies like Isagenix is that they have buffer money. But company loyalty still doesn’t mean anything to me. I am very grateful Isagenix has given me the opportunity to grow as a food scientist which is why I am loyal to them but I have to prepare myself. Why do you think I have this podcast?

So after this long story, I hope I can answer some questions in regards to people worrying about jumping ship on your current job. This is exactly the same ordeal I went through so in hope this helps.

Leaving with less than 2 years of experience will ruin my resume

Most HR ladies will say to stay at a company for at least 2 years. I think it’s ideal, but sometimes opportunity needs to be grabbed right away.

Tiffany Lau had the same situation when she worked for Safeway Production. It was brutal! So brutal that she quit and it was the best thing in her life.

Another thing I really want to emphasize is the importance of a tough job. Manufacturing for instance sucks. The hours are long, the people are not the brightest and you barely get free food. In exchange, you make a lot of money and become extremely valuable in the industry if you stick with it.

You should congratulate yourself for sticking with manufacturing for at least 1 year and from what I’ve been seeing, 1 year might be all you need to jump from manufacturing to Research and Development because the skillset in manufacturing is just so valuable in R and D.

So 2 years is nice, but you will know when enough is enough. If that is 1 year or 1 month, then just leave. But be smart about it, and don’t do it often.

I work with a popular person in the industry and he will defame me

We say the food industry is big, but it’s also small. People know people, yes. But that doesn’t really mean anything.

There are many factors for you not to worry about this. There’s the good way, or the bad way.

Overall, it’s really dumb, especially early in your career, to burn bridges.

What I’m saying is that try to leave your company with modesty, take your 2 weeks notice and leave a great impression on everyone. Though leaving my current job after investing maybe $5000 dollars into making me a cracker expert might have been a big F you, I made more friends than enemies in Leclerc. I think.

But when you move companies, you have to look at bigger things. If I moved from being a product developer at a whey protein company to McDonalds corporate, will people really notice who I am?

You are young, at this stage, you should not niche down. Niching down, or focusing on one very specific product (like protein bars) is for consultants and professors. Even if you know someone from that niche, it’s so easy to just hop on to something similar and increase your skill set.

You can also evaluate your brunt bridge on how him as a connection will ruin you or not.

For example, my manger worked in a spring factory. Ok right off the bat, there is a less than 1% chance I will meet him at a corporate health and wellness company.

However this has hurt me in the past as well. After I joined, I asked my old company if they wanted to make our bars. I got some cold answers…

Overall, one person will not ruin your career unless they’re like Alton Brown or something. What I can say is that the best piece of advice I have is to just simply… be better than them.

The company has does so much for me

If you’re asking this question, then you just have to weigh the pros and cons. In most situations, you might actually have the possibility to get a huge step in salary when switching jobs.

There is a huge debate about company loyalty. This is going to sound harsh, but how many years will you put in before it all crumbles down when they fire you, or lay you off, or new management doesn’t like you? Hopefully not long.

Loyalty is important. If your company is sending you to places, or is training you to do something amazing, they are investing a lot in you and does hurt them when you leave. However, the same perspective can work too. If you make the company a million dollars, they can probably drop you because you cost too much.

This is a huge gray area for me, but I hope these drastic scenarios give you some perspective on whether or not you think loyalty is dead.

Should I wait until I don’t have a job to start looking?

No. You are deemed much more valuable when you are employed and your stress level will be a lot less when you apply for jobs while working. My advice for this is to apply for jobs when you have a REALLY BAD day at work.

When I had my bad 14 hour days, I just slumped down, looked at my ugly face when my computer is loading and started typing in food science jobs and went to town.

In most situations, the state of not having money and trying to live will make your job search unsatisfying and potentially desperate. Your chances of ending up in another unsatisfying job is pretty high.

If you get fired, or laid off, or you got so mad, you threw sharp objects at your boss and left, then you are at a different situation.

I would contact your support network (husband or wife, mentor, family, etc) and let them support you emotionally and financially so you can go 100% on finding the next job

If you have none of those worst case scenario? Just send me an email and I’ll see what I can do.

This is a more rhetorical question: What’s better, being in one company for 30 years of 6 companies 5 years each?

This depends on so many things.

Accomplishments and achievements and the ability to transform your company or department will always give you more points than just slapping a year and what you do.

However, I lean more on having working through a diverse array of companies. I think the best example I can give is my current Chief Science Officer. He’s been in several companies but he was able to create a lot of money for the company in the years he’s worked there. In almost 1 billion in value, there’s the reason he’s Chief.

I think if you have the ability to connect the dots between the companies you’ve worked for and see a common thread of success and reproduce it, then you nailed it. It is inevitable that if you plan to climb the corporate ladder, you will be dealing or managing people. Once you realize that people are truly the same in every company (i.e. they just want to feel valued, and know that they matter), then you can make gold.

Ep. 059 - The Twists and Turns in the Life of Food with Michael Kalanty, Author of How to Bake Bread and Consultant
46:54
2017-09-27 09:28:25 UTC 46:54
Ep. 059 - The Twists and Turns in the Life of Food with Michael Kalanty, Author of How to Bake Bread and Consultant

Today we feature Michael Kalanty, who is a man of many talents. And you learn why that’s the case.

This interview is very well, timeline heavy. You learn step by step and the twists and turns between being an architecture student, chef, pastry chef, bread author, and lastly, consultant. You will learn the key points on how these happen and the catalysts that make Mike what he is today.

What I love in this interview is the twist and turns throughout his life. I really dug in deep on his career path. Questions like Why did he switch into food, why did he decide to write a book, how hard it was to make a book….

And most of all, you’ll learn the best, most tangible advice on how to make good bread.

About Michael

Before Michael Kalanty served as Director of Education for the California Culinary Academy (“CCA”) in San Francisco from 1996 to 2000, he’d already built and sold a successful catering business and pastry shop in his native Philadelphia. While developing the artisan bread course for the Baking & Pastry Program at the CCA, he fell under the spell of yeast. He returned to the kitchen and has been teaching, writing, and baking bread ever since.

He wrote his first book, How To Bake Bread: The Five Families of Bread®, in 2009 “because there wasn’t a detailed book for culinary students that was written in a student-friendly style.” The book went on to win the Gourmand Award for Best Bread Book in the World at the Paris Cookbook Fair the following year.

It’s been adapted by hundreds of culinary schools across the country, most notably the Art Institute which has 42 campuses nationwide. It’s been translated into Brazilian Portuguese and is the standard text for professional culinary schools in Brazil.

Michael’s track record in Bakery Innovation dates back to when the field was merely called product development. Many of his formulas for breads, crackers, and cookies can be found on grocery store shelves for clients like Pepperidge Farm and General Mills.

He works with Clean Label initiatives to create healthy food choices that maximize flavor. Google Campus serves one of his gluten-free cookies.

Michael is a certified master taster and licensed sensory panel moderator. He helps food innovation teams work effectively with consumer research to develop flavor and texture profiles that define food brands. As a teaching tool for his clients, he developed the “Aroma & Flavor Wheel for Bread”, for which he holds the copyright.

He speaks often at conferences and seminars. His report on bakery trends, “What Is Up with Bread!”, is a mainstay on event programs for the International Association of Cooking Professionals and the American Culinary Federation.

Michael lives in San Francisco. He’s taught baking courses across the U.S., in France, Italy, Germany, and Brazil. He teaches hands-on classes at the San Francisco Cooking School and several cooking schools in the Bay Area. How To Bake MORE Bread: Modern Breads/Wild Yeast is his second book.

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students/recent graduates and employers. With a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians or R&D to Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. You’ll see an amazing new website in Spring 2017. Just go to foodgrads.com

Key Takeaways
  • How Gothic architecture made him fall in love with bread
  • How hard work and passion is noticeable to chefs
  • The journey of making a book
  • How a book can make a great business card
Question Summary

One Sentence: I teach people how to bake bread What’s the most interesting place you’ve taught people to bake bread?: Paris cookbook fair. Mike’s book won 2011’s award: How to Bake Bread Steps to take to where you are today: Mathematician to Architecture to Chef to Pastry Chef, to Author to Consultant Did you take any formal education?: No What age did you switch to food?: 26 or so What year did you decide to write a book?: 2000. The “end of the world” made him think about his goals in life. One of them was to write a book. Brazillian Breakfast: Espresso and Asprin Artisan bakers in the Bay Area Was it hard to make a book?: It took 10 years for me to make a book. I would never discourage anyone from writing a book because you can learn about yourself. My Food Job Rocks: I can do a lot of cool projects New Food Trends and Technologies: Clean Label Tips on making good bread: Make one recipe for a year. You learn how it behaves differently in different environments French Country Bread: Pan de Compania What’s one thing in the food industry you’d like to know more about: Working with Herloom Grains. Grinding grains fresh Favorite Kitchen Item: My hands Favorite Book: The World According to Garp Any Advice for anyone to get into the culinary field: We work hard, we sweat Where can we find you next?:  Going to Boston next. New book: How to Bake More Bread

Other Links

Baking bread in a Dutch Oven Grocery Store Delivery Cricket protein Powders Digital Scale Brown Rice Syrup Brown Rice Syrup Powder/Flour Bean to Bar Chocolate

Ep. 058 - Catalyzing Critical Thinking with Sherrill Cropper, Bakery Formulation Specialist at Red Star Yeast
41:16
2017-09-27 09:28:25 UTC 41:16
Ep. 058 - Catalyzing Critical Thinking with Sherrill Cropper, Bakery Formulation Specialist at Red Star Yeast

This was a cool connection. A graduate student from Texas A and M, contacted Katie Lanfranki and Sherrill Cropper. They did a small little interview about the different perspectives between going to graduate school and not going to graduate school. I find this so cool! Not only did people get value from the podcast, but Katie was able to benefit from it as well! I love this! So Katie asked Sherrill to be on the show. Of course, I accepted.

Sherrill holds a PhD in Grain Science in Kansas State. Working in product development, she makes enzyme cocktails that help the baking industry make bread.

I loved talking about Sherrill’s diverse food industry background, such as the internships she did, and we talk a lot about bread. There is also a great amount of career advice such as communicating, critical thinking and networking tips.

If you enjoyed this episode, please, sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com, like us on facebook,  rate and review on itunes, and share with your friends. If you show interest in being interviewed, know someone who would be a great interviewer, or would like to join our team of volunteers, make sure to email us at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com.

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students/recent graduates and employers. With a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians or R&D to Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. You’ll see an amazing new website in Spring 2017. Just go to foodgrads.com

About Sherrill

Sherrill currently is the New Product Development Lab Manager for Lesaffre Yeast Corporation and RedStar Yeast where she develops ingredients for use in bakery applications. She received a Bachelor’s and Master’s degree in Food Science from The Ohio State University where her graduate studies focused on emulsifier and stabilizer functionality in ice cream. She worked as a Food Technologist for Roskam Baking Company before returning back to school to study cereal chemistry and baking at Kansas State University where she received a PhD in Grain Science. Sherrill interned at Nestle, Heinz North America, and Cargill during her undergraduate and graduate studies. She was raised on a dairy farm in Southern Ohio and she spends most of her free time traveling.

Key Takeaways
  • How Enzymes are made industrially. And what makes an enzyme “GMO”
  • Sherrill’s amazing knowledge in grains and emulsification
  • Our Cargill internship experience
  • The difference between whole wheat and white bread in terms of chemistry
Question Summary

What do you tell someone in a sentence or less: I develop ingredients used for industrial applications Dough conditioners and dough improvers Official job title: New Product Development Lab manager / Bakery Formulation Specialist Sherrill develops the blends Sherrill’s career path: Grew up in Dairy Farm, fell into Ohio State Food Science, Internship with Nestle, Internship with Heinz, Roskam Baking Company, Grain Science PhD at Kansas State, Internship at Cargill in shortning Why do you like Bakery Science?: Niche, Kansas state is the only place that has grain science Most Important Skill You Need for Your Job: Critical Thinking How Do you improve critical thinking?: Ask yourself the question first Why Does Your Food Job Rock: I get to feed the world Dream Job Title: Director of Global Food Research Take something out of any experience What do you look for most in a job?: I need something challenging What’s a big challenge you’ve had?: Remembering food law Most “Exciting” Food Trends: Organic, Clean Label, Non-GMO. We have to pander to the market Trending in the Bread world: Tortilla, whole wheat, on-the-go, donuts Whole wheat chemistry: uses big words and tries to use clean label ingredients Biggest Challenge: Educating consumers. Short content gives people problems Solution: Just talk to consumer. Share the info Who inspired you to get into food: My mom directed me to food science because I played with spices as a kid. I do the same with enzymes as well. She has true roots in agriculture Favorite quote: Jackie Robinson: a life is not important except in the impact it has in other’s lives What’s your favorite type of food: peanut butter sandwiches and cereal Any advice to go into your industry?: Network and explore everything. Do the internships and meet people Networking Tips: Go with a buddy, older people will talk to you because eof the generation gap What conferences is beneficial to you?: IFT Expo, American Society of Baking, IBIE, Supply Side If you were to tell your freshman self something, what would it be?: It’s going to be ok.

Other Links

Business to Business Non-GMO enzymes Clean Label 4H and FFA Lipids and Emulsification Cargill’s facility in Plymouth, Minnesota IFT Documentary

Ep. 057 - Swimming in Broth, Tomatoes, and Doritos with Jaime Reeves, R+D Group Manager at Del Monte Foods
44:08
2017-09-27 09:28:25 UTC 44:08
Ep. 057 - Swimming in Broth, Tomatoes, and Doritos with Jaime Reeves, R+D Group Manager at Del Monte Foods

Today we have Jaime Reeves, R and D Manager for Del Monte Foods. Funny story, I think I might have actually met her as an undergraduate. Jaime brings a ton of knowledge as she has developed products for huge companies and well, she has some interesting stories to tell.

Jaime is a high energy, positive woman, and such a huge vat of knowledge. Her child-like enthusiasm is just so refreshing.  If you are a food scientist, I highly recommend this interview because she gives such great advice on how to flavor your products, and generally have fun in your job. We also dive deep into education, especially on the topics such as Non-GMO and Clean Label.

If you enjoyed this episode, please, sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com, like us on facebook,  rate and review on itunes, and share with your friends. If you show interest in being interviewed, know someone who would be a great interviewer, or would like to join our team of volunteers, make sure to email us at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com.

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students/recent graduates and employers. With a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dietitians or R&D to Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. You’ll see an amazing new website in Spring 2017. Just go to foodgrads.com

Question Summary

One Sentence: I’m a food scientist, but I’m not a chef. But I like cooking! It makes food tastes good and doesn‘t kill you. What do you do now?: Del Monte Foods – R+D Manager for Broth and Tomato – Collage-in Career Path: Grew up in Kermin California (Ag area) went to Cal Poly, thought she did nutrition and accidentally ended up in Food Science. Masters in Food Chemistry at Georgia. PHD in UC Davis. Employed in Dallas, Texas, moved to California for Del Monte Notes on Product Developing: Football inspired flavors such as Nacho Cheese Doritos and Grilled Meat Flavor Collaborating with Flavor Houses Collaborate with all players to develop amazing flavors. They taste what flavors in what time and what magic Consumer Testing. Sometimes you don’t win your favorite flavor. My Food Job Rocks: I get to meet the farmer and the food and see all of the process. What makes a good processing tomato?: A really hearty tomato. No seeds or juice. Have to be super tough Dream Job Title: The Willy Wonka of Food. Director of an R+D Group What do you look for in a job?: The people. And tasty products Broth Processing: Concentrated Chicken Carcasses get sent to the Del Monte plant. Food Trends and Technology: Brussel Sprouts, pre-shaved Brussel Sprouts; Balsamic Vinegar, Blue Cheese and Fig combo Biggest Challenge the food industry needs to face: Educating consumers about sound food science. Specifically GMO Who Inspired you to go into food: My mother. Also, I used to create “magic potions”. She taught me how to be creative. Favorite Book: The old lady that swallowed a fly Favorite Food: Life Cereal, but super, super, soggy and then put in the freezer Any advice in the food industry: It’s a fun industry and it’s small, which feels like a family. Yet so much to explore. Advice from your freshman year: Join IFTSA earlier. You meet people and learn a lot

Other Links

Kraft Foods Re-man – Put tomato pastes in big totes. Reconstitute to make extra products Hanford California (has tomatoes) Food Evolution Movie Supply Side West Clean Label If you give a mouse a cookie

 

Ep. 056 - Learning to Cook in Corporate with Kimber Lew, R and D Coordinator at La Terra Fina
46:15
2017-09-27 09:28:25 UTC 46:15
Ep. 056 - Learning to Cook in Corporate with Kimber Lew, R and D Coordinator at La Terra Fina

Today’s episode is with Kimber Lew, R and D Coordinator at La Terra Fina. They make quiches and dips.

Kimber is a graduate from UC Davis and is pretty involved in her chapter at Northern California IFT’ section.

The biggest highlight in this interview is Kimber’s experience with research chefs in her previous company. They taught her not only how to cook, but to taste which I think all product developers should know how to do. It sure has helped Kimber progress in her career.

Other than that, we talk a ton about how to get a product to market, awesome food science titles and most importantly, an important discussion about Ramen Noodles.

If you enjoyed this episode, please, sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com, like us on facebook,  rate and review on itunes, and share with your friends. If you show interest in being interviewed, know someone who would be a great interviewer, or would like to join our team of volunteers, make sure to email us at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com.

About Kimber Lew Kimber Lew is an SF Bay Area native whose path towards the food industry began while watching Alton Brown's Good Eats show on the Food Network. She graduated from UC Davis with a Bachelor's of Science in Food Science, and worked in the research lab of Dr. Charlie Bamforth (aka the Pope of Foam) studying the properties of beer. She ultimately found her passion in product development, and worked at both Valley Fine Foods and La Terra Fina, the latter of which she's been at for over two years. She aspires to make food products that are not only tasty and healthy for consumers, but for the planet as well. She's also an active member of the Northern California section of the Institute of Food Technologists -- currently she serves on the section's Scholarship Committee and writes articles for the section's newsletter, The Hornblower. Outside of work, Kimber is an avid yogi and indoor rock climber, and enjoys cooking and baking for her loved ones when not exploring other ways to procrastinate on folding her clean laundry. Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students/recent graduates and employers. With a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dietitians or R&D to Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. You’ll see an amazing new website in Spring 2017. Just go to foodgrads.com

Key Takeaways
  • Marketing woes when it comes to communicating with Product Developers
  • Why Kimber moved away from the brewing industry
  • How working with research chef made her a better food scientist
  • A discussion on eggs in ramen
Question Summary

What do you tell people what you do for a living?: I’m a food scientist. I’m a product developer. How do you make products?: Sales and Marketing will give an idea, they will make it and they will internally try it and then bid for buyers Steps to get to where you are today: Food Science at UC Davis (transfer) --> Brewing interest --> New food product class --> Internship at Valley Fine Foods --> Worked with Research Chefs --> Got a call from La Terra Fina What’s one skill you think is important in your job: You don’t have to measure your success based on what gets commercialized, you have to base it on what My Food Job Rocks: I have to talk to every department to succeed Do Product Developers need to be artistic?: There is an artistic element Your dream job title: Food Science Extraordinaire, Food Master, Product Ninja Favorite Food Technology: Salt Reduction Techniques (different types of salts being used, and flavor profiles). Convenient hand held breakfast things Biggest challenge the food industry needs to face: Sustainability and food shortages. For example, Brewing companies. Bug companies and the perception of eating bugs Favorite Kitchen Item: Kitchen Aid Favorite Food: Real authentic Ramen. Sous vide technology for eggs Any advice on getting in the food industry: Get some culinary experience such as books, classes, mentorship. Try to shadow other sectors in the food industry What would you tell your freshman self?: You can shadow people for free. The food industry is very receptive. Go join a food science based club.

Other Links

See Kimber's Bio

Ep. 055 - Balancing Work and Graduate School with Joceyln Ngo, R+D Food Scientist at Day-Lee Foods
42:10
2017-09-27 09:28:25 UTC 42:10
Ep. 055 - Balancing Work and Graduate School with Joceyln Ngo, R+D Food Scientist at Day-Lee Foods

Today I interview my friend and alumni Jocelyn Ngo to the podcast and we get to talking about dreams and ambitions, and the like.

Jocelyn and I go way back. I knew her as a high energy stranger back at freshman orientation! Throughout the years, she was also very involved in Cal Poly, rising in the ranks of the food science clubs, doing product development competitions, even being on IFTSA’s board.

Jocelyn's a hard worker, and a big part of this episode is about dealing with graduate school and work and your social life. If you choose to go that route, it’s not easy, but it will be rewarding.

 

If you enjoyed this episode, please, sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com, like us on facebook,  rate and review on itunes, and share with your friends. If you show interest in being interviewed, know someone who would be a great interviewer, or would like to join our team of volunteers, make sure to email us at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com.

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students/recent graduates and employers. With a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians or R&D to Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. You’ll see an amazing new website in Spring 2017. Just go to foodgrads.com

Key takeaways
  • How Pilot Trials can be stressful
  • How Jocelyn survives doing Graduate School (6 hours) and Working (10 hours)
  • How external matters can ruin products
  • Big insight on company culture
Question Summary

What do you tell people in a sentence or less?: I’m a food scientist: the chemistry and study of food What questions are commonly asked when it comes to food science?: GMOs, Organic, What’s this ingredient? What’s the most interesting day at your job?: Every day is interesting but you have to plan for it. Describe the Steps It Took To Get To Where You Are Today: Went to Cal Poly --> Food Science Club Activities --> Internship --> Leprino --> Job at R+D --> Chapman Graduate School Most important skill you need in your job: Perseverance. Pushing through months and months of development. My food Job Rocks: I get to make a product and see it on the shelves What would be your dream job?: Starting a non-profit. Or TV host of the show What do you feel like is the most important to jobs?: Company Culture Innovative Food Trends and Technology: Packaging and the Environment Biggest Challenges in the Food Industry we Need to Face: Opposition of uneducated consumers. Who Inspired you to Get Into Food?: Alton Brown and her family Favorite Book: The Alchemist Favorite Kitchen Item: Rubber Spatula Favorite Food: Mango: Mango Sticky Rice Any Advice for being in the Food Industry: Networking. Join IFT, working with your suppliers, it’s a small business What would you tell your freshman self?: Work hard and have fun

Other Links

Developing Solutions for Developing Countries Leprino Foods: Largest Mozzarella Company in the World Anthony Bourdain Alton Brown Andrew Zimmerman Chobani Flip Cup Steam Bags Encapsulated ingredients Kerry Ingredients IFTSA Southern California IFT

Ep. 054 - Combining Sushi and Team Building with Kaz Matsune, Owner of Breakthrough Sushi
41:21
2017-09-27 09:28:25 UTC 41:21
Ep. 054 - Combining Sushi and Team Building with Kaz Matsune, Owner of Breakthrough Sushi

Today we ahem, dive in the world of sushi

Kaz works at Breakthrough Sushi, where hosts special classes, caterings, and team building events where he teaches people how to make sushi.

Kaz’ innovative sushi concept is awesome and he really takes the time to teach his guests the art of sushi, and then let them do it, and then let them eat it! I actually crashed in one of his classes at Miele, or Rochelle Boucher’s place in San Francisco! All I can say is, Kaz is very tall!

This episode is all about fish! Seriously, Kaz loves his craft and you’ll learn so many cool things such as what Zen Buddhists eat, how to be a sushi chef in japan, why you should always be on time, and the importance of the blue fin tuna

About Kaz

Kaz Matsune is the owner and operator of the Bay Area’s (and possibly North America’s) ONLY team building sushi class experience, Breakthrough Sushi. With two books under his belt and a third in the works, he has become the go to guy in the Bay area for anyone wanting to take sushi classes either privately or as part of a corporate team.

Key Takeaways
  • Kaz’ unique platform for his sushi course
  • How Kaz started his business as a Zen Buddhist service at first
  • Why Bluefin Tuna is so important
Question Summary

How Breakthrough Sushi started: Zen Priest SF Zen Monastery Zen Monastery cooking Shojin Ryori (Zen cooking is vegan cooking) Did you train to be a sushi chef?: Yes, you don’t need a sushi chef certificate in Japan. You learn on the job Most important skill you can have in your industry: Be punctual. Show up. Time is the most valuable thing in the cooking industry Another skill: Be clean. Work clean. Have a clean work environment. Clean environment, and clean mind will give you clean food. My Food Job Rocks: I get to interact with the customer face to face What Makes Good Sushi?: How much heart you put into food What Technologies are really exciting you right now?: Freezing and thawing machine,  Farm Raised Blue-fin Tuna from Kinki University Biggest Problem the food industry has to face: We’re eating too much fish like Bluefin tuna. And Eel too One thing in the food industry you like to know more about: The Why of the Sushi. (Food Science of Sushi?) Who Inspired you to get into food?: the Galloping Gourmet. He did things out of the ordinary Favorite Quote: The depth of a relationship is measured by how many meals you’ve shared with a person Favorite Book: Prune by Gabrielle Hamilton. How she opened the restaurant. Very personal One meal to eat for a month: Steamed rice, miso soup, and three dishes (like pickles, grilled fish, paste) Advice on being in your industry: Be honest, kind, sincere What’s next?: Writing a memoir. You can find me at: Quora

Ep. 053 - A Food Media Diet Plan with Rachel Cheatham, CEO of Foodscape Group
55:18
2017-09-27 09:28:25 UTC 55:18
Ep. 053 - A Food Media Diet Plan with Rachel Cheatham, CEO of Foodscape Group

In this episode, we have Rachel Chetham, the CEO of her own consulting firm, The Foodscape Group. She combines media, policy, and nutritional sciences to make an amazing food communication platform.

This episode is a bit different, one.. because I messed up the audio, Apparently, I had to move my audio equipment halfway through the interview and recording on my end just stopped working! I panicked for about 5 minutes. However, Rachel’s content saved the day. Since Rachel’s answers were so good, I was able to edit in the questions I asked to her

So Rachel’s interview has such amazingly good information. You’ll learn so many things about being a good food communicator. Mainly strategies. For example, what’s the best way to communicate to people about food? Or how can you absorb the right media quickly. She also gives you tips on the best ways to progress through your career.

About Rachel

Dr. Rachel Cheatham holds a doctorate in nutritional biochemistry from Tufts University, where she is an adjunct professor of food marketing and communications. She is Founder & CEO of Foodscape Group, a nutrition strategy consultancy designed to help businesses develop and market healthier foods based on global wellness trends and insights. She has been a commercial television producer, Director at the International Food Information Council, and Senior Vice President at Weber Shandwick, a global public relations firm. She is a Professional Member of the Institute of Food Technologists, and member of the American Society of Nutrition and Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

Key Takeaways (a lot of good ones this time)
  • Rachel has TV experience and has helped her a lot in her job. Her soft skills helped her in her consulting company
  • How Rachel doesn’t have to be the best at nutritional science, but rather be unique
  • Americans want to be uniquely and exotically healthy
  • How marketing and actual nutrition are like ying and yang
  • Why it’s lame to climb up the corporate latter (join a startup!), but you shouldn’t job hop
  • Why Point of View matters when reading science articles.
  • Media is everywhere. From newspapers, social media, and conferences
  • Find a way to line up and skim the sources you find interesting. Read outside of your point of view
Question Summary

Career Map: Marketing and PR, Fitness instructor, doctorate in nutrition science, policy in Food Information, consulting company My Food Job Rocks: I get to chart my own course How do you get your first client?: The network that you build up over time. Have some patience around the jobs that may lead to a more ideal job and the connects you make can be unexpected

Other Links

Tufts University International Food Information Council – Food Policy and Information Inherent Nutrition versus Boosted Nutrition Boosted Nutrition- Fortification Processes that perverse nutrients Food Scientists now need to make processed food healthy Pea Protein Ripple Acquisition

Rachel's Media Diet (only some of them) Food Politics Blog with Mariom Nestle Center for Science of Public Interest American Science of Nutrition Academe of Dietetics Mind Body Green Food 52 Fast Company Business Insider

Recommended Comferences IBIE (Gluten free workshop) New Products Conference for prepared foods Supply Side West Food Vision USA Food Matters Live in London Foodscapegroup.com

Ep. 052 - The Life of a Food Marketer with Eric Dunn, Director of Marketing & Innovation at Nutrifusion
42:08
2017-09-27 09:28:25 UTC 42:08
Ep. 052 - The Life of a Food Marketer with Eric Dunn, Director of Marketing & Innovation at Nutrifusion

Today we dive in the life of food sales and marketing expert, Eric Dunn, who is the director of Marketing and Innovation at Nutrifusion, a patent-pending super fruit and vegetable powder.

Sales and Marketing have always interested me. In college, it wasn't really talked about yet, but if you're in product development, it's half the battle! Sales and Marketing is the lifeblood of a company and paired with a great product, it becomes an unstoppable force. I really enjoyed this interview with Eric because this is a type of job that not many food enthusiasts are aware of.

If you are interested in sales and marketing in the food industry, then Eric does a great job explaining the difference to me. He also talks about where to find the best food news and why packaging is so important in this industry.

If you enjoyed this episode, please, sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com, like us on facebook,  rate and review on itunes, and share with your friends. If you show interest in being interviewed, know someone who would be a great interviewer, or would like to join our team of volunteers, make sure to email us at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com.

About Eric

Eric Dunn is the Director of Marketing at NutriFusion®. He attended Clemson University (Your 2016 National Champions) for his B.S. in Marketing and M.B.A. in innovation. Eric's day-to-day role is to help connect the marketing and sales teams. He works on website updates, social media management, PR, email campaigns, and more to help NutriFusion® reach their customers. Over his past few positions, he found a passion for the food industry and is focused on helping companies develop healthier products that meet new consumer expectations.

NutriFusion® leading innovation in plant-based ingredients for the food, beverage, supplement and pet industries. NutriFusion® developed the GrandFusion® product line to stabilize and concentrate the naturally occurring vitamins and minerals in fruits and vegetables. GrandFusion® enables companies to add natural vitamins without impacting the flavor or texture profile of their products. For example, with the GrandFusion® 12 fruit and vegetable blend, you can deliver 50% daily value of 12 vitamins with only 225 milligrams of powder.

Question Summary

One sentence or Less: Help innovative food companies sell and market products Difference between Marketing and Sales: Sales is more account management to ake the customer happy. Marketing promotes an captures the customer. They work hand in hand. Sales and marketing is a process: linkedin lead generation, be genuine, visit expos, cater your message to the role (business developer or product developer), go for the long run. Career path: Clemson Marketing undergrad, unpaid sales position by communicating with food marketers, graduated from Clemson MBA program Most important skill for Sales and Marketing: Communication and who you communicate with Food Trends or Technologies: Clean Label, we’re trying to do better In your opinion, What is Clean Label?: No artificial ingredients, can be Organic and Non-GMO, Premium, Simple ingredients Are sugar alcohols clean label?: Every consumer might have their own definition of clean label Biggest challenge the food industry has to face: Food Waste What in the food industry you’d like to know more about?: the process to improve technical sales Trifecta of skills: lab, manufacturing, marketing Who inspired you to get into food?: a blend of multiple perspectives and it excites me Favorite Book: The Alchemist by Pahlo (by the way, I read it and it’s amazing) One meal to eat for a month: Macaroni and Cheese in a pot. Annies is great. Hummus. Kirkland has the most affordable hummus tubs What’s one piece of advice to get to your field?: If you have a food science degree, maybe minor in a business and marketing degree. We need more technical people in marketing Anything Inspiring: If you’ve come up with a  good idea, go and chase it

Other Links

IFT16 Pac Expo Food Dive Food Navigator Writing Blogs Email Campaigns Nutrifusion Package insights – eye tracking devices to track package integrity 4 Ps of marketing - The fifth P: Packaging Using transparent clam shells to find out if people buy if the package is transparent Clean Eats Franchise Food Buisness News How Engineers communicate 9 red lines in green ink Vivrati Marketing – Marketing and Sales consulting EPIC foods

Ep. 051 - A Pet Food Perspective with Seronei Cheison, Global Ingredient Innovation Leader at Mars Global Petcare
43:38
2017-09-27 09:28:25 UTC 43:38
Ep. 051 - A Pet Food Perspective with Seronei Cheison, Global Ingredient Innovation Leader at Mars Global Petcare

Welcome to the My Food Job Rocks Podcast with me, Adam Yee, where we showcase amazing food jobs and interview the passionate people who drive the industry forward and this is episode 51!

We have a special guest for you today. A top scientist at an amazing food company who’s had an amazing journey. He grew up in Nandi, a district in Kenya, went to China for graduate school, and now lives in Germany! Or as he says it, made in Nandi, formed in China and refined in Germany

He’s a pet food scientist in one of the most well-known companies in the world and he really digs home on the importance of the petfood industry. So if you want to at least look into the petfood industry, this interview is for you. Hey, I made petfood at my last job, and that industry makes bank.

This is a long one, a bit dense as well, but Seroni, has a lot to offer in his wisdom. After all, his motto in life is “Just DO it, make mistakes. Learn from them. Recalibrate and move on”.

I apologize in advance for any audio issues. When editing I say a lot of uh-huhs. If that bothers you, let me know by sending a quick email saying “stop innerrupting”

If you enjoyed this episode, please, sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com, like us on facebook,  rate and review on itunes, and share with your friends. If you show interest in being interviewed, know someone who would be a great interviewer, or would like to join our team of volunteers, make sure to email us at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com.

About Seronei

Seronei Chelulei Cheison is a Kenyan from Nandi County, the source of Kenya’s world-beating long-distance runners. Born to a very poor family, Seronei nearly missed school as he started off as a herdsboy hired by wealthier families than his grandmother with whom he had relocated at the tender age of five. After starting school at the ripe age of nine, he went on to top his class through primary, high school and university. Eventually he went to China for his MSc & PhD graduating Summa cum Laude at China’s premier food school (Jiangnan University).

It was while in China that Prof.Dr. Ulrich Kulozik of the elite German university, Technical University of Munich. Seronei was shortly offered an opportunity to pursue the German Habilitation leading to an award of Venia legendi and certification to examine and supervise PhD candidates as well as teach Food Biotechnology. His passion is protein chemistry and enzyme technology. He was the first African to be awarded the honour by the TU Munich, which qualifies him for full professorship in a German university.

Seronei moved on to Mars Global Petcare, a subsidiary of Mars, Incorporated where he leads Ingredient innovation in the company voted 99 on the Fortune 100 Best Places to Work for (http://fortune.com/best-companies/mars-99/). Seronei also mentors and supervises industrial attachment interns who pursue their research in ingredient innovation. Seronei lives in Germany with his wife Ednah, three children Kiptoo, Cherop and Kipchumba and their two year old male cat, Simba. He is widely published with over 25 peer reviewed papers, one book chapter and several honours including Best Of Mars which he received in 2015.

His motto in life is “Just DO it, make mistakes. Learn from them. Recalibrate and move on”.  He says that his Made In Nandi, Moulded In China and Refined In Germany makes him a child of “Three horns”, a cultural confluence that helps him navigate the exciting multicultural environment in a very traditional company like Mars. Seronei invites students to apply for internships at Mars’ many business segments and worldwide network and find out what exciting opportunities there are in the corporate world.

What We Talk About

- Difference between Germany Education versus Chinese education: Germany works as a pyramid system. A phd student has about 5 to 10 masters student. Relationship is more formal in Germany - Seronii speaks 5 language - A food has to be loved by the owner and the pet

Question Summary

My Food Job Rocks: I like it when people buy my products What is your job title?: Research and Development – Global life Sciences and technology Any Advice for working in another country?: Always try to speak the language (Senonei speaks 5 languages: Nandi- his mother's language, swahilli, official language,English, Chinese, German). Greatest asset you have in life is being multilingual Food Trends and Technology: Pet food borrows heavily from the human food segment One thing you’d like to know about: Epigenetics Favorite Quote: You are what you eat, if you eat trash you become trash. Food is your medicine Advice in the industry: Give petfood a shot. You won’t have to eat it

Other Links

Mars Inc. Petcare Wrigley Cloudy Juice – unfiltered apple juice www.mars.com go to careers and go to internships Mars internships – you can travel all over the world

Ep. 050 - What I Learned From CEO's
33:01
2017-09-27 09:28:25 UTC 33:01
Ep. 050 - What I Learned From CEO's

Key Takeaways

  • How leaders use family as a support network
  • How to not only innovate, but how to introduce new ideas
  • Should you incubate or join a mastermind if you choose to start on your own?
Other Links

Pina Romolo, CEO from Pico La Cucina  Rohini Dey, Founder from Vermillion Naz Athina Kallel, CEO from Save Good Food Crystal MacKay, CEO from Farm and Food Care Lisa Tse, CEO from Sweet Mandarin Mike Hewitt, CEO from One Haus Raf Peeters, CEO from Qcify Ali Bouzari, CSO from Pilot R+D Dr. Howard Moskowitz from Mind Genomics Terra Chips Dang Foods Taco Bell Fancy Food Show Expo West Foodgrads Peas On Moss

Transcript

The last ten episodes had a bunch of startups and businesses that are not only innovative, but also are down to earth and realistic. It was amazing to talk to the owners! In this context, we’ll refer any owner, and founder as a CEO, though sometimes this isn’t the case. What I loved about learning from the CEOs was that these people were in a stage where they made something profitable but can also tell us the tangible tips needed to succeed in the food industry.

This episode will take a lot of excerpts from past episodes, such as Pina Romolo, from Picco La Cucina and Rohini Dey from Vermillion as they have also created businesses from the ground up. The last ten episodes brought on a great amount of guests including Naz Athina Kallel from Save Good Food, Crystal MacKay from Farm and Food Care, Lisa Tse from Sweet Mandarin, Mike Hewitt from One Haus and Raf from Qcify. Within these interviews, we see a common thread that hopefully you can dissect in terms of starting something… and executing something.

The word CEO, is fancy and powerful. Those that hold the title know that theya re the ones with the final say in anything that goes. Any initiative they bring will override any other opinion.

Being the Chief requires a special type of person. A person obsessed with science might actually not make a good CEO. Take for example both Dr. Howard Moskowitz and Ali Bouzari. Both are Chief Science Officers and rely on a CEO with a different skill set.

Ali Bouzari’s story on pilot R+D’s role describes this well. A team of three creative food professionals had hired Dana Peck to run their finances. Once they realized how essential she was on the team, they made her CEO. She was CEO because she knew much more about finance, a which is the blood that runs companies, and that her business experience trumped all three of her partners. Her experience with mergers and acquisitions in her past life brought a point that she could get clients and manage them well.

So it’s very important for a CEO to generate money and be a champion of what their company stands for. I think in most situations, a CEO is designed to generate money needed to fund the other arms and legs in the department.

Anyways, I have about 6 core topics that I found beneficial from interviewing these guests and the idea is to distill the information well enough where you can be innovative, supportive, and efficient. Let’s begin

Family Matters

Both Pina and Lisa are in family companies. Pina has her mother do the R and D work, and Lisa collaborates with her sisters. From their interview, you can tell that they are big picture, and that they are risk takers. All of the founders we’ve interviewed are.

Though I don’t want to be biased, being younger, more ambitious, and the most adaptable in your family seems to be the best indicator of being considered a CEO. Some people like the spotlight, or rather, are willing to sacrifice being in the spotlight.

Another side of the coin is Mike Hewitt, who wanted to start his own business because he wanted to spend more time with his family. The chef is life is hard, with 12 hour days and minimum pay, Mike had to decide to change jobs.

They say that an entrepreneur has to sacrifice working 40 hours a day to work 80. But most people who work those hours have their family supporting them, which I think is vital for success.

Whther you work with family or for family, a support network is necessary to succeed. We drive into this a little bit further down, but I want to state it now. The people who you care about are probably your first customers. And like all businesses, it’s important to make your customers happy

Challenging Unfamiliar Concepts and Trends

Naz and Rohini both made concepts that were risky. Naz found opportunity in ugly fruit and Rohini decided to take on ethnic indian cuisine. Both, however, added their own little twist. Naz combined ugly food with technology and created an amazing app that allows her to pick up ugly food and Rohini decided to add a fine dining element to Indian cusine to make Vermillion a hit.

Something I’ve noticed during a lot of lectures on innovation is a specific formula that is quite common. Combining a new concept with an old one and creating a new yet familiar concept. This has been the best way to introduce something really new and pairing it with something old.

A big example of something new with something old is an example I gave about an article about the Fancy Food show.

Terra Chips, who make specialty vegetable chips. I was fortunate to listen to the Financial officer speak and their story was interesting.

Two chefs were working under this superstar chef at a restaurant and the chef started deep frying things like lotus root and putting them on top. Everyone raved about them. However, the two chefs could never be as good as the superstar chef so he started to be better at something else.

They took off and decided to start frying vegetables like lotus root on their own. Soon it became things like orange sweet potatoes, purple potatoes, taro, etc. They started with a bicycle, then an ice cream truck, then finally got a distributor going.

Terra Chips uses the unfamiliar concept of fried root vegetables but sine they serve it in a familiar chip bag

Here’s a twist on it: I was listening to the snacking innovation summit the other day and Dang foods was speaking. He was saying it was thanks to Whole Foods white labeled coconut chips that they were able to be successful. An old entity introduced a new concept and people realized that these coconut chips were there the whole time.

The most important thing to know is that not everyone will like your innovative concept, but there are people who love those things. As many of our CEO guests have said, follow your audience.

From Novice to Expert and when to split The basis of any consulting business is to be an expert in your field that is so good, people will pay you directly for your services.

Can the same be said for starting your own business? From what I’ve been researching, it depends.

From who I talked to, most businesses are born out of passion or born out of solving a problem.

So based on our guests, about 3 guests who started their business out of passion are people like Pina, Rohini, Lisa, and Naz

Rohini started with a high paying job in the business consultant industry but she found a gap in Indian cuisine. Because she absolutely loved food, she decided to dive in and conquer the ethnic up-scale dining scene.

Lisa and her sister sold their houses to continue on their family restaurant and took it to the next level. Though they might have had some restaurant experience as children, they took it to the enxt level as adults with a  sauce line and cookbook. Sometimes other types of experiences can work.

And Naz’ story is amazing. She started her business after her bout with cancer. Absolutely amazing. She has embraced technology and is solving our food waste problem.

The other 3 guests I want to analyze are people who started something because they could do it better, and that would be Mike Hewitt, Raf Peeters, and Crystal Mackay. These people have actually experience in their field and have used their network to leverage their business.

Mike Hewitt created One Haus with about two years of Human Resource experience. Maybe that’s all you need. However, Mike’s previous experience in the hospitality and restaurant industry gave hi the ability to make One Haus unique.

Raf Peeters has said that Qcify is created based on a need in the market place, but his decade of experience in optics electronics has helped him build a stable and profitable business.

Crystal Mackay has been an educator all her life and from pigs to pretty kuch the whole Canadian food industry, she’s the best at telling stories.

I guess what I’m saying is that, does experience matter? I guess not. I think (as Raf has said), passion matters. You can start something any time you want if you have decades of experience, or none at all.

Innovate!

I’ve written a couple articles about this on linkedin. All CEOs are innovative, either rn product, or process. It’s extremely important to develop this type of mindset as this will not only help you make great products, but also help you develop a mindset to create new products, or let me try and say it in a way you should think of it…. To develop a mindset to solve problems.

Learn How to Look for Solutions

Every day it seems like there are problems. Every second something happens at the white house, there are a bunch of problems. Though those are problems that are a bit harder to solve, it’s important to think of ways to fix them. Just imagine, nothing else. Write it down. Now more than ever, social media shows us so many things wrong with the world. If we just thought of solutions, it would make the world a better place, right?

Ugly food has been a creeping problem recently. Funny enough, we discussed it about 3 years ago in food science class and now we see people doing something about it. Naz was able to see the problem, and not only think of a solution (giving technology for farmers to tell her to pick up excess produce) but also build a business out of it!

I started the podcast the same way. Nicole from Foodgrads wrote an article about a problem, I thought of a solution to use a podcast to interview people about their jobs. It was an idea I was floating around and once I saw that someone else had a problem, I gave her a solution.

People who can analyze problems and figure out solutions are so valuable and those that execute are worth their weight in gold.

So I leave you with a challenge that every time something on the news makes you mad, sit down and write how you would solve it.

Be on the Cutting Edge

Naz mentions “uberification” to gather her ugly fruit around San Diego. Uber is technically a cutting edge industry and anyone who hops on the trend to empower people to share their assets. Podcasts are also cutting edge technically. A lot of big advertisers are looking into podcasts because they’ve noticed the podcast model makes the consumer trust the brand more.

So how can you be on the “cutting edge”? Expos like the Fancy Food Show help, even farmers markets, but also articles like foodbeast and Food Dive show amazing food trends no one has ever heard of. This is hard to realize, but if you are an expert at something, you might actually be on the cutting edge! 99% of the world’s population is probably not as smart as you are in a specific subject.

If I were to boil down my experiences, am I on the cutting edge of my industry? I focus a lot of my time on food. My facebook is full of it, I go eat at trendy restaurants for fun, I work at a private company (more on this below) that does a billion/year so they have innovation to burn, I’m networked with amazing professionals and I always ask my friends “what new technologies are really exciting you right now?”

This is not to brag, but I put a lot of time into food, and to be on the cutting edge, it does take commitment.

CEOs are experts int heir field, and theya re also the tip of the spear when it comes to making innovative postions. In factm I would say the best part about being the head of a company is that you can direct innovation in a way that you want to do. However, it’s very important to realize is that you aren’t the one driving the decisions, it’s your customers.

Make Little Bets

If you read any self-help, startup book, this is a common thread. The point of making little bets is that you have to actually do something for you to be truly innovative. Yes, to actually become the definition of innovative, you actually have to start something!

This might sound scary, but it gets easier the more times you do it. Not only does making little bets make you more creative, but it builds up your confidence and thought process where you can execute great ideas over and over again.

I’ll talk about an example. In the past, I was in a group of product developers. We conceptualize new products. Before, there was old management who would shoot down every possibility because in theory, it sounded dumb, or other political BS. But once we started actually making the product and then doing a sensory test of 20 people, people started to change their minds

Another example I give is from small projects. People are usually overwhelmed with huge goals. For example, starting your own Tech Company, or grocery store, or national soda brand. They think they have to start with a million dollars in capital to succeed. Not really. It takes maybe $500 dollars to make a product, create a label, and start a farmer’s market stand. Good luck!

Should you incubate?

Naz is the only person I’ve intereviewed who went though an incubator. Does that mean you should? A common theme I’ve seen through these leaders is that they have mentors and likeminded people surrounding them.

Incubation is a great tool when it comes to networking but from what I’ve researched, it isn’t 100% necessary. In fact, most businesses that are sorted out are more or less focused on at least having a mentor or 5 and a support network of friends.

Mentors seem to be a vital resource to succeed in life and I’ve had guests on the podcast who are not business owners praise their mentors.

I’ve had a decent amount of mentors, some I’ve paid and some that I’ve earned. Some failed in their ventures, and some say they haven’t failed.

Mentors are hard to choose from, and like any relationship, it might take a while for the relationship to click. You have to be in constant contact with each other, and in most situations, YOU have to be the one to take initiative to contact them.

My advice to finding mentors? You can join start up incubators as a guarantee, but I feel like working hard and publicizing your work is the best way to bring attraction. Not only in side projects like this one, but also in your career.

Sometimes a mentor isn’t necessarily set as a title, but rather the way you communicate. I have weekly office meetings with the Chief Science Officer, he makes room for these meetings because he likes to see me grow. When we talk, he talks about his experiences in the past on how to deal with people, or how he talks about not only the best way to solve the problem, but also why it’s the best way.

The way him and I interact, where he is passing down knowledge to me, and I am receiving and executing. That is mentorship.

A support network is also important. And an incubator can give it to you because there are people in the same boat as you.

Some people throw around the world mastermind, which I fell in love with the idea at first, but then I realized they kind of suck.

I think if set correctly, they can be a huge asset, but I’ve noticed they are only for MLMs and dreamers. Especially for starting something new, goals are really really hard. Accountability is extremely necessary, but surprisingly, you only really need one person. The most effective way to have a support network is constant yet separate contact with people who love what you do. I’ve found tis to work in the podcast when making certain decisions. I am in constant contact with Nicole Gallace from food grads, Kim Schaub from peas on moss, Katie Lanfranki, and others when it comes to making decisions. I call them, ask for advice, and take it to heart, and execute. They do the same.

What I’m getting at in most cases, it just takes one person to help you get motivated and help you with decisions. 3 is way too many.

So finally, is incubation a good thing? You don’t need it, but you also don’t need to buy a $100 dollar outdoor fireplace, you can build one yourself. If getting the resources for a mentor and support network is too time consuming, then an incubator is a very good option,

The Food Industry is more than being a chef.

After 50 episodes ranging from chefs, product development, food authors, consultants, engineers and recruiters, I can safely say that the food industry is much more than restaurants. Mike really hits this home in his interview. You don’t have to play with food to be part of the food industry. All you have to do is contribute to feeding people. Though we do have the CEOs who have restaurant businesses here, who’d ever thing you can be like Raf and combine technology and quality control!

You can be a manager of a liquor store, or hustling people to buy wheat protein as a broker. If you love actually being involved in quote: feeling the food, that you can get a stable job and become a research chef, or you can be a food scientist.

The food industry has so many different opportunities because as we’ve heard before, everyone has to eat. And you can be just one piece of the puzzle for feeding the world. Whether you help the big companies or carve your own path.

Ep. 049 - The Quality Technology Industry with Raf Peeters, CEO of Qcify
43:31
2017-09-27 09:28:25 UTC 43:31
Ep. 049 - The Quality Technology Industry with Raf Peeters, CEO of Qcify

Today I have Raf Peeters who owns his own quality technology company. These guys basically solve problems on the quality control realm of things

Here’s a quick bio on their company

Qcify is a young and dynamic company built by an enthusiastic group of industry experts. For many years our founders have worked closely with food processing companies in the fields of automation and imaging technology. 

Our team has bridged the gap between the technological wonders of Silicon Valley and the much needed Quality Control improvements the majority of food processors in the Central Valley and other global food producing areas were waiting for.

Qcify strives to be the leading global innovator, developer and provider of quality inspection solutions that will transform the way our customers and their business partners gather, manage, distribute and communicate quality control information.

By providing digital fingerprints of the produced food, our patented technology (patent pending) and services can be used for quality control, processing line optimization and automation as well as inventory management, among other applications.

Raf’s a pretty awesome dude. We really get into a talk about how technology and food will keep on converging and we’ve only just scratch the surface

 

If you enjoyed this episode, please, sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com, like us on facebook,  rate and review on itunes, and share with your friends. If you show interest in being interviewed, know someone who would be a great interviewer, or would like to join our team of volunteers, make sure to email us at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com.

About Raf Peeters Raf Peeters is currently Co-Founder and CEO of Qcify Inc, a Silicon Valley technology company that strives to be the leading global innovator, developer and provider of quality inspection solutions that will transform the way their customers and business partners gather, manage, distribute and communicate quality control information. By providing digital fingerprints of the produced food, Qcify's patented technology (patent pending) and services can be used for quality control, processing line optimization and automation as well as inventory management, among other applications. Raf is also President and CEO of Innova Food Tech, a consulting firm that's active in the food industry and more specifically food processing equipment. Prior to this he held the position of Area Sales Manager and Director US Operations at Visys from 2007 to 2013. After relocating for the company from Belgium to California he realized an annual sales of >$4M within 2 years. Due to this expansive sales Visys was able to merge with Key Technology, a Nasdaq listed company, in 2013. Whenever Raf has time he likes to travel and experience other cultures. This year he'll be able to check one more thing of his bucket list: visit 40 countries before his 40th birthday. Key Takeaways
  • Why Raf’s technology makes quality more accurate
  • How minimum wage will sprout more technology
  • Why Raf goes all in in his ventures
Question Summary

Steps it took to get to where you are today: Graduated as a electronics engineer, service tech in the food optical industry, joined a young startup, then they got acquired, and they started their own What makes Qcify unique?: 360 degree vision system (most use 2D). It takes the whole inconsistency out of the equation What’s the best way to convince someone to use your product?: Take it on the road Let the product do the talking My Food Job Rocks: It feels like I’m not working. When you’re really passionate, you can overcome everything Trends and Technology: There is so much data in the food industry and we’ve just scratched the surface in collecting it. There are a lot of people in the food/tech realm and it will take a while for the winners to show. What’s one thing you’d like to know more about?: Spend more time traveling and closely follow up on trends on different continents Who inspired you to get into food?: My parents. Also passionate about passionate people Favorite Kitchen Item: An Oven Any Advice on how to start a business?: You have to be passionate about it. Also know what your audience wants, Know the basics, do your homework, and go for it What’s next?: Expand the company, we’re active in 3 countries. Long term: to keep coming up with new technologies. Favorite Conferences: International Nut and Dried Fruit Congress, Almond conference in Sacramento, California League of Food Processors,

Other Links

Microbiological plate phone app Vision system Almonds and Pistachios Series Imaging – using drones and images to track data Hampton Creek – They are doing different things Theranos

Ep. 048 - From Chef to Recruiting Chefs with Mike Hewitt, CEO of One Haus
32:12
2017-09-27 09:28:25 UTC 32:12
Ep. 048 - From Chef to Recruiting Chefs with Mike Hewitt, CEO of One Haus

I had the opportunity to talk to the amazing Mike Hewitt who runs his own chef recruiting agency. They are Hospitality Recruiters specializing in dining room, culinary and corporate salaried positions.

Mike’s background is kind of cool. He’s worked in the family restaurant, went to culinary school in Switzerland, then moved to the United States for a restaurant job. He then started his own restaurant and then went over to… Human Resources?

He does this for a very valid reason, to take care of his growing family, and that’s something I hope you take away from this episode. Mike still loves food, you can definitely tell. But now he is helping the food industry in a different way by connecting talented people to each other.

His company One Haus is unique as he recruits recruiters that have a strong operational restaurant background so his employees used to work in restaurants. This allows his works to find quality people because they just know what it takes.

Other than this, you’ll leanr a couple of really cool recruiting technologies and the best festivals to go to for … recruiting

I really enjoyed this episode, Mike is an awesome guy and I loved the straightforward advice he gives on how to get a job.

If you enjoyed this episode, please, sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com, like us on facebook,  rate and review on itunes, and share with your friends. If you show interest in being interviewed, know someone who would be a great interviewer, or would like to join our team of volunteers, make sure to email us at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com.

About Mike Hewitt Principal & Headhunter Mike Hewitt has over twenty years of experience in the hospitality industry, ranging from operations, brand development, human resources, consulting and recruiting . With this extensive insight ranging from fine dining to fast casual, large restaurant groups to single mom & pop operations, Mike brings a deep understanding of operator needs, having been there once himself. Mike’s approach to recruiting focuses on assessing company culture and honing in on a particular candidates’ specific skill set to make the match. He has a post graduate degree in Hotel & Restaurant Management from the Ecole Hoteliere de Lausanne. Key Takeaways
  • How Mike went from a family restaurant to being CEO of a recruiting company
  • The key moment on why Mike switched to the recruiting industries
  • Why Linkedin Rocks
Question Summary

How do you get clients?: Network, referrals, returning back Elevator Pitch: We are connectors, connectors for long term success Describe the steps it took to get to where you are today: Parents had a restaurant in Spain, Culinary School at Ecole hoteiere de Lausanne in Switzerland, hired into the United States, Started his own restaurant, then HR Director, then started his own company. Why did you target hospitality?: It’s what I know. We hire operators and turn them into recruiters. (Operators: Chefs, managers, etc) Moment Mike wanted to do recruiting: looking at his 4 month old baby and say “why haven’t I seen this baby in 4 months?” My Food Job Rocks: It’s the variety. I get to work with so many different industries Food Trends and Technologies:  Embrace technology. Use technology to connect the dots! Spark hire - One-Way Video Technology Linkedin – a more passive way for communication Sometimes you have to track them for as long as 4 years to make a recruitment sale What makes a good candidate?: An honest candidate, knows exactly what they want, and can do a good job Listen first, then speak. It’ll be easier to find them a job Biggest challenge the food industry needs to face?: Commitment level. They are in it just for the fun and games Glamorization of Chefs: It’s good for my industry, But it’s all about how to do a job What’s one thing in the food industry you’d like to know more about: What the new trends are. Best way is to go to educational sessions and talks Recommended Festivals and Conferences: Choose depending on your goal: Awareness is key. Biggest exposure. For example: Miami Wine and Food Festival, Charleston Asten, Palm Beach, people who would hire us as a recruiting agency Who inspired you to get into food?: My mother, culinary school. Favorite Kitchen item: My vitamix Favorite Food: Guacamole… Guamanian dish, ground lemon chicken dish How would you start your own business?: If you love food, you don’t have to be a chef What’s next?: Farm to Turn Table How does your company like to be contacted?: linkedin; one-haus.com

Other Links

PNLs Budgets Labor Cost Describe the steps to get to the restaurant business: Guamanian Dish Island Style – Poke The one Poke restaurant in Arizona

Ep. 047 - How to make an Award-Winning Restaurant, Sauce Line, and Cookbook with Lisa Tse, CEO of Sweet Mandarin
46:16
2017-09-27 09:28:25 UTC 46:16
Ep. 047 - How to make an Award-Winning Restaurant, Sauce Line, and Cookbook with Lisa Tse, CEO of Sweet Mandarin

Today we have Lisa Tse, CEO of the Chinese restaurant, Sweet Mandarin in Manchester, United Kingdom… well… she does a lot more than just that.

The Tse family has done the impossible: in 12 years, Sweet Mandarin has an award winning restaurant, their own factory making sauces for the Queen of England, and they write best selling cookbooks.

This is an interview you don’t want to miss as Lisa really gives you a run down on what makes her brand so successful. The stuff she does is not easy..like listening to customers, or being on TV shows like Gordon Ramsey and Dragon’s Den, but I try my best to dissect those secrets.

I’m serious, there is so much good advice in this episode, I couldn’t even categorize it. Every single sentence that Lisa says, is valuable advice whether you’re in the restaurant industry, products industry, or even want to write a cook book.

If you want to get into any of those things, this interview is for you.

Apologize for a bit of noise, we’re in a kitchen that’s how hard Lisa works!

Key Takeaways 

- How Lisa got into Dragon’s Den (Shark Tank) and how her experience was - Believe in your product, know your target market, know your demand - The Queen of England buys their sauces

Question Summary

Why did you make your own factory?: We wanted to control the Gluten-Free, MSG free, and nut-free process The secret to amazing products: knowing your customer questions. Always answer customer demands. How did you get to where you are today?: Have a clear idea on what you want to do.

General Advice:

Gap in the market for Chinese food in Britain It’s good to forecast in the future Do a price point and ask why (can they afford it?) Her and 2 sisters sold their houses to start a restaurant in the middle of nowhere Partner with corporate customers Make customers return, collect their data through emails and facebook Influence the bloggers Partnering with public schools on how to learn how to cook Chinese food (lots of press)

Was it one big day that caused your popularity to explode?: Yes: TV spots, cookbooks, products, brand equity Big Day, ITV British TV “Will the girls launch the restraurant in time?” Gordon Ramsey’s F word – They won best local Chinese Restaurants Cookbooks: New York Times Best Seller Her sister even wrote a book that got adapted in a play in Hong Kong Members of the British Empire for their sauces

My Food Job Rocks: It’s all about the customers and their experience, also an amazing team and the team can make an impact How do you hire good employees?: They have to do the job description at the end of the day. No matter what. What food trends and technologies are really interesting you right now?: Street Food, Sugar-Free Sauces, Biggest challenge in the food industry we need to face?: Obesity One Thing you’d like to know about: Shelf-Space in Retail Who inspired you to get into food?: My Family, Ken Hom in Britian Cooking TV Favorite Quote: The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step Favorite Book: The Bible, I read it every day Favorite Kitchen Item: Her Wok, also Sweet Mandarin Wok: Licensing the brand Favorite Food: Sweet and Sour King Prawns Most Popular dish in Sweet Mandarin: Sweet and Sour Chicken, Clay Pot Chicken, Chicken Curry, Chilli Aubergines Any advice to start what Sweet Mandarin does: Write a business plan, find a mentor, working capital, focus on quality What’s next and where can we find you: Youtube videos; sweetmandarin.com; sweetmandarin.net; Instagram; facebook, linkedin; twitter.

Dragon’s Den Online shop sweet mandarin Mable’s Clay Pot Chicken Meal Kits Ratatoullie Amazon.com Artisan Food Shops

Ep. 046 - How to Be a Private Chef for George Lucas with Rachelle Boucher, Culinary Events Manager at Miele
38:56
2017-09-27 09:28:25 UTC 38:56
Ep. 046 - How to Be a Private Chef for George Lucas with Rachelle Boucher, Culinary Events Manager at Miele

Today’s guest has been so supportive in our promotional efforts and I love her energy! Culinary Events Manager Rachelle Boucher, is probably one of the most passionate people I know. She really puts 110% percent into her job and you’ll learn throughout the interview all of the interesting experiences she’s been a part of.

Before being a wonderful Event Planner at Miele, she was actually a private chef for the one and only George Lucas. If you’re interested in being a private chef, she brings a lot of good pointers here including how she got found and what he likes to eat. Rochelle also tells you how to create wonderful events and how an amazing team can make your work feel like play.

I was actually lucky enough to visit Rachelle at Miele’s showroom in San Francisco. I enjoyed a steam pressed automated coffee and a cookie and Rochelle toured me around the showroom.

Amazing stuff. I’ve never seen such high class appliances. Imagine a microwave that acts as an oven, and then acts as a steam box! It’s crazy!

The beauty in forging relationships like this is that I can connect others. Rochelle was really interested in food science and I was able to connect them with the Northern California IFT Section! I raved about this awesome place to Erin Evers, Russ Nishikawa’s employee (episode 25) and they are now making a crazy awesome event at their showroom.

If you enjoyed this episode, please, sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com, like us on facebook,  rate and review on itunes, and share with your friends. If you show interest in being interviewed, know someone who would be a great interviewer, or would like to join our team of volunteers, make sure to email us at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com.

Key Takeaways
  • Why Rachelle is so excited about Miele appliances
  • Our discussion about San Francisco’s foodie scene
  • How to get a private chef job with George Lucas
  • What makes a good culinary event
Question Summary

When someone asks what you do for a living: Culinary Events Manager for the Miele Showroom in San Francisco; Cooking Teacher, Event Planner, Content Creator How You Got to Where You Are Today: I started in Art school and worked in the restaurant industry My Food Job Rocks: My company is amazing and my team is incredible Favorite Food Technology: Home appliances using steam, sous vide, induction; INNIT – Internet of Things Favorite Quote: Julia Child: Never ever apologize for your food Favorite Book: The Recipe Writer’s Handbook, Harold McGee On Food and Cooking Favorite Food: Vietnamese Food Any Advice for anyone going into your field?: Get your degree. It can make you creative; Find mentors Where can we find you?: Linkedin, Instagram, flavor agent: twitter: flavor agent

Other Links

Miele Experience Centers Push-button Coffee Steam technology Cooking Classes Induction Cooking Intro to Steam Cooking Masterchef Program Working as a  waitress at a cocktail bar  Private Chef George Lucas Villroy and Boch – Isabelle Von Boch Anise Nick Ord

Ep. 045 - Why Stories Matter with Crystal McKay, CEO of Farm Food Care
33:48
2017-09-27 09:28:25 UTC 33:48
Ep. 045 - Why Stories Matter with Crystal McKay, CEO of Farm Food Care

oday Crystal McKay, CEO of Farm Food Care pleasantly converses with us the importance of stories. She’s a farm girl and has worked with food all her life.

Her job at Farm Food Care is to really inform the Canadian people about their food system. Kind of what this podcast and foodgrads are doing. I loved talking to Crystal because she really emphasizes how stories are the best way to convey information.

Within this episode, you’ll learn a lot of facts such as the “new definition of local” and why it’s hard for the whole world to become completely vegetarian

If you enjoyed this episode, please, sign up on our email list, like us on facebook,  rate and review on itunes, and share with your friends. If you show interest in being interviewed, know someone who would be a great interviewer, or would like to join our team of volunteers, make sure to email us at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com.

About Crystal McKay

Crystal is the CEO for Farm & Food Care Canada with a vision for building public trust in food and farming in Canada.  Farm & Food Care represents a coalition of farmers and associated food and agri-businesses proactively working together with a commitment to provide credible information on food and farming. 

Crystal is a dynamic presenter who has delivered hundreds of presentations to a broad range of audiences from farmers to university students to CEOs across North America. 

Crystal was raised on a farm in the Ottawa Valley, where her family still farms today.  She is a graduate of the University of Guelph and several executive leadership programs.  She is a past President of the University of Guelph OAC Alumni Association, and a former director of both the Ontario 4-H Foundation and the Poultry Industry Council. 

She enjoys spending time with her young family and playing hockey whenever she gets the chance!

Key Takeaways
  • Crystal and I’s passion about sharing stories
  • How Crystal progressed from intern to CEO
  • The amazing trend about Canadian Agriculture
  • In a global sense, 2/3s of land can only raise meats
Question Summary

Uber Drive Question: I talkn to people about food and farming and where it comes from Job Title: CEO of Farm and Food Care. A Charity to inform people about food. Typical Day: Management and presentations Favorite Topic to talk about: Talking about the people, especially with people with heart Most important skill in your industry: people skills. The ability to collaborate My Food Job Rocks: I get to talk to people about food and farming every single day Food Trends and Technology: The transformation from “local” to Opinion on GMO: GMos will produce more food with less Opinion on Fake Meat: Choice is great. There is some data that alters things Opinions on Crickets: It’s a good idea but I’d be a bit desparate to eat that What’s the biggest challenge the food industry has to face?: Feeding more people with less resources One thing in the Food Industry you’d like to know more about?: I’d ask this question to more people What do you consider a food expert?: Everyone is a food expert Who inspired you to get into food?: My family are farmers Favorite Quote: Quoteoftheday.com; Do your best until you know better, then when you know better, then you do better – Maya Angelou One meal to eat for a month: Dill Pickles, but also pizza. Briny foods Advice in the food industry: Find out what you love and then go for it. You gotta start somewhere What’s Next?: Building the team

Other Links

4H Club – Do by doing Univeristy of Guelph – Animal Science; Rural Extension – Communications Ontario PorkCanadian Center of Food integrity Leclerc Foods California Support local when you can Farm-to-Table In 1900, 1 farmer= 10 people, 1 farmer = 140 people Precision farming Impossible food or Beyond Meat 2/3s of all farmland can only be used to make meat. Think globally Salty fish- Cate lin briny fish chips Farmfoodcare.org

Ep. 044 - Lessons on Being Innovative with Alan Marson, Managing Director at New Food Innovation Ltd.
39:21
2017-09-27 09:28:25 UTC 39:21
Ep. 044 - Lessons on Being Innovative with Alan Marson, Managing Director at New Food Innovation Ltd.

In this episode, I introduce Alan Marson, Managing Director of New Food Innovation a sort of… Illuminati? Of the British food system. He and a few other people are really trying to shake up the European food system.

Here’s a quick summary from linkedin:

"New Food Innovation is consultancy group with over 200 years of industrial experience and skills across all areas of the food industry, having careers in Large Multinationals food producers, Major UK food groups, Major food Ingredients suppliers, supermarkets, and Food entrepreneurs Formed by Managing Director, Alan Marson, was one of the early adopters of open innovation practice and has an established track record of bringing new technology to market, an extensive network of connections within food business and the product and technology innovation communities.

The Team focuses on high-level working within strategic innovation activities, technology landscaping, scouting, technology translation, and external networking development for many UK's major brands. We are currently working with and supporting a group of food industry and academic experts with a wide range of science and industry technical expertise. This know-how has been gained during careers working for both international food companies (major branded and private label) and leading highly renowned center’s of learning for food Science including Unilever, GlaxoSmithKline, University of Nottingham, Associated foods Premier Foods, Northern Foods.

During these Careers we have been able develop over 45 patents, launch over 42 first to market technologies, Sponsor end and supervised over 60 PhD’s, In the past 5 years we have been involved in collaborative research and development projects with funding of over 5 million pounds, the associates group, have an extensive network across all sectors of the food Industry which includes over 4000 direct and 500,000 digital food professional contacts."

Impressive, huh? Well, within this episode, he shares his wisdom and passes it on to you.

The meat and potatoes of this episode is near the end, where Alan really opens up about the future of food. We talk a huge amount about alternative meats, how to find innovative companies, and the future of going digital

If you enjoyed this episode, please, sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com, like us on facebook,  rate and review on itunes, and share with your friends. If you show interest in being interviewed, know someone who would be a great interviewer, or would like to join our team of volunteers, make sure to email us at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com.

Stay  hungry folks.

Key Takeaways
  • The important soft skills you need to be successful
  • The amazing world of alternative meats
  • If a big company bought out a small company, would you leave?
Question Summary

Would you ever Retire?: Not if you enjoy work How did you get to where you are today?: Supported over 40 food technology companies Most Important Soft Skills: How to collaborate, network, empathy, listening, and inspiring people My Food Job Rocks: There’s always something new to do Food Trends and Technologies: Finding more alternative protein sources because meat is affecting climate change Biggest challenge the food industry has to face: The current food system needs to focus more on health Solution: Focus Subsidizing on other things – a $5 dollar burger would actually cost $13 burgers What would you like to know more about?: Behavioral economics and how things work Who inspired you to get into food?: My sister was in the food industry, I also worked in a bakery Your favorite Kitchen item: a good bread knife If you had one meal to eat: Pasta (I thought he said Pastor) Do you have any advice for people who want to get into your industry: Find out what makes you tick by having the opportunity to work in different roles How to Find Progressive Companies: The are usually Privately owned companies What’s next for you?: Digital space like Gamefication Contact info: We don’t have a website. Innovation Distillery. (Alan is very responsive on Twitter) 

Other Links

Twitter European Food Apprenticeships Solenzyme Flexitarian Chinese Campaign to Reduce meat consumption Fungal protein Algae Derived Protein Cricket Protein Beyond Meat

Ep. 043 - An Opportunity with Ugly Food with Naz Athina Kallel, Founder of Eu Herd
40:46
2017-09-27 09:28:26 UTC 40:46
Ep. 043 - An Opportunity with Ugly Food with Naz Athina Kallel, Founder of Eu Herd

"How much ugly and excess vegetables and fruit can 7 local farms and 27 chefs save in 3 months? Over 5000 pounds!"

We have another startup for you today. Naz Athina Kallel started Eu Herd, San Diego's first marketplace for ugly food. Naz shares with us an amazing story, she decided to start this company after recovering from cancer treatment and getting a second chance at life, wanted to make an impact on the world.

In this podcast, I am a huge believer of sharing stories and I love people’s perspective. Naz is different from what we’re used to, but I want to really ask to take her approach with an open mind and have her story inspire you, to well.. maybe start something on your own. As long as you recognize passion, which she clearly has, I ask you to respect where she is coming from.

If you enjoyed this episode, please, sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com, like us on facebook,  rate and review on itunes, and share with your friends. If you show interest in being interviewed, know someone who would be a great interviewer, or would like to join our team of volunteers, make sure to email us at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com.

Key Takeaways
  • San Diego county has the most number of small farms in the country
  • How Naz is saving the world in everything she does
  • An amazing story of how Naz started the company
  • How being terminally ill changed Naz’ perception of food
Question Summary

What is Eu Herd?: Eu means Good in Greek and Herd means community. San Diego’s first virtual farmer’s market Food Trends and Technology: How farmers can embrace technology Entrepreneur Advice: Don’t wait for things to happen, offer to do it. You will learn so much What would you like to learn more about?: Why is the industry wasting 40% in our food? Who inspired you to go into food?: Africa (Kenya), mother Favorite Kitchen Item: Electric Wine Bottle Opener Favorite Food: Freshly picked lettuce and foods in a skillet Advice on Starting Your Own Business: Find a painpoint, also study the regulatory peice

Other Links

SEO – Search Engine Organization Foodgrads.com Landing Page Ugly Food Kashi Foods Blessing Bags Head and Neck Cancer Start-up Leadership Program Zoosk Localvore San Luis Obispo Curly Kale “Uberfication” Food Waste Food Deserts Eric Ries –Lean Startup (MVP) Hera Hub (woman’s coworkering space) Felina Handson (Founder) Email Naz for any advice at Naz@euherd.com

Ep. 042 - What a Food Engineer Does with Amit Sinha, Process Innovation Engineer at Watson Inc
31:31
2017-09-27 09:28:26 UTC 31:31
Ep. 042 - What a Food Engineer Does with Amit Sinha, Process Innovation Engineer at Watson Inc

In this episode, we have Amit Sinha, Process Innovation Engineer at Watson, an ingredient company. This company is particularly fun because they products are so innovative. Most of their ingredient capabilities are based off of a specific need in the market. If you go to any food science based expos like IFT or Supply Side West, you gotta check out their booth. A giant, white, two story booth and they al;so have great notebooks.

This is a fun episode because you get to learn the magic of food engineering.

I actually saw Amit Sinha in action during a small lecture in Supply Side West, what he presented was pure magic. He has found a way to make vitamins… disappear.

About Amit Sinha

Process Innovation Engineer, Amit Sinha, from Watson has been in the dietary supplement and food and beverage industry for the last 10 years. With an MBA in Marketing and MS in Chemical Engineer, he finds that this is the right combination for his career path. By being able to utilize market research and through ingredient discovery, he’s able to successfully use his processing knowledge to innovate. Innovation is very important to him in both his personal and professional life as stagnation can set in if you one is not challenged every day.

Aside from being a foodie and trying new things, Amit has a passion for Crossfit and movies. He tries to use his work knowledge in implementing a healthy and fit lifestyle. Currently, he finds the plant-based diet an intriguing area with great potential and great products. Amit definitely believes, you have to love what you do so you can fully invest in it!

Key Takeaways
  • Best definition on What a food engineer does
  • Where to find innovation. Walmart vs Whole Foods
  • How to promote innovation internally and externally in a company
  • As a fortification expert and a crossfitter, what is Amit’s diet?
Question Summary

What do you say in a sentence or less?: I’m a food engineer (so you’re the ones making us unhealthy) What do you actually do?: Process Innovation Engineer – Look for new ingredients and new technology to fit what the customer wants to do How do you find ideas?: Grocery shopping. The isles that have the new ingredients Amit’s Career Timeline: Pharmaceuticals à Food and Beverage à Premix (Fortification) à Watson Most important skill to have in your job: You have to learn how to research. Be hands on and learn from operators. Watson is an ingredient supplier Food Trends and Technologies: Clean Label concept and transparency: who can do this the best? Clean Label: Where you can pronounce what’s on the label, nothing is harmful Biggest challenge the food industry has to face?: How to convince people a research article is true/false Best solution: Educate the law makers One thing you’d like to know more about: 3D Printing Who inspired you to get into food: Crossfit (what?) Quote: [1 road diverged into 2] and I took the one less traveled by Favorite Food: Chipotle! Any Advice getting into your field?: Get an entry level job in the field you’re broadly interested. Get the experience and build on it Inspiring Advice: Try something outside of your comfort zone

Important Links

Prescott Arizona Sedona Fortification Lentil Protein Cricket Protein Whole Food Supplements Lysterine strips Edible Glitter Custom-made ingredients False Claims Watson’s amazing booth in Expos Natural Strawberry vs Synthetic Strawberry Cockroach milk Rennet Sports Nutrition One bar that names the ingredients R+D Prepared Food Seminars (already passed)

Ep. 041 - How Soda Works with Haley Richardson, Associate Scientist at Dr. Pepper/ Snapple Group
25:05
2017-09-27 09:28:26 UTC 25:05
Ep. 041 - How Soda Works with Haley Richardson, Associate Scientist at Dr. Pepper/ Snapple Group

We are back to our regular show where we interview amazing food jobs.

This next batch of episodes are some unique ones, and I think I’m getting better at asking questions maybe.

Today we have Haley Richardson from Dr. Pepper/ Snapple Gorup talking about well, being a soda scientist.

Have you ever wondered how Soda is made on a bench top? Or how new flavors get idealized? This episode explains all of that.

We also geek out about the perfect steak and the show Unwrapped.

Key Takeaways

- How food scientists make soda bench samples - The crazy way on how Dr. Pepper runs their companies - Haley’s most interesting interview question - How Food Science made Unwrapped better

Question Summary

What is your official title?: Application Scientist for Dr. Pepper/Snapple What’s a Typical Day?: No day is the same. Describe the Steps it Took To Get To Where You Are Today: Originally Engineering to Food Science Most important skill you need to succeed: Critical Thinking My Food Job Rocks Because: I get to try the newest flavors Where do you see yourself in 5 years?: Teach someone her job. Wants to go deeper in science. What do you look for most in a job?: Working with Passionate people Food Technologies: 3D Printing, Plant Beef, Lab Grown Beef Who inspired you to get into food?: My Parents. Her dad cooks a perfect steak Favorite Kitchen Item: Whisk Advice going into the food industry: If you have that passion, you should do it Inspirational quote: If you want to make Jelly Belly flavors, go for it.

Additional Links

University of Arkansas IFT16 Sodas “Throwing” a Soda term, see episode Bag-in-a-box Dr. Pepper Snapple Group Mott’s Apple Juice Nantuket Nectars Mr and Mrs. T’s Mixers Unwrapped All Natural – What is Natural? It’s not the poison it’s the dose Clostridium Botulinum Botox 3D Printing Future of Food- 2050 The perfect steak Thai Red Curry Coconut Macaroons Calamari

Ep. 040 - 10 Lessons From The Graduate Student Series
35:16
2017-09-27 09:28:26 UTC 35:16
Ep. 040 - 10 Lessons From The Graduate Student Series

We wrap up all 8 episodes of the graduate school series with a jam packed episode of amazing takeaways and pratical advice about graduate school. 

Most of this episode is a recording from the scripts below:

10 Things I Learned From Interviewing Graduate Students (Part 1)

10 Things I Learned From Interviewing Graduate Students (Part 2) on Thursday

 

The Ultimate Graduate School Timeliine is posted here

Ep. 039 - [Graduate Student Series] Different Major, Same Food Enthusiasm with Eleni Galata, Graduate Student at University of Missouri
44:40
2017-09-27 09:28:26 UTC 44:40
Ep. 039 - [Graduate Student Series] Different Major, Same Food Enthusiasm with Eleni Galata, Graduate Student at University of Missouri

Welcome to the My Food Job Rocks Podcast with me, Adam Yee, where we showcase amazing food schools and interview the passionate people who drive the industry forward and this is episode 39!

First I gotta say, welcome home

This is out final interview for the graduate series and I wanted to interview someone kind of different. Though most of our interviewees are Food Science related in some way, I wanted to get somone a bit different. Eleni Galata studies Agriculture Communications at the University of Missorui and I am so glad I did this interview.

Eleni talks about a lot of processes that are easy to follow. So easy to follow I mapped it out on the show notes.

We also talk a lot about media such as how GMOs are being perceived by the media and how the best social networks aren’t necessarily about how much money people shove up their accounts, but what matters is that people just have to show that they care.

So yea, this is the final interview, I will be distilling and summing up these interviews next episodes in kind of a recap form. Till then, enjoy this one, you are going to learn a lot

If you enjoyed this episode, please, sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com, like us on facebook,  rate and review on itunes, and share with your friends. If you show interest in being interviewed, know someone who would be a great interviewer, or would like to join our team of volunteers, make sure to email us at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com.

About Eleni Galata

My name is Eleni Galata, and I'm a phd student in Ag and Applied Economics in University of Missouri-Columbia. My work has to do with how people search and share information about food technology, and I study how food advocacy networks can reach important people more efficiently. In my family we always spoke Greek and Russian and since I was a kid, I learned that context matters: Just because one word exists in both languages, just the translation will not always represent identical meanings. I'm a cat-mom and cannot hide my fascination for the Thanksgiving Holiday Tradition or the Mid-West.

Key Takeaways

- Why Eleni decided to go to the United States (money reasons) and why she wanted to focus her education - How to find your ideal university: Find universities à Find professor’s publications -->  Contact them via email --> Contact via skype or such --> Establish a relationship and ask questions --> Research what other people did after graduation --> Talk to your personal network - How Eleni’s contact at a conference got her into graduate school - How the Media Reported the Impact of GMO foods. Even though there’s more data that GMOs are not bad, reporters did not change their perspective on GMOs - How successful organizations in the food area win at social media. The most successful companies are not putting more resources in social media, but they are making it more caring and personal. - Why you should work with your adviser to find funding

Question Summary

Favorite Thing About Your Univeristy: The university cares for its students such as health and wellness. Difference about Greece Education: In Greece, you should be able to know what you want to be Advice: Be proactive when networking, It’s a big yet small world, It’s hard not to be biased, We are the average of the 5 people we contact Best Part of Being a Graduate Student: You have a lot of freedom Worst Part of Being  Graduate Student: You have a lot of freedom… What would you ask your past self?: It’s fine if you don’t know what you do, but don’t waste your time Favorite Quote: Does the fish know that it’s wet? Probably not, but it’s wet.

What We Talk About

Greece International Welcome Party Spanakopita –Spinach Pie Galaktoboureko– Milk, Sugar, Greek Pie International Economics and Politics Masters in Agriculture (in Greece) University in Netherlands Agricultural Economics GMO foods Fake News Student Success Center Fellow in other Universities (you can renew them)

 

Ep. 038 - [Graduate Student Series] Applying to a Foreign University with Fiona Salim, Graduate Student at Wageningen University
34:13
2017-09-27 09:28:26 UTC 34:13
Ep. 038 - [Graduate Student Series] Applying to a Foreign University with Fiona Salim, Graduate Student at Wageningen University

Today’s guest is an old classmate back in the college days and I actually met her at a Chinese college club. Fiona Salim came from Indonesia, studied at San Luis Obispo, got an awesome job at Bakersfield, California, and now is in the Netherlands’ getting an advanced degree.

When I heard she was in another country, I had to ask her to be on the show.

And the information that you’ll get from this one is very valuable. Because Fiona applied to both United States and European schools, you’ll learn about the differences between a United States University Application versus a European one, and you’ll learn the very different atmosphere that revolves around this university.

Even if you’re not interested in applying to graduate school in another country, I highly recommend having an open mind and listening to what Fiona has to say. It’s well worth it.

Take your time in Europe you guys, next week, we’ll be flying back to the United States where we interview our final guest, who is from Greece.

If you enjoyed this episode, please, sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com, like us on facebook,  rate and review on itunes, and share with your friends. If you show interest in being interviewed, know someone who would be a great interviewer, or would like to join our team of volunteers, make sure to email us at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com.

Key Takeaways

- How Fiona got into the food industry without a food science degree and got a really fun job because of it - Why Fiona chose Whennigen over Ohio State - Our discussion about process innovation - How work experience can “alter” your mindset in academia - Why you might need to look outside of the United States

Summary of Questions

Why Did you Decide to Go To Graduate School?: I’m impatient. I wanted to learn more about food to progress into the industry What aspects were important for researching graduate school?: Food and Health. Looking at the syllabus and curriculum Kansas State How is the application process?: Easier. You don’t need a GRE. But you need a VISA and you have to move. You don’t have to email your professors. You decide on your thesis your second year Best Advice about the application process: Emailing professors is still important, but you also have to be crystal clear about what you want. Leverage your network – Fiona leveraged her network to get into Winnepeg Funded: Unfortunately, Fiona is not funded. It costs $65,000 dollars for 2 years in the Netherlands but it’s $100,000 dollars in the United States if you’re out of state. Work Experience: People with no experience blame machinery and instruments rather than process Who Inspired you to get Into Food?: Food is more fun than healthcare Favorite Kitchen Item: Silicon Tip Kitchen Tongs Favorite Food: Tonkatsu Ramen Favorite is somewhere in San Francisco or Santa Clara Advice for going into graduate school: Don’t be discouraged and look beyond the United States If you were to tell your 18 year old self something: Don’t worry too much about grades. Live life. Make friends

What We Talk About

Wageningen Univeristy - Only focus: Healthy food Neatherlands IFT Website Cal Poly San Luis Obispo Biochemistry Nestle Research Bakersfield California Icyness Dr. Jimenez – Ohio State 3D Printing Netherlands made the lab grown meat burger Make a puree out of a carrot into a carrot (find link) Enzymes to create food Non-GMO Steak Korean Barbaque Beyond Meat

Ep. 037 - [Graduate Student Series] From India to the United States with Deepak Kumar, Graduate Student at Oklahoma State
31:44
2017-09-27 09:28:26 UTC 31:44
Ep. 037 - [Graduate Student Series] From India to the United States with Deepak Kumar, Graduate Student at Oklahoma State

Alright guys, I hope you enjoyed Ireland, now let’s go to India… and then back to the United States.

For our graduate student series, we have Deepak Kumar, who came from India to do graduate school. I really wanted to get an international student who came from a foreign country to the United States because, well, you see them a lot. Deepak is also just getting a masters degree which might interest some of you guys who don’t want to  go all in for a PhD.

In this episode, we really hone in on what makes a United States education valuable, and the really cool tips Deepak used to find information from across the oceans. I’ll give you a hint, it involves facebook.

On Wednesday, we pack our bags and head to the Neatherlands where my college friend Fiona decided to go. If you’re interested in actually going to a different country for graduate school, this is the episode for you.

If you enjoyed this episode, please, sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com, like us on facebook,  rate and review on itunes, and share with your friends. If you show interest in being interviewed, know someone who would be a great interviewer, or would like to join our team of volunteers, make sure to email us at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com.

Key Takeaways

- Why Deepak decided to get a Masters in the United States - Our discussion about algae proteins and spirulina - How to use Facebook groups to ask students about professors

Summary of Questions

Why did you want to go to Graduate School: Improve my knowledge and English and meet people from different background. Why did you choose your university?: Prior connections through India. What are you researching right now?: Algae protein and spirulina. Encapsulation. Funniest research stories: Giving people green colored cookies Best advice for the application process: Ask people like the student advisor How did you find these people: facebook groups Are you funded? : Yes, not the first year, but we have a research fund. Food Trends and Technologies: 3D Food Printing The biggest challenge food industry needs to face: Balance between nutrition and taste Who Inspired You to Get Into Food?: From a lecture in undergraduate. Gum technology Favorite Quote: There is no love more sincere than the love of food - George Brenard Shaw Favorite Book: Food Chemistry by Etree Beliez Favorite Food: Eggs. Hard boiled egg, scrambled, any Indian Omelets: Green chilies and onions Best part about being a graduate student: Getting funded, get free passes for conferences Worst Part: The Pressure. A lot of deadlines Anything inspiring you’d like to say?: It’s a great experience and this industry will go forever

What We Talk About

Brian Chau Texas Tech Urbana Champaign Ionic gelation Sodium Alginate Calcium Chloride Reverse Specification 3D Printing clubs IFT16 SQF Conference

Ep. 036 - [Graduate Student Series] A European Perspective with John Gleeson, Graduate Student at the University College Dublin
43:17
2017-09-27 09:28:26 UTC 43:17
Ep. 036 - [Graduate Student Series] A European Perspective with John Gleeson, Graduate Student at the University College Dublin

Very jolly guest we have this time. John Gleeson lives and studies in Dublin, Ireland and has been all his life. What I found amazing about his accomplishments is his involvement in the IFTSA board.

I think it’s important to get a perspective on how other graduate schools work, especially out side of the United States and John explains the differences very well.

Throughout this interview, we have a great discussion about communicating what we do as food scientists and John does an amazing job discussing the difference between how European universities work.

Key Takeaways

- How John Gleeson got into the IFTSA board - How Europe works differently from the US Graduate School - How superheroes are related to superfoods (they save lives) - How food safety and quality in Europe works - Using the science to talk about flipping burgers on the grill

Question Summaries

Why did you decide to go to graduate school?: I got bored, I love science What are you studying?: Food derived peptides Strangest lab stories: I broke my finger and also all of the reagents The application process: Know what you want Interview Question: Do you like Failing? Get used to it Funding: It’s tough competition in Europe Food Trends and Technologies: Lab Grown Meat The Challenge is the biggest thing people have to face: Consumer Regulations and the Consumer perception How to solve Consumer Perception: Have the scientists talk (well) Who inspired you to get into Food (nutraceuticals): The people I wanted to hang out with Favorite Quote: Wish beyond measure is man’s greatest treasure – Harry Potter Favorite Book: Harry Potter Favorite Kitchen item: Kitchen Aid Favorite Food: Soup, Tomato and Basil Soup Anything Inspiring: Fail fast, Researchers like to talk to researchers

What We Talk About

Nicole’s New Food Magazine Article Play with hamsters, Guinea pigs, cute animals Dublin Institute of Technology Communications Development Nutraceuticals Operational Excellence Analysts Fatty Acid Alginate Cytoxan Royal Society of Chemistry Antioxidants Green Tea Extract EFSA – European Food Safety Authority Beta Glucans Find A PhD website Lab grown collagen Lab grown milk Food is the ultimate emotive thing Harry Potter: The Cursed Child

Ep. 035 - [Graduate Student Series] Why Work Experience Matters Here with Audrey Girard,
29:17
2017-09-27 09:28:26 UTC 29:17
Ep. 035 - [Graduate Student Series] Why Work Experience Matters Here with Audrey Girard,

Another episode of our graduate student series and this week, we are featuring Audrey Girard, who is doing her PhD at Texas A and M.

Audrey does an amazing job talking about her prior experiences and she had three different internships before deciding to go to graduate school.

Also, she gives awesome book recommendations like Lab Girl and The Man Who Fed the World. These are definenelty on my ever growing book list.

Enjoy another graduate student’s perspective. Do you see a trend so far? Just let me know.

The next four episodes will take you around the world and back again. We are interviewing someone in Europe on Wednesday, someone who traveled from the US to the Netherlands and two people who left their home countries to come to the United States to study what they love. You don’t want to miss these.

If you enjoyed this episode, please, sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com, like us on facebook,  rate and review on itunes, and share with your friends. If you show interest in being interviewed, know someone who would be a great interviewer, or would like to join our team of volunteers, make sure to email us at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com.

About Audrey

Audrey is a 4th year PhD student in Food Science & Technology at Texas A&M University. Her research focuses on the chemistry of cereal grains; specifically, she is working to alter cereal proteins using tannins to enhance and increase the applications for said proteins. Audrey graduated from Kansas State University in 2013 with her BS in Bakery Science & Management. During her undergraduate, Audrey completed three internships in food science and worked part-time in research labs on campus, which helped inform her decision to pursue her PhD. Audrey is a member of AACCI (American Association of Cereal Chemists International) and IFT. Audrey can be found semi-regularly Instagramming (@abiteofscience) and infrequently blogging (abiteofscience.wordpress.com).

Key Takeaways

- How Audrey’s three internships influenced her graduate school studies - Audrey’s unusual unofficial lab job - Audrey’s and Mine’s discussion of Holistic Health

Summary of Questions

Best thing about Texas A and M: The tradition Why did you want to go into graduate school: I liked research and I liked to go further in product development. Why did you want to get your PhD?: I really liked teaching Research: how Tannins interact with Gluten In layman’s term: How we can use gluten in other applications using an antioxidant called tannins Best hint about the application process: Make sure you have connections Food Trends and Technology: Holistic Health Approach Biggest Challenge the food industry has to face: Consumer trust Favorite Book: The Man Who Fed the World - Norman Borlaug Who inspired you to go into food?: My mom Advice for Graduate School: Get experience any way you can Something inspiring: Don’t just go to graduate school because you don’t have a plan: It’s a lot of work Favorite Quote: Everyone you meet knows something you don’t –Bill Nye, If you can’t explain it simply, you don’t understand it enough - Albert Einstein Favorite Food: Steak and Potatoes, Medium-Rare, Mashed potatoes, I like Steak Fries

What We Talk About

Slaughterhouse Story Kellogg’s Internship Dansico internship Flowers Foods internship Grain Science Emailing professors Texas A and M Kansas State Purdue Rutgers Bakery Science Edible films Modified Starch Tortilla Ovens HPLC Wheat Mill Lab Girl-Hope Jarren – Important book Teaching Assistantships Research Assistantships Science Communication Perceptions of fat Cowboy beans and rice

Ep. 034 - [Graduate Student Series] Escaping Monotony with Caroline Campbell, Graduate Student at NC State
38:22
2017-09-27 09:28:26 UTC 38:22
Ep. 034 - [Graduate Student Series] Escaping Monotony with Caroline Campbell, Graduate Student at NC State

This is our second interview for our Graduate Series and we bring you another great graduate student who is in her final year of graduate school. Caroline Campbell’s interview gives some great, actionable tips on how to start your graduate process and this can be found on our new writing project, the Weekly Stew. The title is “Actionable tips on researching graduate school”.

Caroline also does an amazing job talking about why she went to graduate school and this might resonate you in that if you are finding your job a bit boring, maybe it’s time for a change.

Key Takeaways

- How Graduate school can escape the boring, repetitive jobs - How modified Starches are made - The crazy method Caroline uses to measure and visualize how people chew - How Caroline benefitted from graduate school

Question Summary

 

Why did you decide to go to Graduate School?: I didn’t want to get stuck with Quality Assurance Favorite thing about North Carolina State: The Community and Family Feel Advice for researching graduate school: Talk to your professors in your current school, and find what you love PhD thesis: Looking at food texture on how we eat and how much we eat. Funnest research subject: Gluing a magnet to people’s tongue The biggest advice for the application process: Funding is harder to find than you think Trends and Technologies: Fake Meat and Whey Protein functionality Biggest Challenge the food industry has to face: Communication and Food Safety Who Inspired You to get into food?: Alton Brown Favorite Book: On Food and Cooking Harold McGee Favorite Kitchen Utensil: Food Processor Favorite Food: Eggs Advice for going to graduate School: Be open minded. Also, graduate school is hard. It’s like a full time job

What We Talk About

Raleigh- great beer, great brew, microbrewries Southern Barbeque Year off study abroad/ couple of internships Cargill – texturizing division Modified Starches- All Natural Modified Starches University of Idaho Start emailing interesting professors Software that monitors people chewing Biomarkers Pickle fermentation Plant Protein Alton Brown’s Live Shows Eggs on burgers IFTSA Chapter President Chair of IFT Relations

Ep. 033 - [Graduate Student Series] The Amazing Graduate Race with Amy DeJong, Graduate Student from University of Wisconsin - Madison
37:43
2017-09-27 09:28:26 UTC 37:43
Ep. 033 - [Graduate Student Series] The Amazing Graduate Race with Amy DeJong, Graduate Student from University of Wisconsin - Madison

Thank you for joining me for the first episode of the Graduate Student series and we’re kicking it off with a bang with a friend of mine that I kinda knew at my time in undergraduate.

About Amy DeJong

Amy DeJong is a PhD candidate in food science at the University of Wisconsin- Madison.  Her work focuses on understanding phase transitions of sugar –free sweeteners in confections. Amy earned a BS in Food Science from the University of Wisconsin in 2012 and has been an active member of IFTSA since 2009, where she has served in both chapter and institute leadership positions.  Currently, she is the Immediate Past President of IFTSA with roles on the IFT Board, IFTSA Board, and Feeding Tomorrow Board of Trustees. She has also been an intern with the Wm. Wrigley Jr. Company since 2010.

In addition to her work in food science, Amy loves to travel.  You may recognize her from the CBS reality show, The Amazing Race, where she and her lab mate, Maya, beat out 10 other teams in a race around the world to win its 25th season. 

Key Takeaways

- The most amazing reason how Amy and her lab partner got into the Amazing Race and the impact it had - Figure out what you’re interested in, or have someone help you (like Amy’s company) - How IFTSA enhanced Amy’s graduate school experience and career track

Question Summary

Why Amy Decided to Go to Graduate School: While working, Amy loved research rather than product development Advice on Application Process: You HAVE to reach out to a professor and have them interested before applying How to research: ask professors and ask students in the lab Favorite Food Technology: 3D food printing What the food industry should be focusing on: Transparency between consumer and producer Inspired you to get Into Food: Amy’s journey in choosing food science Favorite Kitchen Item: Spiralizers Advice getting into graduate school: Really think about it. Graduate School is completely different from Undergraduate School Anything inspiring: If you can put your mind to it, you can do anything

What We Talk About

The Amazing Race Doctorate in ice cream PhD Student University of Wisconsin Madison Wisconsin Graduate School Company Funded Wrigley Graduate students get funded by either grants or sponsored by industry IFTSA Institute of Food Technologists Student Association Sorbitol crystallization (this is actually Amy's publish paper. Congrats Amy!) Structure-Function relationships Sugar crystallization GM Technology Zoodles President of IFTSA You need to have something else as a graduate student

Ep. 032 - The Power of Plants with Ken Botts, Food Policy Manager for the Humane Society
46:28
2017-09-27 09:28:26 UTC 46:28
Ep. 032 - The Power of Plants with Ken Botts, Food Policy Manager for the Humane Society

Today’s guest is Ken Botts, the Food Policy Manager at the…Humane Society?

So I believe that Ken’s job title is very misleading. I would call him more like a food service plant protein expert. He lead a a team and travels all over the United States implementing plant based proteins into food institutions.

For example, his team works with chefs in schools, amusement parks, and even the military to educate and create amazing menus that use plants.

In this episode, you’re going to learn everything about the hot topics of plants. This includes why eating plants is important not only health wise, and sustainability wise, but also learn the latest companies innovating with plant proteins, really cool recipes like non-dairy cheeses, and even about urban farming.

Again, we wanted to remind you about the graduate school series next week. We'll be pushing hard on this initiative. In fact, we even a have freebie to give you. In exchange for an email address, you can get a nice, polished, graduate school post which will tell you what and when to prepare for applying to graduate school.

About Ken Botts

Ken Botts is a food service consultant, speaker, and blogger. In 2009 he designed and developed the nations first all vegan dining hall at the University of North Texas. His ideas and insights have appeared in media outlets including; USA Today, The Dallas Morning News, Green Source DFW, ABC news, Food Service Director Magazine and VegNews. Ken uses his 35+ years of food service experience to help restaurants and food service organizations implement plant-based menus and concepts. His mission in life is to help make the world a better place one plate at a time.

Key Takeaways

- Millennial’s push to know what’s in their food and why they care about food and the future - The challenges of opening a Vegan Restaurant - Amazing advice on how to network really well - The hottest plant food trends - How plants can potentially save the world - Why the Military loves plants - Why Urban Farming might be the solution

Summary Answers

When you’re introduced to someone, what do you tell them you do?: Teach chefs how to work with plant protein Most exciting part of the job: I get to travel all over the world to help food service professionals Millennials are driving the demand of plant proteins Most Important Skill You Can Have: Long term connecting with people Tips to be a connector: Never meet a stranger. Have the mindset that you can help someone when you meet them. My Food Job Rocks: Make the world a better place through food The Biggest Challenge the Food Industry as to Face: How are we going to feed the future without destroying the planet? Who Inspired you to Get Into Food: My mom: if you get a job in the food service, you’ll always have a job Favorite Quote: If somebody offers you an amazing opportunity and you don’t know how to do it, say yes. – Richard Brandson Favorite Book: Diet for a Small Planet Favorite Piece of Equipment: Vitamix – You can heat soup! Favorite Food: Bean Burritos Advice to get into your industry: Strive to learn something new every day. Find yourself a mentor. And think as big as you can How does the Humane Society get clients?: Schools first, other things follow. It’s free too.

What We Talk About

Global Conference for Amino Acids James Beard Foundation Humane Society Paul Shapiro Josh Balk – Cofounder Hampton Creek Kristie Middleton Vegan Dining Hall Men’s Journal about Plant Based Proteins “Clean Meat” Feed 9 billion people in 2050 Beyond Meat Tyson Food buys a stake in Beyond Meat Kite Hill Almond Cheese Treeline Vegan Cheese Myoko Vegan Cheese – Has a book Chickpeas World Health Organization Year of the Pulses Changing the culture of the culinary world through Chefs Department of Defense Urban Farming Northeastern University Herbavore festival in Riverside Pumpkin Mac and Cheese – recipe posted at kenbotts.com Humbolt State University Sea World Parks Ken Botts.com Twitter kbotts@humanesociety.com

Ep. 031 - Food Safety Auditing with Tiffany Lau, Retail Food Safety Auditor for the NSF
43:55
2017-09-27 09:28:26 UTC 43:55
Ep. 031 - Food Safety Auditing with Tiffany Lau, Retail Food Safety Auditor for the NSF

I’m so happy to introduce Tiffany Lau, a friend I knew from Cal Poly. We actually graduated together, and from time to time, we catch up. Though before this interview, it’s been a while.

Anyways, very excited to have Tiffany on the show because she has experience with a very important, but not really well talked about part of the industry.

She is the first guest to focuses on a very important part of the industry: food safety.

Working as an Auditor for the NSF, she goes and does audits for retail food stores. This mainly involves correcting and teaching workers about food safety habits.

If you’re interested in learning about audits, this is really for you. You’ll learn a ton of things such as what tests to take, what it’s like to work at home, and why this job might resonate with you.

This is also a pretty nice interview if you’re interested in sales

Let’s begin

Key Takeaways
  • The difference between a health inspector and 3rd Party Auditing
  • Why a Food Safety position might be for you
  • Retail Safety versus Manufacturing Safety
  • Pros and cons of being Home-based
  • The payoff for being a food safety auditor
Summary

Most common problem in audits: There is no one specific problem Why Does Your Food Job Rocks: It feels like I can help people Where do you see yourself in 5 years?: I want to try Regulatory. Quality, Food Safety, or Regulatory What do you look for most in a job?: A job should make you happy Food Trends and Technology: Rolled ice cream Biggest Challenge to Food Industry needs to face: Food Labeling Who Inspired you to Get into food: Alton Brown, my mom Favorite Kitchen Equipment: Kitchen Aid Favorite Food: Korean Food – buckwheat in cold broth Advice: If you’re studying to be an auditor: focus on microbiology and food safety Deleting your goal or purpose on your resume People Skills, interacting with clients, make them not afraid of you When looking into the future: ask if this is right for you Something inspiring: “Lucky Breaks don’t happen, they’ll only happen when you find something you love”

What We Talk About (Links)

3rd Party Food Safety Auditor Unannounced Audits Explaining food safety aspects Recruiting via linkedin CPFS Certified Professional Food Safety Credential Bad bug chart (coming next year) Food Defense Shelf-life 626 Night Market Korean fried chicken Koreatown – Kyochan Chicken- best Korean fried chicken Taylor Swift Song (Haters gonna hate) Smart Label Initiative Non-GMO Gluten-free French Macarons Macarons vs Macaroons Jajangmyeon REHS - Registered Environmental health specialist

Ep. 030 - Should You Go To Graduate School?
23:23
2017-09-27 09:28:26 UTC 23:23
Ep. 030 - Should You Go To Graduate School?

Some housekeeping items:

- We're going 2 times a week! Check out a new episode every Monday and Wednesday starting January 2nd! - On January 2nd, we will be creating an awesome new series called the Graduate Series. You can check it out at myfoodjobrocks.com/graduate

Key Takeaways
  • Hear me pronounce words wrong like existential crisis
  • My story about applying to graduate school
  • 5 reasons why you should apply to graduate school anyways
  • See what we're launching in January
Is Graduate School For You?

 

I wanted to tell you my story on graduate school, which isn’t very exciting, but whatever.

I think everyone has this weird thing, like an existential crisis, that happens in your senior year of college where you have absolutely no idea what to do after graduating. I think it’s very common to have graduate school cross your mind once or twice during your final year in college. The school I went to to be honest, has a slight disadvantage when it comes to applying for graduate school. Though some people in my university do get in, the skill set in the food science program at Cal Poly was definitely geared more towards industry preparation. For example, I only had to take one Organic Chemistry course, where most master’s programs require like 3 courses on it. There are exceptions.

But anyways, applying to graduate school is really tough, I found it extremely stressful and overall, I turned in my application late and didn’t get in. Actually, I only applied to Penn State for graduate school. I got so angry at UC Davis’ process that I didn’t even finish it.

First of all, you have to take this dumb test where you stare at a computer screen for 6 hours, then you have to ask 3 people why you’re the best and either have them take the time to write a letter, or they ask you to write it for them, and then you have to not only request a transcript, but in some cases, you have to type it all in the application process as well! It was extremely frustrating for me.

I was also applying to jobs and if you looked back at like, episode 10, then you might remember how much time that consumed out of my day.

Overall, I had a cheesy revelation that there are plenty of people who are successful without a Ph.D. and I’ve heard a lot of stories about the pros and cons of graduate school, and then I realized I really didn’t want to deal with the stress of long hours and bite sized paychecks.

With a job, I could get money and spend it on cool projects, like this one!

Note: these are my opinions for people with a Food Scientist background. There are many people who major in things that might as well have an advanced degree, though if you think hard enough, you can actually get around it.

For example, a chemist might need a Masters but I know a handful of people who get into project management fresh out of college with a BS.

But the 7 people we will be interviewing do understand the value of a higher education and they will tell you all of their trials and tribulations, their hints and short cuts, and their undying passion to make the world a better place.

But anyways, I wanted to give you five distinct pieces of advice about graduate school and reasons why you should at least apply, or not apply. Sometimes it might be worth it, sometimes not.

5 Tips for deciding if Graduate School is for you.
  1. Decide what you want to do with your life

Most directors for rich companies have PhDs because they have the ability and drive to tell people confidently that they’re wrong.

The company I work at specifically have a lot of people at the director level that are doctorates.

So when it comes to mapping out your life, this is really, really hard. It is actually very rare for someone to follow their life in one straight line.

A masters will open doors, but so will starting a podcast about the food industry. Well, that was a bit tongue in cheek, but the fact remains, graduate school is a very nice, structured, accomplishable task and you can do great things in a narrow field when you get that masters or phd. If you want an unconventional method, get a job, and spend money on fun projects.

Some people don’t want to find the “truth of tomatoes” and that’s fine too. I think if you’re passionate and actually like what you studied, you can definitely do graduate school.

The cool thing with food science, however, is that there is a lot more incentive to enter the work force right away. This is mainly because having a science degree means two things:

  • You think you can tell lesser educated people they’re wrong (which is why you can be a supervisor straight out of college)
  • You can weigh and record in a little book your cookie recipe over and over again

Well, with a  masters degree, it adds a bit of a layer of complexity:

  • You think you can tell lesser educated people they’re wrong (which is why you can be a manager straight out of college)
  • You can weigh and record in a little book your cookie recipe over and over again, but now you can write a plan to make better cookies before you record your data.

So I am basically giving you the philosophy that a degree and work experience are pretty much equal, and the only thing that separates is the value and initiative YOU have to take to be successful.

Also, I can guarantee you that working at a 12 hour shift in a factory for a month is equal to a month in graduate school. I did this, it sucked, but I got a job that I love because of it.

Guys, to do great things, you must do something challenging, I can’t stress this enough. A good life is hard, if life was easy, it’d be too boring, right?

  1. Do you have good grades and accomplishments? Go For It!

Our friend Heather McCain is an amazing student, was our chapter IFT president, did a lot of stuff for IFTSA, and got stuff done. It would be a shame for her NOT to apply for graduate school.

I did some cool stuff too, so I decided to not let this go to waste and applied to graduate school.

This is the same experience I had going into college for my Bachelors. I wanted to be a chef, but my grades were pretty good so I decided to apply to college. But graduate school, I realized… I’m not an academic. I’m still not sure what I’m good at. But I have a good idea on what I’m bad at.

In my opinion, it’s extremely painful to apply to graduate school but you should give it a shot. When I say painful, it’s going to take time and it’s going to take effort. The experience has some tangible takeaways, like knowing math… and knowing words…

So I have a bias about applying to graduate school because the process was absolutely terrible in my mind but I think with the interviews this month, you’ll have a much better strategy than I had. Who knows, I might actually change my mind.

Again, if you have the prerequisites, at least try applying. There is no harm to. I mean I did, and failed horribly at it! The point is, you’re going to regret not trying, more than you’ll regret trying.

And this statement is true for all decisions in life.

  1. Do you know a professor? Go for it!

If you have a professor’s digits on your phone, you can probably get funding. At least much more easier than everyone who doesn’t?

Most strategies I’ve learned from the interviews is that it is MUCH easier to contact professors, and set up a relationship and then apply to graduate school. The professor is going to OK you anyways so as long as you don’t have glaringly bad GPA or exam score.

Within the 7 interviews in the coming week, you’ll realize that a handful of them contacted professors and secured funding before even doing the application process. However, some were long time connections, and some didn’t even have to worry about it.

If this helps, Graduate school is not undergraduate school. It’s a low paying job with high returns in value and you have to treat it as such. You can get a job via connections and you can go to graduate school via connects. This is because you’re going to work with this professor for a very long time. He or she has to like working with you.

  1. Do you just not want to deal with the “real world”? Don’t Do It.

Everyone is scared about the real world and everyone has considered graduate school to be another two to 10 years of academic limbo. I would know, I’ve had it and I I’ve also heard graduate students that “I’m not ready to face the real world yet”

In my personal experience, that’s the worst, most cringe-worthy excuse I’ve ever heard.

In fact, you should deal with the real world first before deciding to go to graduate school. Get some industry experience, do an internship, work at a slaughterhouse. These experiences might actually give you more of a drive to get into graduate school.

The real world isn’t that bad, I mean you make money, right? And you can spend it on whatever you want. When you’re a graduate student, you have to be very frugal…well, unless your parents are paying for it. Then go for it!

  1. Do you want a higher pay grade? Don’t Do It… yet
    1. This questions depends on your major, but I’m going to assume the people listening are trying to get into the food industry.

Depending on the company, they will pay for your education. And you’ll also get paid for work! What a steal. If that ever gets offered, you should do it.

However, if you meticulously plan your life like a lot of my friends, you’re probably going to be disappointed.

My friends are like “oh in 5 years after I get my masters I’ll make this, then I’ll get married, have 2.5 kids and  nothing else will go wrong. I mean, maybe I dunno, but you can’t predict the future and even with that mindset, if one thing doesn’t go your way, your life will be very unhappy, which is just not necessary.

So does a graduate degree generally means more pay? Depends where you end up. Industry? Academia? Entrepreneurship? The possibilities are indeed endless.

With my discussions with Katie Lanfranki, we both discussed the fact that in this industry, having an advanced degree does not necessarily mean you’ll be paid higher. There are starting salaries in food science that make more than professors, who have made less than 10,000 dollars in the past 4 to 10 years.

Point being, don’t get your graduate degree for the money. DO it because you are interested in a specific subject, and want to be a MASTERS of it.

But again, mastery can come from anywhere. I would concider Deya from Beyond Meat (episode 24)is considered an expert in Extrusion with just a bachelors, and Darryl the ice cream consultant(episode 21) gained from entrepreneurship.

Either way, DO NOT GET YOUR ADVANCED DEGREE FOR THE MONEY. Having this mindset is very toxic. You have to do it because you love what you do. You have to do what will make you happy.

Anyways, those are my 5 reasons to go (or not go) to graduate school. But please, listen to all seven interviews so you can get multiple perspectives, multiple pieces of advice from people all over the world. This is extremely important. I would have killed for this if I was in graduate school.

Ep. 029 – Owning a Restraurant and Empowering Women for Culinary Leadership with Rohini Dey
29:13
2017-09-27 09:28:26 UTC 29:13
Ep. 029 – Owning a Restraurant and Empowering Women for Culinary Leadership with Rohini Dey

We have an amazing guest today, Rohini Dey is an inspiring woman, who not only owns a very successful restaurant in New York and Chicago, but also spearheads a great scholarship program for aspiring women in the culinary field.

We are also proud to announce the Women in Culinary Leadership Scholarship and encourage you to apply. Click here for the link.

About Rohini Dey, Ph.d. 

A leading restaurateur, proponent of Indian cuisine with her unique Latin twist across Vermilion Chicago and NYC, an avid supporter of women, former World Bank economist and McKinsey management consultant, Rohini Dey straddles the worlds of business and philanthropy across the US and India.

Rohini was inspired to break away from her management consulting career by a desire to go entrepreneurial and a conviction that Indian cuisine in the United States was either confined to stereotypes, or timid and washed out. Rohini created and developed the Vermilion Indian-Latin concept and cuisine. She led the spectrum of entrepreneurial activities across her NYC & Chicago entities. As founder, owner and culinary director of Vermilion, Rohini oversees the operations and culinary evolution of her restaurants.

As a woman restaurateur, Rohini is a staunch supporter of women in business and mentorship and education of girls on a global level. A member of the Board of Trustees and the National Advisory Board of the James Beard Foundation, she co-founded the James Beard Foundation Vermilion Women in Culinary Leadership Program (WICL), backed by a roster of incredible restaurateur-mentors and celebrity (CFW) “Chefs for Women.”

About Vermilion

Since inception, Vermilion has been acclaimed as “Best New Restaurant” by Chicago Magazine, Travel & Leisure, Town & Country, USA Today, and Bon Appetit, among others. For its pioneering cuisine, woman-led team and Rohini’s entrepreneurial journey, she and Vermilion have been profiled in The Financial Times, Time, Oprah Magazine, Fortune, Esquire, Crain’s, Chicago Tribune, Wall Street Journal, New York Times, BBC World, CBS News, and NBC, among others.

Key Takeaways

- How Rohini took advantage in the rise of Ethnic Food - How Rohini planned her research to make her restaurant (she gets very intense! Like interviewing 40 people) - Why Rohini is also very passionate about Women in Culinary Leadership (there’s a scholarship at the end) - Tips on what they look for as a candidate for a scholarship

What We Talk About

Previous Job: World Bank and McKinsey Indian Cuisine Passion: to feed the world Latin Cuisine Tandoori Skirtsteak (It’s fusion) Play with food anything south of the US What makes a good Chef?: Taste-minded, Cost-minded, Team –oriented, Vision-minded, Why Does Your Food Job Rock?: "Because I can create an amazing new cuisine and surprise people by how delicious it is." Women in Culinary Leadership – (Jamesbeard.com) James Beard Foundation Women in Culinary Scholarship Tip: Go Above and Beyond and Ask For More New Trends and Techologies: Exotic flavors and spices getting utilized Stiff upper-lipped Upscale Dining Favorite Meal: Home cooking and street dining Grilled Peruvian food in Cuzco Tempura in Japan What’s the one thing you’d like to know more about: Someone to catapult Rohini’s business (I pitch here about food science) Advice on how to start your own restaurant: Do your research. Especially the cost. Vermilion in New York and Chicago New York is more competitive and jaded than Chicago eaters

 

Ep. 028 - Expert Part-Time Food Blogging with Jessica Gavin, Sr. Research Scientist from Nutralite
53:10
2017-09-27 09:28:26 UTC 53:10
Ep. 028 - Expert Part-Time Food Blogging with Jessica Gavin, Sr. Research Scientist from Nutralite

Enter to win $500 dollars at Jessica Gavin's contest. Click Here!

Today we have an amazingly bubbly guest. Jessica Gavin is a Sr. Research Scientist for Nutralite, which is a division of Amway. She’s been there for about 9 years which I find absolutely amazing.

What’s also super cool is that Jessica has her own food blog at jessicagavin.com which has amazing pictures and recipes. Her blog is one of the most professional food blogs I’ve seen as someone who is a food scientist.

More importantly, Jessica has decided to showcase a scholarship for aspiring food scientists and this is the first thing on our show notes at myfoodjobrocks.com/028jessica . We definently encourage any student listening to apply.

Keeping this short, because this interview is jam packed with great information just about how to be a good product developer, communicator, and mother.

Note: Though Jessica and I work for direct sales companies, we cannot sell our own products! However, I hope through our conversation, you can tell they treat us quite well.

Key Takeaways

- Why Jessica stayed in her company for 9 years - How to use a culinary mindset in a product development aspect - Why Nutralite grows their own Botanicals - Jessica’s blogging skills and why she did it, and what she does (around 42:00 minutes in) - Why Jessica wants to give you money

What We Talk About

Nutralite- Amway Botanicals Flintstones Vitamins Probiotics Direct Sales Cal Poly San Luis Obispo Taryn Yee The Most Important Skills in your job: Learning to build trust Every failure is an opportunity to learn Stages (pronounced: Stauge)- volunteering at a restaurant Culinary Science Ali Bouzari What’s your dream job: Culin-neer? Own company What do you look for in a job?: Your company values you Most exciting food technologies: Clean Label, Gluten-free, GMO-free what you don’t put in Soybeans Pea Protein Supply Side West What’s the biggest problem the food industry has to face?: Pseudoscience and communication Uber communication Millennials What’s your beat? Who inspired you to get into food?: Jessica’s Grandfathers (crazy story) Favorite thing you like to cook: Home made dumplings Butternut squash macaroni and cheese Tofu Favorite Quote: Wayne Gretski: Miss 100% shots you don’t take Favorite Book: Science of Good Cooking Favorite Kitchen Utensil: Spiralizer What would you eat for a month?: Croissants French Polynesia Advice for the Food Industry: What is your Passion? What energizes you? Advice for your freshman self: Study abroad or take interational lessons Take internship opportunities Cargill Slaughterhouse in Texas Jessica Gavin’s Blog Reddit Consistency is key Income Report Trolls Scholarship

Ep. 027 - The Macaroon Buisness with Pina Romolo, CEO of Piccola Cucina
29:05
2017-09-27 09:28:26 UTC 29:05
Ep. 027 - The Macaroon Buisness with Pina Romolo, CEO of Piccola Cucina

 

We have another great small business this episode. Piccola Cucina is an Italian bakery that focuses on Italian baked goods such as macarons and focus on using almonds in their mix.

In this episode, you’ll learn about the different varieties of Macarons, how important it is to maneuver and adapt in the food industry as a small player, and some amazingly good resources and advice from the CEO herself.

I always appreciate having small businesses on the podcast and we have a few more coming up in the pipeline. I admire their tenacity and thinking in the long term. This interview is no exception.

About Pina Romolo

An entrepreneurial, international trade, sales, and relationship management executive, delivering the highest level of client service with keen attention and acuteness to cultural and political sensitivities with valuable contacts in a number of worldwide regions; expert knowledge and proficiency in English, Spanish, Italian, French and basic German.

Specialties: BA in languages, Specialty Food Manufacturing, Strategic Business Planning, Channel Sales, Web presence, Business Development, Event Management, Public Relations, Relationship Management

About Piccola Cucina

Piccola Cucina is the premier manufacturer of gourmet, handcrafted, almond based foods. These artisan products use almonds as the first ingredient and are made with the utmost of care and attention, manufactured in a dedicated gluten free facility. Products include a line of Italian macaroons, 6 flavours in all. Flavours include Amaretti, Chocoretti, Pistachioretti, Limonetti, Coconutt & Walnutti.

Products also include almond based pie & tart shells. The sweet shells are free from gluten, dairy, grains, soy, corn & yeast, low in sodium & vegetarian. And the unsweetened shells are a multipurpose, vegan free from gluten, dairy, soy, corn & yeast & low in sodium. These shells are dense, won't get soggy, can withstand and hold any filling, from sweet to savoury, to quiches & meat pies, to deep dish pizza and anything in between.

Key Take Aways

- The history and diversification of macaroons (macarons) - Amazing specialty food industry resources - The ability to listen to customers and pivot - How do small businesses compete against the bigger guys? - Why family is everything

What We Talk About

Italian Family Recipes Italian Macaroons Amoretti cookie Almond flour French Macaroons, America Macaroons Brazil Macaroons Tip for making macaroons: Ask my mother Vegan Pie shells Listening to customers Food and Beverage Mannitoba (Board of Directors) Ciao Specialty Food Show Fancy Food Show in San Francisco Specialty food association newsletter Biscotti Gluten-Free My Food Job Rocks: I’m surrounded by good people, I get to be my own boss, I can build a legacy Food Technologies: Non-GMO As a business, what would you like to know more about?: I am learning every day District Ventures- Armine Dickinson’s Incubators Who inspired you to get into food?: My family, my mom Favorite Book: Arlene Dickinsons: All In Favorite Kitchen Item: A good knife Freezing basil Favorite Food: Pasta, Spaghetti Carbonata Advice to Start a Food Company: Be prepared to be in it for the long haul Don’t cut corners piccolacucina.com twitter linkedin

Ep. 026 - Tis' the Seasoning with Stephanie Ronquillo, Food Scientist at Newly Weds Foods
43:16
2017-09-27 09:28:26 UTC 43:16
Ep. 026 - Tis' the Seasoning with Stephanie Ronquillo, Food Scientist at Newly Weds Foods

Stephanie Ronquillo is a Cal Poly alumni, and perhaps she could be described as one of my first influences in getting me involved in college. She was the ideal academic student. With the 4.0 GPA, president of the food science club, she’s smart.

After college, she went straight into industry and works at Newly Weds Foods as a food scientist where her focus is on seasoning blends.

In this interview, we focus a good chunk on strategies to make your college experience meaningful, childhood heroes, and interview tips.

 

Ep. 025 - A Food Career Around the USA with Russ Nishikawa, VP Business Development at SPI Group
36:46
2017-09-27 09:28:26 UTC 36:46
Ep. 025 - A Food Career Around the USA with Russ Nishikawa, VP Business Development at SPI Group

Today’s guest is the Vice President of Business Development for a distributor/ supplier, SPI Group, Russ Nishikawa.

What SPI Group does is brokers deals with lesser known ingredients and markets them to customers. A specialized ingredient producer will make deals with distributors for them to market or sell their product. For example, I would have never known about a pea protein from Belgium if it wasn’t for the SPI Group.

You don’t hear much about these types of businesses in school, but they are all the rage in industry, especially if you deal with highly functional and trendy ingredients.

Anyways, I’ve known Russ Nishikawa for a couple of years in Northern California. He reminds me of my uncle to be honest.

About Russ Nishikawa

Russ has been involed in the growth of SPI Group for 25 years. He is involved in new ingredient business development with key customers and targeted market segments, working with new ingredient from new and existing suppliers and determining how applicable the product benefits are to each end product and customer, and maintaining a very technical approach to understanding the value of each ingredient to our customer's needs.

About SPI Group

SPI Group is a distributor of specialty ingredients to food, nutritional, and nutraceutical manufacturers in the Western United States and Canada.

Quality Ingredients Personal Service Logistical Solutions Technical Personnel

Key Takeaways
  • How Russ got his first job in Hawaii
  • Why learning about people is more important than process and equipment
  • How tricky it is to substitute cleaner ingredients
What We Talk About

Humble Pie NCIFT New Professionals SPI Group Colorado Utah Clean Label Sodium Benzoate Lactic Acid Social Media MSG UC Davis Food Science Hawaii- Maui Papayas Punaynay IslandCommerce Wisconsin Learning more about People Formosa Food Ingredients New Zealand Milk Products New York Most Important Skill in the Industry: Empathy How to improve empathy: it’s about character, you’re trying to do the best for yourself and others Why Does Your Food Job Rock: It’s Part of Commerce Food Trends and Technologies: Clean Label GMO, Non-GMO Phosphates Spices and Extracts The Biggest Challenge the Food Industry needs to Face: Trust in the consumer and transparency We’re on the same side What’s one thing in the food industry you want to know more about?: How food interacts with each other Understanding process Inspiration: My Sister got me to look at food science Pilot Plant Most important ingredient: The people. Quote: Be The Light –Buddha Don’t be a downer Favorite Food: Poco Loco (might actually be El pollo loco) Poke QSR Advice for the Food Industry: Match your personality to the career you like For the Future: I’d like to build process lines to Food Banks

Ep. 024 - A Passion For Extrusion with Deya Suarez Trujillo, Extrusion Engineer at Beyond Meat
41:30
2017-09-27 09:28:26 UTC 41:30
Ep. 024 - A Passion For Extrusion with Deya Suarez Trujillo, Extrusion Engineer at Beyond Meat

First off, I am loving the diversity of our guests recently. From different ages and genders from all over the world!

The person we are interviewing today fits into this category. Deya is from Mexico and now works for the ever-trending Beyond Meat, where they produce meat substitutes that actually taste like real meat. If you do some research, their process making it (which is proprietary, and won’t be discussed too much here, sorry folks) is pretty fascinating.

You’re going to learn a ton about an interesting process called extrusion, which is a very scientifically complex process that creates really cool products. Basically, you take raw materials, put them into a machine and it pops out a product… that was a horrible description… but if you just google the process on how hot dogs, protein bars, or even how puffed cereal is made, you’ll know what I’m talking about.

I used to do some extrusion work in college and at my old job so it was nice to talk to somewhat of a kindred spirit.

However, I think Deya takes it to the next level, she is probably one of the most passionate people I’ve ever seen in a particularly specific subject and you will find out exactly why in this episode

About Deya Suarez Trujillo

Deya was born in Monterrey, Mexico to parents with engineering and food science masters degrees. Their influence and understanding of the teaching method and her mother’s strong belief in leading by example and learn by doing, challenged Deya early in life to take risks and not be afraid to fail, as well as her dad always pushing her to be limitless creative.  Together with her passion for creating yummy food allowed her to excel as a fearless, young engineer, working with heavy machinery, and integrating her work with scientists.

Deya attended university at Tecnologico de Monterrey known for their expertise and innovation with food science, particularly food engineering using extrusion technology.  Additionally, Deya spent a year as an exchange student at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver.  A food protein extrusion program at Texas A&M exposed her to the versatility of combining food and engineering machinery to create a wider range of food products.

This lead Deya to Beyond Meat, a company focused on improving human health, positively impacting climate change, conserving natural resources and respecting animal welfare through the innovation of plant based meat products. There, she leads the extrusion team developing, designing and communicating scale-up technology transfer for manufacturing in the extrusion team. On any given day she can be found working the drill press, creating and testing new die models for product improvement and functionality or testing new sustainable ingredients to help make the Beyond Meat products better. She gets messy, takes chances, develops early proof of concept designs, and executes on time.

Deya rides her bike to work along the beach and enjoys the beach with friends. She loves hiking in the hills above the ocean, painting, watching football, doing yoga and cooking with friends and family (specially Mexican food).

Key Takeaways
  • How Deya got into extrusion technology
  • Why Deya and I love Steve Jobs
  • Why you should be involved in something specific
What We Talk About

IFT16 IFT App Uber Extrusion Engineer Meat Replacements Extruder Clextral Twin Screw Extruder Buhler Extruder Extrusion functionality and reminiscing problems How to recreate extrusion during the bench sample process Texas A and M Extrusion Course Food Science Engineer Easy-Bake Oven Techologico De Monterey (College) Cereal Science My Food Job Rocks: I do what I love Beyond Meat Why Plant protein is the future Extrusion By Products such as Whey, Fruit Skins, etc Reducing Food Waste Favorite Quote:

Here's to the crazy ones, the misfits, the rebels, the troublemakers, the round pegs in the square holes... the ones who see things differently -- they're not fond of rules... You can quote them, disagree with them, glorify or vilify them, but the only thing you can't do is ignore them because they change things... they push the human race forward, and while some may see them as the crazy ones, we see genius, because the ones who are crazy enough to think that they can change the world, are the ones who do. (I have this on my cubicle)

Steve Job’s Autobiography Favorite Book: The Happiness Track Emma Seppoa Life’s too Short to Be Stressful Favorite Food: Mexican Food (Salsa) Advice for anyone who wants to go in the food industry: Get Ready. Find something unusal that you’re passionate about Find the experts and go out to find the experts Invest in your future: You might not have all the knowledge right now, but if you’re surrounded with people who know things but you don’t, learn from them. Appreciate what you know, and share what you know, and learn other things from other people My Linkedin Video about Extrusion Processing

Ep. 023 - From Military Chef to Industry Chef with Michael Bunn, Sr. Manager of Product Dev. and QA at Sam's Club
27:16
2017-09-27 09:28:26 UTC 27:16
Ep. 023 - From Military Chef to Industry Chef with Michael Bunn, Sr. Manager of Product Dev. and QA at Sam's Club

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Ep. 022 - Canadian Academia to Australian Industry with Bo Wang, Sr. Technologist From Nu-Mega Ingredients
42:20
2017-09-27 09:28:26 UTC 42:20
Ep. 022 - Canadian Academia to Australian Industry with Bo Wang, Sr. Technologist From Nu-Mega Ingredients

Today we have a special guest who came all the way from Australia. Bo Wang was born in China, moved to Canada for academia, and now lives in Australia working for the industry. His focus is microencapsulation and works to encapsulate fish oil at Nu-Mega Technologies.

Within this episode, he not only talks about his amazing opportunities living in difference contries, but also really digs deep on the difference between academia and industry.

Also, let me know if the audio is good or not, it’s a bit fuzzy this time and I would love your feedback. I recommend you listen without headphones this time if you can.

The first section of this episode is a segment of Peas on Moss' episode. You can find the full article here.

About Bo Wang

Dr. Bo Wang is a Senior Food Technologist at Nu-Mega Ingredients, Queensland, Australia where he is leading the development of novel microencapsulation delivery systems for various bioactive ingredients. He is also an adjunct Senior Lecturer at The University of Queensland and an Adjunct Senior Research Fellow at Deakin University.

Dr. Bo Wang has a Ph.D. in Food Chemistry and Engineering from China Agriculture University and completed his fellowships at Agricultural and Agri-Food Canada and Deakin University before starting his career in the industry. His current research interests include a broad spectrum of natural products extraction and characterization, analytical chemistry, food biotechnology and omega-3 oil technology with expertise in the nano-/micro-encapsulation technologies.

About Nu-Mega Ingredients

NU-MEGA Ingredients Pty Ltd. develops, produces, and supplies omega-3 DHA as an ingredient to the food industry. The company offers a range of microencapsulated Hi-DHA tuna fish oils for addition to various products in dry powder form. It offers its products for various applications, such as infant nutrition products, including infant formulas and moist solid preparations; bread and bakery products; cereals, which include muesli bars and breakfast products; dairy products, such as frozen confection, yoghurts, fromage frais, and milk; supplements, including capsules and dietary products; beverages and juices; animal feeds; and fruit preparations. The company was founded in 2002 and is based in Melbourne, Australia. NU-MEGA Ingredients Pty Ltd. operates as a subsidiary of Clover Corporation Limited.

Key Takeaways

- Bo’s AMAZING traveling opportunities - Why Microencapsulation is pretty important - Different Cultural Ways of thinking between culture, academic and industry - When Bo said he was a Food Engineer and people thought he was a Chef - The big difference between Industry and Academia

What We Talk About

Australia China Agricultural Engineer Canada Lycopene Food Engineer Ph.D Microencapsulation Fish Oil Cultural Way of Thinking Most Important Skill: The consumer don’t really need a perfect product. Fulfill their needs, not yours Food By-products My Food Job Rocks: I love it! I can serve people Biggest Challenge: Food Industry focuses more on money than research What’s one thing you’d like to know more about?: How to process raw materials into extracts Did anyone inspire you to get into food? : My Supervisors and connections Favorite Food: Chinese people can eat anything Scorpions Insects (why he doesn’t like the trend) Advice for anyone who wants to go to the food industry: The connection between academia and industry is close. Do not stay in the lab, keep on making connections and asking questions IFT Expo Retail Euro VitaEuro AIFST – Austrlia IFT AOCS – Chemistry Society Agricultural Engineering Conference

Ep. 021 - All About Ice Cream with Darryl David, Consultant at Darryl's Ice Cream Solutions
50:33
2017-09-27 09:28:26 UTC 50:33
Ep. 021 - All About Ice Cream with Darryl David, Consultant at Darryl's Ice Cream Solutions

    Have you ever wanted to start your own Ice Cream Buisness? Daryl David is the man for you! His life is 100% ice cream. From starting his own business, to now helping people grow their own, there is no man I know who knows more about ice cream than Darryl David If you want more information on Darryl, check out his website on www.icecreamprivatelabel.com This episode is full of everything ice cream. Ice cream history, ice cream business, ice cream science, and ice cream innovation. Key Takeaways

  • The history of ice cream and its renaissance
  • How to contact a co-manufacturer for business
  • Rich, young entrepreneurs who want to make pot ice cream
  • Why ice cream is the perfect food science experiment
What We Talk About Dairy or Non-Dairy Frozen Buisness Such as: Ice Cream,Popsicles, Mom and Pop Ice Cream Shop, Gelato icecreamprivatelabel.com Private Label CoPacker SEO friendly Soda Fountain Steve’s Ice Cream (Harryl’s Ice Cream) Batch freezer Coldstone Creamery Electrofreeze White Mountain Freezer Quote: “What people see today is the fast moving train, not the wheels struggling at the beginning” Golden Age of Ice Cream: Chunks of Cookies, Artificial turned Natural, adding nuts Startups for Ice Cream What you need to talk to a Manufacturer: Ingredients, products, capacity, formula The difference between making things at home versus manufacturing Maltomeal Enough information to know everything, or over confidence THC-infused ice cream Mantra: Let’s make a product professionally, consistently, and good! Good Experience versus Bad Experience in product development Momenti – high end alcohol ice cream Who inspired you to get into ice cream?: Me People eat ice cream to feel good The perfect food example Liquid Nitrogen Shops The process of Dippin’ Dots Advice about Getting into a Food Buisness: Call Darryl I mean, if you think you can’t hire a professional, wait till you hire an amateur Quote: I may lay the canvas out, but they will paint the picture

Ep. 020 - Making College Worth It
29:13
2017-09-27 09:28:26 UTC 29:13
Ep. 020 - Making College Worth It

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Ep. 019 - From Dietetics to Chocolate with Sarabeth Yeli Marshall, owner of Yellibelly Chocolates
36:44
2017-09-27 09:28:26 UTC 36:44
Ep. 019 - From Dietetics to Chocolate with Sarabeth Yeli Marshall, owner of Yellibelly Chocolates

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Ep. 018 Part 2 - The Power of Culinary Science with Ali Bouzari, Author of Ingredient
39:41
2017-09-27 09:28:26 UTC 39:41
Ep. 018 Part 2 - The Power of Culinary Science with Ali Bouzari, Author of Ingredient

  This is part two of Ali Bouzari's amazing interview. Find part 1 here: http://myfoodjobrocks.com/018ali/ And don't forget about our giveaway at www.myfoodjobrocks.com About Ali Bouzari As an Iranian Texan, Ali Bouzari grew up with exposure to different cuisines, but most notably, beef over an open flame. His affinity for food and science lead him to become the guy where all the top chefs call him for help on the science of food. After waking up from a nightmare, he googled on his phone, “food chemistry PhD” and found himself at the University of California, Davis for Food Biochemistry. Strategically located near Napa and Sonoma’s food scene and San Francisco’s thriving entrepreneurial food and tech hub, Davis was his master plan to be the guy where chefs call him. Between being an instructor for the Culinary Institute of America and a graduate student at Davis, he juggled being a freelance consultant for chefs, tapping into the new market of research chefs. Later, he co-founded a consulting firm with top research chefs and a stealthy food lawyer to help make his dream of becoming the go to people for solving food problems. About Ingredient If you want to pre-order Ali’s book, Ingredient, you can go on Amazon. The book is expected to release September 27, 2016. For the price of two mouthwatering sandwiches, the ones similar to what Joey Tribbiani savor, you can learn the essentials of food and cooking through colorful artwork and the translation of esoteric scientific theories into practical at home cooking. You can learn a little more about Ali by reaching out to him on Twitter with his account, Alibouzari. You can also find out more information on his website. The website includes media coverage on Ali, his works in writing, media and Pilot R + D. What We Learn About

  • Read a ton of books; books help you recognize what is really great and between the lines, it helps you understand why something is great
  • Eating can be constituted as research
  • Savory applications in food is trending
  • Ingredient by Ali Bouzari is the Rosetta Stone to cooking
What We Talk About Research: Eating the best Austin BBQ as tax certified Favorite food: Texas BBQ Brisket Beef is a huge thing in Iran and Texas Umami Human breastmilk has 20x more glutamate than cow milk MSG EXO bars Fermentation and Food Industry Favorite Books: Harold McGee’s On Food and Cooking and Sandor Katz’s Art of Fermentation Favorite Kitchen item: Deep Welled-Spoon and Rubber Spatula Advice: Hire a food person when starting a food company. CDO: Chief Deliciousness Officer (this is a mde up term) Ingredient book presale Rosetta Stone of Cooking Website: alibouzari.com Twitter: AliBouzari

Ep. 018 Part 1 - The Power of Culinary Science with Ali Bouzari, CSO of Pilot R+D
28:12
2017-09-27 09:28:26 UTC 28:12
Ep. 018 Part 1 - The Power of Culinary Science with Ali Bouzari, CSO of Pilot R+D

Forbes named him 30 Under 30. Zagat did the same. UC Davis wrote an article about him. HIC The Useful Tool and The Culinologist interviewed him. He gave two TED talks and is about to roll out a book. He will now be interviewed for this podcast. His name is Bouzari, Ali Bouzari. He is a Culinary Scientist at Pilot R + D, holding a doctoracte in food biochemistry and having served as a research chef for the Thomas Keller Restaurant Group. His interview with Adam Yee not only inspires many food industry members to strive for a better tasting and more creative food product, but also brings to light humble beginnings of how a man, a dream and a passion can make the world a better place to cook, eat and understand the impact science has on both. For culinary science! About Ali Bouzari As an Iranian Texan, Ali Bouzari grew up with exposure to different cuisines, but most notably, beef over an open flame. His affinity for food and science lead him to become the guy where all the top chefs call him for help on the science of food. After waking up from a nightmare, he googled on his phone, “food chemistry PhD” and found himself at the University of California, Davis for Food Biochemistry. Strategically located near Napa and Sonoma’s food scene and San Francisco’s thriving entrepreneurial food and tech hub, Davis was his master plan to be the guy where chefs call him. Between being an instructor for the Culinary Institute of America and a graduate student at Davis, he juggled being a freelance consultant for chefs, tapping into the new market of research chefs. Later, he co-founded a consulting firm with top research chefs and a stealthy food lawyer to help make his dream of becoming the go to people for solving food problems. Pilot R + D The genesis of Pilot R + D came through by recognizing collaboration between chefs with diverse research and development backgrounds is much better than independent work. As a special operations delta force, the band of chefs, Kyle Connaughton, Ali Bouzari, Dan Felder and Dana Peck (part lawyer and part chef), became the founding members of an innovation and development firm. Who you gonna call when you’re in need of help as a food and tech entrepreneur? Pilot R + D. Who acts as the hotline during the 11th hour as a fast casual service advisor? Pilot R + D. Research starts with eating a load of good food as a business expense. That’s a job worthwhile where one gets paid to eat food because of science and research! Aside from research, Ali and his colleagues solve problems with a hybrid ideology of product development/food science and culinary/chef mindset. With the approach of flavor being important and ingredient functionality in the context of the whole food, the team tries to figure out their limitations on each project to develop to their clients’ expectations. At times, they think about how pragmatic some projects are and aren’t afraid to admit the impractical demand of the project. That is not to say they are highly selective with their clients. They equally accept any range of proposals. To learn more about Pilot R + D, you can find more information here. Key Takeaways (this episode only)

  • Read Harold McGee’s On Food and Cooking
  • Culinary Science
  • Food ingredients in the context of chefs is to look at the whole ingredient, not the purified form
What we talk about (this episode only) TED Talk Culinary Science Harold McGee UC Davis Biochemistry PhD Culinary Institute of America French Laundry Alton Brown Good Eats Pilot R&D Kyle Connaughton (Fat Duck) Dan Felder (Momofuku) Dana (Morrison Foerster) Grassroots consultancy for chefs Chef scientist Trend forecasting Ingredient Functionality Advice: Learn how to say I can’t do that or it can’t be done Flavor and Taste

Ep. 017 - Why Phil believes in the RCA, with Philip Saneski, President of the RCA Student Committee
36:14
2017-09-27 09:28:26 UTC 36:14
Ep. 017 - Why Phil believes in the RCA, with Philip Saneski, President of the RCA Student Committee

Today we have Philip Saneski, an inspiring, young, proactive, dude who has recently been working hard to build up the Research Chefs Association Student section. Philip works in an innovative consulting company in San Francisco as an intern, has experience as a pastry chef and, as a student, during the school year, he is involved quite heavily in the Research Chef’s Association (RCA). You might remember the Research Chefs Association or Culinology program in episode 12, where Kim Schaub talks about her experiences. Her podcast features culinologists from the RCA. Enjoy the interview! Phil really shines a light on everything the RCA has to offer. About Philip Saneski Philip has culinary experience working in San Francisco Chronicle's 'Top 100 Bay Area restaurants', and Michelin star kitchens as a line cook on multiple stations, as a Pastry Chef for an upscale hotel, at AQ Restaurant, a James Beard Award finalist for 'Best New Restaurant in the Country' and most recently Bob's Well Bread Bakery, named one of the 'Top 15 Small Town Bakeries in the Country' by Travel & Leisure magazine. In addition to being a certified wine sommelier, Philip has expanded his palate by working for award-winning chefs in Portland and Austin. As President and Co-Founder of the Research Chefs Association Student Committee, he is passionate about providing long-term food industry careers to talented students who are able to combine food science and culinary arts - what he calls 'extending the shelf life of chefs'. Interested students can find out more about these R&D opportunities through his Student Committee team's student-run blog The Culinologist: Creating the Future of Food. Philip's extensive pastry experience and volunteer involvement for non-profit organizations led to a coveted internship at a San Francisco Bay Area-based food science product development consultancy, A LA Carte Connections, LLC. During his time as an intern, he became even more enthralled with developing future food products. From gluten-free baked goods to no-bake energy bars, from plant-based proteins to cricket flour. He says that representing innovative start-ups as well as established global corporations is (thankfully) never the same. Whether Philip's balancing school with early mornings as a Pastry Chef or in R&D, everyday his Food Job Rocks! He wants all food interested students to feel the same enthusiasm by making them aware of the numerous career paths available beyond the restaurant kitchen. In March 2016, Philip was given the Research Chefs Association President's Award, the first student ever in the association's 20 year history. About the RCA The Research Chefs Association is the leading professional community for food research and development. Its members are the pioneers of the discipline of Culinology® - the blending of culinary arts and the science of food. Key Takeaways

  • More insight about the world of RCA/Culinology
  • Phil’s awesome tagline and love of crazy desserts
  • How you might benefit if you join the RCA Student Association
What We Talk About Rachel Zemsher Pastry Chef A La Carte Connections The Village Pub AQ Restaurant and Bar Allan Hancock Granada Bistro Bob’s Well Bread Research Chefs Association RCA Conference Gochujang Sous Vide RCA President, Catherine Proper Culinology Magazine Chocolate Beet Cake Phil in 5 Years: Somewhere Innovative Kite Hill What Phil Looks for in a Job: Opportunity Mark Crowell, CuliNex RCA Student Committiee Favorite Kitchen Item: Quenelle Spoons Thomas Keller Advice: Work Backwards Peas on Moss

Ep. 016- Being on TV and Food Media with Julie Miguel from Daily Tiramisu (and others)
34:32
2017-09-27 09:28:26 UTC 34:32
Ep. 016- Being on TV and Food Media with Julie Miguel from Daily Tiramisu (and others)

Today, we have a really cool food job. Julie Miguel can be described as a woman who wears many hats and you’ll see in this episode how much she’s involved in. She’s a food stylist, food media expert, recipe developer, has been on TV multiple times on different stations, and her most important job; being a mother. So this is a very fun interview and you’ll get a lot of really cool, practical tips for how to improve your food photography and recipe development skills. The most important thing in this interview is to really listen to Julie’s advice on achieving your goals. About Julie Miguel Julie Miguel is a digital content producer with a specialization in food media as well as an active food blogger.  The focus of her blog, Daily Tiramisu, is to empower home cooks to be fearless in the kitchen. She does this by taking traditionally difficult recipes and making them easier to execute. Cooking is something that Julie has always been fiercely passionate about. She began cooking after the tragic passing of her mother at age 15.  She is not a trained chef, however, she is a home cook with a lot of real life experience who has trained with many well-known chefs. Julie continues to broaden her culinary experience through her work.  In May of 2016, Julie completed a culinary training and Chinese culture program in Suzhou, China. Julie’s food media career began after she placed 7th on the inaugural season of CTV’s MasterChef in Canada.  Since then, she started her blog and has made numerous appearances on The Marilyn Denis Show and other national and local television channels.  Julie continues to make regular appearances as a cooking segment presenter on television as well as hosting live events.  She has partnered with many nationally recognized food and lifestyle brands and is the co-founder of Mami Umami, a program aimed at teaching youth, life skills in the kitchen.  She has grown a significant social media following through her diverse work and continues to find innovative ways to engage her fans. When she’s not developing recipes for her clients, Julie sits on the Program Advisory Council at Centennial College in Canada where she acts as an industry adviser for their Food Media program.  She is also the Blog Award Chair for the Taste Canada Awards where she administers the Blog Award and also acts as the webmaster and Taste Canada Cooks the Books, Stage Assistant. Her favorite thing to do, besides cooking, is spending time with her husband and two young boys. Key Takeaways

  • What makes a good food photograph
  • How Master Chef Canada inspired and launched her food career
  • Why you should have a personal website
What We Talk About Daily Tiramisu Food Photography Organizing Your Week Lady York Foods in Toronto MasterChef Canada Merylyn Denis Segments - #1 Talkshow in Canada Local Rogers JulieMiguel.com Food Technology: 30 second food videos - For example, Tasty Snapchat Centennial College Inspiration: The production crew for Master Chef Kitchen Item: Meat Cleaver from China Mario Batali Squid Ink Favorite Food: Pizza (Thin crust) Quebec Pizza Advice to be a Food Stylist: Put yourself out there and sometimes, training doesn’t matter Something Inspiring: Look at someone inspiring, and aspire to do the things they do            

Ep. 015 - Choosing Between Work and Graduate School with Katie Lanfranki, R+D Technologist at South Coast Baking
37:18
2017-09-27 09:28:26 UTC 37:18
Ep. 015 - Choosing Between Work and Graduate School with Katie Lanfranki, R+D Technologist at South Coast Baking

I promise, this is the last Cal Poly alumni episode for a while (at least until episode 25)! But I gotta tell you about Katie Lanfranki. Katie is currently a Research & Development Technologist at South Coast Baking, Co. She is one of the most supportive, proactive people I’ve ever met. Katie’s a very inspiring person and she is super knowledgeable. In this interview, you’re going to see just how passionate and excited she is in her job. One of the most valuable pieces of information I’ve found in this interview is about the choice to choose between Graduate School or working in the industry (around 30 minutes in). Katie has helped me in product development competitions, with lots of extracurricular activities and she has been extremely supportive in almost everything I do. She was one of my friends to whom I showed this podcast and she has been extremely helpful, before we even launched. As the podcast picked up momentum, she wanted to help out the FoodGrads cause, like I did. Together we’re working on some really cool campaigns that will launch in the coming months. She was all ready to go to graduate school, and then, decided not too. And she brings some amazing insight on doing this. If you would like to listen to more of our episodes, make sure to check out our iTunes link. If you like them, we would love it if you could rate, review and tell your friends! Thanks! About Katie Lanfranki Beginning her undergraduate education as a Mathematics major at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, Katie quickly discovered she sought a major that allowed for more creativity and innovation. Taking a leap of faith, she transferred majors to Food Science due to her love of food and understanding that the necessity of eating would likely promise job security. She quickly discovered the multidisciplinary major was a perfect match, as it allowed her to dip her toe into numerous subjects while constantly getting to try new foods and feed her inner foodie. In her current role, she develops, as well as maintains, the development of new and improved products. With a love for learning and passion for food, Katie loves to dive into all facets of the food industry. About South Coast Baking South Coast Baking is a wholesale manufacturing company in the frozen dough industry. The company does everything from co-manufactured, custom formula cookies, to innovative panning systems. South Coast Baking sets the standard for delivering the highest quality and lowest possible cost in the frozen cookie dough industry. South Coast Baking’s mission is to produce the highest quality product at the lowest cost. Their philosophy will always be to take care of its customers’ needs – one cookie at a time.  Key Takeaways

  • Why you will never get bored in the food industry
  • Why we talk about In-and-Out So much
  • How important it is to get Involved in College
  • Why Katie decided to choose a job first over graduate school
What We Talk About Frozen Cookie Pucks Triangle Tests Networking! Cal Poly San Luis Obispo Episode 5 Wellness Conference Important Skill: Patience and a Passion for Learning Gluten-Free The Recession Open-Door Policy 3D Printing Packaging Minor Favorite Kitchen Item: Rubber Spatula Altonbrowncast Serial Undisclosed Stuff You Should Know How Umami Works How Caffeine Works America Test Kitchen Milk Street Kitchen Favorite Food: Ketchup with French Fries Well-done In-and-Out fries In and Out That’s what a hamburger is all about Advice for students: Get Involved IFTSA Chapters Continental Mills

Ep. 014 - Professor, Entrepreneur, Philanthropist with Dr. Tom Neuhaus, Owner of Mama Ganache Chocolates (and more)
36:29
2017-09-27 09:28:26 UTC 36:29
Ep. 014 - Professor, Entrepreneur, Philanthropist with Dr. Tom Neuhaus, Owner of Mama Ganache Chocolates (and more)

Do you remember episode 2 and episode 11? Both Trevor Fast and Andrea Zeng took this dude’s chocolate class and were even promoted to work in chocolate production on campus. Today, we’re interviewing a man who has been enamoured with food all his life. He was our professor at Cal Poly, he owned and owns bakeries and chocolate shops, and he spends his time donating chocolate-making equipment to Africa. This man is the one and only: Dr. Tom Neuhaus. If you would like to listen to more of our episodes, make sure to check out our itunes link. If you like them, we would love it if you could rate and review. Thanks! About Dr. Tom Neuhaus Rich. That’s one word that comes to mind when we listen to this episode. Retired professor, business owner and philanthropist, Dr. Tom Neuhaus is rich with stories, experiences, knowledge and, well, chocolate! After an adventurous life baking and cooking across the world and teaching at some of the most well known academic food universities, we have decided that Dr. Nehaus is the epitome of food and science. After training as a chef and baker in Europe, mainly in France and Austria, Dr. Neuhaus found himself eager to open his own restaurant.  Leaving his first restaurant, Sweetish Hill Bakery and Restaurant in Austin, Texas, Dr. Neuhaus found his way to New York City and later Washington D.C. as an Executive Chef at restaurants like Quo Vadis and Fifty States. Following a myriad of prestigious chef positions he entered the world of academia; writing columns for The Washington Post as well as teaching at Cornell’s School of Hotel Administration (where he earned his PhD). Most recently he taught at Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo teaching Sensory Science, Food and Culture, as well as his famous Chocolate Classes! Mama Ganache In 2004, Dr. Neuhaus opened Mama Ganache, a small chocolate business in San Luis Obispo. Mama Ganache makes high quality, ethically sourced and produced chocolates that are both Fair Trade and Organic Certified. Through his business, Dr. Neuhaus has begun making directly sourced chocolates that are not only quality treats but also bring awareness to fair trade and small cocoa farmers in West Africa. Project Hope and Fairness (PHF), founded by Dr. Neuhaus, helps cocoa farmers in Ghana and Ivory Coast (Cote d’Ivoire) with their cocoa production, manufacturing, sales and trade. PHF grounds itself in three platforms- directly supporting cocoa farmers, educating consumers about the cocoa market and encouraging larger chocolate producers to see the importance in adopting Fair Trade policies. We fully believe Dr. Neuhaus hit the nail on the head with his philosophy on being creative, fully inspired and excited by food. We hope you enjoy this high-energy episode with a wonderful and passionate Food Scientist.  Hey Oprah! Are you listening?!? Tom's Ventures To learn more about Project Hope and Fairness and all of Dr. Neuhaus’s amazing work in the Ivory Coast and Ghana please visit http://projecthopeandfairness.org/ Small businesses are making a big difference! To eat some of Mama Ganaches’ delicious treats, find them in San Luis Obispo on Monterey Street or have some delivered right to your door. If you want to read snippets of Dr. Neuhaus’s (yet-to-be-published) autobiography, see what’s tempering in the Mama Ganache kitchen or to see some pictures of his recent adventures to Ghana head over to his blog at https://tomsfoodworld.com/ Key takeaways

  • When you go into food, you are driven by it
  • Why you should invest in small businesses, even if they are in other countries
  • Why finding your muse will set you for life
What we talk about Malcolm Gladwell Howard Moskowitz Cal Poly Chocolates Mama Ganache artisan chocolate Project hope and fairness Shoes stuffed with cigarettes German chocolate Lindt chocolate Favorite Food: Anchovies First Venue: Bakery in Texas Cornell University Eco-hotels in Africa Jacques Torres Technical skill: Curiosity Anthony Bourdain- kitchen confidential Bedford Stuyvesant Fair trade Organic Pine needle beverage Favorite Kitchen Item: Melanger Cement manufacturing Calcium carbonate Fine chocolate industry association Bean to bar association Single origin Favorite Food: Eggs, Fresh tuna, Uni Favorite Quote: Voltaire – I personally don’t like religion but my valet does so he doesn’t steal my spoon Best Advice: Culture and language, Language and food Oprah Depa is the first country in Africa to make their own chocolate Paul Farmer  

Ep. 013 - Bakers Dozen with Adam Yee, Product Developer from Isagenix
25:01
2017-09-27 09:28:26 UTC 25:01
Ep. 013 - Bakers Dozen with Adam Yee, Product Developer from Isagenix

So this interview was from a deal I made with Taryn Yee. I interview her… and then she would interview me. Ideally, I should have made this episode number 5, right? Why should I wait for episode 13? Well, my birthday is January 13th, a baker’s dozen has 13 of something, 13 is an unlucky number? Whichever explanation your prefer, I’ve decided to use my interview for episode 13. Here’s my point of view from my perspective. Taryn Yee asks some pretty funny questions in this one. If you would like to listen to more of our episodes, make sure to check out our itunes link. If you like them, we would love it if you could rate and review. Thanks! About Adam Yee I really don't like writing my own bio. Here's a bit on my linkedin: Food Science Professional who loves to learn all aspects of a business. Likes to get involved in multiple projects, never afraid to help out, and has a huge passion for food. Other activities include involvement in the cultural and food scene in Phoenix including: - Creating a meetup for Asian transplants in Arizona - Joining Asian focused non-profits to better understand community in Phoenix - Offering services to non-profit organizations to help local food buisnesses - Help multiple startups with innovative projects If you need any advice on the food industry or just want to talk, just message me! About Isagenix Isagenix International LLC is a Direct Sales company that markets dietary supplements and personal care products. The company, based in Gilbert, Arizona, was founded in 2002 by John Anderson, Jim Coover, and Kathy Coover. As of 2013 the company reported having over 200,000 active sales associates. In 2012, the company reported revenues of approximately $335 million. The majority of Isagenix's sales come from the United States. Key takeaways - What happens when you go all in when you choose a major in college - Using Science to improve creativity - Why we should invest in food education What we talk about Wednesday lunches with Adam Yee Jambalaya Takoyaki Disney competition Extrusion Phoenix Arizona Food startups Coffee We should focus on: Food education Favorite Quote: Everybody is a Genius. But If You Judge a Fish by Its Ability to Climb a Tree, It Will Live Its Whole Life Believing that It is Stupid Second Favorite Quote: Butter makes everything better Onion cutting goggles Favorite Book: Steve jobs autobiography Favorite Kitchen Item: Cast iron pan In and out Plant based Burger 4 People You'd Like Dinner With Alton Brown Andrew Zimmerman Anthony Bourdain (why I don't want him) Nigella Lawson Mark Zuckerberg  --> in hindsight, I'd choose Elon Musk  

Ep. 012 - On Being a Research Chef with Kimberly Schaub, Innovation Manager at Lundberg Family Farms
42:30
2017-09-27 09:28:26 UTC 42:30
Ep. 012 - On Being a Research Chef with Kimberly Schaub, Innovation Manager at Lundberg Family Farms

So last week, I interviewed Andrea, a Food Technologist working for Lundberg Family Farm, and today, I’m interviewing someone from there too - her boss, a Product Developer and Research Chef at Lundberg! What are the odds? And the meeting between her and I was a completely different scenario as well. It started when I joined Podcaster’s Paradise to jumpstart my Podcasting experience and I saw a poster who looked familiar. I might have seen her on Linkedin actually. I clicked and she worked for Lundberg. I asked Andrea about her and what do you know, it’s her boss. Yes, Kimberly King Schuab was in the same podcast course as I was, and we connected instantly. We realized we had a lot in common so we agreed to collaborate and interview each other. Her episode can be found in the show notes. About Kimberly Schaub Kimberly Schaub is a nutritionist, turned chef, turned product developer, working for Lundberg Family Farms in Richvale, CA. A former Air Force officer, Kimberly has explored a multitude of ways to use her nutritional science training, from running dining facilities to teaching college classes and even food writing. When she's not in the test kitchen or running a sensory panel, Kimberly hosts the PeasOnMoss and The Culinologist Podcasts, volunteers for the Research Chef Association and Institute of Food Technologists, trains for the Rock n Roll Half Marathon, and rock climbs in picturesque Northern California. About Lundberg Family Farms Lundberg Family Farms, based in Richvale, California, in the United States, produces rice, chips, packages, and markets organic foods. It is family owned and has been a pioneer in organic farming, especially rice products. It was the first business to produce and market a brand of organic rice in the United States. Today it is one of the United States' top brands of organic products, with 14,000 acres (57 km2) under management. Key Takeaways

  • The magic behind Modernist Cuisine
  • Communicating between you and your co-packer
  • Why you can start something and others should follow
  • The art of being a product developer
What we talk about Podcaster's Paradise The airforce Research Chef Association Labels Graham Kerr Seattle Culinary Academy Modernist Cuisine Lundberg Family Farm Beecher's Handmade Cheese (artisan food) Most Important Skill: Mental Math and Excel spreadsheets CoPacker Granola Bars Northwest Naturals Cactus IFT Culinology Program offered at a few industries A Book called Culinology Peas on Moss Peas on Moss Podcast Vegetarian Meats Substitutes Acid Rain Andrea Zeng The Galloping Gourmet Favorite Quote: Maya Angelou – “Eating is so intimate"  Favorite Kitchen Item: Global knife Full Tang blade Favorite Food: Thai Food – Pad Thai, Curry, Mango Sticky Rice Best Advice: Always ask questions first Culinologist Podcast CFS – Certified Food Scientist      

Ep. 011 - Cooking and Science with Andrea Zeng, Food Technologist from Lundberg Family Farms
25:58
2017-09-27 09:28:26 UTC 25:58
Ep. 011 - Cooking and Science with Andrea Zeng, Food Technologist from Lundberg Family Farms

Today I interview Andrea Zeng, long time friend, some time rivals. This is a great episode about choosing between culinary school and a degree in food science. Note that you can always have both (as you will find out in a future episode!). We're going to be talking about a lot of cool food science terms like enzymes and retro-gradation. Hang on!! If you would like to listen to more of our episodes, make sure to check us out on iTunes. If you like them, we'd appreciate it if you could rate and review them. Thanks!

About Andrea

Andrea is a graduate of California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo with a Bachelor’s Degree in Food Science and a minor in Packaging. She currently works as a Food Technologist at Lundberg Family Farms, developing new consumer packaged goods within the natural and organic category. During her time at Cal Poly, Andrea was a Student Lead Product Developer at Cal Poly Chocolates. With Cal Poly Chocolates, a student run business through the Food Science Department, Andrea was able to turn ideas into new products and ultimately onto shelves of stores in the local community. By working in a student run business Andrea helped with order fulfillment, inventory management, student management and special events. Currently located in Richvale, California, Andrea works with products ranging from chips, to rice cakes, rice and risottos. Using her experience with quality at Earthbound Farms, her practice in the lab at university and innovation with chocolate, Andrea has been able to create new (and I might say "yummy"!) rice entrees, rice cakes and puffed snacks.  Outside of the test kitchen Andrea also works with sensory testing and food styling and recipe suggestions for the Lundberg website (how cool is that!?). Check out some of Andrea’s creations at most major grocery stores!

About Lundberg Family Farms

Lundberg Family Farms, based in Richvale, California, in the United States, produces rice, chips, packages, and markets organic foods. It is family owned and has been a pioneer in organic farming, especially rice products. It was the first business to produce and market a brand of organic rice in the United States. Today it is one of the United States' top brands of organic products, with 14,000 acres (57 km2) under management.

Key Takeaways
  • Why Andrea (and I guess, me) chose majoring in Food Science over Culinary School
  • How Food Science might enhance your cooking skills
  • The frustration of targeting timelines and waiting for product success
What we talk about

Lundberg Family Farms IFT16 Ridgeview California Heat and Eat Cal Poly Peach Cobbler Enzymes Denature Food Chemistry Retrogradation Vending Machine Restaurants Food Network Giada DeLaurentiss Ina Gartner Alton Brown Victorian Nox Chef’s Knife Zoodle thing Box Grater Quest Noodles Savory Granola Bars Vietnamese Spring Rolls Just Do It

Ep. 010 - My First Food Job Search
29:02
2017-09-27 09:28:26 UTC 29:02
Ep. 010 - My First Food Job Search

In this episode, we are going to talk about my experience getting a job in the food industry as a senior in college. Everyone has a different experience, but mine might relate to yours. (Yes, the picture is photoshopped) If you would like to listen to more of our episodes, make sure to check out our itunes link. If you like them, we would love it if you could rate and review. Thanks! Key Takeaways Best techniques and resources for resume/CV writing One of the best types of advice I received is to focus on the job description Why it might be beneficial moving to a new city What we talk about Waco Texas Career Centers Carl's Jr Foodgrads' top 3 tips for landing your first job What color shirt should you wear for job interviews? Cactus Section IFT (for example) Transcript For some background information, I was very involved in my department in Cal Poly and in my junior year, I received my first internship offer in Fall quarter. So about this internship, all I can tell you is that it was a very well-known company but it was one of those well-known companies which own EVERYTHING. So lucky me, I got the internship, was super excited and then I was sent to Waco Texas for a job…at a slaughter house. As much as I like seeing turkeys getting beheaded and getting half off on deli meat, I found the work a bit unsatisfying and the town unenjoyable. I guess I did the work well enough that I got a job offer, but I had to decline due to the fact that I really didn’t like the location. I came back to college to start a new. So with this background, I thought I would get a job pretty easily. Given that I got my first internship in the Fall. I was wrong, but I didn't give up. Of course I didn’t give up, I needed a job! I started to apply to jobs seriously on January giving me a 6 month time bomb before I graduated. Getting a job before graduating is a good goal everyone should attain and my advice is to actually start at Fall. But the main reason you should start at Fall is to review and renovate your resume. Your resume is your written sales infographic that lets you convince people you are great. The best part of a resume is that you can tell in a black and white fashion if it's working or not. If you get hits, your resume is working. If you're not, then you need some help. Once I realized I wasn't getting hits in late-Fall, I went to some FREE resume seminars offered at our career center and signed up to get my resume looked at. The improvements were tremendous and I would highly suggest doing this first if you are serious about getting a job...which you should be. During this, I busted out 2 resumes: a 1 page resume which explains a quick, basic rundown on skills that show I'm a valuable person and a 2 page resume (front and back) where I listed a run down and on the back, posted project summaries if they were more interested. The career center lady justified that it was ok to have a 2 pager just because I was involved in a lot of stuff. So there are two types of resumes people look at. If you're in a supervisory role, people judge your ability to be a leader and how to be proactive. This is in general a very important skill but should be highlighted when you apply to leadership type of positions such as a supervisor The second 2 page resume was highly technical and talked about amazing projects such as product development competitions and microbiological labs. I found this resume to be very effective with product development and R and D roles. Both of these got amazing hits and next thing I knew, the next 6 months were literally traveling 4 hours each way to interview with companies of all shapes and sizes. Almost every month, I had 2 in-house interviews that caused me to travel far. This is also where I learned the magic of reaching out and sleeping at old friend's couches and catching up for the weekend from family members to old high school friends, I thank them so much for letting me stay over just for a job interview. I think phone interviews and in-house are relatively the same and you need to learn to say digestible and relate-able experiences to your manager. The only difference is that youa re in person and they visualize you as a good fit for the company don’t judge you based off of words alone. My advice is that every time you need to answer a question, you need to answer with a story of why what you did is relatable. Remember to keep it decently short and always end with a loop around in which answers the question. I think it's wise (or should I say, inevitable) that your job search is going to be very specific and if you keep on not getting jobs, your horizons will be broader and broader. I started with specifically product developer jobs and I didn't get very many hits. After a month or so, I had some anxiety about the situation and started to tenaciously apply to jobs outside of my scope, but stayed in the realm of the food industry. There were certain barriers I wanted to not touch, namely it can't be in a rural town (unless it's close to people I know like my grandparents) and it had to be food related (duh! I got my degree for a reason!). I think it's good to have some standards no matter what when applying for jobs. So you really need to ask first: what's important to you? So let's see, in the course of 6 months, I traveled a lot. From my comfy San Luis Obispo home, and traveled everywhere from San Francisco, the whole Bay Area, Los Angeles, Carpenteria, Fresno, other rural towns, and of course, Arizona. In some weekends, I had to plan an interview Friday and Monday so I slept over at a friend's house for the weekend. Fun stuff. And these companies were big and small. Off the top of my head, they ranged from all sorts of jobs in all sorts of industries. Production, Quality, Research and Development mainly and in such industries as meat, bread, cheese, spices, coffee, and other things like that. One of my favorite interviews that I really was devastated I missed was a job at Carl's Jr's headquarters near the beach at Carpenteria California. I crushed the interview and was a shoe in to become a food technologist and make fast food all day. I had a lead with a technologist to whom I sent in my resume and got an interview with the Vice President of R and D. Unfortunately, I lost out to a more experienced candidate. That set me back emotionally for a while. My least favorite interview was a noodle factory in Los Angeles where the interviewers made rude, snarky comments about my intelligence. It looked like a dump anyways. The more jobs I interviewed, the more depressed, the more irritable I became. My self-worth was crushed but I had to keep going or else my pride would be shattered, right? I cared so much about my reputation and comparing myself to my peers what I became very paranoid and looking back at it, I was stupid. Everyone who gets a job has this problem but in reality, I have to say, no one cares if you don't get a job, but people will care when you do. And that's something positive. I think the pivot happened in how things were going when I talked to my mentor/ department head about why I didn't have a job yet and he said something that I took into action: 100% of the focus in the interview needs to be tailored to them. And in hindsight, this was the reason I didn't get the job. I wasn't focused 100% on what they wanted, I focused on what I wanted and why I should be chosen. I had two more interviews next week. One in California and one in Arizona. The  first one was in California for a Quality Supervisor role, the one interviewing me was a tough guy and really grilled me. He told me to memorize the 5 commandments of the company which I had to memorize on the 3 hour car ride over. I did it, and he was very impressed. The interview was very tough as well, his questions were extremely specific and his stare down was intense. After a tour of the factory, we went to the quality department and talked about how he treated his team like family. That is where I realized... I probably got the job. The next was a flight to Arizona to a granola bar factory which hadn't even been built yet. I interviewed with the Vice President of Innovation and we really got into talking with the spirit of innovation. I think my personality won him over more than anything. And maybe its because I fit the bill. The position was for a Food Processing Technologist, a type of in-house research and development position that was open to a lot of possibilities because it was a brand new plant. I got both of them. And had to choose which one to choose. By now, maybe you know which one. Or not. So now this was also really hard. I could either stay close to my friends if I lived in California, or go to a place where I knew absolutely no one. Actually, let me list out the advantages and disadvantages of each: The quality job had better pay, it was in California in between San Luis Obispo and my grandparent's place in Fresno, I could see my friends often and my family as well. However, the job wasn't what I wanted: an R&D job, it was in the middle of nowhere, and I realized if the salary I was offered was worth working 6 days a week for 10 hours in the summer. The job in Arizona was more of a gamble, because I was letting go of being comfortable to land to somewhere uncomfortable. People kept on telling me that it was super conservative and super hot, which scared me. It's tough, people are always scared of the unknown. But the job was a foot in the door for something bigger potentially. It was labeled as a Research and Development job. And though it wasn't a comfy corporate job, it was something that could potentially be greater. After hundreds of conversations with pretty much everyone, I chose the job in Arizona. I think there were three key factors that made me chose Arizona over California: For one, the job was an R and D job which most of my friends said that at the end of the day, it’s a better field to be in. Another was the fact that this was turning over a new leaf for me and this was a potential chance to grow where I could never grow before.   The biggest reason, and I think the most important thing that mattered to me was the local community I would belong to. I suffered living in a town like Hanford, California at my internship in Texas and I knew I'd have a hard time adjusting. A city might be easier. I chose Phoenix because it was full of mystery and a bustling city with 6 million people. I was still young, and I needed to learn to grow up. Also, what's nice about simultaneously being offered 2 jobs is you can leverage pay. So I ended up equalizing the pay of the R&D job to the Quality job.   I could give you hours’ worth of reasons why it's a good idea to move where you absolutely know no one but I won’t. All I can tell you is that I have never been happier moving to this city because I’ve learned to take charge and grow myself. If I hadn’t moved to Phoenix, honestly, I don't think I would have had the courage to start this podcast. So let’s take some time to ruminate on some actionable items. Nicole and Juliette have this wonderful article about how people in the food industry recruit people and to be honest, most of my experiences are very relatable for what they’ve posted in their research article: Food Employers’ Top 3 Tips To Landing Your First Job.I’ll name their top three tips and add my two cents. I find this article extremely useful and I do honestly wish I had this information in hindsight. Their top three tips:

  1. Make sure you want the position. It may sound obvious, but interviewers can tell the difference between someone with a genuine motivation for a chosen field and someone that just wants a job. Interest is also tied to effort.  Being late, or an untidy appearance demonstrate interest levels that are lacking.
If you are looking for a job, remember your goal but also remember your scope. My goal was an R and D job, but my scope was the food industry. Even if I didn’t get an R and D job, as long as I would be in the food industry, I not only would have a chance in an R and D job, but the experience of manufacturing, or document control, would actually make me more valuable to the next employer. There was a point in time where I was obsessed with the color of my dress shirt. I tested blue, green, and red. Coincidentally, my green shirt always got me job offers so now I call it my lucky green shirt. I even used this short when I applied to my current job and got in. 2 Research the company. Arriving unprepared without any idea of what the company produces or who their customers are, will seal your fate. You won’t get asked back. Tailor your “mindset” to the job description. In every job interview you do, it’s wise to read the job description hours before interviewing and direct most of your answers to the job description. This will show much more directly why you are the best fit for the job. Always remember: the point of a job is to help THEM with something. Their job isn’t supposed to solely improve you, it’s supposed to help them earn money so they can invest in you.
  1. Network. Get to know the industry and the players within it. Join associations, ask lots of questions and you will have the upper hand now, and in the future, as you move forward in your career.
Making connections is just increasing your chance to luck. I admit: I exhausted my connections in college and still could not get a job from them. Connections are nice and I highly recommend hustling to get them, but they will never guarantee you a job. Funny story on this one: My second job transition, I knew two guys who interviewed me because I’ve hustled and networked a bunch in Phoenix. That’s another story. Also remember that it’s more about how strong your connections, in terms of your relationship to them and how well they know your name, than how many connections you have. Don’t forget to use industry specific recruitment websites like FoodGrads.com to find your job. There are so many industry specific websites out here. To find more, just google them. Literally food and job will work too. And it’s not the end of the world if you don’t get a job by graduation. In fact, some people would recommend taking a year off to do something totally unrelated. In hindsight, I kind of wish I did something like that but the race to get a job and not tarnish my reputation went to my head. It really depends on what you want and in what financial situation you’re in. You probably shouldn’t Eurotrip when you’re 5 figures in debt, but I’m also not your mother. Again, this is one example of a job hunt and I wanted to share it with you because this is something I would have loved to have been told about when I was looking for jobs. I want you to succeed.  

Ep. 009 - Selling Solutions with Kyle Failla, Sales Manager at Glanbia
29:55
2017-09-27 09:28:26 UTC 29:55
Ep. 009 - Selling Solutions with Kyle Failla, Sales Manager at Glanbia

This week we eat and chat with Kyle Failia. As a Sales Manager with Glanbia (a global company supplying dairy isolates and functional ingredients), Kyle has found a perfect fit for his passion!   About Kyle  Originally a Nutrition student, Kyle's interest in functional ingredients and physical activity crossed paths at his sales position with Nutrishop. Through his interactions with customers and his curiosity for ingredients, Kyle became interested in the creative side of nutrition. However, knowing that he did not want to become a dietitian, he stumbled upon Food Science and became an undergraduate in the Food Science program at Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo. It is then that Kyle knew he had found the perfect fit.     As a result of product development competitions at Cal Poly and his involvement as a board member at IFTSA (Institute of Food Technologist Student Association) Kyle landed a job with Glanbia on their graduate program. It is here that he was able to experience every aspect of the business from marketing to R&D and production. Most recently, Kyle has become an account manager with Glanbia. In this role, mainly focused on the west coast, he helps clients solve functional problems with their products. Find Kyle on LinkedIn to learn more about his thoughts on Protein and Processed Food!   About Glanbia Glanbia is a global, performance nutrition and ingredients group with operations in 32 countries and 5,200 employees. It has leading market positions in sports nutrition, cheese, dairy ingredients, speciality non-dairy ingredients and vitamin and mineral premixes. Glanbia products are sold or distributed in over 130 countries. While Europe and the USA represent the organization's biggest markets, Glanbia is also expanding in to markets in the Middle East, Africa, Asia Pacific and Latin America. The Glanbia Group has four segments; Global Ingredients, Performance Nutrition, Dairy Ireland and Joint Ventures & Associates.   Key Takeaways

  • How a book covered in a cereal box convinced Kyle to go into food science
  • Why sales might be the career for you
  • Why you should take advantage of the extra-curricular opportunities available to you in College
What we talk about: Otaku (this is a restaurant) Ireland Whey Protein Premix Acquisitions Optimum Nutrition ISOPure Think Thin Bar “Just add Glanbia” Fresno, California NutriShop Cal Poly IFT Expo New Orleans IFTSA (Board Member) Product Development Teams Sales as a Career 3D Printing Nutrient Timing (this is a book) Cooked (this is also a book) Chef’s Table (this is a documentary) Pizza

Ep. 008 - Food Writing with Eve Turow Paul, Author of Generation Yum
30:11
2017-09-27 09:28:26 UTC 30:11
Ep. 008 - Food Writing with Eve Turow Paul, Author of Generation Yum

In this episode, I interview Eve Turow Paul about her amazing writing career and the importance of soil. About Eve Eve Turow Paul, author and consultant, has taken on a big challenge: understanding the preferences and trends of the mysterious Millennial. By taking a deep dive into the psychology of this generation, Turow has gained an understanding of their fears and desires, especially when it comes to food culture around the world. Through her book A Taste of Generation Yum: How the Millennial Generation’s Love for Organic Fare, Celebrity Chefs and Microbrews Will Make or Break the Future of Food, Turow has become, in our eyes, an expert in Millennials and their unparalleled fascination with food. Turow approached the research for her book by interviewing high profile food writers and commentators including Anthony Bourdain and Michael Pollan, and feedback received  directly from Millennials themselves. She provides fascinating insights in to Millennials obsession with food and their role in the future of food culture and policy, specifically in America. Through her studies Turow has been able to guide start-ups and Fortune 500 companies alike in making sound decisions when it comes to Millennials. Her writings have been featured in The Chicago Tribune, Plate, Refinery29 and The Huffington Post. Turow's Career Before her current position as Millennial Expert in Residence for Group SJR (a part of Hill+Knowlton Strategies), Turow worked as a contributing writer to the New York Times as well as with journalist and cookbook author Mark Bittman. Hard copies of her book can be found at retailers MacNally Jackson or Espresso Book Machine. E-book versions can be found at Apple Stores, Barnes and Nobel, Kobo, Google Play or Amazon! Find out more about Eve on Twitter and Instagram at @EveTurowPaul and on Facebook at Facebook.com/ETurow. Key takeaways

  • How to meet Anthony Bourdain (and other important people)
  • How to turn writing into an amazing food job
  • Why dirt is so important
What we talk about Generation Yum Mark Bitman Food Columnist New York Anthony Bourdain Argentina Bonnie Wolfe, NPR Nestle Generation Z Old for Snapchat The Recession How technology is changing food Microbiome Fitbits 3D Printing Voltaire –cultivate your garden Japanese custom knives We need more farmers Is your job fulfilling?

Ep. 007 - Making an Impact with Jeffrey Nguyen, Supply Chain Engineer at Gatorade
22:10
2017-09-27 09:28:26 UTC 22:10
Ep. 007 - Making an Impact with Jeffrey Nguyen, Supply Chain Engineer at Gatorade

In this episode, Jeffery a supply chain engineer talks about leadership in a diverse environment and convinces you that you can change the world. About Jeffrey Nguyen Jeffrey graduated in 2015 with a BS in Chemical Engineering. We both met at an Asian organization and found we had similar leadership interests so we became friends. He now works at Pepsico under the Supply Chain Associate program. In his spare time, he likes to dive in and help communities from volunteer work to supporting organizations and he’s all about taking action and making an impact. About Gatorade The Gatorade Company, Inc. is an American manufacturer of sports-themed beverage and food products, built around its signature line of sports drinks. Gatorade is currently manufactured by PepsiCo and is distributed in over 80 countries. The beverage was first developed in 1965 by a team of researchers at the University of Florida, to replenish the combination of water,carbohydrates, and electrolytes that the school's student-athletes lost in sweat during rigorous sport activities. Originally produced and marketed by Stokely-Van Camp, the Gatorade brand was purchased by the Quaker Oats Company in 1987, which, in turn, was bought by PepsiCo in 2000. As of 2010, Gatorade is PepsiCo’s 4th-largest brand, on the basis of worldwide annual retail sales. Within the United States, Gatorade accounts for approximately 75 percent market share in the sports drink category. Key Takeaways

  • What a supply chain engineer does
  • How to work together with people who have no education and speak a different language
  • Why being in a big corporation magnifies your impact
  • How to impact lives and why you need to explore your town
What we talk about Pepsico Arizona State University Main Ingredient ACEL- Asian Corporate Entrepreneur Leaders Supply Chain Engineer Thermodynamics Bio Diesel Batch Reactors Flavor Pails Dealing with Different People Electrolytes 3D Printing of Food Food and Culture Ghandi – You must be the change you see in the world Sushi – Salmon Sashimi Art and Culture in Arizona

Ep. 006 - Achieving World Peace with Dr. Howard Moskowitz, CSO of Mind Genomics (and more)
34:34
2017-09-27 09:28:26 UTC 34:34
Ep. 006 - Achieving World Peace with Dr. Howard Moskowitz, CSO of Mind Genomics (and more)

In this amazing episode Adam talks to Dr. Howard Moskowitz, C.S.O. of Mind Genomics and personal hero of Malcom Gladwell. About Mind Genomics Mind Genomics is an empirical, scientific way to identify how people subconsciously respond to aspects of everyday experience. More simply put, Mind Genomics works to sequence a consumer’s brain, layer by layer. This creates a “template” that predicts how someone will feel about new products, services, and messages. This map can then be used as a baseline to predict how other individuals will react. No other science offers this kind of insight. You can see why Mind Genomics is a hot topic in the food industry. It produces a dramatic "lift" in customer response by going beyond customer preferences and lifestyles. Instead it provides direct insight into what consumers are thinking - even when they don't know how to articulate their preferences. About Dr. Howard Moskowitz ..........someone who I think has done as much to make Americans happy as perhaps anyone over the last 20 years, a man who is a great personal hero of mine: someone by the name of Howard Moskowitz, who is most famous for reinventing spaghetti sauce" -Malcom Gladwell, Choice, Happiness and Spaghetti Sauce, Ted Talk, September 2006. Dr. Howard Moskowitz isa well-known experimental psychologistand an inventor of world-class market research technology. He graduated from Harvard University in 1969 with a Ph.D. in experimental psychology. He has written/edited twenty-six books, published over 400 articles and serves on the editorial board of major journals. He has many speaking engagements and does guest lectures at leading business schools and food science schools. His latest book with co-author Alex Gofman, Selling Blue Elephants (Wharton School Publishing) demonstrates and popularises how IdeaMap (i-Novation`s flagship product) creates new products and messages from areas as diverse as credit cards, jewellery offers, presidential messaging, stock market communications, and transnational innovation. Awards and Accolades Dr. Moskowitz has won numerous awards, among them the Scientific Director`s Gold Medal for outstanding research at the U.S. Army Natick Laboratories, and the 2001 and 2003 awards by ESOMAR (European Society Of Market Research) for his innovation in web-enabled, self-authored conjoint measurement, and for weak signals research in new trends analysis and concept development.  In 2004, Dr. Moskowitz was elected as an IFT Fellow, and was awarded the "David R. Peryam Award", from ASTM, in recognition of outstanding contributions to the field of basic and applied sensory science. In 2005, Dr. Moskowitz was awarded the Charles Coolidge Parlin Marketing Research Award for his substantial contributions and dedication to the advancement of marketing research practices. Most recently, he is the recipient of the ARF Research Innovation Award and The Market Research Council Hall of Fame Award, both in 2006. From November 2004 to November 2006, Dr. Moskowitz appeared weekly on ABC News Now as the Food Doctor. His segment highlighted the most innovative and interesting aspects of the food industry. Key Takeaways

  • Why different people like different things (and not just food)
  • An example of someone zigging while everyone zags
  • How to use Moskowitz’s principle to achieve world peace
 What we talk about

Ep. 005 - What is Food Science?
17:22
2017-09-27 09:28:26 UTC 17:22
Ep. 005 - What is Food Science?

Welcome to the My Food Job Rocks Podcast with me, Adam Yee. This is episode 5. We’re going to try something a little bit different this time, I think every 5 or so episodes, I really want to do a deep info session on certain things people don’t know about the food industry. In this episode, I want to talk about what is Food Science, and really, how to become a food scientist. I hope to use this episode to tell all of my friends what the heck I do. Moving to Phoenix where I absolutely knew no one, I’ve met a lot of new people and in most situations, I’ve had to say what I do for a living. I’ve tried things like my actual vague job title, when I first moved to phoenix this was: food processing technologist! What the heck was that? Then I changed to: “I work with food” but I’ve felt most comfortable saying what I’ve studied: I’m a food scientist. In most situations in my life, whenever I tell someone I’m a food scientist, they give me some strange look and tell me what the heck that is. I’m sure my colleagues will nod in agreement that this has happened once in their life. I hope in this episode, to really bring a brief introduction on what is Food Science and how you can remember this profession. Key takeaways:

  • The definition of Food Science, and what they do
  • Where you can study food science
  • The difference between Food Science and Nutrition
What We Talk About: Google’s definition of Food Science Institute of Food Technologist Sodium Benzoate in Soda Ethlyene  Splenda  Stevia Bacon Soda Chicory Root Fiber Flaming hot Cheetos EXO Cricket Protein Pea Milk (Ripple) Chapman University Food Science Accredited Food Science University Chipotle E.Coli Freeze Drying Extrusion American Institute of Baking Food Science vs Nutrition The next sewage blockage of 2016 (read the reviews) 

Ep. 004 - Butter Makes Everything Better with Taryn Yee, Food Technologist from Safeway/Albertsons
22:22
2017-09-27 09:28:26 UTC 22:22
Ep. 004 - Butter Makes Everything Better with Taryn Yee, Food Technologist from Safeway/Albertsons

This episode's a funny one, I interview Food Technologist Taryn Yee (no relation) from Albertsons/Safeway and we reminisce on the good times and get kind of obsessed with Pad Thai. About Albertsons (from Wikipedia): In January 2015, Albertsons acquired Safeway Inc. for $9.2 billion. The newly merged company has more than 2,200 stores and over 250,000 employees, which makes it the second largest supermarket chain in North America after Kroger, which has 2,424 stores. Prior to the merger it had 1,075 supermarkets located in 29 U.S. states under 12 different banners. Its predecessor company, Albertsons, Inc., was sold to Albertsons LLC (a Cerberus Capital Management-led consortium), CVS Pharmacy, and SuperValu Inc. in 2006. CVS acquired the freestanding drugstores while the Cerberus-led consortium (Albertsons LLC) and Supervalu (New Albertsons, Inc.) divided the supermarket divisions among themselves. After selling the majority of its stores to various buyers, in January 2013, Albertsons LLC, acquired SuperValu's remaining Albertsons stores, as well as its ACME, Jewel-Osco, Lucky, Shaw's and Star Market brands, in exchange for $100 million in cash and $3.2 Billion in SuperValu debt. The sale was completed by March 2013. The company's corporate name was Albertson's until 2002, when the apostrophe was removed. About Taryn Taryn has her Bachelors in Food Science and a Masters in Dairy Science from Cal Poly. She’s worked in a bunch of companies including Albertsons, Land o Lakes, startups and restaurant jobs. She was very involved in college and you should also be involved in college! Key Takeaways -What are Copackers -Why the Food Science Major is really fun -Acronyms in the Food Industry What We Talk About Mama Papa Luthuanian Cuisine Alameda Library Albertsons Safeway The Deal Copacking Cal Poly San Luis Obispo  Building 24 Masters of Professional Studies (Dairy) IFTSA Disney Competition Land o Lakes Condensed Butter Monster Energy Red Cups from Starbucks  Natural Color vs Artificial Giant Microwaves How microwaves work A watched pot never boils  If you give a mouse a cookie Chopsticks – How to use chopsticks Training chopsticks Pad Thai – Fish sauce, Malagang root, tamarind Mango Sticky Rice

Ep. 003 - Being a Food Mercenary with Brian Chau, Food Technologist from the Helmsman Group
23:57
2017-09-27 09:28:26 UTC 23:57
Ep. 003 - Being a Food Mercenary with Brian Chau, Food Technologist from the Helmsman Group

So today we are going to talk about consulting (kind of). Consulting happens when you have a bunch of connections and they know you are good at what you do. In Brian’s case, he works for a consulting company called the Helmsman Group a company many organizations trust to launch their food products for retail sales. About the Company: At The Helmsman Group, we look at the big picture to understand how our recommendations will affect the company as a whole. We strive to offer you the best advice not just for the present, but that will also grow with your business far into the future. While we strive to understand the implications for every action on your company as a whole, we are meticulous in our attention to detail to ensure that there are no loose ends as we work through all changes with your organization. About Brian Chau Taken from the Helmsman Group Website Brian serves as Food Technologist for The Helmsman Group. He handles product development, quality, food safety and regulatory aspects for client projects. By taking client feedback, he will serve to make client ideas become reality and ensure the product falls under regulations and food safety parameters. His research and development experience draws from his time at Mattson and Ghirardelli Chocolate Company and his quality assurance experience stems from his work at Kerry Ingredients. His alma mater is the University of California, Davis where he earned his Food Science and Technology degree, HACCP certification and ServeSafe Food Handler's Certificate. He earned an opportunity to travel to Japan to intern at Kagawa University for Food Toxicology and Technology during the summer of 2013. Any time is Chau Time, as long as Brian Chau is here. Food scientist, fungal fanatic and charismatic chemist, at your service. Brian is very passionate about fungi, having come up with his own fungal puns because mushrooms are not to be truffled with. Aside from fungal hobbies, Brian is an assistant editor to the NCIFT Hornblower and an educator having been a tutor for 8 years and a volunteer teacher for Stanford SPLASH program for 3 sessions. What We Talk About Serendipity UC Davis  That tea from dubai  Mushrooms in a box   Expo West  Lorrie Colwin Eating with Friends and Talking about Eating Morelles  Candy Caps Driscoll’s Chicken Adobo Curry Dandelion Chocolates Quebec Canada Soylent

Ep. 002 - Talking Chocolate with Trevor, Production Supervisor at Dandelion Chocolate
17:43
2017-09-27 09:28:26 UTC 17:43
Ep. 002 - Talking Chocolate with Trevor, Production Supervisor at Dandelion Chocolate

In this episode, I will be talking to my good friend Trevor Fast on why he likes chocolate so much and what happens when you follow your passion. About Dandelion Chocolates: Dandelion Chocolate is a bean-to-bar chocolate factory in the Mission District of San Francisco. We opened our workshop out of a lifetime love of chocolate. Our friends often said that given enough time, it seemed inevitable that one of us would open a chocolate factory. They watched as we experimented with growing small cacao plants in our apartments, pan roasted beans in the oven, and ate our way through the many of the chocolate shops of the world. In early 2010, we decided to share our craft chocolate with our friends and family and have expanded since. Currently, in our factory in the Mission district of San Francisco, we roast, crack, sort, winnow, grind, conch, and temper small batches of beans and then mold and package each bar by hand. By sourcing high quality beans and carefully crafting tiny batches, we try to bring out the individual flavors and nuances of each bean. We’re excited to bring artisan bean-to-bar chocolate back to the bay area. Like many, we miss Scharffen Berger now that they moved east to join Hershey’s. We lost our local source for cocoa nibs and some of our favorite bars of dark chocolate. We hope and aspire to take over where others have left off and bring quality, local chocolate back to the area. About Trevor Fast: This interview within Dandelion speaks for itself:  We’d like you to meet Trevor, one of our lead chocolate makers who has an endless supply of corny jokes and puns that we never hesitate to steal and use as our own.  Q: What is your superpower? A: The ability to tell jokes. Q: Tell me your best joke. A: How many tickles does it take to make an octopus laugh?  Q: How many? A: Ten tickles. Q: (pause) That’s your best joke? A: No. It’s one of my best jokes. Q: How many do you have? A: Infinite. Q: That’s a lot of jokes.  A: Have you ever seen an elephant hiding in a tree? Q: No. A: That’s because they’re so good at it. What We Talk About: Dandelion Chocolate   Chocolate Process Winnower Melanger Bean to Bar TonKatsu Learn by Doing Cal Poly Food Science Program Cal Poly Chocolate Program Dandelion in Japan

Ep. 001 - Starting Up With Nicole and Juliette, Founders of FoodGrads
35:56
2017-09-27 09:28:26 UTC 35:56
Ep. 001 - Starting Up With Nicole and Juliette, Founders of FoodGrads

In this episode, we talk to Nicole and Juliette from FoodGrads.com about why food is so relatable and why we've decided to do something new. About Food Grads Every job seeker has a unique story to tell and we want to help them tell it. Online networking can be a powerful tool for connecting employers and job seekers. However, after working in recruitment for over a decade, we know that finding the right networking opportunities online can be tough. What’s more, attracting high quality employees is expensive, and, as a new professional, job seeking can be time consuming and frustrating, so, we created a new way for employers and job seekers to connect. Our passion and knowledge of the food sector led us to focus only on companies and professionals in food science, agribusiness, nutrition and food research. FoodGrads.com was born. We are an exclusive online community only for food professionals. Network with future employers and build your professional online profile so that employers can engage you on a whole new level and get to know the real person behind the resume. About Nicole and Juliette Nicole and Juliette are both British and they both coincidentally moved to Canada around the same time. After seeing each other on and off, they bumped into each other at a Yoga class, got talking and decided to create FoodGrads. What We Talk About: www.Foodgrads.com Food Science Major My Food Job Rocks ReBar Twitter Linkedin Radical Remissions by Kelly Turner - Jamie Oliver Simon Sineck  Ratatoullie Stilton Cheese

Ep. 000 - Introducing the My Food Job Rocks Podcast
04:40
2017-09-27 09:28:26 UTC 04:40
Ep. 000 - Introducing the My Food Job Rocks Podcast

Why does your Food Job Rock? This and many other food related questions are the things we ask the passionate people we interview here. This podcast is to celebrate the people who make our food and show aspects of the food industry people don’t really think about. It recognizes the unsung heroes that make your food what it is today. I’ll be saying a small blurb at the beginning of each episode about updates going around and about the people we interview. If you are interested in the many career options in the food industry, this podcast is for you. We not only show you what people do, but why they love what they’re doing. You are going to realize, that these are people who truly love food and are so proud to be in this industry. Whether it’s chocolate, butter, granola bars or bacon, you will see a first hand, personal experience on what these passionate people do for a living. The jobs, ranging from managers to chefs to writers, each put their own little ingredient in the boiling pot which is the food industry. We interview young people straight out of college, and older people who’ve had a couple years in the industry, and then some retired people who still do their work with food. This podcast would not be possible with the help of an amazing company called FoodGrads. If you are truly interested in not only learning about the food industry, but also have the opportunity to get a job in the industry, be sure to go to their website at www.FoodGrads.com. I’ll be seeing you guys every Monday early in the morning. We have plenty of channels you can download this but always make sure to check the FoodGrads blog as the kind of central hub for this podcast.

Ep. 086 - The Food Safety Fanatics Part 2 with Ben Chapman, Associate Professor at NC State University
59:54
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 59:54
Ep. 086 - The Food Safety Fanatics Part 2 with Ben Chapman, Associate Professor at NC State University

As the title says, this is another Food Safety Fanatic that I just loved talking to! Still young in his career, Ben Chapman does so many things in his field such as being a professor, writing on a blog, and of course, co-hosting a podcast with our previous guest, Don Schaffner.

Ben’s focus on food safety is on the food service side as a lot of his work deal with how to have chefs and other people in the food service industry work with food safety, that not only includes teaching, but he also gives people the tools, whether gaget-like or not to mitigate the complex world of food microorganisms.

Other than that you’ll get a lot of great food safety resources, a great discussion of how food safety is portrayed in the media, and where Ben takes his kids when they grocery shops.

Sponsor - FoodGrads

If you are even just a little bit interested in a career in food & beverage, you should join FoodGrads.  It’s an interactive platform where you can hear about different careers, hear from your peers, have a voice and share your story as well as ask specific questions and get feedback from industry experts across the sector.

You can create a profile, add your resume and search for co-op, internships and full time opportunities just for Food Grads. Employers can find you too, they can recruit you for jobs and projects they need help with to give you the relevant industry experience you need.

Join FoodGrads today! Just go to Foodgrads.com

Sponsor - Steviva Ingredients

Has marketing ever asked you to pull a rabbit out of a hat? I know they have with me. They want clean-label sugar reduction because that’s the trend. And in addition to clean label, we need to follow the ever-changing FDA laws, meet low cost parameters AND create a product that tastes EXCELLENT – with no aftertaste issues.

They want us to make magic happen.

Who do they think we are - Houdini?

Let me tell you who the real magicians are. Steviva Ingredients. Steviva has more than two decades of experience in R&D and clean-label sugar reduction in a variety of applications: beverage, baked goods, fillings, frostings, condiments. Give em a call. They’ll create a solution for you. If they can help me, they can help you. Go check them out at stevivaingredients.com.

Housekeeping

If you like what you heard, like us on facebook or write a review on itunes. It helps wonders.

I am also inviting you to sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com. I am doing this new thing called the 5 course meal where I send you 5 pieces of hand picked content and deliver it every Friday morning. Like a meal kit…

If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Knowledge Bombs
  • How I got my butt kicked my freshman year in college
  • The hidden benefits of podcasting when you’re in conferences
  • How I read Ben’s article before I even knew about it

What do you do?: I spend time making people less sick. I give people tools for people to not get sick What do you do if I know a little about the food industry?: Give resources to food production or consumer;s homes to help them find food borne illnesses.

4 reasons why people get sick:

Handwashing and poor personal hygiene Cross contamination Temperature – improper cooking Storage temperature

These are generally poor decisions. We help track them

What’s the best thing you do for your job?: We have the opportunity to make a difference. If it stops people from getting sick, it’s worth it. How did you get to where you are?: In high school, I was super interested in microbiology and diseases. Got a summer job in food safety. Masters degree on keeping salmonella off of tomato’s. PhD thesis:  How much handwashing it takes to get rid of bacteria. Applied to NC State. Been there for 9 years. What do you teach students?: I mentor graduate students, give them the skills to ask food safety questions What type of skillset or personality do you need to be good at your job?: Being inquisitive and critical. Critical of others work and your own work. In science, we have peer review and we have to be critical How did food safety talks start?: I was a graduate school student and I met Don. I got Don to speak at a freshman class and I had to have him stay at my house. Don and Ben signed up for Storycore to talk about Food Safety, and Don kept on inviting Ben to be a panelist and then decided to make a podcast. How do you make your podcast enticing to viewers?: We’ve noticed the least prepared you are, the better your episode might be What makes a Good Podcast: Excellent Story-tellers, they can paint a picture of what’s going on, and harmony between guests. The best podcasts is where we’re sitting on a bar, drinking a beer What kind of Podcasts do you listen to?: Bill Simmons Podcast (BS report). 5x5 podcasts. Back to work - Dan Benjamin. John Roderick - Roderick on the line. Pod Save America. I recommend: Stuff you should know Barfblog: Most memorable article. Michael Jordan Flu game was linked to bad pizza. Barfblog used to be a forum for people to talk about food poisoning. When we launched, nobody did it, so we did it. Since you have kids, where do you shop?: Everywhere. My kid loves to shop and we go pretty much everywhere. Ben knows a lot of people in the grocery industry and can text them to see what’s up. What type of food trends and technology are really interesting you right now?: Chefs are becoming more aware and appreciative of people in Food Safety Why are food safety outbreaks showing up more? Is it just me?: Media now has more space because it’s online now. Foodborne outbreaks makes great stories. More conversations about food safety are good. Chipotle Outbreak analysis: Foodborne outbreaks are scars for life. Chipotle hasn’t done a good job sharing information BBC’s article: 2 years ago. We actually get norovirus outbreaks every day What’s one thing about the food industry you’d like to know more about?: the food industry does a really good job when saying food safety is a priority. However, I’d like to know more about the process for food safety and how people make decisions day in and day out. We don’t do a  good job saying things aren’t perfect. Favorite book?: Vivian Howard, North Carolina Chef Deep Run Roots: My Favorite Recipes from the South. TV show: A chef’s life Favorite Kitchen Items: Thermometer. Cobart PDP 300 Digital Instaread thermometer. Only $20 dollars Any advice for anyone going into the food industry: Don’t do anything unless you’re passionate about i. There are a lot of jobs in the food industry, and it’s growing in food safety Find Ben at: Barfblog, Food Safety Talk,  Twitter: @benjaminchapman, Instagram: @barfblogben

Links

International Association for Food Protection Collard Greens Norovirus Bluebell Outbreak Chipotle Outbreak Peanut Butter Outbreak Peanut butter Outbreak in Australia

Ep. 085- The Food Safety Fanatics Part 1 with Don Schaffner, Distinguished Professor at Rutger's University
49:12
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 49:12
Ep. 085- The Food Safety Fanatics Part 1 with Don Schaffner, Distinguished Professor at Rutger's University

Dr. Don Schaffner is an amazing food safety scientist who’s the best in class. In fact, let me name youa  few of his amazing awards: You can read his amazing biography here

What’s also super cool, is that Don and his co-host Ben do a whole lot of extracurricular activities to promote food safety and one of their favorite things to do is podcasting. For over 4 years, they’re been doing discussions of food safety and post them online for everyone to enjoy and they do have quite a following.

If you are in food safety or are considering food safety, you have to listen to this interview. Don gives you valuable advice on how to really be a star player in food safety and some amazing resources such as Barfblog, Food Safety News, and the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Reports

About Don

Dr. Donald W. Schaffner is Extension Specialist in Food Science and Distinguished Professor at Rutgers University. He has authored more than 150 peer-reviewed publications and educated thousands of Food Industry professionals through short courses and workshops in the United States and around the world.

He is a Fellow of the Institute of Food Technologists and the American Academy of Microbiology. He has served as an Editor for the journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology since 2005.  Dr. Schaffner was the president of the International Association for Food Protection in 2013-2014. In his spare time he co-hosts a food safety podcast at foodsafetytalk.com.

Sponsor - FoodGrads

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

Sponsor - Steviva Ingredients

Has marketing ever asked you to pull a rabbit out of a hat? I know they have with me. They want clean-label sugar reduction because that’s the trend. And in addition to clean label, we need to follow the ever-changing FDA laws, meet low cost parameters AND create a product that tastes EXCELLENT – with no aftertaste issues.

They want us to make magic happen.

Who do they think we are - Houdini?

Let me tell you who the real magicians are. Steviva Ingredients. Steviva has more than two decades of experience in R&D and clean-label sugar reduction in a variety of applications: beverage, baked goods, fillings, frostings, condiments. Give em a call. They’ll create a solution for you. If they can help me, they can help you. Go check them out at stevivaingredients.com.

Housekeeping

If you like what you heard, like us on facebook or write a review on itunes. It helps wonders.

I am also inviting you to sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com. I am doing this new thing called the 5 course meal where I send you 5 pieces of hand picked content and deliver it every Friday morning. Like a meal kit…

If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Knowledge Bombs
  • What is an extension specialist? What are extensions?
  • If you want a career in food science, think about Food Science and Quality because boy we have a lot to do
  • How Don met Darin Detwiler

Official Job title: Distinguished Professor – Distinguished Professor and Extension Specialist How long have you worked in Rutgers?: Over 25 years! Extension course: they’ve always existed, but not widely visible What’s the best skill can you have in Food Safety and Quality: You need to keep learning. The knowledge you have today will be outdated by next year Don’t think what you know today is going to necessarily be known tomorrow. You always have to keep up with new outbreaks and keep on changing your mind What resources do you use to keep you up to date?: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Reports published by the CDC Barfblog: Doug Powell and Ben Chapman. What’s making people barf! Food Safety News by Bill Marler Food Safety Talk with Ben Chapman. 2 PhDs in Food Safety talk about food safety. A director’s commentary of what’s in the food safety news How did Food Safety Talks start?: Howard Stern Terrestrial Radio 100th anniversary of IAFP. NPR people came over and Don met Ben and then they talked and then they made a podcast Dan Benjamin: 5 by 5. How to do podcasting articles How long has Food Safety Talks been on?: 5 years! Why Does Your Food Job Rocks?: I love everything about my job. (Literally everything) What advice can you give a 24 year old on having the achievements that you have?: Give it time, You don’t get ahead on focusing on regrets on the past. It’s just not relevant Don’t focus on the past, focus on the present. Don’t let setbacks set you back. Food Technology: Whole Genome Technology. The radar the CDC is using is getting more sensitive. Also, mimicking norovirus What do you think the biggest challenge the food industry has to face?: Integration of FSMA What’s one thing in the food industry you’d like to know more about?: Why people aren’t complying to rules Favorite Quote: Prediction is very difficult especially about the future. Favorite Book: DiscWorld by Terry Prachett Favorite Kitchen Item: Digital Scale What kind of advice would you give a fresh graduate?: Do the right thing. Life is too short that don’t take food safety and quality seriously. Where can we find you?: Food Safety Talk podcast. Don Schaffner from Rutgers. Bug Counter on twitter. Emails (don’t do emails)

Other Links

Penn State Ice Cream Course Texas A and M Extrusion Course Better Process Control Course Cyclospora Norovirus Preventative Controls Rule: a training is required Produce Safety Rule Supplier Verification Programs Irrigation of Water Provisions of the fresh produce rule Foreign Supplier Training University of Georgia American Greed: Peanut Corporation Story Core (never launched, but we have them at Food Safety Talks) Dr. Darin Detwiler FSMA webinars

Ep. 084 - The Magic of Food Pivoting with Ronald Arceo, founder of foodbox.tv (and other things)
55:25
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 55:25
Ep. 084 - The Magic of Food Pivoting with Ronald Arceo, founder of foodbox.tv (and other things)

This episode is a bit different, and it acts more of a conversation, but it’s a darn good conversation. I met Ronald talking on Shapr, a swipy-like app for business people and just to let you know, I get a lot more meetings on Shapr than the other ones and they’re productive as well.

Ronald has been on TEDEx, he was an ex-magician, has done several media expenditures, web design work, and has a huge passion and curiosity in food

So we talk a lot of cool stuff about food, but also take this as just a casual talk with two very creative people. We try and understand each other, and we do quite well I’d say. Think of this episode a bit differently, not just about the job Ronald has, but also his mindset, or his ability to create, pivot, and entertain.

I’m excited for what Ronald has in stock for us and I hope after your interview, you do too.

About Ronald

Food tech entrepreneur. Online Marketing and Launch Event Specialist & Amateur Magician. ;)

Former Creative Marketing Strategist for The Red Group, LLC.

In my consulting efforts I helped build brands online. More specifically, I consulted companies and coached experts on how to get started in creating their following online through education based marketing.

Some past projects include TEDxCalicoCanyon, MagicMez, The Last Formula, and most recently The Foodbox.

I've been given the opportunity to work with some amazing people over the years. If you'd like to contact me, please don't hesitate to reach out.

Sponsor - FoodGrads

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

Sponsor - Steviva Ingredients

Has marketing ever asked you to pull a rabbit out of a hat? I know they have with me. They want clean-label sugar reduction because that’s the trend. And in addition to clean label, we need to follow the ever-changing FDA laws, meet low cost parameters AND create a product that tastes EXCELLENT – with no aftertaste issues.

They want us to make magic happen.

Who do they think we are - Houdini?

Let me tell you who the real magicians are. Steviva Ingredients. Steviva has more than two decades of experience in R&D and clean-label sugar reduction in a variety of applications: beverage, baked goods, fillings, frostings, condiments. Give em a call. They’ll create a solution for you. If they can help me, they can help you. Go check them out at stevivaingredients.com.

Housekeeping

If you like what you heard, like us on facebook or write a review on itunes. It helps wonders.

I am also inviting you to sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com. I am doing this new thing called the 5 course meal where I send you 5 pieces of hand picked content and deliver it every Friday morning. Like a meal kit…

If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Knowledge Bombs
  • Ronald and Adam’s connection to San Luis Obispo
  • Two tribes in the world of eating: Live to eat, and eat to live
  • The twists and turns for Foodbox
  • Why food farmers are switching to growing more "special" crops
Question Summary

What is Foodbox.tv: We took a pivot and will be focusing on telling the stories and technologies of local food TEDex: Ronald presented at TedEx: Calico Canyon the Human Connection What has magic taught you?: Magic taught me to learn fast. Magic shows a raw emotion that we don’t see often. Magic violates a preconceived notion Favorite Quote: Pain of regret weighs ton, while the pain of discipline weighs ounces Do you have any advice for people who want to do what you do?: You have to love what you do, but you have to be strategic Where can we find you?: fdbx.tv

Other Links

TEDEx Runa Free Conference Call Shapr University Las Vegas San Luis Obispo Cal Poly The Restaurant Coach Blue Apron Plated Soylent Meal Replacement Ketosis Diet 1000 True Fans Articles Book: Sapiens Book: Cooked: A Natural History of Transformation The Magician’s Code – Kindle book Vegan Wrestler makes vegan stuff in Arizona Singh Farms and Meadows Sous Vide Marajuana Herb Water Growth Mindset Luck + Preparedness = Success

 

Ep. 083 - The Food Engineer From Israel with Anton Slavkin, Product Development Engineer at Strauss Group
48:32
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 48:32
Ep. 083 - The Food Engineer From Israel with Anton Slavkin, Product Development Engineer at Strauss Group

Anton found me randomly through linkedin, found my website, and scheduled an interview all in a span in 2 weeks. Oh, did I mention he’s from Israel?

It was absolutely amazing talking to someone my age from across the country and learning about the differences and similarities between how the food industry works. You’ll learn a little bit about the pros and cons of the Israeli university system, a lot about the daily life of a food engineer, and why Israeli's love guacamole.

About Anton

Anton Slavkin is a cheese product development engineer in the Israeli company Strauss Group.

He has worked as a krill oil extraction process engineer in the nutraceuticals company Enzymotec Ltd and as a chocolate and cereal snacks product development engineer in Unilever Israel.

He earned his B.Sc. in Biotechnology and Food Engineering from IIT (Israel Institute of Technology – The Technion).

In his spare time, he enjoys playing the guitar, inventing new homemade recipes (a.k.a cooking) and hiking.

Anton is passionate about making our world a better place by promoting environmental awareness and using current research data for the development of better products.

About Strauss Group

Strauss Group is an international Food & Beverage company that strives to improve people's lives, headquartered in Israel, where we are the largest food company. The company's portfolio includes four businesses: Strauss Coffee B.V., Strauss Israel, Strauss Water, and PepsiCo – Strauss Fresh Dips & Spreads International aligned with two global consumer trends: Health & Wellness and Fun & Indulgence.

Strauss Group is active in 20 countries worldwide in our diverse fields of activity through partnerships with multinationals. The company brings its know-how in Coffee, Water, Chocolate, Dips & Spreads to diverse markets and cultures, making them accessible to people just the way they like them, adapted to local tastes and habits.

Sponsor - FoodGrads

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

Sponsor - Steviva Ingredients

Has marketing ever asked you to pull a rabbit out of a hat? I know they have with me. They want clean-label sugar reduction because that’s the trend. And in addition to clean label, we need to follow the ever-changing FDA laws, meet low cost parameters AND create a product that tastes EXCELLENT – with no aftertaste issues.

They want us to make magic happen.

Who do they think we are - Houdini?

Let me tell you who the real magicians are. Steviva Ingredients. Steviva has more than two decades of experience in R&D and clean-label sugar reduction in a variety of applications: beverage, baked goods, fillings, frostings, condiments. Give em a call. They’ll create a solution for you. If they can help me, they can help you. Go check them out at stevivaingredients.com.

Housekeeping

If you like what you heard, like us on facebook or write a review on itunes. It helps wonders.

I am also inviting you to sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com. I am doing this new thing called the 5 course meal where I send you 5 pieces of hand picked content and deliver it every Friday morning. Like a meal kit…

If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Knowledge Bombs
  • Clean Label and communication all over the world
  • A discussion about food science and perspective and engineering
  • The difference between US and Israel food education
  • Will clean meat be kosher? Well, religion is not science, right?
  • What the heck is red label?

What do you tell people what you do?: I develop new cheese product. I don’t usually use the word Food Engineer unless someone knows what a food engineer is What is a food engineer?: A food scientist who understands engineering and processing concepts Strauss Group: Milk products, cheese products, cold filled dips Do you think people think food scientists get a lot of negative press?: Yes, even in Israel. Steps to be a food scientist in Isreal: All people in Israel must serve in the military. Anton served in the navy. Then studied food engineering in IIT Israel Institute of Technology. Product Developer in Unilever, Food Engineer at Enzymotec (Krill and fish oil) but the company was too small, couldn’t advance. What’s the most important skill you need in your job?: Flexibility. Try to see the bigger picture When you entered your first job, did you feel prepared?: Absolutely not. 90% of the things, you don’t know how to do. You just know a little bit more. What would have been better?: Faculty should be more involved in industry. But it might depend on the institute, or even country. My Food Job Rocks: I can eat, I can eat new things, I can be proud of what I can make What would be your dream job title?: CEO. You get to set the direction of the products Do you have any CEO’s you look up to?: Richard Brandson of Virgin. Steve Jobs of Apple (duh) What do you look for most in a job?: A sense of mission. How do I make the world a better place? Kosher Food Trends and Technology: Lab Grown Meat Clean Meat Biggest Challenge the Food Industry has to face: Negative image of the food industry Are there any companies that are doing a good job at improving food image?: Strauss does a bit Favorite Quote: Hippocratus- Let Food be Thy Medicine and let Medicine be thy food Favorite Food: Avacado – I’m making Guacamole weekly. You can actually grow Avocado in Israel. Any advice for anyone to go into the food industry: Don’t be afraid of following your dreams If you were to tell your freshman self something, what would it be?: Take more engineering classes. Not just food, but more complex chemistry. Why do other disciplines synergize with food engineers?: If you understand both sides, it’s great Anton asks me a question: How did you do this?

Other Links

Frutarom IFF Givaudan Symrise Quark Clean Label and Cost Reduction CE 300 – Ascorbic Acid Job Hopping Red Label – Implemented in Chilie, Israel, USDA Added Sugars delay

Ep. 082 [Bonus] - Adam Yee In The Break Room: Honest Opinions on Careers, Learning, Podcasting, and Mindset
01:23:12
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 01:23:12
Ep. 082 [Bonus] - Adam Yee In The Break Room: Honest Opinions on Careers, Learning, Podcasting, and Mindset

Hey everyone! This is a bonus episode! It's also really long.

Kim from Peas on Moss and I recorded this a long time ago, but I figured I would post this since we've been talking about careers a lot on the podcast/blog.

So I talk a bit less modest in this episode, and maybe I'm a bit too honest this episode. Whether you agree with me on the points I make, I hope you find value in them. If you disagree, then challenge them and tell me what you think.

We talk a lot on all sorts of subjects such as job hopping, resume, the purpose of life, preparedness in a degree, podcasting life, all stuff of that nature.

No sponsors this episode. This one is a freebie.

(warning: we do say "you know" way too much in this interview. Enjoy!)

Housekeeping

If you like what you heard, like us on facebook or write a review on itunes. It helps wonders.

I am also inviting you to sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com. I am doing this new thing called the 5 course meal where I send you 5 pieces of hand picked content and deliver it every Friday morning. Like a meal kit…

If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Knowledge Bombs
  • How long should you stay at your job and how does that matter?
  • Adam’s track record
  • Storytelling is the best skill ever
  • Discussing ethnic background
  • CV’s and resumes
  • Passion versus Skill
  • How to be prepared for your first job
  • Master’s versus Work Experience
  • Risk versus Failure: Different roles have different values of risk
  • How to answer questions in your job
  • Who to talk to when you don’t know the answer
  • How to deal with greedy people and how to deal with them
  • How to find and identify A players and C players
  • Extroversion versus Introversion
  • How Adam stopped being Shy
  • How people can take advantage of teaching niche jobs
  • Catalysts of Change
What We Talk About

Twin Screw Extrusion Andrea Zeng Leadpage My Department Head’s CV Xennial Millenials ruin everything Little Bets Fiona Salim Impostor Syndrome Myer’s Briggs Kim is an ENTJ Adam is an ENTP Crematory Association How Podcasting Changed My Life Michael Kalanty James Altucher Derek Sivers – Bronze Medalist

Ep. 082 - A Recruiter's Point of View: Inside the Job Searching World with Michael McDonnell, President and Managing Partner at Global Recruiters of Columbia
01:01:11
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 01:01:11
Ep. 082 - A Recruiter's Point of View: Inside the Job Searching World with Michael McDonnell, President and Managing Partner at Global Recruiters of Columbia

How can I describe Michael McDonnell? He is transparent, technical, and full of energy. Not bad for a 25 year old running his own recruitment company.

His job is to reach out and find what food companies are looking for and I have some good news for those of you listening, these people are looking for experts.

I grill Michael on all sorts of crazy questions that I felt like when I looked for a job and Michael answered these like, really well. And I ask questions such as how companies look for rockstars, the benefits of using a recruiter, what an ATS system is and why does everyone use it, and my personal question: how long should someone be in their job? Michael answers all of these with short and direct honesty and I just learned so much from this interview.

So sit back and relax as we look into how recruiting works and how that will benefit you.

Sponsor - FoodGrads

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

Sponsor - Steviva Ingredients

Has marketing ever asked you to pull a rabbit out of a hat? I know they have with me. They want clean-label sugar reduction because that’s the trend. And in addition to clean label, we need to follow the ever-changing FDA laws, meet low cost parameters AND create a product that tastes EXCELLENT – with no aftertaste issues.

They want us to make magic happen. 

Who do they think we are - Houdini?

Let me tell you who the real magicians are. Steviva Ingredients. Steviva has more than two decades of experience in R&D and clean-label sugar reduction in a variety of applications: beverage, baked goods, fillings, frostings, condiments. Give em a call. They’ll create a solution for you. If they can help me, they can help you. Go check them out at stevivaingredients.com.

Housekeeping

If you like what you heard, like us on facebook or write a review on itunes. It helps wonders.

I am also inviting you to sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com. I am doing this new thing called the 5 course meal where I send you 5 pieces of hand picked content and deliver it every Friday morning. Like a meal kit…

If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Knowledge bombs
  • How job hopping is disrupting all the industries
  • How to squeeze things out of people and get really valuable information (through kindness)
  • Mike’s opinion on Whole foods and Amazon
  • Adam’s special gift: getting free food

What do you tell people about you?: I partner with organizations or I make things. I build partnerships and deals. We really work with the company What do you consider a finalist for a search?: Whatever the company specifically wants, but also questioning their initial requirements. We want to exceed those expectations How do you find clients in the food and beverage industry and how do you communicate with them?: It starts with being on the phone. It requires a lot of cold calling. Maybe 100 phone calls to connect with another company. Who do you contact when you cold call?: Our best way is to connect with the Hiring Manager so we can find the right service to find the right people Does everyone want a Rockstar or do they not want a rock star?: Depends. Sales people want a Rockstar. For QA or data based, you might not want someone super extraverted.

Job search tips

Usually, people want the best of the best. Job boards might actually show the best of the worst

“It’s better to be employed than not employed” most people think this but sometimes good people get in unfortunate circumstances A recruiter has a genuine conversation with a hiring manager and really focuses on getting the best fit and exploring options

ATS system- automatic tracking system which is a vetting system that looks for 5 key words. Your resume might not even be looked at another person

Cultural fit is absolutely critical for job success

It takes seconds for people to look at your resume

Job hopping: It’s so easy now and you can increase your salary faster. We don’t know what will happen 10 years from now, but now it’s 2 years.

How long should you stay at your job?: I’d say 5 years.

How did you get you to get to you where you are today?: I’m 24, I’m the youngest owner in my recruiting network. Worked for ConAgra brands (Territory Sales), Shanghai university of finance and economics, military active orders, disctrict manager in training for truck stops. Mentor told me to open a recruiting firm. Basically I had conversations with the right individuals. I have always wanted a job in CPG and in the food industry. What is the most important skill you can have in the food industry?: Flexibility and adaptability. Things are moving so fast that you’ll be left in the dust Common themes between excellent candidates: People who strategically plan their future. This might be through their resume or by just talking to him. My Food Job Rocks: I get to speak with amazing, unique individuals What’s the most interesting conversation you have?: I cold called a famous TV person and gave value. Food Trends and Technology: Adaptable Experts and not so much specialized experts Biggest Problem in the Food Industry: Lots of “foo-foo” going on un terms of claims. Consumer needs to educate themselves. There’s a lot of documents that involve claims What is one thing in the food industry you’d like to know more about?: I’d ask a question: where is the largest need? I’d ask this to 100 people and gather the responses. Favorite Quote: Help enough people to get what they want and the world will give you what they want There are no problems we can solve together and very few problems we can solve ourselves I listen to hour motivationial quotes on youtube Favorite kitchen item: knife. You can change things around and it’s dangerous Favorite book: The Maxwell Daily Reader Do you have any advice for anyone who wants to go into the food industry?: Ask questions. You can open so many doors by asking questions to people. Ask people why do they eat what they eat. What do you eat?: I eat it all. I research a lot on diets but then I eat a lot sometimes. I eat a lot of protein.  What are the common myths about job searching you’d like to dispel?: “There’s no jobs”. As of now, there are tons of jobs. “I’m over qualified” It’s pretty easy to downgrade Where can we find you?: Linkedin McDonnellm2 GRN Columbia.com

Other Links

5 Whys ask Why 5 times Sweets and Snack Expo

 

Ep. 081 - Democratizing Baking Knowledge with Dr. Lin Carson, CEO if Bakerpedia
51:44
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 51:44
Ep. 081 - Democratizing Baking Knowledge with Dr. Lin Carson, CEO if Bakerpedia

Lin Carson is one of those amazing people who will give away knowledge for free. In this case, her amazing technical expertise in the bakery industry has made her able to share this on an awesome website called Bakerpedia. Think of it as Wikipedia, but for bakers!

If you are into bread, especially in a commercial sense, you will absolutely love this interview.

So get ready, for an exciting segment about baking, along with the tips of finding and joining high growth companies, the latest amazing technology in the baking industry, and maybe this episode will inspire you to make a wiki site on your own.

About Lin Carson

A passionate trailblazer who constantly challenges current ways of thinking when it comes to innovation and sustainability in the field of grain science, Dr Lin Carson’s love affair with baking started about 20 years ago when she earned her BSc degree in Food Science & Technology at the Ohio State University. Keen on deepening her knowledge in baking, bread and grain product texture, she went on to earn her MSc then PhD from the Department of Grain Science at Kansas State University.

In 2007, she started the R&D program and baking lab at Wendy's New Bakery Company in Ohio where she managed the team responsible for product development, ingredient and equipment sourcing, analysis equipment and procedures, specification development and commercialization.

Opportunity came knocking in 2013 and Dr Carson took up the position of Director of Technical Services at Dave's Killer Bread (DKB) in Portland, OR. There, she oversaw food safety, quality, co-manufacturing and R&D procedures.

Her experience heading the R&D departments at two of America’s leading food brands was invaluable and was how she discovered a huge gap in technical information sharing.

When she’s not running BAKERpedia, Dr Carson serves as Treasurer on the Board of Directors at the American Society of Baking, a role she has held since 2007. One of her notable achievements is spearheading the Product Development Competition that aims to identify and reward innovative thinking in commercial baking processes.

Aside from all things bakery, Dr Carson is married with three boys and is a self-proclaimed health nut. She trains regularly for Triathlons as a hobby with a transition goal of under 1 minute.

About BAKERpedia

A year later, armed with knowledge, conviction and sheer guts, Dr Carson launched BAKERpedia with the ultimate aim of strengthening the entire baking ecosystem, allowing ideas to thrive, improving efficiencies and encouraging opportunities for growth.

Today, as the world’s only FREE and comprehensive online technical resource for the commercial baking industry, BAKERpedia is used by commercial bakers, ingredient sellers, equipment suppliers and baking entrepreneurs who have easy access to the answers they need to make informed decisions daily.

This Episode is Sponsored by Foodgrads

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion–there’s something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

[New] This Episode is Also Sponsored by Steviva Ingredients

Hey everyone, we have a new sponsor on the podcast and I am happy to introduce you guys to the wonderful people at Steviva, a sweetener company in Oregon. If you want to hear more about this amazing company, listen to episode 72 with their CEO Thom King. What’s really cool about Steviva is that they are changing their whole company into something bigger and better and I love telling the story of how this will happen. As we progress, we plan to go through the process of Steviva’s transformation and inform you on what this amazing company can do for you.

For more information about Steviva, go to http://www.stevivaingredients.com/

Housekeeping

If you like what you heard, like us on facebook or write a review on itunes. It helps wonders.

I am also inviting you to sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com. I am doing this new thing called the 5 course meal where I send you 5 pieces of hand picked content and deliver it every Friday morning. Like a meal kit…

If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Knowledge Bombs
  • Why baking is complicated versus other areas of food
  • Being in Operations versus in the Lab
  • A discussion about clean label and skilled labor
Question Summary

One sentence: I’m the CEO of Bakerpedia.com . A free resource on baking technology How Bakerpedia happened: Food Science Degree, Grain Science Degree, running technical teams in the bakery industry, had an idea, found a gap, worked 2 years without any pay to get it off the ground What do you consider a growing company?: To be really aggressive, have double digit growth percentage a year. Can any company at any size be a growing company?: Great people make growth happen. Big companies just have a harder time getting great people What have you taught your team to be great at their jobs?: Mainly technical skills and basic knowledge of the baking industry. Be open to learn more and more Where do you gather your technical knowledge?: On the job training, courses, AIB, etc. You have to be on the job. Was it hard to make Bakerpedia?: Not at all. Launching is really easy. The most challenging thing: How to monetize My Food Job Rocks: I get to learn something different from different bakers every time and bake amazing bread. Consulting arm: Lin works with 2 high growth clients. That’s enough for her Food trends and Technology: Rapid Hydration. A high seed sprayer. Patent: Rapido-jet When can we expect these new bakery innovations to happen?: Biggest factor is cost. Equipment can last a very long time. Some mixers can last 30 to 40 years. What is something in the food industry you’d like to know more about?: Why aren’t companies cleaning up their labels? Why are they fighting to change their ingredients? The technology is there. Job Hopping: You can’t change that. You have to identify good leaders How do you identify good leaders?: Your network needs to be large. Many years of experience. Do you have a question on how to identify good leaders?: No Who inspired you to get into food?: My father owned a food brokerage and I hung out in their kitchen Favorite Quote: The only way to discover the limits of the possible is to go beyond the limits and test the impossible. Arthur C Clark: Scifi Writer Favorite Book: David and Goliath – Malcolm Gladwell also does Revisionist Gladwell Favorite Kitchen Item: Table Top Hobart Version Favorite Food: Bread. I am on this 90 loaves in 90 day journey. Check eatbread90.com Favorite bread: An imported Australian bread with a peral flour Do you have any advice for people wanting to go to the food industry?: Go ahead, we need you! A lot of startups do not have food scientists on their teams. How do we contact you?: If you want inspiration as a working mother, connect with me on facebook. You need to be passionate about what you do. Once you have enough passion, it doesn’t feel like work.

Links

AIB facility in Kansas Cracker Training Course Kansas State University Grain Science Wendy’s Dave’s Killer Bread Bakeryconcepts.net Why are manhole covers round? eatbread90.com

Ep. 080 - An Overview of Ideation to Commercialization
41:30
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 41:30
Ep. 080 - An Overview of Ideation to Commercialization

An Overview of Ideation to Commercialization

This episode is going to be a bit different than other episodes. Most episodes were reflection based or stuff about my life but I guess I might have ran out of things to talk about in my life. At least for now.

So in this episode, I’m going to talk about the life cycle of a product, how an idea forms, goes through the gauntlet and then commercialized to make tens of thousands of something you've created.

Along the way, I’ll give you some tips on how to make this process faster, or who you have to deal with to succeed in this aspect.

Most people in a food company don’t know the whole process. Those that do either learn from a startup or force themselves to get involved. I’m the latter. After a recent project where it’s finally launching, I now have full confidence in how a product is made.

There are a ton of moving parts and I hope that this episode will break down and show you how to actually make a food product from idea to selling it to millions.

This Episode is Sponsored by Foodgrads

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion–there’s something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

[New] This Episode is Also Sponsored by Steviva Ingredients

Hey everyone, we have a new sponsor on the podcast and I am happy to introduce you guys to the wonderful people at Steviva, a sweetener company in Oregon. If you want to hear more about this amazing company, listen to episode 72 with their CEO Thom King. What’s really cool about Steviva is that they are changing their whole company into something bigger and better and I love telling the story of how this will happen. As we progress, we plan to go through the process of Steviva’s transformation and inform you on what this amazing company can do for you.

For more information about Steviva, go to http://www.stevivaingredients.com/

Housekeeping

If you like what you heard, like us on facebook or write a review on itunes. It helps wonders.

I am also inviting you to sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com. I am doing this new thing called the 5 course meal where I send you 5 pieces of hand picked content and deliver it every Friday morning. Like a meal kit…

If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Transcript Ideation

There are two types of areas where ideas come from: external or internal.

External ideas are based off of market research, or what’s currently selling, or even as simple as “this product exists, but it has x problem, let’s invent a product that doesn’t have x problem”. Most of the time, people in the marketing department develop something called a competitive or gap analysis which lists 5 to 10 of the top selling product’s strengths and weaknesses.

An easy way to develop an idea is to just look at a competitive analysis and increase the positive attributes by like 20% and then also remove anything negative.

One example is if I did a competitive analysis about protein bars and I see that the max protein bar is 20 grams  of protein and uses sucralose, I could probably be “innovative” and sell a protein bar with 24 grams of protein and no sucralose. Though most companies would balk at the idea that this is the way they “innovate”, when you boil it down, it’s pretty much that.

Another method of ideation is internal and this takes a high amount of intuition and out-of-the-box thinking. This is an extremely hard type of innovation that is based off of finding the cutting edge of innovation and thinking differently. Only a few people have the talent of connecting the dots, but if you feel like you do, then go for it.

Again, I want to stress how hard and risky this is. The bigger the company, the more people are going to think you are insane for even bringing it up. But what do they know? They don’t know food as much as you do right?

The best example I have in this situation is Apple (of course). Innovation doesn’t have to be completely new, but it has to be so out of the box people think you’re insane. For example, no headphone jack? That’s insane! Why would they do that? I’m not a tech expert, but that is one example, of an internally inspired innovation.

Another food related example is taco bell. In my podcast, I talk about the naked chicken chalupa a lot because I am so amazed that taco bell made a taco shell out of fried chicken. No average company would ever think about doing that.

So ideas are great but convincing a whole team that an idea is great is the fun part.

Most ideas come from founders or marketing. Depending on the company, research and development is involved, but not as often as you think. They’re the experts and they know their customers, so they are in charge with their ideas. As a product developer, you should respect that.

But idea approval is messy and there are several ways of doing this. So how do you validate an idea? The biggest toolset in your arsenal is data. Collecting data that your idea will work out is the best way to prove that this idea is legit, but event that has its downfall. Most really innovative ideas might not even come to fruition because it’s so ahead of their time, or the method of collecting data is wrong.

In all due respect, the best way of having an idea be approved by a body just takes a charismatic person who knows how to push the right buttons and convince someone that their idea will make a lot of money. I know this isn’t what most people want to hear, but that’s the way most crazy ideas happen, and also the most terrible mistakes.

This is a really specific type of company culture: the culture of accepting ideas. Most companies say ideas come from anywhere, but most companies don’t implement it. All that is true is that the chain of command is really long and eventually, a product has to reach someone at the top and they have to stamp their mark of approval. Good luck!

Pre- Commercialization

So an idea gets approved and then what? You have to then do the work to make the product tangible to the manufacturing team, whether this manufacturing team is a copacker or owned by your company.

This includes a variety of steps which mainly includes making optimal prototypes and gathering documentation on what the ingredients are. Again, different companies have different methods but the big idea is, you have to develop a good recipe that is easily reproducible and make sure it doesn’t kill or sue anyone.

So for me, developing a prototype is the fun part and there are tons of ways to do it. If you are under nutritional barriers such as it has to be under this amount of calories or must have this much protein, then it’s best to start doing the nutritional data analysis first than to go in the kitchen and go to town. A good prototype has to go through a vetting process and there are many ways to do it, but all of them involve having someone taste your product. In small companies, maybe you just need a couple of people who like it. In big companies, maybe 20 to 50 people have to like the taste before validating your product can be brought up to a higher being.

This higher being is what I liked to call, a judge. Someone who has the authority to approve or disaspprove your hard work. In some cases, this is the marketing department, or the executive, or the founder of a company.

The more data you have where people actually like your product, the more you can convince the “judge” to approve your product. Most rational people will approve something if the majority of people like it, even if he or she doesn’t. But that’s not always the case. Sometimes, the judge will say “I don’t like this, I wish it has this, this this, and you have to go back to the lab and try again.

Barely anyone gets it right the first time. Some ideas go through 100s of iterations and still get scrapped. But that’s the life of a product developer.

So let’s say you convince marketing and the “judge” that your prototype is awesome? It’s going to be very important to eventually get documents of all of these ingredients and archive them. For me, this is the worst part of the job, but it is a necessary evil. There are some innovations in the pipe line to make this easier, like RogoHub, but it will be a very long time before everyone is on board.

Getting documents usually involves getting proof from a sales person about the ingredients you put into your food. For example, you need the nutrition facts. If your product is gluten free, then you need a certificate verifying it’s gluten. If it’s Non-GMO, you have to get a statement, but maybe you even need a certificate. Ideally, your boss should have a good system to gather, sort, and archive docuemtns so in case of any outbreak, you’ll be ready to pull out the source. If you don’t have something like this, start one.

In some companies, this task is shared among product development, quality assurance, and regulatory or maybe just one of them.

This is serious stuff and is going to be super important in the future.

Do note, in most companies, this is the sole purpose of a product developer, or a person in research and development who develops new products. If you had to focus on one thing in the corporate behemoth, this is where you should be the expert at.

Commercialization

Once pre-commercialization passes, then you go into the complex world of commercialization which now involves almost every department working together to complete a timeline. This includes planning, inventory, transportation, packaging, labels, product marketing, procurement, product development, regulatory, and quality assurance, oh, and generally, a Project Manager is in charge of it too.

So it works like this: the “Judge” approves of a product in pre-commercialization, and then the company has to make a huge investment to actually make the product. Planning has to make the forcast oh how many will sell, inventory has to make sure there’s enough room in the warehouse and develop systems to track the product, transportation has to coordinate moving the product everywhere, packaging has to develop or confirm the packaging used is correct, labels has to design something pretty and compliant, product marketing monitors if everything’s ok, product developers get blamed for everything, regulatory makes sure we have all of the doohickies to pass it thoggh the boarders (if necessary), and quality assurance makes sure we have all of the specs necessary to document in case we get into trouble.

You see this sort of ecosystem sprout out that depending on the company, is either treated as a harmonious beautiful, collaboration, or like Game of Thrones in which a lot of unexpected drama happens either internally in the company, or externally say, a factory mishap or a communication error.

So commercialization takes a tremendously long time just because of so many people and professions are collaborating together. Technically, you’re going to do the least amount of work here but that might not always be the case. You now take on the role of someone who verifies things such as factory manufacturing reports, and how labels writes things on the level. If you have the confidence, you also become an authority figure on the product (though marketing might fight you for it).

The best way to handle commercialization is not only be an expert at what you do (creating great products) but also be a great communicator with all of the clashing personalities, and the clashing professions.

In general, the time frame from commercialization starts with a forecast which goes into motion. If you don’t have a forecast, then well, better just throw money in the pot and see what happens. A Label file gets circulated around departments that all departments confirm around. Your job here is to verify they are using the right ingredients, the right claims, and the right label. That’s about all. Marketing copy or what ugly color they use to represent your products has nothing to do with you.

During this time, we communicate with the manufacturer. The manufacturer sends replicate samples of the formula to cross check if communication between formulas is ok. Usually, a triangle sensory test is used to make sure no one can statistically tell the difference between the two products. between corporate and procurement gets a pilot protocol in motion. A pilot is a test run with the manufacturer to make sure they can actually run the lab sample. A pilot is a big step for a small investment. It tests everything about communicating with the contract manufacturer. It tests their mettle in gathering ingredients, communicating with the corporate team, and most importantly, confirms that the product can be made and tastes relatively the same compared to your formula sheet. Packaging is also important, and are usually packaged in blank film or white stocked depending on the product.

After the pilot sample is approved (byt the way, you’ll have 100s of samples to give away), procurement initiates the production run which takes about 6 to 10 weeks at minimum before starting production.

Post- Commercialization

For a product developer, not much goes on here. Quality assurance usually takes the reigns and deals with some check list stuff. However, it is important to keep track of how well your product is doing. You can always ask planning or marketing for the digits.

However, now since your product has launched, there are so many other things that can go wrong and all of them focus on either cost reduction or raw material issues. Things that are very hard for a product developer to predict.

Cost reduction involves changing one ingredient with another, usually cheaper ingredient. Cheap doesn’t mean lower quality, over time, things get cheaper due to technological advancements. Low cost projects are usually due to high volume and a bunch of other stuff I don’t really focus on.

Raw material issues involve a supplier completely running out of a material and everyone panics. Issues like this are terrible because sometimes the material is so unique or there is a shortage in the world in general. Purchasing will hound you to find a replacement and then there is no replacement because there is no substitute! Whatever.

So what separates good product developers from great product developers?

Well, it’s a simple answer. How far do you want to understand the process? Do you just want to do your thing?

From the people I’ve interviewed, and the people I’ve asked for advice, understanding the complexities of turning your idea into something people buy and eat is one of the keystones to becoming a great product developer.

But you actually can’t be an expert at everything.

The best product developers are the ones who can communicate and understand the process, and have the confidence to convince people that they know what they are doing. They are the ones who can convince marketing on the challenges of making something, or can work with a manufacturer to make their formula a reality. It’s getting info from various sources on what’s running out so you can prepare to kake changes or subsitutution.

To summarize, a good product developer knows not only their role, but how to communicate their role to others.

The more you understand the process, the more autonomous you can be, and the more you know what you’re actually talking about. Yes, it’s a daunting step to know how all of this works, but you don’t become great in your own bubble.

 

Ep. 079 - Tips on Growing Food Businesses with Elliot Begoun, Principal of the Intertwine Group
50:23
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 50:23
Ep. 079 - Tips on Growing Food Businesses with Elliot Begoun, Principal of the Intertwine Group

Elliot Begoun is the Principal of The Intertwine Group, which a practice focused on helping emerging food and beverage brands grow. He works with clients to design and execute customized route-to-market and go-to-market strategies that build velocity, gain distribution, and win share of stomach. His articles appear in publications such as the Huffington Post, SmartBrief, and FoodDive.

Elliot has had a lot of experience in the food industry. 25 years to be exact and he knows what makes good companies tick. His knowledge about marketing, supply chain and retail management astound me and I hope they do for you too.

In this episode, be prepared to learn how to be a successful food company, our predictions in the grocery space, and the common obstacles brands struggle with, and how to over come this obstacles

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion–there’s something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

Housekeeping

If you like what you heard, like us on facebook or write a review on itunes. It helps wonders.

I am also inviting you to sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com. I am doing this new thing called the 5 course meal where I send you 5 pieces of hand picked content and deliver it every Friday morning. Like a meal kit…

If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Knowledge Bombs

- When to share information versus asking for money - What Elliot describes as being a food lifer - Why entreprenuers should focus on what the grocery industry will become in 5 years

Question Summary

Sentence or less: I help emerging food and beverage brands grow How do you network?: It’s more about establishing relationship. How do you establish trust?: Go all in and help someone when asked What do you do?: I’m a principal. I understand and analyze emerging businesses and make them grow How did you get to where you are today?: Almost went to law school, so he got into general management at a small restaurant franchise, Bon Vorong, Graduate School, Shamrock Foods for 18 years, Foster Farms, then Intertwine Did you find an MBA useful?: I got more self-confidence and I absorb information better, but it’s debatable What skill do you need to be a successful food company?: You have to learn how to listen. You also have to learn how to be a problem solver My Food Job Rocks: I get to be part of a lot of companies and I love seeing them in stores Food Trends and Technology: Meal kits and how to bring amazing foods to busy families The biggest challenge the food industry needs to face: How are we going to feed 9 billion people? Are there any companies that are changing the food system?: There are lots of companies doing it in different ways. For example, dairy farms collecting methane and ugly fruit What is one thing in the food industry you’d like to know more about?: After 28 years, I still have no idea what it’s about Who inspired you to get into food?: Restaurant management job: it was offered to me. On my next job, I got a mentor and she taught me everything. Then I got into retail and it was like a real fun puzzle. Favorite Book: A More Beautiful Question My Quote: The quality of your life is determined by the quality of your questions. — Dr. John Demartini What do you think new brands struggle with the most?: Distribution philosophy. Build a compelling argument for your consumers to buy your products again and again and again to build velocity What is your advice for funding?: Make money first Do you have advice for anyone who wants to go into the food industry?: Run! Just kidding: The food industry is enormous. Go somewhere where you can make a difference. Also. Learn! How to reach Elliot: www.theintertwinegroup.com ; elliot@theintertwinegroup.com

Other Links (we link Elliot's Articles Here)

Food Dive Huffington Post Aldi’s Lidl Fancy Food Show

 

Ep. 078 – How to Spice Up Your Product Development with Jessica Goldstein, Spice Girl at Nu Spice
51:04
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 51:04
Ep. 078 – How to Spice Up Your Product Development with Jessica Goldstein, Spice Girl at Nu Spice

While scrolling through some linkedin folks I found Jessica Goldstein’s lecture she did at the RCA. About a week before, one of my friends sent me a link to her and said she might be good to interview. So I did.

Jessica is part of the Nu Spice family business, with her partner in crime being her father. She’s grown up in the food industry all of her life but she first decided to work in an electronics firm’s marketing company. But after a few weeks, she hated it and decided to go all in for the food industry. That means hustling small buisnesses, reading the USDA Standards and Labeling guideline page to page, and enjoying and analyzing every part of her food.

One of my favorite things about Jessica is her ability to describe flavors in such a way, that both the technical minded and the culinary minded would just melt. You’ll hear a couple of great food descriptions within this interview such as when I ask her what she had for dinner yesterday. Hope you enjoy it as much as I do.

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

Housekeeping

If you like what you heard, like us on facebook or write a review on itunes. It helps wonders.

I am also inviting you to sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com. I am doing this new thing called the 5 course meal where I send you 5 pieces of hand picked content and deliver it every Friday morning. Like a meal kit…

If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Knowledge Bombs
  • How Jessica went from marketing to food
  • The dynamic between Jessica and her father in the family business
  • How Jessica learns and keeps learning about food science
Question Summary

The influences in how to where you got to where you are today: Grandfather owned food business in New York, Grandpa sold it, father worked in food industry and then bought it. Jessica decided to step in and modernized the business after she hated her marketing job Popular in Cuba: no Cubano's, after the age of seven, people don’t eat dairy What do you tell people when you first meet them?: I play with your food, I design flavor profiles for food manufacturers Education: Jessica has a masters in food science and bachelors in creative writing and psychology Nu Spice’s niche: medium sized meat manufacturers who want to develop new flavors Important Skills for developing: Know the customer’s consumer. Whole foods customer has a different perspective than Food City How did you learn food science vocabulary?: My suppliers educate me. Also learning to educate people on this vocabulary Important skills for selling: It’s a people business. People buy from people that they like Food Trends and Technology: Veggie Burgers, Safeway launches Beyond Meat burgers Who is feeding the world?: Monsanto (despite their controversy) is feeding the world in poor places Food trends: Northern African flavors, stews, Horesus hue – Paprika paste, savory, fermentation such as sriracha and miso Favorite Book: Modernist Cuisine. You can download it on a tablet Be creative and innovation is everywhere What was the most amazing thing you ate last?: Stuffed Artichoke Butterflies Advice in the food industry: You need to love food

Other Links

RCA Conference James Calvetti Meats Nu Products Seasoning Company or Nu Spice – Family owned business Hoboken, New Jersey LG Electronics Marketing Department Thai Basil Sweet Basil Red basil USDA Standards and Labeling Guidelines book Bone Marrow and bread Bone Marrow in Hawaii where you take a shot in the bone Life is too short to eat the same thing twice Standards of Identity Top-Note

Ep. 077 - Going Bananas for Fair Trade with Kim Chackal, Sales Manager at Equifruit
43:15
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 43:15
Ep. 077 - Going Bananas for Fair Trade with Kim Chackal, Sales Manager at Equifruit

This episode is all about Fair Trade, you’ll not only learn about Equifruit’s focus on bananas, but also what other products can be fair trade, awesome resources in the fair-trade industry, and things of that nature.

Kim herself is an expert salesperson. Ever since she was 18 years old, she learned to go out and sell, and we talk over her expert techniques and here’s a secret… it’s all about perspective.

Also to note is Kim’s philosophy in life. She’s had so many jobs but because she loved what she did, and that opened more and more opportunities in her life. Something to think about.

So in this episode, you’ll learn where bananas come from, how a diamond ring can be fair trade, and how to be an amazing sales person

About Kim

Kim is a native Montrealer with a passion for all things food.  She graduated from Concordia University with a degree in Psychology and pursued further education at St. Pius X Culinary Institute, where she attained a diploma in French cuisine.  Kim has worked in sales from the start of her career: restaurant, retail, spa industry, catering and now, Fairtrade bananas!

Kim joined Equifruit as sales manager in late 2014.  After nearly 15 years of sales experience, she wanted to be more connected on a social justice level.  She loves the challenge of convincing Canadian customers to put farmers first.  Kim brings to the table relentless optimism, contagious enthusiasm and an irrevocable passion for fair trade.

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

Housekeeping

If you like what you heard, like us on facebook or write a review on itunes. It helps wonders.

I am also inviting you to sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com. I am doing this new thing called the 5 course meal where I send you 5 pieces of hand picked content and deliver it every Friday morning. Like a meal kit…

If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Knowledge Bombs
  • Where fair trade bananas come from
  • How everything can be fair trade
  • How fair trade funds farmer’s kids with money
Question Summary

What do you tell people you do?: Exotic fair trade fruit saleswoman. A light intro on fair trade Fair Trade: Doing business on fair terms. The producer gets paid properly. When I was 18 years old: Sales as B2B. Cold calling. Selling a product from door to door How did you put yourself out there when finding your next gig?: Social media How to be a good sales person: A really good salesperson reads people well. Everything from the tone of your voice to the language Does good sales people come from books or experience?: It might be more innate than you think. You can develop a salesperson, but you have to be perceptive. An introvert can be a salesperson Food Trends and Technologies: Purchasing habits of Bananas. People are buying products because of the value of the products Where do you find your sales research?: Canadian Government Websites Who inspired you to get into food?: My family Career path: I study the things I find interesting. You have to love what you do, but there will be challenges. Ask the questions: what would you do for free? Or what excites you? Kitchen Item: I’m a knife snob. I have to carry my knives for vacation Advice for a Sales Job: Ask to be paired to an expert salesperson Favorite Food: Salad and fresh fruits. I would wait for the seasons to enjoy my fruit Advice about life: It’s more important to love what you do because it opens up amazing opportunity. You’ll be a happier human being. Equifruit.com Equifruit Twitter Equifruit Instagram Equifruit facebook Equifruit linkedin

Other Links

Fairtrade Canada Fairtrade.net Canadian Fairtrade network Guelph Organic Tradeshows Canadian Produce Marketing Association Fair Trade Chocolate, Sugar, Tea Fair Trade cotton shirt Fairtrade Diamond Ring Farm and Food Care BA Psychology Concordian University Saint Pious the 10th – Culinary School Catering Company Fighting the Banana Wars Harriett Lam Social introvert Good survey about personalities Neilson

 

Ep. 076 - How to Be A Food Lawyer with Cesare Varallo, Independent Food Lawyer and owner at foodlawlatest.com
54:40
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 54:40
Ep. 076 - How to Be A Food Lawyer with Cesare Varallo, Independent Food Lawyer and owner at foodlawlatest.com

Food Law is one of those topics I fell asleep at in college. But it wasn’t until working in the industry did I find just how important it really is.

If you’ve been a fan of this podcast, you might have heard my frustrations learning about how the Europeans deal with GMOs. If you’re a first time listener, I’ll talk about it again.

But Ceasare Varallo is the man when it comes to making me excited about food law. He’s a lawyer in Italy who focuses on such things as food fraud, regulatory compliance, and communicating crises.

This is an amazing interview all about being a food lawyer. You’ll learn how to get a job in regulatory, how to get people to trust you as an expert and the amazing food technologies Cesare’s really into. One in particular that I haven’t heard of until recently… block chain technology

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

If you like what you heard, like us on facebook or write a review on itunes. It helps wonders.

I am also inviting you to sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com. I am doing this new thing called the 5 course meal where I send you 5 pieces of hand picked content and deliver it every Friday morning. Like a meal kit…

If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Knowledge Bombs
  • Ceasare’s work is three fold: food safety, regulatory, and managing communication
  • How Ceasare found his niche in food law
  • Why regulatory is getting more and more important
  • The interesting things about food marketing
  • How to learn more about food regulatory
Question Summary

Introduction in a sentence or less?: I’m a food lawyer. I help food companies to reach the compliance Cesare started with commodities at first and then went to more complicated things later Steps it took to get to where you are today: Criminal lawyer, switched law firm and found food clients. Noticed about the specific type of advice Foodlawlatest.com

Blogging advice If you have good content, it will be successful Avoid scandal or “fake news”, give useful facts Interacting with your audience is super important

What’s the most important skill you need for your job?: How you communicate and interact with people How do you get people to trust you more?: A blog with good content is a sign of trust, facts are a sign of trust, showing that you really know what you’re talking about. Keep on delivering good content and make them comfortable.The customer today is much more informed Customers are reading more food labels and are willing to spend good, safe, tasty and authentic food. Food Technology: Smart Agriculture, Drones, Artificial Intelligence to spot food safety issues, block chains, Block Chain: Technology used to secure the financial transactions: bitcoins/ cryptocurrency. Will help food fraud a lot. Biggest Challenge the food industry needs to face: Fraudulence and trust. Big companies are not trusted. Local is more trusted. A small minority has a lot of power What is something you would like to know more about?: Marketing. How much work it takes to do marketing campaigns. How do you make things Viral? Favorite Book: Lord of the Rings Favorite Quote: Winston Churchill: success consists of going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm Favorite Kitchen Item: My favorite dish is risotto so I like a really big wooden spoon

If anyone wanted a job in regulatory, what should they study on their own?: You can find many courses in food law in United States. California and New York has plenty Study the objective official source depending on countries. Common websites. FDA website, Code of Federal Regulations Not so simple in Europe: 26 countries with deviations Independent blogs can work too

Advice getting into the food regulatory industry: Get your hands dirty. You can’t imagine the complexity with regulatory issues. It’s more about how you approach the problem Where can we find you?: Foodlawlatest@gmail.com

Other Links

Foodlawlatest.com Baby formula scandal Olive Oil Book: Extra Virginity Anti-Vaxxers “We don’t trust science but everyone is eating supplements” Viral Marketing Coca-cola put names on the cans, and they monitor and test everything Food Marketing Nerds Podcast

Ep. 075 - A Recruiter's Point of View: How to Unearth New Opportunities with Bob Pudlock, Recruiter at Gulf Stream Search
01:03:29
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 01:03:29
Ep. 075 - A Recruiter's Point of View: How to Unearth New Opportunities with Bob Pudlock, Recruiter at Gulf Stream Search

What’s the point of a food industry podcast if I can’t help you with your careers?

That’s why I’ve actually taken a liking on interviewing recruiters because recruiters know the best way to get a job.

Bob Pudlock is one of those people. He is an independent recruiter who knows his stuff. Taking an unconventional route, Bob went into recruiting because companies would pay him top dollar to recruit. Yep, one sentence solidified his career.

Bob has a lot of practical advice in the show such as how to make 100% use of job interviews when you have to pay for your own flight, the power of long-term networking, and one of my favorite topics, which is better? Factory experience or a master’s degree?

Shownotes: http://myfoodjobrocks.com/075Bob

About Bob Pudlock

Bob Pudlock is the owner and President of Gulf Stream Search, an executive search firm that works with companies in the food and nutritional supplement industries to identify, assess and capture top talent for their organizations.

Bob has been in the search industry for 17 years - he has placed individuals all throughout the US and Caribbean at all levels - most of the positions he fills are in R&D, Quality, Sales/Marketing, and Plant Operations throughout the US - he works with venture capital firms that focus on the food industry, start-ups, as well as established brands in the food and supplement industries.

Bob grew up in Cleveland, OH and attended John Carroll University where he played on the golf team.  He moved to South Florida in 2011 and is active outdoors with running, swimming, stand-up paddle board racing, fishing and bicycling.

5 top reasons My Food Job Rocks

1. I can work from anywhere - I conduct nearly all of my work via phone, email, and video.

2. I choose what companies, searches, and candidates I work with.

3. I make my own hours - I work as much or as little as I like - although my business demands a lot of my time, I still have the flexibility and control over my schedule to do the things I enjoy outside with the people close to me.

4. I control my income.

5. I get to work with up and coming talent in the food industry and I also get to work with companies that are changing the way we look at nutrition and health in general.  I get to work with people that are truly making a difference in the world.

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

 

If you like what you heard, like us on facebook or set a review on itunes. It helps wonders. If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Knowledge Bombs
  • How to make the most of paying to fly to a job interview
  • Why you should go to hiring managers and not HR
  • How even the smallest talks can be impactful
  • The value of factory experience
  • The many factors about the lack of free labor
Question Summary

Sentence or less: I identify or recruit top talent in the food industry What do you do specifically?: 2 things: companies go to him to find people and he finds great people I focus on relationships and connecting What was the time you talked to someone who didn’t accept the job at the time?: I try to open up to people to imagine the possibilities. I try to set more expectations. What’s the best advice for growing your network?: Throw your net wide, not deep The best thing about your job: The journey of hiring Steps it took to get to where you are today: Ohio, Private schools, good at sports, underachiever, didn’t think what would happen when he grew up, golf coach, training salesmen, “Bob, we will pay you top dollar to find salespeople”, pet food recruiting, then expanded to more - Sometimes it’s ok not to know what you’re going to do What’s the most common theme between excellent candidates?: For young people: curiosity for learning and getting to really understand all the different steps on the product development cycle What is more valuable? Masters experience or Factory experience?: Factory experience. It can’t be replaced or supplemented at a later date. For many people, most people want to do different things Why Does Your Food Job Rock?: It’s all about the journey. Also, I work for myself and I get to have control over who I work with What is Bob’s Win Rate (Hired versus not hired): Average is 10-15 interviews for one hire. Bob has had impressive numbers. The secret is understand what the company is looking for Food Trends and Technologies: The blurred lines between mainstream food and nutrition What is the biggest challenge the food industry needs to face?: Skilled labor. Some reasons: we put our manufacturing plants in the middle of nowhere, lobbying to reduce regulations for hiring skilled labor. Favorite Quote: The Man in the Arena. Favorite Book: Oh the Places You’ll Go Favorite Kitchen Utensil: Utensils that are not utensils Advice on the food industry: If you’re going technical, get a degree. Think of other degrees like Masters or MBAs What is a common myth that you’d like to dispel about job hunting?: The best resume doesn’t always win Where can we find you?: Gulf Stream Search. Email: bob.pudlock@gulfstreamsearch.com Phone number: 561-450-9490

Other Links

Hiring Manager – Someone who requests a new employee H1B Visa

Ep. 074 – How to Get a Job at the FDA with Steve Gendel, Vice President, Division Food Allergens at IEH Laboratories
45:21
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 45:21
Ep. 074 – How to Get a Job at the FDA with Steve Gendel, Vice President, Division Food Allergens at IEH Laboratories

Steve Gendel has worked in the FDA for 25 years and this guy has had an amazing career doing so.

He’s been involved in the latest and greatest technologies ranging from early stage GMOs, Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act, and of course, our favorite one right now, FSMA.

The best part of this episode is the very practical and real advice he give son how to get a job at the FDA. Of course, it’s a special mix of fiscal year luck, and who you know. He tells you the best places to meet people in the FDA, where the FDA usually works at (which of course, it’s not easy find), and when to start asking your contacts if there are positions open.

 http://myfoodjobrocks.com/074Steven

About Steven M. Gendel, Ph.D.

Dr. Gendel works to ensure safe food for everyone through education, consulting, and support of food manufacturers and organizations of all sizes as the Vice President, Division of Food Allergens, IEH Laboratories and Consulting Group. This includes facilitating compliance with the rules issued under the Food Safety Modernization Act, and supporting the development of Hazard Assessments and Food Safety Plans. He applies a scientifically sound approach to allergen control and testing, and to resolving compliance issues.  He is a Food Safety Preventive Control Alliance Preventive Controls Lead Trainer, a Certified Food Scientist, and an experienced speaker.  Previously he was the Food Allergen Coordinator for the US Food and Drug Administration where he lead policy initiatives, the development of regulatory documents, and assisted in enforcement activities.  He has over 25 years of experience in food safety science and policy and over 90 techincal publications. He held postdoctoral positions at Harvard University and the University of Toronto and was on the faculty of the Department of Genetics at Iowa State University before joining the FDA.

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

Knowledge Bombs
  • Steve talks about why he stayed in the FDA for 25 years
  • How the FDA is funded
  • What the FDA controls
  • What Steve thinks has the best food safety programs
  • The best advice on how to get into the FDA
  • When to start looking for a FDA job
Question Summary

One sentence or less: I’m a food safety scientist. My job is the next thing you eat will not kill you Best thing about your job: I feel like I’m really making the world safer Step to get to where you are today: Undergraduate degree in engineering in KS Western reserve , Graduate in UC Irvine in biology, Department of Genetics in Iowa University, met someone at FDA which was now Institute of Food Safety and Health, stay with the FDA for 25 years, now a consultant

What is the difference between the FDA then and now?: A lot of external factors shape the projects such as consumer, laws and regulations, and new congressional turnover The hot topic before you left: FSMA is coming into effect (well…. Maybe not anymore) Most important skill you can have in food safety: Flexibility. Food safety is a very integrative type of field. There are a lot of pieces in Food Safety.

Projects Steve was involved in:

  • Potential allergens in GMOs (back when it was new)
  • Risk analysis modeling
  • Joint project between FDA and Health Canada about Soft-cheeses and L.monocytogenes
  • Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act. Thresholds for Allergens
  • Lead author of an allergen threshold report
  • Helped with FSMA’s preventative control

New Food Trends and Tech: Advanced Genome Technologies. Can be a great tool to understand pathogens. It helps you understand where they come from and then we can do that Biggest Challenge the Food Industry has to face: Transparency. Mainly asking “why” One thing you’d like to know more about: How companies invest in food safety and food safety program Favorite Quote: To err is human but to really mess up, you need a computer Favorite Food: Grilled Cheese Sandwich. Sharp Cheddar, Swiss Cheese, Artisanal Food What Advice Would You Give TO Work In The FDA: At this particular time in history, it’s hard to say. However, meet people in the FDA. It’s who you know. How to meet FDA people: Scientific Conferences. Local meetings at IFT and IAFP, American Chem Society, Society of Toxicology, talk to them, they will know others who do. USAjobs.com Office of Regulatory Affairs. There are District Offices. Contact the Deputy Director of that office Commissioner’s Fellowship ORISE- Oakridge CIFSAN – Centers for Food Safety in Universities that work collaboratively. Can get graduate or postdoc positions Fiscal Year for the Federal Government: Begins October 1st, ends October 1st. But start looking now How to find Steve: linkedin

Other Links

Ep. 031 - Tiffany Lau Myrian Zboraj – Quality Assurance Magazine GATTACA Walmart Costco

 

Ep. 073 - The Importance of Food Safety with Dr. Darin Detwiler, Assistant Dean at Northeastern University College of Professional Studies
01:00:15
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 01:00:15
Ep. 073 - The Importance of Food Safety with Dr. Darin Detwiler, Assistant Dean at Northeastern University College of Professional Studies

Darin’s son died of an E.coli outbreak and he has spent the last 25 years devoting his life to making the world a safer place.

Within the last 25 years, he’s become a Doctorate in Law and Policy where his main focus is to implement Food Policy. He’s talked with doctors, scientists, law makers, and graduate students into fighting for food safety. In his spare time, he comforts people who have gone through the same troubles as he has, and shares their stories.

Darin does a great job weaving intricate stories to give you the sense of importance in Food safety, which includes aspects of history, humanity and Chipotle.

A serious note for this interview: This is a very dense and emotional conversation of food safety. Darin really cares about what he does, and by the end of the episode, I hope you have a renewed sense of importance in food safety.

About Darin 

Dr. Darin Detwiler is the Assistant Dean and a Professor of Food Policy at Northeastern University College of Professional Studies, Boston, MA.  He is a food industry consultant, columnist, and frequent speaker at events across the country and beyond.  

He is coincidentally going to be on American Greed (yes, that's his voice) this week 

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

Knowledge Bombs
  • Why deadly foodborne illnesses spikes during the summer months, which causes a bad experience in Thanksgiving
  • The stories behind statistics. Focus on the stories.
  • How the FDA has changed in the last 25 years
  • How people being lazy can cause massive damage
  • How history impacts food policy
  • Everyone has a role to play in food safety
  • Understanding the cause and effect in food safety
  • Why Darin chooses Academia to do Food Safety
  • How Darin balances out food industry stories and family stories and the differences between them
  • How Darin’s perception of food safety has changed over time
  • The lack of Ethics in the Peanut outbreak
  • We talk smack about Chipotle
  • I’m as old as Chipotle
Key Summary

How Darin has improved Food Safety: 1992 – operating a nuclear reactor, supported the USDA on food safety, went back to university and taught for 15 years in forensic science, Doctorate in Law and Policy and focus was on implementing food policy, Two reasons why food safety fails: They don’t understand or they don’t care. Maybe we need to teach people earlier. Most Food Safety folly is based on greed My Food Job Rocks: Food affects everyone and we connect to it on all aspects of life What advice do you give people to excel at what they do?: If you see things and you don’t take action, or won’t eat your own product, ask questions. Be a self-advocate. Why did Chipotle fail their food safety protocols?: Failure to invest in safety. The system needs work, but their response is textbook What should Chipotle should have done to be better?: They can’t fix the past

Other Links

Stop Foodborne Illnesses Jack-in-The-Box E.coli outbreak 1993 Food Fraud: Big in Europe Bioterrorism Upton Sinclair – The Jungle Peanut Outbreak Chipotle Outbreak Contact: d.detwiler@neu.edu Quality Assurance Magazine

Ep. 072 [Bonus] - A Coffee Chat with the Best CEO I Know with Thom King, CEO of Steviva
25:16
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 25:16
Ep. 072 [Bonus] - A Coffee Chat with the Best CEO I Know with Thom King, CEO of Steviva

I usually do a pre-interview with my guest, to kind of explain what we do, if they listen to the show, and stuff like that. However Thom’s pre-interview was so good that I had to share it.

Think of this as an episode where I invite an old friend out to coffee to see what’s going on with his life. Thom is an amazing person who reminds me a lot of Derek Sivers.

Thom is also a guest who loves to swear so I edited a few things so the itunes police doesn’t get me.

So you’re going to learn a bit about documentation, and also some great podcasts that Thom listens to. Also, the really awesome perks Thom has built up in Stevivia’s office. There is a reason for that. If you want a full reason, listen at myfoodjobrocks.com/072Thom

Enjoy!

Key Takeaways
  • The importance of documentation
  • Thom’s investment in employee happiness
  • How to have employees talk to you
Other Links

Non-GMO in Europe Louis Hows – School of Greatness Tom Bilyeu - Impact Theory Mixergy Tom Bilyeu Tim Ferriss Show Kale Chips Healthy Crunch How I Built This One Question You Would Like to be Asked?: Why do you do what you do? Weird things in Steviva’s office: Tomato’s and chickens, food Friday

Ep. 072 - Starting a Sweetener Company in a Garage and Growing to More than $10 Million with Thom King, CEO of Steviva
52:32
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 52:32
Ep. 072 - Starting a Sweetener Company in a Garage and Growing to More than $10 Million with Thom King, CEO of Steviva

 

Thom King is probably the best CEO I’ve ever had the chance to talk to. He’s fun, innovative, and he just loves his job and the people he works with.

I had a great hour and a half talk with him on my lunch break and had to find an excuse when I got back to work. This interview is that good.

Where to start from this interview… whether you’re a young professional, an old soul, or a struggling entrepreneur, Thom will give you advice on all aspects of your career.

You’ll learn how to deal with conflict in the work place, the touching reasons why Thom loves his job, the amazing first stage of stevia and the growth of the brand, and at the end of the segment, the power of having a good idea and working hard so that everyone knows you’re the best.

Remember: I am currently recording this at my hotel at IFT. Just saying, I’ll be there until Wednesday. If you’re available, I’d love to meet you. Just email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

If you like what you heard, like us on facebook or set a review on itunes. It helps wonders. If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

 

About Thom King

Part CEO, part personal development wonk and part biohacker info geek, Thom is a self-confessed serial entrepreneur. While his favorite book list contains many success-oriented and personal-development classics, the classic definition of achieving success (e.g., making a lot of money) is not what inspires or motivates Thom. He follows more of a “you aren’t doing well unless you’re also doing some good” line of thinking. Thom’s company has been built around the simple principle of “do the right thing.”

Knowledge Bombs

- How to deal with conflict in the work place - Literally the birth of Stevia - How to get triple digit growth 3 years in a row - Some methods to understand people - Thom’s interesting hobby and how he makes them - How to validate a good idea

Question Summary

Elevator Pitch: A sweetner that doesn’t affect blood sugar levels that became an ingredient company Favorite thing to do as a CEO: Make my employees cry with tears of joy; Be appreciative with your employees What do you think you do in a day?: Manage personalities How many people are in your company?: 32 people How do you deal with conflict?: Clashing is a function of a breakdown in communication; I learn about the problem, and get to a common ground People who get under your skin: Imagine them as a six year old child Steps it took: Thom met Jim while doing radio, he tasted Stevia, made Stevia extract in a  garage Steviva was born in 1992 2008 – Stevia was given provisional GRAS status, moving Thom’s company to Food Ever since 2015, Steviva has experienced triple digit growth Metabolic disease: Obesity, diabetes Why did you start a food company and what keeps you going?: Getting rid of metabolic disease is my why Most important skill you can have in the industry: integrity. Constantly improve your product. Integrity is a service to makea  good product. Food trends and technologies: Probiotics and fermentation Thom makes his own probiotics and uses an 11 strain fiber What is one thing you’d like to know more about?: Hydrocolloids, thickening agents Example: thai chilli sauce, jam, etc Favorite Quote: Tony Robbins: Anything is possible and it’s up to you to make it probable Favorite Book: Right now is Tools of Titan Favorite Kitchen Item: Sous Vide Favorite Food: Spaghetti and Meatballs Any Advice for starting your own business: listen to Gary Vee’s Podcast. You grind and grind and grind and grind some more This is the best time in the world ever to start a business Low entry points for validating your idea: social media and crowd funding One thing you’d like to know about starting your business: more knowledge about Accounting What’s next for Steviva: Moving to another facility. Quadrupalling the size of our R+D lab Steviva: twitter, Instagram, etc info@steviva.com --> direct it to Thom!

Other Links

Steviva Nextiva brand – Stevia infused agave nectar Marrakesh Spice Provencal Anise Maple syrup Masala Chai Spice DE 42 High fructose corn syrup Jim May – Founder of Wisdom Naturals DISC test – Analyzing human needs for all employees Polyols/Erythritol FDA rulings on fiber Jerusalem Artichoke Chicory Root IMOs Custom Probiotics Glendale Los Angeles Flowbee- vaccum haircut Ketogenic diet Exogenous ketones

Ep. 071 - How to Find Good People and Great Companies with Steve MacIntyre, Director of People and Culture at Vibrant Health Products
46:46
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 46:46
Ep. 071 - How to Find Good People and Great Companies with Steve MacIntyre, Director of People and Culture at Vibrant Health Products

I am fortunate to interview Steve MacIntyre, as he brings a new perspective compared to the standard guests we interview here. He is the first Human Resource professional, and the only one I know who is really passionate about his industry.

Like many of our guests, Steve’s career path involved a lot of twists, and turns, and ultimately, a lot of leaps of faiths. From the army, to health and safety, to eventually, human resources, you can really feel how Steve has kind of gone with the flow in his career.

As a HR professional, Steve brings some amazing advice in this interview which will help you become a much better professional.

We give you some tricks on how to take advantage of networking, make the most of taking an expert to coffee, and igniting your intellectual curiosity

About Steve MacIntyre

An energetic, results-focused HR professional who directly contributes to a high performance culture by creating an employee oriented climate and implementing progressive and consistent people management practices that emphasize engagement, integrity, productivity and consistency.

Provides sound advice and guidance on human resources issues to leaders enabling our business to attract, retain, and engage great people who are inspired by superior results.

About Vibrant Health Products

Our story finds its humble beginnings in the Okanagan Valley in British Columbia, where Brad Brousson began using his mother’s recipe to bake sprouted grain bread for guests at a wellness resort. In 1989, Stan and Kathy Smith partnered with Brad to form Vibrant Health Products, sharing Brad’s passion for health and wellness.

Over the years, the company has expanded to include three brands: Silver Hills Bakery, One Degree Organic Foods, and Little Northern Bakehouse. But the company remains family-owned and operated. And the same homemade quality that began in Brad’s kitchen is still present in each loaf of bread, bagel, and bun we bake.

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

If you like what you heard, like us on facebook or set a review on itunes. It helps wonders. If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Knowledge Bombs

- Why being a HR professional in the food industry is different compared to any other industry - How to be transparent and getting into the culture of transparency - How Steve used networking to excel at his job - Why Steve left his first job because of the products they made - How to get the most value out of a coffee interview - How to encourage people to demonstrate intellectual curiosity

Question Summary

Sentence or less: Senior level HR practitioner for the food industry Why do you like the food industry: Food is something we all share. It's more intimate What is the best thing about your job?: Hiring people, and give young professionals their first opportunity Describe the steps it took to get to where you are today: I was in the army, electrician apprenticeship, laid off, food business is hiring electricians, health and safety committee, HR director asked him to take over and he loved it Required HR: Chartered Professional in Human Resources (Canada)  or SPHR (US) What should more people do to be good at their job?: Network with people who do what you do and do what you want to do.  Be intellectually curious My Food Job rocks: I get to be part of this movement Food Trends and Technologies: Sustainability, Whole Foods One thing in the food industry you’d like to know more about?: Marketing. How do we influence you to buy our stuff? Advice Going Into The Food Industry: Call me! But seriously, I love talking to passionate people. How do you find good candidates?: I’m looking for energy How can we reach you?: Through linkedin

Other Links

Gardeen Flexitarian Give and Take

Ep. 070 - A Year in Review
27:19
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 27:19
Ep. 070 - A Year in Review

 

If you like what you heard, like us on facebook or set a review on itunes. It helps wonders. If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Manuscript

Looking at my calendar, I saw that this podcast actually started in June.

It’s felt like a long time. A lot of things have happened while creating this podcast. I met some incredible people, collaborated with geniuses, and made my connections with my friends unbreakably strong.

Other than that, a total of 15,000 people have downloaded the podcast, averaging 215 listens per episode. For me, I’m happy with this.

So in this episode I just wanted to really flesh out the events that made this podcast for what it was today, and how it slowly transformed. From the independent website, graduate student series, to why I am changing some of my questions, I want to tell you just how fun it was making this thing and where we’re planning to go next.

Let’s being

Beginnings

Have I told this story before? Maybe only to my guests, or with my friends.

When I first moved to Phoenix, I became obsessed with Podcasts, almost about the same time I started hating my job, which you can listen about in episode 60, which was around the time I wanted to find a way out.

I noticed that sure, listening to music was fun, but it wasn’t productive. So I started listening to audio books which I borrowed form the Phoenix library. Soon it evolved into podcasts.

My first podcasts I listened to often were Smart Passive Income and Entrepreneur on Fire. I’d consider these entry-level because they are indeed inspiring stories with a little bit of tactical knowledge. This went on for about a year.

In maybe January 2016, I read an article by Tim Ferriss about how he started his podcast. Through his write up, I found it was pretty easy to do. For example, the equipment was dirt cheap, and the barrier to entry is pretty good.

About a month later, Nicole posted the fated article about how the food industry is hiring people at a declining rate and everything kind of clicked.

The lesson here is really about this simple equation, that opportunity + preparedness = luck is something that resonates with me when I do projects.

If I didn’t listen to podcasts, or read how to do them, I would never had had the opportunity to work with Nicole. There are many other factors in how this started up that made it worked as well.

For example, Foodgrads was a startup, so they were flexible and willing to support me in this venture. Though they didn’t give me initial capital, the power of just getting a thumbs up is more than enough justification to get started with the podcast so I set aside $1000 dollars and went to town. I would provide the episodes, and they would provide the website that I could post on.

I bought equipment recommended by Tim Ferriss including this microphone. I downloaded Audacity, and then I bought a course called Podcaster’s Paradise. This course was created by John Lee Dumas from Entrepreneur on Fire. I subscribed for about 3 months and learned a lot of technical tidbits in not only on how to use Audacity, but how to structure my podcast from getting guests to sending thank you notes. It also gave me some amazing tools such as calendly.com and libsyn.

I also found the facebook group they had extremely supportive and that’s also where I met Kim from Peas On Moss, who started her podcast the same time as I did.

So starting that, I now had to get guests. First up was Nicole and Juliette from Foodgrads as they were the ones hosting it on their website, so it just seemed right. Then I got Trevor Fast, Brian Chau, and Taryn Yee, while on a work trip to California. I literally scheduled time to meet and record. It was really fun!

I remember doing the dumbest thing while doing Trevor’s interview. I thought the room was too noisy so I thought we could do it in the office. We ended up doing the interview in a cramped, noisy room where chocolate was being refined. Editing that was a pain.

So you keep going. Episode 6 was my most valuable guest being Dr. Howard Moskowitz in more ways than one. This one was a stroke of luck I had no idea how I got him on the show. I just connected on linkeidn, he sends me a bunch of stuff and I asked him to be on the podcast. That’s so cool!

I realized then, that the ability to ask someone to be on a podcast is an extremely valuable tool. For one, it gives you a very legitimate excuse on inviting, and talking to people you want to talk to, and

I would say about 70% of my podcasts have guests I personally contacted, 10% are from people who sign up to be interviewed randomly and another 20% are referred to by either previous guests or friends.

My biggest tips for finding great guests is pretty simple, especially for people on linkedin.

For one, if they post a lot, it’s more likely they would like to be on the show. There are only a few exceptions I’ve had with this.

People who are going to launch something, whether it’s a book or new product, are especially willing to talk about it as well. This is how I got Ali Bouzari on the show, for instance.

Connectors, whether self-proclaimed are not have their perks too. Rochelle Boucher, for example, knew a ton of people and supported me in huge amounts getting guests that came to her Miele location. I returned the favor with my own resources.

After my recent talk with Alex Oesterle from Food Marketing Nerds, I found that he has a very different way of contacting. A bit more professional, which I might want to dive in the future.

He goes through PR firms or PR departments to get amazing guests from the marketing department. I’ve only had a couple of guests been blocked by denying permission, which I actually find kind of, a strange and outdated practice, but I understand.

But the method I use works, I have absolutely no problem finding guests and I actually realized that I don’t need big shots on my podcasts. I actually really enjoy interviewing fresh, inspiring graduates. Some recent examples like Jon Weber and Louis Edmond, who both just got their jobs, were extremely satisfying to talk to just because of their passionate outlook in life and I wouldn’t have it any other way.

So this brings me to another topic about what you want your podcast to represent. This means knowing your audience, and catering to that audience.

Overall, the message and structure for My Food  Job Rocks is a pretty simple one: explore different food jobs, dive in a little bit of their history, and explore their viewpoints on current events such as technology or current events. At the end, we cool down and talk about books, quotes, and favorite foods.

The questions we’ve designed for our show is pretty standard, but testing certain questions has made the process a lot of fun.

One of the questions I’ve changed was “what is a standard day like?”

I used this question in the beginning, but all I got was “every day is different!” So I changed this question and worded it in multiple different ways. Sometimes I say “what’s the most exciting part of your job?” or “what’s the worst?” some of my personal favorites include asking the process of how to make a certain food such as with Jocelyn Ngo or Haley Richardson. By diving into a subject filled with enigma versus a standard routine, in usually generates more excitement.

One of the other questions I’ve had a good time playing around with is “what do you think are the important skills you need in your job?”.

My favorite answer to this question is from Tiffany Tong from Canada’s Smartest Kitchen, where she said adaptability. After she did a beautiful explanation of the word, I dug deeper. “How do you become more adaptable?”

I guess the trend and evolution of the questions I ask is more about “how can I make this podcast more exciting/unique, and what type of tactical and actionable advice can I give to my audience?”

Next topic is in regards to why we split off from Foodgrads initially, around episode 16:

Well, I wanted more control and a certain person who was there at the time didn’t want that. Eventually, they had to approach to let me go.

I’m bad at assuming things, so I’ll leave it as: I grew too big for their nest so I had to leave. With a mix of disappointment, support from my friends, and admittedly, utter rage, I decided to make my own website to host my podcast.

I still had a weekly podcast so I had to make a website fast.

Luckily, this wasn’t just a start-from-scratch bang my head against the wall. Ever since I started hating my job, I dabbled into website design. I made my first “successful” website called Az Asian Food Review. Where I reviewed Asian food in phoenix.

I had to pay for a theme dedicated to podcasting (which in hindsight, I never used that feature) and a pretty good front page function.

Building the website was actually one of the most exhilarating I’ve done for this project and I am really proud of the website I made.

Using my skills from Canva, and my website experience, I made a website for maybe under $150 dollars that I could use as my playground.

And looking back, I used it as a playground very well.

Evolving the shownotes, making a blogging section for my own personal use, and recently, hosting another person’s content made this website a proud accomplishment.

Eventually, I made a deal with Foodgrads to work with them. Yes, it was awkward at first, but both Nicole and I supported each other. I actually had a huge internal debate not to do it because of an ego issue on my end, but that was a dumb, childish reason. The main reason is really, we can’t do this alone. If we’re split now, there is no way to conquer the industry. I need Nicole to be a powerhouse distribution force in the future, and she needs my high quality content to satisfy her readers.

Two lessons appear from this: don’t burn bridges, and don’t give up. I could have easily been extremely hot headed and aggressive in this scenario, and let my ego do the talking, but I had to bite my tongue. It’s paid off.

Another thing is consistency. If you really want to make this not a hobby, you need to be consistent with your episodes. Too many people get burnt out or just lose motivation on doing a weekly podcast.

What actually happened was I liked interviewing so much I ended up having so many episodes, I had to open the flood gates and launch 2 episodes a week. I was so hard to switch to 1 but I realized that two episodes a week really took a toll on my life. Luckily, I had Veronica Hislop save me with her willingness to provide awesome content with her blog posts.

So I want to wrap this whole thing up into a lessons learned scenario.

Both podcasting and website design were once small interests, that later became hobbies and then actually became revenue generating.

Yes, I made my initial investment back 5 times over. Some were direct requests, others were from referrals from guests. Not only that, but certain guests have contacted me for other projects and what’s coming in the next couple of years is really something.

At the end of the day, the biggest lesson I have for you is to just start doing something an hour a day. It can be researching, or reading, or just gathering information.

Eventually, a seed will be planted into your mind. When the opportunity strikes, you’ll be prepared.

As maybe you could tell from this episode, most of the opportunities I was given was

So the best place to invest a minimal amount of skill? I’ll give you two resources where you can find a skill and then have the opportunity to dig deeper.

Entreprenuer Podcasts

The SPI podcast by Pat Flynn is probably the best resource to find a collection of people who are making income in unconventional ways. This was actually one of the avenues I’ve used to another area of interest which ended up being a bad investment but that’s another story.

You can probably find things similar to SPI by typing in entrepreneur podcast in your favorite search engine. Other search terms you can use is Bootstrapping, and built.

Recently, Reid Hoffman’s Masters of Scale has been one of the best things I’ve ever listened to so if you’re going for it, you gotta listen to his stuff.

And

Facebook sponsored webinars

If you’re like me, a bunch of people are now pitching their “free webinar” facebook ad on my feed constantly.

Maybe it’s because I like stuff that attracts those adds to me…

Anyways, you should try it out. You’ll only invest one hour of your time.

But be careful! These types of webinars will always try and sell you something. It’s just their design. Whether you buy or not, is up to you. However, as a disclaimer, I buy maybe 20% of products that I see in webinars.

The point in exploring different avenues is to eventually find something where you can utilize the skill. The demand or timeline will be your bridge from interest to skill.

The power of having your back against the wall, you’ll be surprised in what you could get done.

Have a website to build in a week when someone lets you go? Time to get serious.

This is actually what I’m kind of missing now, the stuff I’m doing is awesome, but I need a sense of urgency to kick me in the butt. Apparently, it’s just my personality.

So where is this podcast heading in the future?

I don’t know. My goal is 100 episodes. Judging by the rate of this, we’ll be there in January.

With more than 50 interviews under my belt, I think it’s time to push a little bit on wrapping up the content in a nice little bow and send it to people who would find value in it such as professors, career consolers, or whatever.

I think I can put a little more oomph in sharing the content to others who might want to take the food industry as a career path.

Overall I have to tell you, I’m in this for the long run. Not just the podcast, but the connections I’ve made with every guest on the show is extremely valuable and every time I see their names or faces, I remember of the pieces of gold within their interview. Every podcast guest has taught me so much about just how passionate people are in their job. Whether it’s young professional’s eagerness to learn or the startup CEOs who hustle and works her butt off 24/7 but are fueled with endless energy, those are the guests that keep me going.

The next set of episodes are absolutely amazing. And there’s a lot more variety too. More food safety guests thanks to Marian Zboraj, editor for a Food Safety magazine. She gave me some absolutely amazing people in that sector.

What else, more sales reps, where I go more into what makes a good salesman, and the best CEO I’ve ever met.

There’s just so much coming up, that I always look forward to trying something new.

Thank you to everyone who’s been with me this past year. Thank you to all of our listeners, to all of our supporters, whether financially or emotionally. I don’t know what’s coming next, but things are building and as long as we’re in this together, we can do anything.

 

Ep. 069 - An Opportunity in the Indian Food Industry with Shyamoli Gramopadhye, Food Technologist at DairiConcepts
42:27
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 42:27
Ep. 069 - An Opportunity in the Indian Food Industry with Shyamoli Gramopadhye, Food Technologist at DairiConcepts

Today we have Shyamoli Gramopadhye a food technologist at Dairy Concepts where she solves the technical problems of her clients in the cheese and cheese powder industry. Shyamoli is actually a very supportive writer for Foodgrads and writes articles on the site.

This episode has a lot of info about India’s food scene. Not just the culinary aspect, but the industry aspect as well! Shyamoli is highly passionate in this aspect and is learning as much as she can in the United States, where she will hopefully bring it back to India some day.

Other tidbits in the episode include: the power of creative freedom, curiosity, and we sprinkle in a few great book recommendations throughout the episode.

About Shyamoli

I'm a Food Technologist in the Innovation Department at DairiConcepts. I'm extremely passionate about all aspects of food and my latest achievement in the food world is being an Elite Squad Yelper!

About DairiConcepts

As a comprehensive solution specialist, DairiConcepts offers an extensive line of cheese- and dairy-based powders, seasoning blends, concentrated pastes, flavor enhancers and hard Italian cheeses. With industry-leading expertise in clean label formulation and manufacturing, our custom ingredients can accommodate your specific flavor profiles and label claims, as well as broaden dairy-flavored ingredients into new dimensions of taste and functionality.

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dietitians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

If you like what you heard, like us on facebook or set a review on itunes. It helps wonders. If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Key Takeaways

- Research versus business and how it works in industry - Shyamoli’s experience with her mother’s food business - Shyamoli and my discussion about farming

Question Summary

What do you tell people in a sentence or less?: I’m a food technologist What specifically do you do?: Food technologist for Dairy Concepts. They are a support system and test flavors Dairy Concepts: Cheese and cheese powder company Favorite thing to do at your job?: A mixture of science and business. I can see both sides and see how my research affects the money Career Path: My mom is in the food industry, undergraduate degree in biotechnology, subject that talked about food industry, went to get a masters Reason why I went to the US: To study food science and bring it back to India. There’s no food innovation in India The most important skill you need for your job?: Curiosity How should you spark your curiosity?: You definitively have to be in a field that interests you. Read more, keep your eyes open My Food Job Rocks: I can learn so much about food and use it to start something new What Business would you want to start?: A farmer space where people can come see what it takes to farm. The Future of Food: The Third Plate by Dan Garber What do you look for most in a job?: Creative Freedom Is it a cultural thing?: Yes Food Technology: Plant Based food such as lentils Biggest Challenge: How broken the food system is Who is doing a good job fixing it?: Hampton Creek, Kashi, Larabars Favorite Kitchen Item: Muffin Mold for portion control Favorite Book: The Voluntourist by Ken Budd Favorite Food: Pani Puri Food Media: Food Dive, Food Rush If you were to tell a food science class right now, what would it be?: Talk to people and don’t hesitate to talk to experts The more people talk to people, the more we can dismiss miscommunication

Other Links

Foodgrads.com Procurement Indian Organic Farming Chef’s Table Fair Trade Chocolate Beard Wine Chocolate by Simran Sethi Endangered Species Craft Chocolate

Ep. 068 - How to Use Podcasting for Food Marketing with Alex Oesterle, Ideation Director of Bluebear Creative
45:40
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 45:40
Ep. 068 - How to Use Podcasting for Food Marketing with Alex Oesterle, Ideation Director of Bluebear Creative

We have quite a unique guest today. Alex Oesterle co-owns his own creative agency, Blue Bear Creative in Boulder, Colorado. His client base is food companies where he creates marketing campaigns for food companies that target the good old millennial population.

What’s great about Alex is that he also hosts his own podcast. He created Food Marketing Nerds, a podcast focusing solely on food marketing professionals. So of course, we talk a lot about podcasting and how it benefitted our professional lives. We also discuss what makes a good podcast and how to get guests.

If you want to get started with Alex’s podcast, I suggest checking out these three episodes.

Other than that, if you are interested in marketing, or branding, this podcast brings a lot of really good strategies on the table. For example, so many different marketing strategies including snapchat, Tasty videos, and choosing your niche

If you like what you heard, like us on facebook or set a review on itunes. It helps wonders. If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

Key Takeaways
  • Why Boulder, Colorado is an amazing food entrepreneur place
  • Why mellenials don’t like “Why mellenials” articles
  • Why Alex and I love Podcasting
  • How snap chat is used in the food media space?
  • Really interesting discussion about Wendy’s social media strategy
Question Summary

What is Blue Bear Creative?: We are a creative agency that focuses on millennials in the creative agency What is the best thing about your job?: The creative work What is the worst thing about your job?: The admin work Steps: College at CU Boulder, various job and internships at Qudoba, worked at restaurants in college, went into Finance, did Finance in startups, met cofounder and their skills aligned How do millennials like to be marketed?: They don’t like to be in a statistic. Example: Pepsi Ad Why Did you Make A Podcast?: To capture knowledge in how to make us better than our job How has podcasting benefitted you and your brand?: Personally, it’s shown me how to be successful and I get to see different marketing strategies How do you usually contact guests?: We reach out to brands that are really cool (I use linkedin) What do you think makes a great interview podcast?: Being able to spitball and roll with ideas and knowledge in the industry. Have the hosts do their research. I look for tactical information What Brands are Killing it Right Now?: Justin’s Nut Butter, all of Alex’s guests, Chick-Fil-E, Taco Bell What Food Technologies are Really Exciting you Right Now?: Messaging and tracking data Tasty Style Videos Rogue Wendy’s Account As a business, what is one thing in the food industry you’d like to know more about?: How a big food company without outside help made it Favorite Book: Malcom Gladwell’s Blink Favorite Quote: Man in the Arena

It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat.

Any advice about starting a Creative Agency: Start small. Have a specialty or expertise What’s next and where can we find you?: Continue to grow. We’re growing.

Other Links

Blue Bear Creative Website Denver Colorado Boulder is the Silicon Valley of Natural Products Boulder Chip brand Expo West Naturally Boulder Time Article about Millennials Fat Burning Man Podcast Throwing Shade Audible Food Marketing Nerds Denver Convention Center: Blue Bear Statue

Ep. 067- How Gummies Work with Jonathon Weber, R and D Technologist at Herbaland Naturals
36:14
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 36:14
Ep. 067- How Gummies Work with Jonathon Weber, R and D Technologist at Herbaland Naturals

Today we have Jonathon Weber on the show, a young professional who works at Herbaland Naturals, a gummy company in Vancouver, Canada.

Jonathon just graduated but he’s worked for so many companies! He also has chef experience, and now he’s a food technologist. This guy is really passionate on what he does. If you are currently in college. Really listen to the part about how he gets internships

Other gems in this episode, is that you learn a little bit about the gummy industry, learn how to hustle in college and do internships for small companies, and Jonathon and I geek out about ethnic food which includes talking about Dominican food, Banh Mi sandwiches, monte cristo sandwiches, and my spring fling, gochujang

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

Key Takeaways

- Why Jonathon changed his route in food science - How Jonathon got 3 internships while in college - Jonathon and my talk about ideation to commercialization - Our discussion on a lot of different ethnic food

Question Summary

Pitch Question: I’m a food technologist in the gummy industry What’s the best thing about your job?: I solve problems Did you learn about gummies in school?: No, I learned it at work Pre-gel How would you tell a freshman how to make gummies?: It’s simple: a matrix, a sugar and water. Everything else can alter it like pH or other sugars can change it When finding these internships, how did you find them?: I had to cold call them and ask to join, and asked to grow together Most Important Skill Do You Need For you Job?: Organic Chemistry and people skills What Would Be Your Dream Job title?: Culinary Cowboys What do you look for most in a  job?: Room for growth, is there support? Are they open minded? Small Companies are cool because you wear so many different hats Food Trends and Technology: Plant based everything Biggest challenge the food industry has to face?: The food we’re making is sustainable Who inspired you to get into food?: My mother Favorite meal from my mom: Braised beef and beans (recipe here) Favorite Book: The Count of Monte Cristo Favorite Quote: Keep growing, exploring, have fun, learn something new every day, and above all, be yourself Favorite Kitchen Knife: My mercer Tips for sharpening knives: practice. Use a sharpening stone Favorite Food: Banh Mi Weird stuff in Banh Mi Any advice to get into the food industry: Work hard, never give up, be active, network, try new things, taste everything If you were to tell one thing about your freshman self, what would it be?: follow your instincts, ask more questions, spend more time with professors, and you have to be having fun

Other Links

Soda Scientist Haley Richardson Niagara College culinary and food technology Culinary Scientists Provisions Food Company Savory Cookies and Condiments Black River Juice Co – Ontario Ideation to Commercilization Pea protein gummy Plant based burger that bleeds Plant based fried chicken Monte Cristo Knife sharpening stone Vancouver Hoisin Sauce Gochujang Siracha

Ep. 066 - School Food Supply Chain with Sapna Thottahil, Supply Chain Specialist at School Food Focus
45:50
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 45:50
Ep. 066 - School Food Supply Chain with Sapna Thottahil, Supply Chain Specialist at School Food Focus

I am so excited to have Sapna Thottahil join me today.

Sapna has an amazing background. From her early days in food waste to her fullbright scholarship Indian Organic Farming, Sapna is very passionate on the current issues in food that are just starting to get our attention.

With a  good heart, she now has a job as a Supply Chain Specialist at School Food Focus where she manages the supply chain for all ingredients that goes to feed schools in California.

So not only do we discuss one of the most important (yet not well talked about) careers in the food industry, but we also get into a lot of other really cool things such as whether to buy local, or fair trade, the cool things happening in the school food space, and an excellent tip on how to make your own vanilla extract.

hat’s the end of the show everyone, if you like what you heard, like us on facebook or set a review on itunes. It helps wonders. If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

About Sapna

This excerpt was copied from her website

Sapna E. Thottathil, PhD is a first generation Indian American and the author of India’s Organic Farming Revolution: What it Means for Our Global Food System. She is passionate about finding solutions to global health and environmental problems and has over 10 years of experience in international development, environmental resource management, and food and agriculture.

Sapna is currently a Supply Chain Specialist at School Food Focus, where she develops opportunities with food companies interested in supplying better K-12 public school food.

She has worked on environmental policy and climate change for multiple organizations, including the Environmental Protection Agency and Health Care Without Harm, and has contributed to several articles on sustainable meat procurement, featured in Civil Eats and the American Journal of Public Health.

She earned her BA from the University of Chicago, where she was awarded the Udall Scholarship for environmental leadership, before going on to receive an MSc from Oxford University and a PhD in Geography from the University of California at Berkeley, where she was the recipient of a Fulbright fellowship. She currently sits on the Board of Pesticide Action Network, serves as a Council Member for Oakland Food Policy Council, is on the National Advisory Council for the Women, Food and Agriculture Network, and is a Health Equity Expert with the Center for Global Policy Solutions. 

In her spare time, she enjoys cooking, gardening, hiking, identifying wildflowers and birds, and relearning how to play the piano. She is also working on another book.

Sapna lives in Oakland, California with her husband and son.

Key Takeaways
  • What Supply Chain does
  • Our discussion on buying local versus buying fair trade
  • Why cafeterias are starting to cook raw chicken
  • Sapna’s top 3 spices
Question Summary

What is your definition of Supply Chain?: Logistics between production and consumption Do you buy fair trade or local?: Farmers all around need our support Steps to get to where you are today: Office of Solid Waste to Oxford University in England, UC Berkeley PhD, Fullbright Scholarship to India, published a book, School food procurement What Claims do you look for on School Food Focus: Healthy ingredients, ingredient guide is posted on school food focus What should young people be doing for their job?: Never stop learning What unusual class did you take to help you at your job?: Science and Environmental Issues My Food Job Rocks: I work for a mission focused organization with people who want to change the world Food Trends and Technology: Cafeterias are buying raw chicken and cooking it in house. Transparency in food Challenges in the Food Industry: Food Waste and ironically people are hungry. Supply Chain is full of inefficiencies Who is doing a good job fixing this?: Plant based food companies How do you get on Non-Profit Boards?: It’s like applying for a job. Networking and know the right people Who Inspired You to get into food?: Consumers and my mother Favorite Kitchen Item: Spices. Spice Cabinet Top 3 Spices: Coriander, basil, vanilla Vanilla extract tip: Cheap vodka, great vanilla beans Any advice for anyone going into the food industry: Read on the sector, Check out these really cool podcasts (MFJR), Network, What’s next?: Sapna is making a new book Sapna kerala at wordpress.com

Other Links

School Food Focus Raw Materials Distributors Pesticide Action Network Food Miles Fair Trade Cal Poly Chocolates Value-added goods Kerala India Southern Indian Cuisine Civil Eats Comfood

 

Ep. 065 - From Chef to Consultant: How to Find and Implement Culinary Trends with Dan Follese, Owner of Follese Culinary Consulting
44:18
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 44:18
Ep. 065 - From Chef to Consultant: How to Find and Implement Culinary Trends with Dan Follese, Owner of Follese Culinary Consulting

In this episode we have Dan Follese, the owner of Follese Culinary Consulting, where he goes to clients with the latest trends and brings new innovative concepts to life.

Dan’s main clients are fast food companies and we go through a lot of talk about how he views new trends and his opinion on certain fast food restaurants. For example: a debate on which is better: taco bell or Chipotle.

But this is a really fun episode. Dan is a wealth of knowledge and we talk about amazing resources to make you more innovative. For example, he’s told me research programs I’ve never thought of, how to communicate better as a food science person, and just his experiences as a chef, food photographer, and consultant were really a treat to hear.

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

About Dan

With nearly 30 years in the business of preparing food, Chef Dan has forged his own path to create a robust background unlike any others. Chef Dan brings vision of collaboration, innovation and on trend concepts steeped in classic culinary ideology that will make your consumers crave more. An extremely motivated and detail-oriented culinary professional with diverse and progressive experience in multiple environments. Chef Dan has prepared white cloth gourmet meals for celebrities, appearances on “Best of Wine & Food” TV Food Network, collaborates alongside food scientists, converts recipes to formulas for mass production, leads nationwide food trend tours, directly supports onsite sales & has created some of today’s biggest LTO’s. Having worked directly with some of the largest food manufacturers he understands the necessities in food production. A Minnesota native Chef Dan has worked and traveled his way around the globe. Spending nearly thirty years in South Florida where he met his wife. They have settled down for the simple life of Green Bay, Wisconsin where they raise their family. Chef Dan’s passion for food and beverage will translate into your Gold Standard of success

Key Takeaways

- The Big 3 Fast food empires - Olive Garden used to make their own pasta - Why we need Cheese Experts - The sad story about people stealing steaks in restaurants - Dan’s opinion on taco’s à Taco Bell versus Chipotle

Question Summary

What do you tell them in a sentence or less: I create concepts out of food products for mass or restaurant chains. I work for all sorts of companies including start ups and kitchen manufacturers Background: Chef, Johnson and Wales, Food Styling and Photography How long did you get into full-time consulting?: Most people in the culinary field don’t know about commercialization. Culinary schools are now teaching food science How to Start Consulting: Answer good basic, culinary trade information Most food has already existed, but you have to evaluate how the customer will react to it What should young people do to be good at their job?: You have to do what you love Why are restaurant fail rates so high?: The dream and glamour can go to your head Staff steal steaks from restaurants all the time My Food Job Rocks: I get to experiment with new food ideas and implement them to large companies How to Find and implement new trends:

Look at local markets See the hottest restaurants on yelp and see what they do More importantly, what appeals to me?

How to train sales people on new products: Demonstrate the simplicity of the product. The top 3 items comparing why it’s different, very basic applications Most Food Scientists don’t want to be customer facing Food Trends and Technology: Health and Wellness: Gluten-Free Biggest Challenge the Food Industry has to face: Food Safety One thing in the food industry you’d like to know about?: Food Science!; Cannabis in the Food Industry Inspired to Get into Food: A Restaurant Job in high school How do you get promoted?: Be someone to show up for any task asked for them. The spirit. Favorite Book: Le Repertoire De La Cuisine Favorite Quote: If there's time to lean there’s time to clean Favorite Food: My wife says pizza but I say Chimichanga Taco Bell vs Chipotle Any advice for anyone in the food industry?: Love food What’s Next? Where can we find you?: Trade Shows Expo West IFT17 I go and represent customers

Kitchen Aid stand mixer Data-Central Technomics Mintel Smoked Gouda Arby’s Smoked Gouda special Snacking Innovation Summit – Food Navigator McDonalds Burger King Wendy’s Big Mac into 3 different version Culinology Cargill American Cheese Jackfruit Sunflower Seeds and Butter Pea Protein Whey protein Naked Chicken Chalupa

Ep. 064 - Tips for Writing a Great Food Book with Susie Wyshak, Author of Good Food, Great Business
49:36
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 49:36
Ep. 064 - Tips for Writing a Great Food Book with Susie Wyshak, Author of Good Food, Great Business

It was an honor interviewing Susie Wyshak, author of Good Food Great Business as she shows us so many useful tips on how to start a food business and how to write a book.

I actually was able to meet Susie for a brief time during my trip to the Fancy Food Show, which we talk about during the episode. She even signed my copy of Good Food Great Business and you can see it in the show notes.

If you haven’t read the book and you are looking to start a food business, I highly suggest this one. It’s so good! From personal experience, I found the resources so valuable, the format really easy to follow, and the examples are superb.

Other little gems in this episode includes great tips and tribulations of writing a book, me showing off my food science knowledge, and Susie’s thoughts on robots in the future.

About Susie Susie Wyshak is the author of Good Food, Great Business: How to Take Your Artisan Food Concept From Idea to Marketplace and Chocolate Chip Cookie School, for kids. She blogs about trends at FoodStarter.com and offers strategy and naming services to sustainable food entrepreneurs, local food shops and other small businesses. Key Takeaways
  • Why Susie’s book is amazing
  • Why she decided to make a book and some tips on doing it
  • What Susie thinks of robots
  • Adam talks about food science and inulin
Question Summary

Educational Background: MBA in Marketing

Tips on writing a book How did you contact people for info?: I just asked them! But I had a strong network Do you think the industry is small?: Yes, but it’s just like any industry What is the hardest thing about writing a book?: Books are linear and writing about a non-linear process is very challenging How long did it take you to write the book?: Always had the idea, met Chronicle books the following year, then took a couple years. Having deadlines will get you to focus. It’s like doing a Marathon. Be flexible and not be frustrated.Edits were mainly about Clarifying and explaining things. Thanks to her publisher What has been the benefit of publishing the book?: I can do what I wanted and work who I wanted to work with What would you eat for a month straight?: Lebanese Grape leaves stuffed with rice and lamb Do you have any advice for writing a book: Read a book about writing books

My Food Job Rocks: I can help people and I have a community Food Trends and Technology: Single serving on-the-go foods What do you feel nailed single-serve foods?: That’s It – 2 piece fruits Biggest challenge in the food industry: immigration and food waste Susie’s thought on robots: It’s complicated and conflicting. We need to think through it. What’s one thing in the food industry would you like to know more about?: food processing Who inspired you to get into food?: An appreciation to small farmers Favorite Book: Harold McGee On Food and Cooking What would you eat for a month straight?: Lebanese Grape leaves stuffed with rice and lamb Do you have any advice for writing a book: Read a book about writing books What’s Next?: A new book about a grocery store, going to the Natural Products Expo Where can we find you?: Susie@foodstarter.com What other food shows do you recommend? Fancy Food Show – Winter Summer New Hope Natural Products Expo – LA and Baltimore Candy Association Specialty Coffee Association

Other Links

Fancy Food Show Hummus Stir – Top food pick Portable coffee tablet – tierra nueva Good Food Great Business Foodzie – Marketplace for Artisan food Pierto’s Principle: 80 / 20 rule Foodstarter.com – Susie’s own website New Amazon Store Meal Kits Chipotle Chicory Root - Inulin Food Safety Modernization Act The Joy of Cooking Alice Medrich Baking with Julia Scissors that have two knife blades Microplane Zester Coffee Grinder Spice Grinder

Ep. 063 - Taste Everything! with Tiffany Tong, Strategic initiatives Lead at Canada's Smartest Kitchen
37:38
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 37:38
Ep. 063 - Taste Everything! with Tiffany Tong, Strategic initiatives Lead at Canada's Smartest Kitchen

We have a great guest today as Tiffany Tong, Strategic Initiatives lead at Canada’s Smartest Kitchen, enters the scene and brings with her an amazing story about doing what you should do, versus doing what you want to do.

See, Tiffany didn’t start in food. Not for a long time. She was actually in the ever stable and lucrative oil and gas industry. Her switch to food seemed easy on paper, but as we dive deeper in the interview, you realize that the journey had its challenges. I really appreciate Tiffany for sharing her story, and along with that, we talk a lot about how to strategize your company’s target clients, how to apprentice for a celebrity chef, and some really cool food jobs we found on the internet. Like… Chief Adventure Officer

About Tiffany

An insatiable learner, Tiffany's background ranges from supply chain management and organizational change management in the oil and gas industry to food media. To compliment her Bachelor of Commerce in Business Process Management, Tiffany received a Culinary Arts diploma from the Northern Alberta Institute of Technology. As the Food Media Developer for one of Canada's best-known chefs, she managed the production of two cookbooks, including the recipe development. As the newest member of the Canada's Smartest Kitchen team, Tiffany brings a unique blend of business and culinary experience combined with creativity and energy.

About Canada's Smartest Kitchen

For food companies of all sizes, Canada’s Smartest Kitchen’s team of chefs and scientists develop customized solutions to create better tasting food products tested by consumers. Their proprietary SMART Advantage Process for food product development supports startups and multinationals alike with a customizable suite of services that can inject value at any stage in a product’s pathway to market. 

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. You’ll see an amazing new website in Spring 2017. Just go to foodgrads.com

That’s the end of the show everyone, if you like what you heard, like us on facebook or set a review on itunes. It helps wonders. If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Key Takeaways
  • How Tiffany rebranded the company and found out their 4 major client bases
  • How volunteering landed her a gig with a celebrity chef
  • Tiffany’s great resources for food tech and food jobs
Question Summary

One Sentence or less: I have a very fancy title Title: Strategic Initiatives Lead at Canada’s Smartest Kitchen How do people visit you?: Referrals, website What does a Strategic Lead do?: Big ticket items such as funding applications, rebranding, service line extensions and expansions Seafood companies Functional Foods Innovative Ingredient Suppliers Artisan Producers Career Timeline: Business Bachelors of Commerce at University of Calgary, to Supply Chain Oil and Gas, then organizational change management Northern Alberta Institute of Technology, to culinary arts, Moved to the Island to apprentice with Chef Michael Smith as a food media developer, How did you apprentice with Chef Michael Smith?: I found a post on the internet. And I volunteered at a trade show with a TV personality. Most Important Skill for your job?: Adaptability. There is something new every day How do you become more adaptable?: The ability to be ok with not knowing. Be ok with the uncomfortable and come in with a fresh set of eyes. Worst Thing You’ve Tasted In Your Job: Bugs Best Thing You’ve Tasted In Your Job: Prime Rib Dream Job Title: Not really a job title, but opportunities. What Do You Think Makes a Good Job?: Good learning opportunity and to be involved in everything Food Technologies: Food and Future Collab Biggest Challenge: Our Food System Who Inspired you to get into food?: I’ve always loved food. The people who supported me were my parents and partner Favorite Quote: Henry David Thoreau Quotes. If you have built castles in the air, your work need not be lost; that is where they should be. Now put the foundations under them. What does that mean to you?: Dream big Favorite Food: Japanese food, Chinese food, Pizza, Bahn Mi Advice for anyone in your field?: Taste everything, do it with an open mind If you were to tell yourself something in the past: Trust your gut. The right thing to do versus what you love to do

Other Links

Bluechip – big clients Good Food Jobs Website Chief Adventure Officer Omnivore's Dilemma Mike Lee – Future Earth 3 sisters Corn, Squash, Beans Pulses

Ep. 062 - From Chef to Food Scientist: Sticking to your Dreams with Louis Edmond, Food Technologist at Advanced Pierre Foods
37:24
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 37:24
Ep. 062 - From Chef to Food Scientist: Sticking to your Dreams with Louis Edmond, Food Technologist at Advanced Pierre Foods

Louis Edmond is an extremely inspiring fellow. He has loved food his whole life and decided to be a chef, until he realized that the chef isn’t the most stable job in the world. Then he dived into the world of food science in his final semester. Though he didn’t get a food science job, he worked darn hard until 6 years later, he applied for his masters, and now works as a food technologist at Advanced Pierre Foods.

Louis’ strength is the ability to tell quite inspiring stories and he really loosens up in the final minutes of the interview, where he reminisces about his amazing week in culinary camp in high school.

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. You’ll see an amazing new website in Spring 2017. Just go to foodgrads.com

If you like what you heard, like us on facebook or set a review on itunes. It helps wonders. If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Key Takeaways 

 

  • How Louis found out about Food Science and kept chasing it
  • Our discussion on a focus on customer relationship when it comes to product development
  • Why we love innovation
  • A discussion on Cardemum and Star Anise
Question Summary

One Sentence or less: I create and develop new products for food manufacturers Where will we find the food you make?: Lots of store brands, fast fixin’s brands Favorite Thing About Your Job: I’m still learning about meat processing and I love learning Can You Describe The Steps of Your Career?: Culinary School, Had a food product development class in his final semester, looked into R+D Chef, Movie Set Catering Work. Hospital, Graduate School University of Georgia, Internship at McCormick, New Orleans What is the most important skill for your job?: Foodservice mindset: how is it going to be handled, used and consumed? Who is that person? Think of who the end-user is My goal: Is to develop the next biggest trend Dream Job: To be an executive What do you look for most in a job?: Innovation and the ability to grow and develop Examples: McCormick Food Technology: Plant based meats; Ethnic food backgrounds such as India Biggest Challenge the Food Industry has to face: How to transition from simple and clean to process Who is doing the best job advocating this?: Panera Who inspired you to get into food?: My Grandmother. A Culinary Camp in Georgia. Bombshell quote: If you can do anything, every day, all day for free, what would it be? Quote: Be the change you want to see in the world; Teach a man how to fish, he’ll learn how to fish forever Book: The Aladdin Factor. “I don’t have a problem asking because I already don’t have it”. Mindset by Carol Dweck Favorite Food: Bayona (New Orleans) – Smoked Duck and Cashew and Pepper Jelly Sandwich and Shrimp Susan Spicer If You were to tell your freshmen self something, what would it be?: Be more patient in going after your goals. Great things have developed with patience.

Other Links

Research Chef Advanced Pierre Foods – Meat Division Fried Chicken Nugget Process Ketogenic diet Fancy Food Show in San Francisco Cardamom Sriracha Gochujang Best Thing I Ever Ate

 

Ep. 061 - Living and Breathing Healthy Kale Chips, with Julie Bernarski, Founder and President of the Healthy Crunch Group
40:39
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 40:39
Ep. 061 - Living and Breathing Healthy Kale Chips, with Julie Bernarski, Founder and President of the Healthy Crunch Group

Today we have Julie Bernarski, Founder and President of the Healthy Crunch Company

Julie’s company makes an amazing Kale Chip product and she was so nice she sent me a whole box of it!

 

In my opinion, these are the biggest, most satisfying kale chips I’ve ever eaten. The flavors are crazy innovative and the kale is a nice, dark green.

Though we talk a lot about the product on the podcast, I feel the best takeaway advice for this product is specifically helpful if you are thinking of starting a product based business. Though the best giveaway is to love your product, also love your competitor’s products. And the more research you do with your competitors, the more of an advantage you have.

Other than that, Julie does an amazing job talking about how to Network and she lists all of the associations she’s a part of. Most of these associations are women leadership and food related. And this is an important piece of advice: that you should specialize where you network.

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. You’ll see an amazing new website in Spring 2017. Just go to foodgrads.com

Key Takeaways
  • The secret ingredient to great food
  • How you can improve an existing brand with your own vision
  • How a great team means everything
  • Why Julie’s team go to yoga conferences
  • Healthy Crunch is focused on food safety
Question Summary

Product: Artisan Kale Chips, Free of all major allergens Tagline:Free of everything you don’t want, full of everything you do want Steps in her career: Registered Dietitican to Unilever doing Regulatory (food claims, formulations) to Culinary School at New York City, worked in different restaurants, went to Toronto and wanted to start her own food business. Julie started small, and gathered interest fast

Best ways to network: Be a go getter and be confident on your product. Know your product and don’t be shy. Go to food industry events Women in food industry management Canadian women in food Home Economist Association Also: Always carry samples, live and breathe this, you give your sample to everyone and eventually it connects

Why you should buy Julie’s kale chips: Big, crunchy, and school safe Marketing strategy: Marketing team, has amazing promotional material Most powerful marketing tool: Instagram and trade shows (demos). You get to talk with the customer Trade Shows in Canada: Gourmet Food and Wine Show Why Does Your Food Job Rock?: I do so many things every day. From marketing, to production, to trade shows to convincing buyers to buy my stuff Food Trends You’re Excited About: Getting rid of all major allergens. There’s a whole row in a grocery store that’s free of all major allergens What’s the biggest thing the food industry has to face?: Food costs are going up What is one thing you’d like to know more about?: How to scale up and be efficient Who inspired you to get into food?: My parents. They worked hard. Jamie Oliver too. Julie would like to work with him Favorite Book: I collect cookbooks all over the world Favorite Kitchen Tool: Plastic Cutting Boards One Meal to Eat for a Month Straight: A nice, roasted salmon Salmon Skin Advice for starting your own food company: Do your research. Know your category inside and out. Make a document of every kale chip in the world. Advice for researching: Google. Go talk to retail stores and trade shows. Talk, talk talk! What’s Next?: 2 new flavors (cucumber dill, mango jalapeno), launching into the US Spring 2017 Email: hello@healthycrunch.com healthycrunch.com

Other Links

Sunflower seeds (no allergen) Culinary School at New York City Natural Gourmet Institute Coconut Curry Loblaws Nitrogen Flush

Ep. 060 - On Changing Jobs
28:28
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 28:28
Ep. 060 - On Changing Jobs

Some housekeeping items before we get into this episode.

We will be going back to one episode a week starting at episode 61 to focus more time on website improvements and writing. I was fortunate to have a young food science student named Veronica Hislop reach out to me. Working together, we collaborated to make a sort of flavor article series. Check out Flavor Investigator Veronica Hislop dive into the very mysterious world of flavors, which if you are in industry, this might be beneficial for you.

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students/recent graduates and employers. With a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians or R&D to Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. You’ll see an amazing new website in Spring 2017. Just go to foodgrads.com

Transcript

Today we are going to dive into the topic about switching jobs.

We as young people are in a weird situation when the topic of changing jobs pops up. Especially when you have career job and you want to switch to another career job. This is mainly because well, the people who give advice to you about switching jobs lived in a world of pensions and loyalty. Is loyalty dead in the corporate world? I’d say yes, but that’s my opinion.

I’ve helped a couple of friends walk though this transition and they talk about the questions like “people are going to see me as a job hopper” “

The best part is, I’ve done this exact same thing! I switched jobs and so have so many of our guests! Andrea Zeng, Tiffany Lau, Jocelyn Ngo, Kimber Lew to name a few. In fact, the people I mentioned had less than or around 2 years’ experience before they hopped to a different job.

So in this episode, I am going to walk through my experience in switching jobs in a lot more detail than what I’ve done before. Hopefully, I’ll be able to relieve some stress if you’re deciding to jump ship.

-------

My first job was at a granola bar factory. Then it made dog food, then it made fruit bars and then it didn’t. I don’t know what they do now.

In hindsight, the job was really tough but it solidified my work ethic and skill set.

The job paid very well and I learned a ton. With the amount of overtime I was working, I made a lot of money!

But overtime comes at a cost. It usually means no social life, or you’re too tired to do anything.

So why did I leave? A combination of things. For one, the job I applied to while working was my dream job. Something I wanted in college. Also, I really didn’t like waking up at 4:30 am and working 10 hour shifts. I think a big part (in hindsight) was my manager.

Probably the tipping point was when I disobeyed my manager and left on a vacation I had planned. It was just a day, but things didn’t go very well.

When I came back, I was taken into the office with the HR Manager and well, we had a talk. Basically, I was assigned to something called a Performance Improvement Program which is the scariest thing on earth. Basically, you have 30 days of constant monitoring to shape up or get let go.

According to the internet, the chance of actually getting fired from this is high. Some even say it’s a death sentence and you’re just biding time. So I looked for new jobs.

I won’t get into too much detail about this, but I was able to change my mindset about work and became more positive and listened to criticism. Overall, I completed the Pip program and got a bonus. Nice. However, this also showed a giant red flag: that loyalty is dead.

During my exit interview, I deduced that the PIP was basically made to figure out what the heck I was doing at this job. No one really knew my role so I didn’t do much. Once the PIP was in place, they gave me more supervisor duties with none of the credit. And that was red flag number two.

Every time I had a bad day, like managing an entire factory line by myself (even the maintenance program) or clean 100 gallons of hot syrup in a 90 degree room, I looked up jobs and just kept searching.

People were also leaving (or wanted to leave) left and right. Work got increasingly frustrating because people had their heads up their butts. But now I’m just ranting. Red flag number 3

So I hustled a bit harder. I applied to more jobs even out of state and started to volunteer at a local artisan food shop to see if I can potentially start something (I actually sold spices there for a while)

Eventually, I got a call from my current company. However, my first phone interview with my now-current manager went horribly wrong.

So I pioneered the dog biscuit line with like, 2 people. Oh, and if someone went to the dog food line, they couldn’t go back to the granola bar line., that includes Maintenance. So when something goes wrong, maintenance was very hard to reach and convince to go there. And of course, something goes wrong.

Let’s see, I came in at 4:30 am today and my phone interview was at 4pm. I thought I could make it right? Well, murphy’s law sliced through me and I had to stay for 14 hours fixing that line with minimal help.

I had to reschedule the phone interview. Luckily,  my current manager had experience with factory work so he sympathized with me and that might have also been another reason why I got the job. More on that later.

Either way, I wanted to cry that night. It was one of those days that you hated your job and wanted to run away forever. Luckily, I haven’t had one of those days in a long time.

It took about 2 months to filter through the interview process with Isagenix due to a couple of schedule conflicts on both our ends. It felt like years. I was actually in a business trip learning how to make crackers when I got the job offer. My old company was investing heavily in me to lead a new line and sent me to trainings and factory work to become a master of crackers.

So this is the dilemma: the company is investing so heavily in me that means I should stay? It’s a good rational, and a debate I had with my mentors.

The two roads were both very promising when you look at it in a bird’s eye view. I am not sure what was the biggest reason I decided to accept Isagenix. I would be sacrificing a higher pay, and a specialized skill in return for a stable office job and not much traveling (so they say as I’m writing this on a plane in Montreal).

Then I remembered the red flags and how I got that Performance Improvement Plan… as I said before kids, loyalty is dead.

After accepting the job offer, I had to wait 2 weeks back in Phoenix to get all of the paperwork scanned so I was am legitimate person. Being at my old company was brutally slow and I’ve noticed some hostility on the R+D end and the production end building up. Well, just gave me more reason to leave. After a hostile email from the head of R+D, the HR lady wanted to talk to me on how that was inappropriate of her and then I said I was leaving.

There was no counter offer, but my quality manager friend told me she was pretty upset. In fact, there were about 5 people who left in a two month span so the Phoenix plant has started to show its scars.

During the exit interview (where you need to be brutally honest on why the company sucks… which I didn’t do) I really just said that I wanted to develop products and she realized that too. However, we did have a long discussion on my manager (who apparently got fired).

My quality manager best friend congratulated me and so did some other people. The manager I worked under said maybe two words to me, and that was mainly business related. Most of the people who didn’t like me were like this.

And so after that, I bought like, 50 boxes of delicious factory cookies and went to San Luis Obispo for some weird reason.

I started my new job next week and in hindsight, I should have waited longer and enjoyed a nice vacation but I was actually excited to start my job!

I worked in Leclerc for about 1 and a half years and now it’s about 1 and a half years in isagenix. I can tell you this: I have never had a bad day at work working here. If I ever did have a bad day, I think of the worst day at the factory and shrug and smile. The hours are nice, the coworkers are very friendly and the opportunity to advance is a lot easier than in my old job.

I get to create great products and have freedom own hat to develop. I get to travel to conferences, factories, and trainings all over North America to learn how to be a better food scientist. I absolutely love it.

This was the best decision I’ve ever made.

Overall, the biggest source of advice I’ve gotten was from a combination of mentors and my dad. It’s your life, you need to realize that your whole life is NOT about the company. It’s about you.

If you get a job offer to a new company, it’s hard to embrace the change but of everyone I’ve talked to about changing jobs, it’s been worth it.

For me, changing jobs allowed me to have a much better work life balance. I also travel to really cool places and eat really good food while I’m there. The dense amount of experience I got form manufacturing gave me a useful perspective and I was able to use the skills from my previous job to become an awesome product developer.

Will Isagenix drop me? Possibly. There have been instances where I’ve messed up but the great thing about companies like Isagenix is that they have buffer money. But company loyalty still doesn’t mean anything to me. I am very grateful Isagenix has given me the opportunity to grow as a food scientist which is why I am loyal to them but I have to prepare myself. Why do you think I have this podcast?

So after this long story, I hope I can answer some questions in regards to people worrying about jumping ship on your current job. This is exactly the same ordeal I went through so in hope this helps.

Leaving with less than 2 years of experience will ruin my resume

Most HR ladies will say to stay at a company for at least 2 years. I think it’s ideal, but sometimes opportunity needs to be grabbed right away.

Tiffany Lau had the same situation when she worked for Safeway Production. It was brutal! So brutal that she quit and it was the best thing in her life.

Another thing I really want to emphasize is the importance of a tough job. Manufacturing for instance sucks. The hours are long, the people are not the brightest and you barely get free food. In exchange, you make a lot of money and become extremely valuable in the industry if you stick with it.

You should congratulate yourself for sticking with manufacturing for at least 1 year and from what I’ve been seeing, 1 year might be all you need to jump from manufacturing to Research and Development because the skillset in manufacturing is just so valuable in R and D.

So 2 years is nice, but you will know when enough is enough. If that is 1 year or 1 month, then just leave. But be smart about it, and don’t do it often.

I work with a popular person in the industry and he will defame me

We say the food industry is big, but it’s also small. People know people, yes. But that doesn’t really mean anything.

There are many factors for you not to worry about this. There’s the good way, or the bad way.

Overall, it’s really dumb, especially early in your career, to burn bridges.

What I’m saying is that try to leave your company with modesty, take your 2 weeks notice and leave a great impression on everyone. Though leaving my current job after investing maybe $5000 dollars into making me a cracker expert might have been a big F you, I made more friends than enemies in Leclerc. I think.

But when you move companies, you have to look at bigger things. If I moved from being a product developer at a whey protein company to McDonalds corporate, will people really notice who I am?

You are young, at this stage, you should not niche down. Niching down, or focusing on one very specific product (like protein bars) is for consultants and professors. Even if you know someone from that niche, it’s so easy to just hop on to something similar and increase your skill set.

You can also evaluate your brunt bridge on how him as a connection will ruin you or not.

For example, my manger worked in a spring factory. Ok right off the bat, there is a less than 1% chance I will meet him at a corporate health and wellness company.

However this has hurt me in the past as well. After I joined, I asked my old company if they wanted to make our bars. I got some cold answers…

Overall, one person will not ruin your career unless they’re like Alton Brown or something. What I can say is that the best piece of advice I have is to just simply… be better than them.

The company has does so much for me

If you’re asking this question, then you just have to weigh the pros and cons. In most situations, you might actually have the possibility to get a huge step in salary when switching jobs.

There is a huge debate about company loyalty. This is going to sound harsh, but how many years will you put in before it all crumbles down when they fire you, or lay you off, or new management doesn’t like you? Hopefully not long.

Loyalty is important. If your company is sending you to places, or is training you to do something amazing, they are investing a lot in you and does hurt them when you leave. However, the same perspective can work too. If you make the company a million dollars, they can probably drop you because you cost too much.

This is a huge gray area for me, but I hope these drastic scenarios give you some perspective on whether or not you think loyalty is dead.

Should I wait until I don’t have a job to start looking?

No. You are deemed much more valuable when you are employed and your stress level will be a lot less when you apply for jobs while working. My advice for this is to apply for jobs when you have a REALLY BAD day at work.

When I had my bad 14 hour days, I just slumped down, looked at my ugly face when my computer is loading and started typing in food science jobs and went to town.

In most situations, the state of not having money and trying to live will make your job search unsatisfying and potentially desperate. Your chances of ending up in another unsatisfying job is pretty high.

If you get fired, or laid off, or you got so mad, you threw sharp objects at your boss and left, then you are at a different situation.

I would contact your support network (husband or wife, mentor, family, etc) and let them support you emotionally and financially so you can go 100% on finding the next job

If you have none of those worst case scenario? Just send me an email and I’ll see what I can do.

This is a more rhetorical question: What’s better, being in one company for 30 years of 6 companies 5 years each?

This depends on so many things.

Accomplishments and achievements and the ability to transform your company or department will always give you more points than just slapping a year and what you do.

However, I lean more on having working through a diverse array of companies. I think the best example I can give is my current Chief Science Officer. He’s been in several companies but he was able to create a lot of money for the company in the years he’s worked there. In almost 1 billion in value, there’s the reason he’s Chief.

I think if you have the ability to connect the dots between the companies you’ve worked for and see a common thread of success and reproduce it, then you nailed it. It is inevitable that if you plan to climb the corporate ladder, you will be dealing or managing people. Once you realize that people are truly the same in every company (i.e. they just want to feel valued, and know that they matter), then you can make gold.

Ep. 059 - The Twists and Turns in the Life of Food with Michael Kalanty, Author of How to Bake Bread and Consultant
46:54
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 46:54
Ep. 059 - The Twists and Turns in the Life of Food with Michael Kalanty, Author of How to Bake Bread and Consultant

Today we feature Michael Kalanty, who is a man of many talents. And you learn why that’s the case.

This interview is very well, timeline heavy. You learn step by step and the twists and turns between being an architecture student, chef, pastry chef, bread author, and lastly, consultant. You will learn the key points on how these happen and the catalysts that make Mike what he is today.

What I love in this interview is the twist and turns throughout his life. I really dug in deep on his career path. Questions like Why did he switch into food, why did he decide to write a book, how hard it was to make a book….

And most of all, you’ll learn the best, most tangible advice on how to make good bread.

About Michael

Before Michael Kalanty served as Director of Education for the California Culinary Academy (“CCA”) in San Francisco from 1996 to 2000, he’d already built and sold a successful catering business and pastry shop in his native Philadelphia. While developing the artisan bread course for the Baking & Pastry Program at the CCA, he fell under the spell of yeast. He returned to the kitchen and has been teaching, writing, and baking bread ever since.

He wrote his first book, How To Bake Bread: The Five Families of Bread®, in 2009 “because there wasn’t a detailed book for culinary students that was written in a student-friendly style.” The book went on to win the Gourmand Award for Best Bread Book in the World at the Paris Cookbook Fair the following year.

It’s been adapted by hundreds of culinary schools across the country, most notably the Art Institute which has 42 campuses nationwide. It’s been translated into Brazilian Portuguese and is the standard text for professional culinary schools in Brazil.

Michael’s track record in Bakery Innovation dates back to when the field was merely called product development. Many of his formulas for breads, crackers, and cookies can be found on grocery store shelves for clients like Pepperidge Farm and General Mills.

He works with Clean Label initiatives to create healthy food choices that maximize flavor. Google Campus serves one of his gluten-free cookies.

Michael is a certified master taster and licensed sensory panel moderator. He helps food innovation teams work effectively with consumer research to develop flavor and texture profiles that define food brands. As a teaching tool for his clients, he developed the “Aroma & Flavor Wheel for Bread”, for which he holds the copyright.

He speaks often at conferences and seminars. His report on bakery trends, “What Is Up with Bread!”, is a mainstay on event programs for the International Association of Cooking Professionals and the American Culinary Federation.

Michael lives in San Francisco. He’s taught baking courses across the U.S., in France, Italy, Germany, and Brazil. He teaches hands-on classes at the San Francisco Cooking School and several cooking schools in the Bay Area. How To Bake MORE Bread: Modern Breads/Wild Yeast is his second book.

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students/recent graduates and employers. With a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians or R&D to Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. You’ll see an amazing new website in Spring 2017. Just go to foodgrads.com

Key Takeaways
  • How Gothic architecture made him fall in love with bread
  • How hard work and passion is noticeable to chefs
  • The journey of making a book
  • How a book can make a great business card
Question Summary

One Sentence: I teach people how to bake bread What’s the most interesting place you’ve taught people to bake bread?: Paris cookbook fair. Mike’s book won 2011’s award: How to Bake Bread Steps to take to where you are today: Mathematician to Architecture to Chef to Pastry Chef, to Author to Consultant Did you take any formal education?: No What age did you switch to food?: 26 or so What year did you decide to write a book?: 2000. The “end of the world” made him think about his goals in life. One of them was to write a book. Brazillian Breakfast: Espresso and Asprin Artisan bakers in the Bay Area Was it hard to make a book?: It took 10 years for me to make a book. I would never discourage anyone from writing a book because you can learn about yourself. My Food Job Rocks: I can do a lot of cool projects New Food Trends and Technologies: Clean Label Tips on making good bread: Make one recipe for a year. You learn how it behaves differently in different environments French Country Bread: Pan de Compania What’s one thing in the food industry you’d like to know more about: Working with Herloom Grains. Grinding grains fresh Favorite Kitchen Item: My hands Favorite Book: The World According to Garp Any Advice for anyone to get into the culinary field: We work hard, we sweat Where can we find you next?:  Going to Boston next. New book: How to Bake More Bread

Other Links

Baking bread in a Dutch Oven Grocery Store Delivery Cricket protein Powders Digital Scale Brown Rice Syrup Brown Rice Syrup Powder/Flour Bean to Bar Chocolate

Ep. 058 - Catalyzing Critical Thinking with Sherrill Cropper, Bakery Formulation Specialist at Red Star Yeast
41:16
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 41:16
Ep. 058 - Catalyzing Critical Thinking with Sherrill Cropper, Bakery Formulation Specialist at Red Star Yeast

This was a cool connection. A graduate student from Texas A and M, contacted Katie Lanfranki and Sherrill Cropper. They did a small little interview about the different perspectives between going to graduate school and not going to graduate school. I find this so cool! Not only did people get value from the podcast, but Katie was able to benefit from it as well! I love this! So Katie asked Sherrill to be on the show. Of course, I accepted.

Sherrill holds a PhD in Grain Science in Kansas State. Working in product development, she makes enzyme cocktails that help the baking industry make bread.

I loved talking about Sherrill’s diverse food industry background, such as the internships she did, and we talk a lot about bread. There is also a great amount of career advice such as communicating, critical thinking and networking tips.

If you enjoyed this episode, please, sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com, like us on facebook,  rate and review on itunes, and share with your friends. If you show interest in being interviewed, know someone who would be a great interviewer, or would like to join our team of volunteers, make sure to email us at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com.

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students/recent graduates and employers. With a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians or R&D to Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. You’ll see an amazing new website in Spring 2017. Just go to foodgrads.com

About Sherrill

Sherrill currently is the New Product Development Lab Manager for Lesaffre Yeast Corporation and RedStar Yeast where she develops ingredients for use in bakery applications. She received a Bachelor’s and Master’s degree in Food Science from The Ohio State University where her graduate studies focused on emulsifier and stabilizer functionality in ice cream. She worked as a Food Technologist for Roskam Baking Company before returning back to school to study cereal chemistry and baking at Kansas State University where she received a PhD in Grain Science. Sherrill interned at Nestle, Heinz North America, and Cargill during her undergraduate and graduate studies. She was raised on a dairy farm in Southern Ohio and she spends most of her free time traveling.

Key Takeaways
  • How Enzymes are made industrially. And what makes an enzyme “GMO”
  • Sherrill’s amazing knowledge in grains and emulsification
  • Our Cargill internship experience
  • The difference between whole wheat and white bread in terms of chemistry
Question Summary

What do you tell someone in a sentence or less: I develop ingredients used for industrial applications Dough conditioners and dough improvers Official job title: New Product Development Lab manager / Bakery Formulation Specialist Sherrill develops the blends Sherrill’s career path: Grew up in Dairy Farm, fell into Ohio State Food Science, Internship with Nestle, Internship with Heinz, Roskam Baking Company, Grain Science PhD at Kansas State, Internship at Cargill in shortning Why do you like Bakery Science?: Niche, Kansas state is the only place that has grain science Most Important Skill You Need for Your Job: Critical Thinking How Do you improve critical thinking?: Ask yourself the question first Why Does Your Food Job Rock: I get to feed the world Dream Job Title: Director of Global Food Research Take something out of any experience What do you look for most in a job?: I need something challenging What’s a big challenge you’ve had?: Remembering food law Most “Exciting” Food Trends: Organic, Clean Label, Non-GMO. We have to pander to the market Trending in the Bread world: Tortilla, whole wheat, on-the-go, donuts Whole wheat chemistry: uses big words and tries to use clean label ingredients Biggest Challenge: Educating consumers. Short content gives people problems Solution: Just talk to consumer. Share the info Who inspired you to get into food: My mom directed me to food science because I played with spices as a kid. I do the same with enzymes as well. She has true roots in agriculture Favorite quote: Jackie Robinson: a life is not important except in the impact it has in other’s lives What’s your favorite type of food: peanut butter sandwiches and cereal Any advice to go into your industry?: Network and explore everything. Do the internships and meet people Networking Tips: Go with a buddy, older people will talk to you because eof the generation gap What conferences is beneficial to you?: IFT Expo, American Society of Baking, IBIE, Supply Side If you were to tell your freshman self something, what would it be?: It’s going to be ok.

Other Links

Business to Business Non-GMO enzymes Clean Label 4H and FFA Lipids and Emulsification Cargill’s facility in Plymouth, Minnesota IFT Documentary

Ep. 057 - Swimming in Broth, Tomatoes, and Doritos with Jaime Reeves, R+D Group Manager at Del Monte Foods
44:08
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 44:08
Ep. 057 - Swimming in Broth, Tomatoes, and Doritos with Jaime Reeves, R+D Group Manager at Del Monte Foods

Today we have Jaime Reeves, R and D Manager for Del Monte Foods. Funny story, I think I might have actually met her as an undergraduate. Jaime brings a ton of knowledge as she has developed products for huge companies and well, she has some interesting stories to tell.

Jaime is a high energy, positive woman, and such a huge vat of knowledge. Her child-like enthusiasm is just so refreshing.  If you are a food scientist, I highly recommend this interview because she gives such great advice on how to flavor your products, and generally have fun in your job. We also dive deep into education, especially on the topics such as Non-GMO and Clean Label.

If you enjoyed this episode, please, sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com, like us on facebook,  rate and review on itunes, and share with your friends. If you show interest in being interviewed, know someone who would be a great interviewer, or would like to join our team of volunteers, make sure to email us at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com.

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students/recent graduates and employers. With a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dietitians or R&D to Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. You’ll see an amazing new website in Spring 2017. Just go to foodgrads.com

Question Summary

One Sentence: I’m a food scientist, but I’m not a chef. But I like cooking! It makes food tastes good and doesn‘t kill you. What do you do now?: Del Monte Foods – R+D Manager for Broth and Tomato – Collage-in Career Path: Grew up in Kermin California (Ag area) went to Cal Poly, thought she did nutrition and accidentally ended up in Food Science. Masters in Food Chemistry at Georgia. PHD in UC Davis. Employed in Dallas, Texas, moved to California for Del Monte Notes on Product Developing: Football inspired flavors such as Nacho Cheese Doritos and Grilled Meat Flavor Collaborating with Flavor Houses Collaborate with all players to develop amazing flavors. They taste what flavors in what time and what magic Consumer Testing. Sometimes you don’t win your favorite flavor. My Food Job Rocks: I get to meet the farmer and the food and see all of the process. What makes a good processing tomato?: A really hearty tomato. No seeds or juice. Have to be super tough Dream Job Title: The Willy Wonka of Food. Director of an R+D Group What do you look for in a job?: The people. And tasty products Broth Processing: Concentrated Chicken Carcasses get sent to the Del Monte plant. Food Trends and Technology: Brussel Sprouts, pre-shaved Brussel Sprouts; Balsamic Vinegar, Blue Cheese and Fig combo Biggest Challenge the food industry needs to face: Educating consumers about sound food science. Specifically GMO Who Inspired you to go into food: My mother. Also, I used to create “magic potions”. She taught me how to be creative. Favorite Book: The old lady that swallowed a fly Favorite Food: Life Cereal, but super, super, soggy and then put in the freezer Any advice in the food industry: It’s a fun industry and it’s small, which feels like a family. Yet so much to explore. Advice from your freshman year: Join IFTSA earlier. You meet people and learn a lot

Other Links

Kraft Foods Re-man – Put tomato pastes in big totes. Reconstitute to make extra products Hanford California (has tomatoes) Food Evolution Movie Supply Side West Clean Label If you give a mouse a cookie

 

Ep. 056 - Learning to Cook in Corporate with Kimber Lew, R and D Coordinator at La Terra Fina
46:15
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 46:15
Ep. 056 - Learning to Cook in Corporate with Kimber Lew, R and D Coordinator at La Terra Fina

Today’s episode is with Kimber Lew, R and D Coordinator at La Terra Fina. They make quiches and dips.

Kimber is a graduate from UC Davis and is pretty involved in her chapter at Northern California IFT’ section.

The biggest highlight in this interview is Kimber’s experience with research chefs in her previous company. They taught her not only how to cook, but to taste which I think all product developers should know how to do. It sure has helped Kimber progress in her career.

Other than that, we talk a ton about how to get a product to market, awesome food science titles and most importantly, an important discussion about Ramen Noodles.

If you enjoyed this episode, please, sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com, like us on facebook,  rate and review on itunes, and share with your friends. If you show interest in being interviewed, know someone who would be a great interviewer, or would like to join our team of volunteers, make sure to email us at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com.

About Kimber Lew Kimber Lew is an SF Bay Area native whose path towards the food industry began while watching Alton Brown's Good Eats show on the Food Network. She graduated from UC Davis with a Bachelor's of Science in Food Science, and worked in the research lab of Dr. Charlie Bamforth (aka the Pope of Foam) studying the properties of beer. She ultimately found her passion in product development, and worked at both Valley Fine Foods and La Terra Fina, the latter of which she's been at for over two years. She aspires to make food products that are not only tasty and healthy for consumers, but for the planet as well. She's also an active member of the Northern California section of the Institute of Food Technologists -- currently she serves on the section's Scholarship Committee and writes articles for the section's newsletter, The Hornblower. Outside of work, Kimber is an avid yogi and indoor rock climber, and enjoys cooking and baking for her loved ones when not exploring other ways to procrastinate on folding her clean laundry. Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students/recent graduates and employers. With a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dietitians or R&D to Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. You’ll see an amazing new website in Spring 2017. Just go to foodgrads.com

Key Takeaways
  • Marketing woes when it comes to communicating with Product Developers
  • Why Kimber moved away from the brewing industry
  • How working with research chef made her a better food scientist
  • A discussion on eggs in ramen
Question Summary

What do you tell people what you do for a living?: I’m a food scientist. I’m a product developer. How do you make products?: Sales and Marketing will give an idea, they will make it and they will internally try it and then bid for buyers Steps to get to where you are today: Food Science at UC Davis (transfer) --> Brewing interest --> New food product class --> Internship at Valley Fine Foods --> Worked with Research Chefs --> Got a call from La Terra Fina What’s one skill you think is important in your job: You don’t have to measure your success based on what gets commercialized, you have to base it on what My Food Job Rocks: I have to talk to every department to succeed Do Product Developers need to be artistic?: There is an artistic element Your dream job title: Food Science Extraordinaire, Food Master, Product Ninja Favorite Food Technology: Salt Reduction Techniques (different types of salts being used, and flavor profiles). Convenient hand held breakfast things Biggest challenge the food industry needs to face: Sustainability and food shortages. For example, Brewing companies. Bug companies and the perception of eating bugs Favorite Kitchen Item: Kitchen Aid Favorite Food: Real authentic Ramen. Sous vide technology for eggs Any advice on getting in the food industry: Get some culinary experience such as books, classes, mentorship. Try to shadow other sectors in the food industry What would you tell your freshman self?: You can shadow people for free. The food industry is very receptive. Go join a food science based club.

Other Links

See Kimber's Bio

Ep. 055 - Balancing Work and Graduate School with Joceyln Ngo, R+D Food Scientist at Day-Lee Foods
42:10
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 42:10
Ep. 055 - Balancing Work and Graduate School with Joceyln Ngo, R+D Food Scientist at Day-Lee Foods

Today I interview my friend and alumni Jocelyn Ngo to the podcast and we get to talking about dreams and ambitions, and the like.

Jocelyn and I go way back. I knew her as a high energy stranger back at freshman orientation! Throughout the years, she was also very involved in Cal Poly, rising in the ranks of the food science clubs, doing product development competitions, even being on IFTSA’s board.

Jocelyn's a hard worker, and a big part of this episode is about dealing with graduate school and work and your social life. If you choose to go that route, it’s not easy, but it will be rewarding.

 

If you enjoyed this episode, please, sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com, like us on facebook,  rate and review on itunes, and share with your friends. If you show interest in being interviewed, know someone who would be a great interviewer, or would like to join our team of volunteers, make sure to email us at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com.

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students/recent graduates and employers. With a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians or R&D to Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. You’ll see an amazing new website in Spring 2017. Just go to foodgrads.com

Key takeaways
  • How Pilot Trials can be stressful
  • How Jocelyn survives doing Graduate School (6 hours) and Working (10 hours)
  • How external matters can ruin products
  • Big insight on company culture
Question Summary

What do you tell people in a sentence or less?: I’m a food scientist: the chemistry and study of food What questions are commonly asked when it comes to food science?: GMOs, Organic, What’s this ingredient? What’s the most interesting day at your job?: Every day is interesting but you have to plan for it. Describe the Steps It Took To Get To Where You Are Today: Went to Cal Poly --> Food Science Club Activities --> Internship --> Leprino --> Job at R+D --> Chapman Graduate School Most important skill you need in your job: Perseverance. Pushing through months and months of development. My food Job Rocks: I get to make a product and see it on the shelves What would be your dream job?: Starting a non-profit. Or TV host of the show What do you feel like is the most important to jobs?: Company Culture Innovative Food Trends and Technology: Packaging and the Environment Biggest Challenges in the Food Industry we Need to Face: Opposition of uneducated consumers. Who Inspired you to Get Into Food?: Alton Brown and her family Favorite Book: The Alchemist Favorite Kitchen Item: Rubber Spatula Favorite Food: Mango: Mango Sticky Rice Any Advice for being in the Food Industry: Networking. Join IFT, working with your suppliers, it’s a small business What would you tell your freshman self?: Work hard and have fun

Other Links

Developing Solutions for Developing Countries Leprino Foods: Largest Mozzarella Company in the World Anthony Bourdain Alton Brown Andrew Zimmerman Chobani Flip Cup Steam Bags Encapsulated ingredients Kerry Ingredients IFTSA Southern California IFT

Ep. 054 - Combining Sushi and Team Building with Kaz Matsune, Owner of Breakthrough Sushi
41:21
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 41:21
Ep. 054 - Combining Sushi and Team Building with Kaz Matsune, Owner of Breakthrough Sushi

Today we ahem, dive in the world of sushi

Kaz works at Breakthrough Sushi, where hosts special classes, caterings, and team building events where he teaches people how to make sushi.

Kaz’ innovative sushi concept is awesome and he really takes the time to teach his guests the art of sushi, and then let them do it, and then let them eat it! I actually crashed in one of his classes at Miele, or Rochelle Boucher’s place in San Francisco! All I can say is, Kaz is very tall!

This episode is all about fish! Seriously, Kaz loves his craft and you’ll learn so many cool things such as what Zen Buddhists eat, how to be a sushi chef in japan, why you should always be on time, and the importance of the blue fin tuna

About Kaz

Kaz Matsune is the owner and operator of the Bay Area’s (and possibly North America’s) ONLY team building sushi class experience, Breakthrough Sushi. With two books under his belt and a third in the works, he has become the go to guy in the Bay area for anyone wanting to take sushi classes either privately or as part of a corporate team.

Key Takeaways
  • Kaz’ unique platform for his sushi course
  • How Kaz started his business as a Zen Buddhist service at first
  • Why Bluefin Tuna is so important
Question Summary

How Breakthrough Sushi started: Zen Priest SF Zen Monastery Zen Monastery cooking Shojin Ryori (Zen cooking is vegan cooking) Did you train to be a sushi chef?: Yes, you don’t need a sushi chef certificate in Japan. You learn on the job Most important skill you can have in your industry: Be punctual. Show up. Time is the most valuable thing in the cooking industry Another skill: Be clean. Work clean. Have a clean work environment. Clean environment, and clean mind will give you clean food. My Food Job Rocks: I get to interact with the customer face to face What Makes Good Sushi?: How much heart you put into food What Technologies are really exciting you right now?: Freezing and thawing machine,  Farm Raised Blue-fin Tuna from Kinki University Biggest Problem the food industry has to face: We’re eating too much fish like Bluefin tuna. And Eel too One thing in the food industry you like to know more about: The Why of the Sushi. (Food Science of Sushi?) Who Inspired you to get into food?: the Galloping Gourmet. He did things out of the ordinary Favorite Quote: The depth of a relationship is measured by how many meals you’ve shared with a person Favorite Book: Prune by Gabrielle Hamilton. How she opened the restaurant. Very personal One meal to eat for a month: Steamed rice, miso soup, and three dishes (like pickles, grilled fish, paste) Advice on being in your industry: Be honest, kind, sincere What’s next?: Writing a memoir. You can find me at: Quora

Ep. 053 - A Food Media Diet Plan with Rachel Cheatham, CEO of Foodscape Group
55:18
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 55:18
Ep. 053 - A Food Media Diet Plan with Rachel Cheatham, CEO of Foodscape Group

In this episode, we have Rachel Chetham, the CEO of her own consulting firm, The Foodscape Group. She combines media, policy, and nutritional sciences to make an amazing food communication platform.

This episode is a bit different, one.. because I messed up the audio, Apparently, I had to move my audio equipment halfway through the interview and recording on my end just stopped working! I panicked for about 5 minutes. However, Rachel’s content saved the day. Since Rachel’s answers were so good, I was able to edit in the questions I asked to her

So Rachel’s interview has such amazingly good information. You’ll learn so many things about being a good food communicator. Mainly strategies. For example, what’s the best way to communicate to people about food? Or how can you absorb the right media quickly. She also gives you tips on the best ways to progress through your career.

About Rachel

Dr. Rachel Cheatham holds a doctorate in nutritional biochemistry from Tufts University, where she is an adjunct professor of food marketing and communications. She is Founder & CEO of Foodscape Group, a nutrition strategy consultancy designed to help businesses develop and market healthier foods based on global wellness trends and insights. She has been a commercial television producer, Director at the International Food Information Council, and Senior Vice President at Weber Shandwick, a global public relations firm. She is a Professional Member of the Institute of Food Technologists, and member of the American Society of Nutrition and Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

Key Takeaways (a lot of good ones this time)
  • Rachel has TV experience and has helped her a lot in her job. Her soft skills helped her in her consulting company
  • How Rachel doesn’t have to be the best at nutritional science, but rather be unique
  • Americans want to be uniquely and exotically healthy
  • How marketing and actual nutrition are like ying and yang
  • Why it’s lame to climb up the corporate latter (join a startup!), but you shouldn’t job hop
  • Why Point of View matters when reading science articles.
  • Media is everywhere. From newspapers, social media, and conferences
  • Find a way to line up and skim the sources you find interesting. Read outside of your point of view
Question Summary

Career Map: Marketing and PR, Fitness instructor, doctorate in nutrition science, policy in Food Information, consulting company My Food Job Rocks: I get to chart my own course How do you get your first client?: The network that you build up over time. Have some patience around the jobs that may lead to a more ideal job and the connects you make can be unexpected

Other Links

Tufts University International Food Information Council – Food Policy and Information Inherent Nutrition versus Boosted Nutrition Boosted Nutrition- Fortification Processes that perverse nutrients Food Scientists now need to make processed food healthy Pea Protein Ripple Acquisition

Rachel's Media Diet (only some of them) Food Politics Blog with Mariom Nestle Center for Science of Public Interest American Science of Nutrition Academe of Dietetics Mind Body Green Food 52 Fast Company Business Insider

Recommended Comferences IBIE (Gluten free workshop) New Products Conference for prepared foods Supply Side West Food Vision USA Food Matters Live in London Foodscapegroup.com

Ep. 052 - The Life of a Food Marketer with Eric Dunn, Director of Marketing & Innovation at Nutrifusion
42:08
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 42:08
Ep. 052 - The Life of a Food Marketer with Eric Dunn, Director of Marketing & Innovation at Nutrifusion

Today we dive in the life of food sales and marketing expert, Eric Dunn, who is the director of Marketing and Innovation at Nutrifusion, a patent-pending super fruit and vegetable powder.

Sales and Marketing have always interested me. In college, it wasn't really talked about yet, but if you're in product development, it's half the battle! Sales and Marketing is the lifeblood of a company and paired with a great product, it becomes an unstoppable force. I really enjoyed this interview with Eric because this is a type of job that not many food enthusiasts are aware of.

If you are interested in sales and marketing in the food industry, then Eric does a great job explaining the difference to me. He also talks about where to find the best food news and why packaging is so important in this industry.

If you enjoyed this episode, please, sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com, like us on facebook,  rate and review on itunes, and share with your friends. If you show interest in being interviewed, know someone who would be a great interviewer, or would like to join our team of volunteers, make sure to email us at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com.

About Eric

Eric Dunn is the Director of Marketing at NutriFusion®. He attended Clemson University (Your 2016 National Champions) for his B.S. in Marketing and M.B.A. in innovation. Eric's day-to-day role is to help connect the marketing and sales teams. He works on website updates, social media management, PR, email campaigns, and more to help NutriFusion® reach their customers. Over his past few positions, he found a passion for the food industry and is focused on helping companies develop healthier products that meet new consumer expectations.

NutriFusion® leading innovation in plant-based ingredients for the food, beverage, supplement and pet industries. NutriFusion® developed the GrandFusion® product line to stabilize and concentrate the naturally occurring vitamins and minerals in fruits and vegetables. GrandFusion® enables companies to add natural vitamins without impacting the flavor or texture profile of their products. For example, with the GrandFusion® 12 fruit and vegetable blend, you can deliver 50% daily value of 12 vitamins with only 225 milligrams of powder.

Question Summary

One sentence or Less: Help innovative food companies sell and market products Difference between Marketing and Sales: Sales is more account management to ake the customer happy. Marketing promotes an captures the customer. They work hand in hand. Sales and marketing is a process: linkedin lead generation, be genuine, visit expos, cater your message to the role (business developer or product developer), go for the long run. Career path: Clemson Marketing undergrad, unpaid sales position by communicating with food marketers, graduated from Clemson MBA program Most important skill for Sales and Marketing: Communication and who you communicate with Food Trends or Technologies: Clean Label, we’re trying to do better In your opinion, What is Clean Label?: No artificial ingredients, can be Organic and Non-GMO, Premium, Simple ingredients Are sugar alcohols clean label?: Every consumer might have their own definition of clean label Biggest challenge the food industry has to face: Food Waste What in the food industry you’d like to know more about?: the process to improve technical sales Trifecta of skills: lab, manufacturing, marketing Who inspired you to get into food?: a blend of multiple perspectives and it excites me Favorite Book: The Alchemist by Pahlo (by the way, I read it and it’s amazing) One meal to eat for a month: Macaroni and Cheese in a pot. Annies is great. Hummus. Kirkland has the most affordable hummus tubs What’s one piece of advice to get to your field?: If you have a food science degree, maybe minor in a business and marketing degree. We need more technical people in marketing Anything Inspiring: If you’ve come up with a  good idea, go and chase it

Other Links

IFT16 Pac Expo Food Dive Food Navigator Writing Blogs Email Campaigns Nutrifusion Package insights – eye tracking devices to track package integrity 4 Ps of marketing - The fifth P: Packaging Using transparent clam shells to find out if people buy if the package is transparent Clean Eats Franchise Food Buisness News How Engineers communicate 9 red lines in green ink Vivrati Marketing – Marketing and Sales consulting EPIC foods

Ep. 051 - A Pet Food Perspective with Seronei Cheison, Global Ingredient Innovation Leader at Mars Global Petcare
43:38
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 43:38
Ep. 051 - A Pet Food Perspective with Seronei Cheison, Global Ingredient Innovation Leader at Mars Global Petcare

Welcome to the My Food Job Rocks Podcast with me, Adam Yee, where we showcase amazing food jobs and interview the passionate people who drive the industry forward and this is episode 51!

We have a special guest for you today. A top scientist at an amazing food company who’s had an amazing journey. He grew up in Nandi, a district in Kenya, went to China for graduate school, and now lives in Germany! Or as he says it, made in Nandi, formed in China and refined in Germany

He’s a pet food scientist in one of the most well-known companies in the world and he really digs home on the importance of the petfood industry. So if you want to at least look into the petfood industry, this interview is for you. Hey, I made petfood at my last job, and that industry makes bank.

This is a long one, a bit dense as well, but Seroni, has a lot to offer in his wisdom. After all, his motto in life is “Just DO it, make mistakes. Learn from them. Recalibrate and move on”.

I apologize in advance for any audio issues. When editing I say a lot of uh-huhs. If that bothers you, let me know by sending a quick email saying “stop innerrupting”

If you enjoyed this episode, please, sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com, like us on facebook,  rate and review on itunes, and share with your friends. If you show interest in being interviewed, know someone who would be a great interviewer, or would like to join our team of volunteers, make sure to email us at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com.

About Seronei

Seronei Chelulei Cheison is a Kenyan from Nandi County, the source of Kenya’s world-beating long-distance runners. Born to a very poor family, Seronei nearly missed school as he started off as a herdsboy hired by wealthier families than his grandmother with whom he had relocated at the tender age of five. After starting school at the ripe age of nine, he went on to top his class through primary, high school and university. Eventually he went to China for his MSc & PhD graduating Summa cum Laude at China’s premier food school (Jiangnan University).

It was while in China that Prof.Dr. Ulrich Kulozik of the elite German university, Technical University of Munich. Seronei was shortly offered an opportunity to pursue the German Habilitation leading to an award of Venia legendi and certification to examine and supervise PhD candidates as well as teach Food Biotechnology. His passion is protein chemistry and enzyme technology. He was the first African to be awarded the honour by the TU Munich, which qualifies him for full professorship in a German university.

Seronei moved on to Mars Global Petcare, a subsidiary of Mars, Incorporated where he leads Ingredient innovation in the company voted 99 on the Fortune 100 Best Places to Work for (http://fortune.com/best-companies/mars-99/). Seronei also mentors and supervises industrial attachment interns who pursue their research in ingredient innovation. Seronei lives in Germany with his wife Ednah, three children Kiptoo, Cherop and Kipchumba and their two year old male cat, Simba. He is widely published with over 25 peer reviewed papers, one book chapter and several honours including Best Of Mars which he received in 2015.

His motto in life is “Just DO it, make mistakes. Learn from them. Recalibrate and move on”.  He says that his Made In Nandi, Moulded In China and Refined In Germany makes him a child of “Three horns”, a cultural confluence that helps him navigate the exciting multicultural environment in a very traditional company like Mars. Seronei invites students to apply for internships at Mars’ many business segments and worldwide network and find out what exciting opportunities there are in the corporate world.

What We Talk About

- Difference between Germany Education versus Chinese education: Germany works as a pyramid system. A phd student has about 5 to 10 masters student. Relationship is more formal in Germany - Seronii speaks 5 language - A food has to be loved by the owner and the pet

Question Summary

My Food Job Rocks: I like it when people buy my products What is your job title?: Research and Development – Global life Sciences and technology Any Advice for working in another country?: Always try to speak the language (Senonei speaks 5 languages: Nandi- his mother's language, swahilli, official language,English, Chinese, German). Greatest asset you have in life is being multilingual Food Trends and Technology: Pet food borrows heavily from the human food segment One thing you’d like to know about: Epigenetics Favorite Quote: You are what you eat, if you eat trash you become trash. Food is your medicine Advice in the industry: Give petfood a shot. You won’t have to eat it

Other Links

Mars Inc. Petcare Wrigley Cloudy Juice – unfiltered apple juice www.mars.com go to careers and go to internships Mars internships – you can travel all over the world

Ep. 050 - What I Learned From CEO's
33:01
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 33:01
Ep. 050 - What I Learned From CEO's

Key Takeaways

  • How leaders use family as a support network
  • How to not only innovate, but how to introduce new ideas
  • Should you incubate or join a mastermind if you choose to start on your own?
Other Links

Pina Romolo, CEO from Pico La Cucina  Rohini Dey, Founder from Vermillion Naz Athina Kallel, CEO from Save Good Food Crystal MacKay, CEO from Farm and Food Care Lisa Tse, CEO from Sweet Mandarin Mike Hewitt, CEO from One Haus Raf Peeters, CEO from Qcify Ali Bouzari, CSO from Pilot R+D Dr. Howard Moskowitz from Mind Genomics Terra Chips Dang Foods Taco Bell Fancy Food Show Expo West Foodgrads Peas On Moss

Transcript

The last ten episodes had a bunch of startups and businesses that are not only innovative, but also are down to earth and realistic. It was amazing to talk to the owners! In this context, we’ll refer any owner, and founder as a CEO, though sometimes this isn’t the case. What I loved about learning from the CEOs was that these people were in a stage where they made something profitable but can also tell us the tangible tips needed to succeed in the food industry.

This episode will take a lot of excerpts from past episodes, such as Pina Romolo, from Picco La Cucina and Rohini Dey from Vermillion as they have also created businesses from the ground up. The last ten episodes brought on a great amount of guests including Naz Athina Kallel from Save Good Food, Crystal MacKay from Farm and Food Care, Lisa Tse from Sweet Mandarin, Mike Hewitt from One Haus and Raf from Qcify. Within these interviews, we see a common thread that hopefully you can dissect in terms of starting something… and executing something.

The word CEO, is fancy and powerful. Those that hold the title know that theya re the ones with the final say in anything that goes. Any initiative they bring will override any other opinion.

Being the Chief requires a special type of person. A person obsessed with science might actually not make a good CEO. Take for example both Dr. Howard Moskowitz and Ali Bouzari. Both are Chief Science Officers and rely on a CEO with a different skill set.

Ali Bouzari’s story on pilot R+D’s role describes this well. A team of three creative food professionals had hired Dana Peck to run their finances. Once they realized how essential she was on the team, they made her CEO. She was CEO because she knew much more about finance, a which is the blood that runs companies, and that her business experience trumped all three of her partners. Her experience with mergers and acquisitions in her past life brought a point that she could get clients and manage them well.

So it’s very important for a CEO to generate money and be a champion of what their company stands for. I think in most situations, a CEO is designed to generate money needed to fund the other arms and legs in the department.

Anyways, I have about 6 core topics that I found beneficial from interviewing these guests and the idea is to distill the information well enough where you can be innovative, supportive, and efficient. Let’s begin

Family Matters

Both Pina and Lisa are in family companies. Pina has her mother do the R and D work, and Lisa collaborates with her sisters. From their interview, you can tell that they are big picture, and that they are risk takers. All of the founders we’ve interviewed are.

Though I don’t want to be biased, being younger, more ambitious, and the most adaptable in your family seems to be the best indicator of being considered a CEO. Some people like the spotlight, or rather, are willing to sacrifice being in the spotlight.

Another side of the coin is Mike Hewitt, who wanted to start his own business because he wanted to spend more time with his family. The chef is life is hard, with 12 hour days and minimum pay, Mike had to decide to change jobs.

They say that an entrepreneur has to sacrifice working 40 hours a day to work 80. But most people who work those hours have their family supporting them, which I think is vital for success.

Whther you work with family or for family, a support network is necessary to succeed. We drive into this a little bit further down, but I want to state it now. The people who you care about are probably your first customers. And like all businesses, it’s important to make your customers happy

Challenging Unfamiliar Concepts and Trends

Naz and Rohini both made concepts that were risky. Naz found opportunity in ugly fruit and Rohini decided to take on ethnic indian cuisine. Both, however, added their own little twist. Naz combined ugly food with technology and created an amazing app that allows her to pick up ugly food and Rohini decided to add a fine dining element to Indian cusine to make Vermillion a hit.

Something I’ve noticed during a lot of lectures on innovation is a specific formula that is quite common. Combining a new concept with an old one and creating a new yet familiar concept. This has been the best way to introduce something really new and pairing it with something old.

A big example of something new with something old is an example I gave about an article about the Fancy Food show.

Terra Chips, who make specialty vegetable chips. I was fortunate to listen to the Financial officer speak and their story was interesting.

Two chefs were working under this superstar chef at a restaurant and the chef started deep frying things like lotus root and putting them on top. Everyone raved about them. However, the two chefs could never be as good as the superstar chef so he started to be better at something else.

They took off and decided to start frying vegetables like lotus root on their own. Soon it became things like orange sweet potatoes, purple potatoes, taro, etc. They started with a bicycle, then an ice cream truck, then finally got a distributor going.

Terra Chips uses the unfamiliar concept of fried root vegetables but sine they serve it in a familiar chip bag

Here’s a twist on it: I was listening to the snacking innovation summit the other day and Dang foods was speaking. He was saying it was thanks to Whole Foods white labeled coconut chips that they were able to be successful. An old entity introduced a new concept and people realized that these coconut chips were there the whole time.

The most important thing to know is that not everyone will like your innovative concept, but there are people who love those things. As many of our CEO guests have said, follow your audience.

From Novice to Expert and when to split The basis of any consulting business is to be an expert in your field that is so good, people will pay you directly for your services.

Can the same be said for starting your own business? From what I’ve been researching, it depends.

From who I talked to, most businesses are born out of passion or born out of solving a problem.

So based on our guests, about 3 guests who started their business out of passion are people like Pina, Rohini, Lisa, and Naz

Rohini started with a high paying job in the business consultant industry but she found a gap in Indian cuisine. Because she absolutely loved food, she decided to dive in and conquer the ethnic up-scale dining scene.

Lisa and her sister sold their houses to continue on their family restaurant and took it to the next level. Though they might have had some restaurant experience as children, they took it to the enxt level as adults with a  sauce line and cookbook. Sometimes other types of experiences can work.

And Naz’ story is amazing. She started her business after her bout with cancer. Absolutely amazing. She has embraced technology and is solving our food waste problem.

The other 3 guests I want to analyze are people who started something because they could do it better, and that would be Mike Hewitt, Raf Peeters, and Crystal Mackay. These people have actually experience in their field and have used their network to leverage their business.

Mike Hewitt created One Haus with about two years of Human Resource experience. Maybe that’s all you need. However, Mike’s previous experience in the hospitality and restaurant industry gave hi the ability to make One Haus unique.

Raf Peeters has said that Qcify is created based on a need in the market place, but his decade of experience in optics electronics has helped him build a stable and profitable business.

Crystal Mackay has been an educator all her life and from pigs to pretty kuch the whole Canadian food industry, she’s the best at telling stories.

I guess what I’m saying is that, does experience matter? I guess not. I think (as Raf has said), passion matters. You can start something any time you want if you have decades of experience, or none at all.

Innovate!

I’ve written a couple articles about this on linkedin. All CEOs are innovative, either rn product, or process. It’s extremely important to develop this type of mindset as this will not only help you make great products, but also help you develop a mindset to create new products, or let me try and say it in a way you should think of it…. To develop a mindset to solve problems.

Learn How to Look for Solutions

Every day it seems like there are problems. Every second something happens at the white house, there are a bunch of problems. Though those are problems that are a bit harder to solve, it’s important to think of ways to fix them. Just imagine, nothing else. Write it down. Now more than ever, social media shows us so many things wrong with the world. If we just thought of solutions, it would make the world a better place, right?

Ugly food has been a creeping problem recently. Funny enough, we discussed it about 3 years ago in food science class and now we see people doing something about it. Naz was able to see the problem, and not only think of a solution (giving technology for farmers to tell her to pick up excess produce) but also build a business out of it!

I started the podcast the same way. Nicole from Foodgrads wrote an article about a problem, I thought of a solution to use a podcast to interview people about their jobs. It was an idea I was floating around and once I saw that someone else had a problem, I gave her a solution.

People who can analyze problems and figure out solutions are so valuable and those that execute are worth their weight in gold.

So I leave you with a challenge that every time something on the news makes you mad, sit down and write how you would solve it.

Be on the Cutting Edge

Naz mentions “uberification” to gather her ugly fruit around San Diego. Uber is technically a cutting edge industry and anyone who hops on the trend to empower people to share their assets. Podcasts are also cutting edge technically. A lot of big advertisers are looking into podcasts because they’ve noticed the podcast model makes the consumer trust the brand more.

So how can you be on the “cutting edge”? Expos like the Fancy Food Show help, even farmers markets, but also articles like foodbeast and Food Dive show amazing food trends no one has ever heard of. This is hard to realize, but if you are an expert at something, you might actually be on the cutting edge! 99% of the world’s population is probably not as smart as you are in a specific subject.

If I were to boil down my experiences, am I on the cutting edge of my industry? I focus a lot of my time on food. My facebook is full of it, I go eat at trendy restaurants for fun, I work at a private company (more on this below) that does a billion/year so they have innovation to burn, I’m networked with amazing professionals and I always ask my friends “what new technologies are really exciting you right now?”

This is not to brag, but I put a lot of time into food, and to be on the cutting edge, it does take commitment.

CEOs are experts int heir field, and theya re also the tip of the spear when it comes to making innovative postions. In factm I would say the best part about being the head of a company is that you can direct innovation in a way that you want to do. However, it’s very important to realize is that you aren’t the one driving the decisions, it’s your customers.

Make Little Bets

If you read any self-help, startup book, this is a common thread. The point of making little bets is that you have to actually do something for you to be truly innovative. Yes, to actually become the definition of innovative, you actually have to start something!

This might sound scary, but it gets easier the more times you do it. Not only does making little bets make you more creative, but it builds up your confidence and thought process where you can execute great ideas over and over again.

I’ll talk about an example. In the past, I was in a group of product developers. We conceptualize new products. Before, there was old management who would shoot down every possibility because in theory, it sounded dumb, or other political BS. But once we started actually making the product and then doing a sensory test of 20 people, people started to change their minds

Another example I give is from small projects. People are usually overwhelmed with huge goals. For example, starting your own Tech Company, or grocery store, or national soda brand. They think they have to start with a million dollars in capital to succeed. Not really. It takes maybe $500 dollars to make a product, create a label, and start a farmer’s market stand. Good luck!

Should you incubate?

Naz is the only person I’ve intereviewed who went though an incubator. Does that mean you should? A common theme I’ve seen through these leaders is that they have mentors and likeminded people surrounding them.

Incubation is a great tool when it comes to networking but from what I’ve researched, it isn’t 100% necessary. In fact, most businesses that are sorted out are more or less focused on at least having a mentor or 5 and a support network of friends.

Mentors seem to be a vital resource to succeed in life and I’ve had guests on the podcast who are not business owners praise their mentors.

I’ve had a decent amount of mentors, some I’ve paid and some that I’ve earned. Some failed in their ventures, and some say they haven’t failed.

Mentors are hard to choose from, and like any relationship, it might take a while for the relationship to click. You have to be in constant contact with each other, and in most situations, YOU have to be the one to take initiative to contact them.

My advice to finding mentors? You can join start up incubators as a guarantee, but I feel like working hard and publicizing your work is the best way to bring attraction. Not only in side projects like this one, but also in your career.

Sometimes a mentor isn’t necessarily set as a title, but rather the way you communicate. I have weekly office meetings with the Chief Science Officer, he makes room for these meetings because he likes to see me grow. When we talk, he talks about his experiences in the past on how to deal with people, or how he talks about not only the best way to solve the problem, but also why it’s the best way.

The way him and I interact, where he is passing down knowledge to me, and I am receiving and executing. That is mentorship.

A support network is also important. And an incubator can give it to you because there are people in the same boat as you.

Some people throw around the world mastermind, which I fell in love with the idea at first, but then I realized they kind of suck.

I think if set correctly, they can be a huge asset, but I’ve noticed they are only for MLMs and dreamers. Especially for starting something new, goals are really really hard. Accountability is extremely necessary, but surprisingly, you only really need one person. The most effective way to have a support network is constant yet separate contact with people who love what you do. I’ve found tis to work in the podcast when making certain decisions. I am in constant contact with Nicole Gallace from food grads, Kim Schaub from peas on moss, Katie Lanfranki, and others when it comes to making decisions. I call them, ask for advice, and take it to heart, and execute. They do the same.

What I’m getting at in most cases, it just takes one person to help you get motivated and help you with decisions. 3 is way too many.

So finally, is incubation a good thing? You don’t need it, but you also don’t need to buy a $100 dollar outdoor fireplace, you can build one yourself. If getting the resources for a mentor and support network is too time consuming, then an incubator is a very good option,

The Food Industry is more than being a chef.

After 50 episodes ranging from chefs, product development, food authors, consultants, engineers and recruiters, I can safely say that the food industry is much more than restaurants. Mike really hits this home in his interview. You don’t have to play with food to be part of the food industry. All you have to do is contribute to feeding people. Though we do have the CEOs who have restaurant businesses here, who’d ever thing you can be like Raf and combine technology and quality control!

You can be a manager of a liquor store, or hustling people to buy wheat protein as a broker. If you love actually being involved in quote: feeling the food, that you can get a stable job and become a research chef, or you can be a food scientist.

The food industry has so many different opportunities because as we’ve heard before, everyone has to eat. And you can be just one piece of the puzzle for feeding the world. Whether you help the big companies or carve your own path.

Ep. 049 - The Quality Technology Industry with Raf Peeters, CEO of Qcify
43:31
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 43:31
Ep. 049 - The Quality Technology Industry with Raf Peeters, CEO of Qcify

Today I have Raf Peeters who owns his own quality technology company. These guys basically solve problems on the quality control realm of things

Here’s a quick bio on their company

Qcify is a young and dynamic company built by an enthusiastic group of industry experts. For many years our founders have worked closely with food processing companies in the fields of automation and imaging technology. 

Our team has bridged the gap between the technological wonders of Silicon Valley and the much needed Quality Control improvements the majority of food processors in the Central Valley and other global food producing areas were waiting for.

Qcify strives to be the leading global innovator, developer and provider of quality inspection solutions that will transform the way our customers and their business partners gather, manage, distribute and communicate quality control information.

By providing digital fingerprints of the produced food, our patented technology (patent pending) and services can be used for quality control, processing line optimization and automation as well as inventory management, among other applications.

Raf’s a pretty awesome dude. We really get into a talk about how technology and food will keep on converging and we’ve only just scratch the surface

 

If you enjoyed this episode, please, sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com, like us on facebook,  rate and review on itunes, and share with your friends. If you show interest in being interviewed, know someone who would be a great interviewer, or would like to join our team of volunteers, make sure to email us at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com.

About Raf Peeters Raf Peeters is currently Co-Founder and CEO of Qcify Inc, a Silicon Valley technology company that strives to be the leading global innovator, developer and provider of quality inspection solutions that will transform the way their customers and business partners gather, manage, distribute and communicate quality control information. By providing digital fingerprints of the produced food, Qcify's patented technology (patent pending) and services can be used for quality control, processing line optimization and automation as well as inventory management, among other applications. Raf is also President and CEO of Innova Food Tech, a consulting firm that's active in the food industry and more specifically food processing equipment. Prior to this he held the position of Area Sales Manager and Director US Operations at Visys from 2007 to 2013. After relocating for the company from Belgium to California he realized an annual sales of >$4M within 2 years. Due to this expansive sales Visys was able to merge with Key Technology, a Nasdaq listed company, in 2013. Whenever Raf has time he likes to travel and experience other cultures. This year he'll be able to check one more thing of his bucket list: visit 40 countries before his 40th birthday. Key Takeaways
  • Why Raf’s technology makes quality more accurate
  • How minimum wage will sprout more technology
  • Why Raf goes all in in his ventures
Question Summary

Steps it took to get to where you are today: Graduated as a electronics engineer, service tech in the food optical industry, joined a young startup, then they got acquired, and they started their own What makes Qcify unique?: 360 degree vision system (most use 2D). It takes the whole inconsistency out of the equation What’s the best way to convince someone to use your product?: Take it on the road Let the product do the talking My Food Job Rocks: It feels like I’m not working. When you’re really passionate, you can overcome everything Trends and Technology: There is so much data in the food industry and we’ve just scratched the surface in collecting it. There are a lot of people in the food/tech realm and it will take a while for the winners to show. What’s one thing you’d like to know more about?: Spend more time traveling and closely follow up on trends on different continents Who inspired you to get into food?: My parents. Also passionate about passionate people Favorite Kitchen Item: An Oven Any Advice on how to start a business?: You have to be passionate about it. Also know what your audience wants, Know the basics, do your homework, and go for it What’s next?: Expand the company, we’re active in 3 countries. Long term: to keep coming up with new technologies. Favorite Conferences: International Nut and Dried Fruit Congress, Almond conference in Sacramento, California League of Food Processors,

Other Links

Microbiological plate phone app Vision system Almonds and Pistachios Series Imaging – using drones and images to track data Hampton Creek – They are doing different things Theranos

Ep. 048 - From Chef to Recruiting Chefs with Mike Hewitt, CEO of One Haus
32:12
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 32:12
Ep. 048 - From Chef to Recruiting Chefs with Mike Hewitt, CEO of One Haus

I had the opportunity to talk to the amazing Mike Hewitt who runs his own chef recruiting agency. They are Hospitality Recruiters specializing in dining room, culinary and corporate salaried positions.

Mike’s background is kind of cool. He’s worked in the family restaurant, went to culinary school in Switzerland, then moved to the United States for a restaurant job. He then started his own restaurant and then went over to… Human Resources?

He does this for a very valid reason, to take care of his growing family, and that’s something I hope you take away from this episode. Mike still loves food, you can definitely tell. But now he is helping the food industry in a different way by connecting talented people to each other.

His company One Haus is unique as he recruits recruiters that have a strong operational restaurant background so his employees used to work in restaurants. This allows his works to find quality people because they just know what it takes.

Other than this, you’ll leanr a couple of really cool recruiting technologies and the best festivals to go to for … recruiting

I really enjoyed this episode, Mike is an awesome guy and I loved the straightforward advice he gives on how to get a job.

If you enjoyed this episode, please, sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com, like us on facebook,  rate and review on itunes, and share with your friends. If you show interest in being interviewed, know someone who would be a great interviewer, or would like to join our team of volunteers, make sure to email us at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com.

About Mike Hewitt Principal & Headhunter Mike Hewitt has over twenty years of experience in the hospitality industry, ranging from operations, brand development, human resources, consulting and recruiting . With this extensive insight ranging from fine dining to fast casual, large restaurant groups to single mom & pop operations, Mike brings a deep understanding of operator needs, having been there once himself. Mike’s approach to recruiting focuses on assessing company culture and honing in on a particular candidates’ specific skill set to make the match. He has a post graduate degree in Hotel & Restaurant Management from the Ecole Hoteliere de Lausanne. Key Takeaways
  • How Mike went from a family restaurant to being CEO of a recruiting company
  • The key moment on why Mike switched to the recruiting industries
  • Why Linkedin Rocks
Question Summary

How do you get clients?: Network, referrals, returning back Elevator Pitch: We are connectors, connectors for long term success Describe the steps it took to get to where you are today: Parents had a restaurant in Spain, Culinary School at Ecole hoteiere de Lausanne in Switzerland, hired into the United States, Started his own restaurant, then HR Director, then started his own company. Why did you target hospitality?: It’s what I know. We hire operators and turn them into recruiters. (Operators: Chefs, managers, etc) Moment Mike wanted to do recruiting: looking at his 4 month old baby and say “why haven’t I seen this baby in 4 months?” My Food Job Rocks: It’s the variety. I get to work with so many different industries Food Trends and Technologies:  Embrace technology. Use technology to connect the dots! Spark hire - One-Way Video Technology Linkedin – a more passive way for communication Sometimes you have to track them for as long as 4 years to make a recruitment sale What makes a good candidate?: An honest candidate, knows exactly what they want, and can do a good job Listen first, then speak. It’ll be easier to find them a job Biggest challenge the food industry needs to face?: Commitment level. They are in it just for the fun and games Glamorization of Chefs: It’s good for my industry, But it’s all about how to do a job What’s one thing in the food industry you’d like to know more about: What the new trends are. Best way is to go to educational sessions and talks Recommended Festivals and Conferences: Choose depending on your goal: Awareness is key. Biggest exposure. For example: Miami Wine and Food Festival, Charleston Asten, Palm Beach, people who would hire us as a recruiting agency Who inspired you to get into food?: My mother, culinary school. Favorite Kitchen item: My vitamix Favorite Food: Guacamole… Guamanian dish, ground lemon chicken dish How would you start your own business?: If you love food, you don’t have to be a chef What’s next?: Farm to Turn Table How does your company like to be contacted?: linkedin; one-haus.com

Other Links

PNLs Budgets Labor Cost Describe the steps to get to the restaurant business: Guamanian Dish Island Style – Poke The one Poke restaurant in Arizona

Ep. 047 - How to make an Award-Winning Restaurant, Sauce Line, and Cookbook with Lisa Tse, CEO of Sweet Mandarin
46:16
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 46:16
Ep. 047 - How to make an Award-Winning Restaurant, Sauce Line, and Cookbook with Lisa Tse, CEO of Sweet Mandarin

Today we have Lisa Tse, CEO of the Chinese restaurant, Sweet Mandarin in Manchester, United Kingdom… well… she does a lot more than just that.

The Tse family has done the impossible: in 12 years, Sweet Mandarin has an award winning restaurant, their own factory making sauces for the Queen of England, and they write best selling cookbooks.

This is an interview you don’t want to miss as Lisa really gives you a run down on what makes her brand so successful. The stuff she does is not easy..like listening to customers, or being on TV shows like Gordon Ramsey and Dragon’s Den, but I try my best to dissect those secrets.

I’m serious, there is so much good advice in this episode, I couldn’t even categorize it. Every single sentence that Lisa says, is valuable advice whether you’re in the restaurant industry, products industry, or even want to write a cook book.

If you want to get into any of those things, this interview is for you.

Apologize for a bit of noise, we’re in a kitchen that’s how hard Lisa works!

Key Takeaways 

- How Lisa got into Dragon’s Den (Shark Tank) and how her experience was - Believe in your product, know your target market, know your demand - The Queen of England buys their sauces

Question Summary

Why did you make your own factory?: We wanted to control the Gluten-Free, MSG free, and nut-free process The secret to amazing products: knowing your customer questions. Always answer customer demands. How did you get to where you are today?: Have a clear idea on what you want to do.

General Advice:

Gap in the market for Chinese food in Britain It’s good to forecast in the future Do a price point and ask why (can they afford it?) Her and 2 sisters sold their houses to start a restaurant in the middle of nowhere Partner with corporate customers Make customers return, collect their data through emails and facebook Influence the bloggers Partnering with public schools on how to learn how to cook Chinese food (lots of press)

Was it one big day that caused your popularity to explode?: Yes: TV spots, cookbooks, products, brand equity Big Day, ITV British TV “Will the girls launch the restraurant in time?” Gordon Ramsey’s F word – They won best local Chinese Restaurants Cookbooks: New York Times Best Seller Her sister even wrote a book that got adapted in a play in Hong Kong Members of the British Empire for their sauces

My Food Job Rocks: It’s all about the customers and their experience, also an amazing team and the team can make an impact How do you hire good employees?: They have to do the job description at the end of the day. No matter what. What food trends and technologies are really interesting you right now?: Street Food, Sugar-Free Sauces, Biggest challenge in the food industry we need to face?: Obesity One Thing you’d like to know about: Shelf-Space in Retail Who inspired you to get into food?: My Family, Ken Hom in Britian Cooking TV Favorite Quote: The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step Favorite Book: The Bible, I read it every day Favorite Kitchen Item: Her Wok, also Sweet Mandarin Wok: Licensing the brand Favorite Food: Sweet and Sour King Prawns Most Popular dish in Sweet Mandarin: Sweet and Sour Chicken, Clay Pot Chicken, Chicken Curry, Chilli Aubergines Any advice to start what Sweet Mandarin does: Write a business plan, find a mentor, working capital, focus on quality What’s next and where can we find you: Youtube videos; sweetmandarin.com; sweetmandarin.net; Instagram; facebook, linkedin; twitter.

Dragon’s Den Online shop sweet mandarin Mable’s Clay Pot Chicken Meal Kits Ratatoullie Amazon.com Artisan Food Shops

Ep. 046 - How to Be a Private Chef for George Lucas with Rachelle Boucher, Culinary Events Manager at Miele
38:56
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 38:56
Ep. 046 - How to Be a Private Chef for George Lucas with Rachelle Boucher, Culinary Events Manager at Miele

Today’s guest has been so supportive in our promotional efforts and I love her energy! Culinary Events Manager Rachelle Boucher, is probably one of the most passionate people I know. She really puts 110% percent into her job and you’ll learn throughout the interview all of the interesting experiences she’s been a part of.

Before being a wonderful Event Planner at Miele, she was actually a private chef for the one and only George Lucas. If you’re interested in being a private chef, she brings a lot of good pointers here including how she got found and what he likes to eat. Rochelle also tells you how to create wonderful events and how an amazing team can make your work feel like play.

I was actually lucky enough to visit Rachelle at Miele’s showroom in San Francisco. I enjoyed a steam pressed automated coffee and a cookie and Rochelle toured me around the showroom.

Amazing stuff. I’ve never seen such high class appliances. Imagine a microwave that acts as an oven, and then acts as a steam box! It’s crazy!

The beauty in forging relationships like this is that I can connect others. Rochelle was really interested in food science and I was able to connect them with the Northern California IFT Section! I raved about this awesome place to Erin Evers, Russ Nishikawa’s employee (episode 25) and they are now making a crazy awesome event at their showroom.

If you enjoyed this episode, please, sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com, like us on facebook,  rate and review on itunes, and share with your friends. If you show interest in being interviewed, know someone who would be a great interviewer, or would like to join our team of volunteers, make sure to email us at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com.

Key Takeaways
  • Why Rachelle is so excited about Miele appliances
  • Our discussion about San Francisco’s foodie scene
  • How to get a private chef job with George Lucas
  • What makes a good culinary event
Question Summary

When someone asks what you do for a living: Culinary Events Manager for the Miele Showroom in San Francisco; Cooking Teacher, Event Planner, Content Creator How You Got to Where You Are Today: I started in Art school and worked in the restaurant industry My Food Job Rocks: My company is amazing and my team is incredible Favorite Food Technology: Home appliances using steam, sous vide, induction; INNIT – Internet of Things Favorite Quote: Julia Child: Never ever apologize for your food Favorite Book: The Recipe Writer’s Handbook, Harold McGee On Food and Cooking Favorite Food: Vietnamese Food Any Advice for anyone going into your field?: Get your degree. It can make you creative; Find mentors Where can we find you?: Linkedin, Instagram, flavor agent: twitter: flavor agent

Other Links

Miele Experience Centers Push-button Coffee Steam technology Cooking Classes Induction Cooking Intro to Steam Cooking Masterchef Program Working as a  waitress at a cocktail bar  Private Chef George Lucas Villroy and Boch – Isabelle Von Boch Anise Nick Ord

Ep. 045 - Why Stories Matter with Crystal McKay, CEO of Farm Food Care
33:48
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 33:48
Ep. 045 - Why Stories Matter with Crystal McKay, CEO of Farm Food Care

oday Crystal McKay, CEO of Farm Food Care pleasantly converses with us the importance of stories. She’s a farm girl and has worked with food all her life.

Her job at Farm Food Care is to really inform the Canadian people about their food system. Kind of what this podcast and foodgrads are doing. I loved talking to Crystal because she really emphasizes how stories are the best way to convey information.

Within this episode, you’ll learn a lot of facts such as the “new definition of local” and why it’s hard for the whole world to become completely vegetarian

If you enjoyed this episode, please, sign up on our email list, like us on facebook,  rate and review on itunes, and share with your friends. If you show interest in being interviewed, know someone who would be a great interviewer, or would like to join our team of volunteers, make sure to email us at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com.

About Crystal McKay

Crystal is the CEO for Farm & Food Care Canada with a vision for building public trust in food and farming in Canada.  Farm & Food Care represents a coalition of farmers and associated food and agri-businesses proactively working together with a commitment to provide credible information on food and farming. 

Crystal is a dynamic presenter who has delivered hundreds of presentations to a broad range of audiences from farmers to university students to CEOs across North America. 

Crystal was raised on a farm in the Ottawa Valley, where her family still farms today.  She is a graduate of the University of Guelph and several executive leadership programs.  She is a past President of the University of Guelph OAC Alumni Association, and a former director of both the Ontario 4-H Foundation and the Poultry Industry Council. 

She enjoys spending time with her young family and playing hockey whenever she gets the chance!

Key Takeaways
  • Crystal and I’s passion about sharing stories
  • How Crystal progressed from intern to CEO
  • The amazing trend about Canadian Agriculture
  • In a global sense, 2/3s of land can only raise meats
Question Summary

Uber Drive Question: I talkn to people about food and farming and where it comes from Job Title: CEO of Farm and Food Care. A Charity to inform people about food. Typical Day: Management and presentations Favorite Topic to talk about: Talking about the people, especially with people with heart Most important skill in your industry: people skills. The ability to collaborate My Food Job Rocks: I get to talk to people about food and farming every single day Food Trends and Technology: The transformation from “local” to Opinion on GMO: GMos will produce more food with less Opinion on Fake Meat: Choice is great. There is some data that alters things Opinions on Crickets: It’s a good idea but I’d be a bit desparate to eat that What’s the biggest challenge the food industry has to face?: Feeding more people with less resources One thing in the Food Industry you’d like to know more about?: I’d ask this question to more people What do you consider a food expert?: Everyone is a food expert Who inspired you to get into food?: My family are farmers Favorite Quote: Quoteoftheday.com; Do your best until you know better, then when you know better, then you do better – Maya Angelou One meal to eat for a month: Dill Pickles, but also pizza. Briny foods Advice in the food industry: Find out what you love and then go for it. You gotta start somewhere What’s Next?: Building the team

Other Links

4H Club – Do by doing Univeristy of Guelph – Animal Science; Rural Extension – Communications Ontario PorkCanadian Center of Food integrity Leclerc Foods California Support local when you can Farm-to-Table In 1900, 1 farmer= 10 people, 1 farmer = 140 people Precision farming Impossible food or Beyond Meat 2/3s of all farmland can only be used to make meat. Think globally Salty fish- Cate lin briny fish chips Farmfoodcare.org

Ep. 044 - Lessons on Being Innovative with Alan Marson, Managing Director at New Food Innovation Ltd.
39:21
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 39:21
Ep. 044 - Lessons on Being Innovative with Alan Marson, Managing Director at New Food Innovation Ltd.

In this episode, I introduce Alan Marson, Managing Director of New Food Innovation a sort of… Illuminati? Of the British food system. He and a few other people are really trying to shake up the European food system.

Here’s a quick summary from linkedin:

"New Food Innovation is consultancy group with over 200 years of industrial experience and skills across all areas of the food industry, having careers in Large Multinationals food producers, Major UK food groups, Major food Ingredients suppliers, supermarkets, and Food entrepreneurs Formed by Managing Director, Alan Marson, was one of the early adopters of open innovation practice and has an established track record of bringing new technology to market, an extensive network of connections within food business and the product and technology innovation communities.

The Team focuses on high-level working within strategic innovation activities, technology landscaping, scouting, technology translation, and external networking development for many UK's major brands. We are currently working with and supporting a group of food industry and academic experts with a wide range of science and industry technical expertise. This know-how has been gained during careers working for both international food companies (major branded and private label) and leading highly renowned center’s of learning for food Science including Unilever, GlaxoSmithKline, University of Nottingham, Associated foods Premier Foods, Northern Foods.

During these Careers we have been able develop over 45 patents, launch over 42 first to market technologies, Sponsor end and supervised over 60 PhD’s, In the past 5 years we have been involved in collaborative research and development projects with funding of over 5 million pounds, the associates group, have an extensive network across all sectors of the food Industry which includes over 4000 direct and 500,000 digital food professional contacts."

Impressive, huh? Well, within this episode, he shares his wisdom and passes it on to you.

The meat and potatoes of this episode is near the end, where Alan really opens up about the future of food. We talk a huge amount about alternative meats, how to find innovative companies, and the future of going digital

If you enjoyed this episode, please, sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com, like us on facebook,  rate and review on itunes, and share with your friends. If you show interest in being interviewed, know someone who would be a great interviewer, or would like to join our team of volunteers, make sure to email us at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com.

Stay  hungry folks.

Key Takeaways
  • The important soft skills you need to be successful
  • The amazing world of alternative meats
  • If a big company bought out a small company, would you leave?
Question Summary

Would you ever Retire?: Not if you enjoy work How did you get to where you are today?: Supported over 40 food technology companies Most Important Soft Skills: How to collaborate, network, empathy, listening, and inspiring people My Food Job Rocks: There’s always something new to do Food Trends and Technologies: Finding more alternative protein sources because meat is affecting climate change Biggest challenge the food industry has to face: The current food system needs to focus more on health Solution: Focus Subsidizing on other things – a $5 dollar burger would actually cost $13 burgers What would you like to know more about?: Behavioral economics and how things work Who inspired you to get into food?: My sister was in the food industry, I also worked in a bakery Your favorite Kitchen item: a good bread knife If you had one meal to eat: Pasta (I thought he said Pastor) Do you have any advice for people who want to get into your industry: Find out what makes you tick by having the opportunity to work in different roles How to Find Progressive Companies: The are usually Privately owned companies What’s next for you?: Digital space like Gamefication Contact info: We don’t have a website. Innovation Distillery. (Alan is very responsive on Twitter) 

Other Links

Twitter European Food Apprenticeships Solenzyme Flexitarian Chinese Campaign to Reduce meat consumption Fungal protein Algae Derived Protein Cricket Protein Beyond Meat

Ep. 043 - An Opportunity with Ugly Food with Naz Athina Kallel, Founder of Eu Herd
40:46
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 40:46
Ep. 043 - An Opportunity with Ugly Food with Naz Athina Kallel, Founder of Eu Herd

"How much ugly and excess vegetables and fruit can 7 local farms and 27 chefs save in 3 months? Over 5000 pounds!"

We have another startup for you today. Naz Athina Kallel started Eu Herd, San Diego's first marketplace for ugly food. Naz shares with us an amazing story, she decided to start this company after recovering from cancer treatment and getting a second chance at life, wanted to make an impact on the world.

In this podcast, I am a huge believer of sharing stories and I love people’s perspective. Naz is different from what we’re used to, but I want to really ask to take her approach with an open mind and have her story inspire you, to well.. maybe start something on your own. As long as you recognize passion, which she clearly has, I ask you to respect where she is coming from.

If you enjoyed this episode, please, sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com, like us on facebook,  rate and review on itunes, and share with your friends. If you show interest in being interviewed, know someone who would be a great interviewer, or would like to join our team of volunteers, make sure to email us at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com.

Key Takeaways
  • San Diego county has the most number of small farms in the country
  • How Naz is saving the world in everything she does
  • An amazing story of how Naz started the company
  • How being terminally ill changed Naz’ perception of food
Question Summary

What is Eu Herd?: Eu means Good in Greek and Herd means community. San Diego’s first virtual farmer’s market Food Trends and Technology: How farmers can embrace technology Entrepreneur Advice: Don’t wait for things to happen, offer to do it. You will learn so much What would you like to learn more about?: Why is the industry wasting 40% in our food? Who inspired you to go into food?: Africa (Kenya), mother Favorite Kitchen Item: Electric Wine Bottle Opener Favorite Food: Freshly picked lettuce and foods in a skillet Advice on Starting Your Own Business: Find a painpoint, also study the regulatory peice

Other Links

SEO – Search Engine Organization Foodgrads.com Landing Page Ugly Food Kashi Foods Blessing Bags Head and Neck Cancer Start-up Leadership Program Zoosk Localvore San Luis Obispo Curly Kale “Uberfication” Food Waste Food Deserts Eric Ries –Lean Startup (MVP) Hera Hub (woman’s coworkering space) Felina Handson (Founder) Email Naz for any advice at Naz@euherd.com

Ep. 042 - What a Food Engineer Does with Amit Sinha, Process Innovation Engineer at Watson Inc
31:31
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 31:31
Ep. 042 - What a Food Engineer Does with Amit Sinha, Process Innovation Engineer at Watson Inc

In this episode, we have Amit Sinha, Process Innovation Engineer at Watson, an ingredient company. This company is particularly fun because they products are so innovative. Most of their ingredient capabilities are based off of a specific need in the market. If you go to any food science based expos like IFT or Supply Side West, you gotta check out their booth. A giant, white, two story booth and they al;so have great notebooks.

This is a fun episode because you get to learn the magic of food engineering.

I actually saw Amit Sinha in action during a small lecture in Supply Side West, what he presented was pure magic. He has found a way to make vitamins… disappear.

About Amit Sinha

Process Innovation Engineer, Amit Sinha, from Watson has been in the dietary supplement and food and beverage industry for the last 10 years. With an MBA in Marketing and MS in Chemical Engineer, he finds that this is the right combination for his career path. By being able to utilize market research and through ingredient discovery, he’s able to successfully use his processing knowledge to innovate. Innovation is very important to him in both his personal and professional life as stagnation can set in if you one is not challenged every day.

Aside from being a foodie and trying new things, Amit has a passion for Crossfit and movies. He tries to use his work knowledge in implementing a healthy and fit lifestyle. Currently, he finds the plant-based diet an intriguing area with great potential and great products. Amit definitely believes, you have to love what you do so you can fully invest in it!

Key Takeaways
  • Best definition on What a food engineer does
  • Where to find innovation. Walmart vs Whole Foods
  • How to promote innovation internally and externally in a company
  • As a fortification expert and a crossfitter, what is Amit’s diet?
Question Summary

What do you say in a sentence or less?: I’m a food engineer (so you’re the ones making us unhealthy) What do you actually do?: Process Innovation Engineer – Look for new ingredients and new technology to fit what the customer wants to do How do you find ideas?: Grocery shopping. The isles that have the new ingredients Amit’s Career Timeline: Pharmaceuticals à Food and Beverage à Premix (Fortification) à Watson Most important skill to have in your job: You have to learn how to research. Be hands on and learn from operators. Watson is an ingredient supplier Food Trends and Technologies: Clean Label concept and transparency: who can do this the best? Clean Label: Where you can pronounce what’s on the label, nothing is harmful Biggest challenge the food industry has to face?: How to convince people a research article is true/false Best solution: Educate the law makers One thing you’d like to know more about: 3D Printing Who inspired you to get into food: Crossfit (what?) Quote: [1 road diverged into 2] and I took the one less traveled by Favorite Food: Chipotle! Any Advice getting into your field?: Get an entry level job in the field you’re broadly interested. Get the experience and build on it Inspiring Advice: Try something outside of your comfort zone

Important Links

Prescott Arizona Sedona Fortification Lentil Protein Cricket Protein Whole Food Supplements Lysterine strips Edible Glitter Custom-made ingredients False Claims Watson’s amazing booth in Expos Natural Strawberry vs Synthetic Strawberry Cockroach milk Rennet Sports Nutrition One bar that names the ingredients R+D Prepared Food Seminars (already passed)

Ep. 041 - How Soda Works with Haley Richardson, Associate Scientist at Dr. Pepper/ Snapple Group
25:05
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 25:05
Ep. 041 - How Soda Works with Haley Richardson, Associate Scientist at Dr. Pepper/ Snapple Group

We are back to our regular show where we interview amazing food jobs.

This next batch of episodes are some unique ones, and I think I’m getting better at asking questions maybe.

Today we have Haley Richardson from Dr. Pepper/ Snapple Gorup talking about well, being a soda scientist.

Have you ever wondered how Soda is made on a bench top? Or how new flavors get idealized? This episode explains all of that.

We also geek out about the perfect steak and the show Unwrapped.

Key Takeaways

- How food scientists make soda bench samples - The crazy way on how Dr. Pepper runs their companies - Haley’s most interesting interview question - How Food Science made Unwrapped better

Question Summary

What is your official title?: Application Scientist for Dr. Pepper/Snapple What’s a Typical Day?: No day is the same. Describe the Steps it Took To Get To Where You Are Today: Originally Engineering to Food Science Most important skill you need to succeed: Critical Thinking My Food Job Rocks Because: I get to try the newest flavors Where do you see yourself in 5 years?: Teach someone her job. Wants to go deeper in science. What do you look for most in a job?: Working with Passionate people Food Technologies: 3D Printing, Plant Beef, Lab Grown Beef Who inspired you to get into food?: My Parents. Her dad cooks a perfect steak Favorite Kitchen Item: Whisk Advice going into the food industry: If you have that passion, you should do it Inspirational quote: If you want to make Jelly Belly flavors, go for it.

Additional Links

University of Arkansas IFT16 Sodas “Throwing” a Soda term, see episode Bag-in-a-box Dr. Pepper Snapple Group Mott’s Apple Juice Nantuket Nectars Mr and Mrs. T’s Mixers Unwrapped All Natural – What is Natural? It’s not the poison it’s the dose Clostridium Botulinum Botox 3D Printing Future of Food- 2050 The perfect steak Thai Red Curry Coconut Macaroons Calamari

Ep. 040 - 10 Lessons From The Graduate Student Series
35:16
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 35:16
Ep. 040 - 10 Lessons From The Graduate Student Series

We wrap up all 8 episodes of the graduate school series with a jam packed episode of amazing takeaways and pratical advice about graduate school. 

Most of this episode is a recording from the scripts below:

10 Things I Learned From Interviewing Graduate Students (Part 1)

10 Things I Learned From Interviewing Graduate Students (Part 2) on Thursday

 

The Ultimate Graduate School Timeliine is posted here

Ep. 039 - [Graduate Student Series] Different Major, Same Food Enthusiasm with Eleni Galata, Graduate Student at University of Missouri
44:40
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 44:40
Ep. 039 - [Graduate Student Series] Different Major, Same Food Enthusiasm with Eleni Galata, Graduate Student at University of Missouri

Welcome to the My Food Job Rocks Podcast with me, Adam Yee, where we showcase amazing food schools and interview the passionate people who drive the industry forward and this is episode 39!

First I gotta say, welcome home

This is out final interview for the graduate series and I wanted to interview someone kind of different. Though most of our interviewees are Food Science related in some way, I wanted to get somone a bit different. Eleni Galata studies Agriculture Communications at the University of Missorui and I am so glad I did this interview.

Eleni talks about a lot of processes that are easy to follow. So easy to follow I mapped it out on the show notes.

We also talk a lot about media such as how GMOs are being perceived by the media and how the best social networks aren’t necessarily about how much money people shove up their accounts, but what matters is that people just have to show that they care.

So yea, this is the final interview, I will be distilling and summing up these interviews next episodes in kind of a recap form. Till then, enjoy this one, you are going to learn a lot

If you enjoyed this episode, please, sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com, like us on facebook,  rate and review on itunes, and share with your friends. If you show interest in being interviewed, know someone who would be a great interviewer, or would like to join our team of volunteers, make sure to email us at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com.

About Eleni Galata

My name is Eleni Galata, and I'm a phd student in Ag and Applied Economics in University of Missouri-Columbia. My work has to do with how people search and share information about food technology, and I study how food advocacy networks can reach important people more efficiently. In my family we always spoke Greek and Russian and since I was a kid, I learned that context matters: Just because one word exists in both languages, just the translation will not always represent identical meanings. I'm a cat-mom and cannot hide my fascination for the Thanksgiving Holiday Tradition or the Mid-West.

Key Takeaways

- Why Eleni decided to go to the United States (money reasons) and why she wanted to focus her education - How to find your ideal university: Find universities à Find professor’s publications -->  Contact them via email --> Contact via skype or such --> Establish a relationship and ask questions --> Research what other people did after graduation --> Talk to your personal network - How Eleni’s contact at a conference got her into graduate school - How the Media Reported the Impact of GMO foods. Even though there’s more data that GMOs are not bad, reporters did not change their perspective on GMOs - How successful organizations in the food area win at social media. The most successful companies are not putting more resources in social media, but they are making it more caring and personal. - Why you should work with your adviser to find funding

Question Summary

Favorite Thing About Your Univeristy: The university cares for its students such as health and wellness. Difference about Greece Education: In Greece, you should be able to know what you want to be Advice: Be proactive when networking, It’s a big yet small world, It’s hard not to be biased, We are the average of the 5 people we contact Best Part of Being a Graduate Student: You have a lot of freedom Worst Part of Being  Graduate Student: You have a lot of freedom… What would you ask your past self?: It’s fine if you don’t know what you do, but don’t waste your time Favorite Quote: Does the fish know that it’s wet? Probably not, but it’s wet.

What We Talk About

Greece International Welcome Party Spanakopita –Spinach Pie Galaktoboureko– Milk, Sugar, Greek Pie International Economics and Politics Masters in Agriculture (in Greece) University in Netherlands Agricultural Economics GMO foods Fake News Student Success Center Fellow in other Universities (you can renew them)

 

Ep. 038 - [Graduate Student Series] Applying to a Foreign University with Fiona Salim, Graduate Student at Wageningen University
34:13
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 34:13
Ep. 038 - [Graduate Student Series] Applying to a Foreign University with Fiona Salim, Graduate Student at Wageningen University

Today’s guest is an old classmate back in the college days and I actually met her at a Chinese college club. Fiona Salim came from Indonesia, studied at San Luis Obispo, got an awesome job at Bakersfield, California, and now is in the Netherlands’ getting an advanced degree.

When I heard she was in another country, I had to ask her to be on the show.

And the information that you’ll get from this one is very valuable. Because Fiona applied to both United States and European schools, you’ll learn about the differences between a United States University Application versus a European one, and you’ll learn the very different atmosphere that revolves around this university.

Even if you’re not interested in applying to graduate school in another country, I highly recommend having an open mind and listening to what Fiona has to say. It’s well worth it.

Take your time in Europe you guys, next week, we’ll be flying back to the United States where we interview our final guest, who is from Greece.

If you enjoyed this episode, please, sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com, like us on facebook,  rate and review on itunes, and share with your friends. If you show interest in being interviewed, know someone who would be a great interviewer, or would like to join our team of volunteers, make sure to email us at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com.

Key Takeaways

- How Fiona got into the food industry without a food science degree and got a really fun job because of it - Why Fiona chose Whennigen over Ohio State - Our discussion about process innovation - How work experience can “alter” your mindset in academia - Why you might need to look outside of the United States

Summary of Questions

Why Did you Decide to Go To Graduate School?: I’m impatient. I wanted to learn more about food to progress into the industry What aspects were important for researching graduate school?: Food and Health. Looking at the syllabus and curriculum Kansas State How is the application process?: Easier. You don’t need a GRE. But you need a VISA and you have to move. You don’t have to email your professors. You decide on your thesis your second year Best Advice about the application process: Emailing professors is still important, but you also have to be crystal clear about what you want. Leverage your network – Fiona leveraged her network to get into Winnepeg Funded: Unfortunately, Fiona is not funded. It costs $65,000 dollars for 2 years in the Netherlands but it’s $100,000 dollars in the United States if you’re out of state. Work Experience: People with no experience blame machinery and instruments rather than process Who Inspired you to get Into Food?: Food is more fun than healthcare Favorite Kitchen Item: Silicon Tip Kitchen Tongs Favorite Food: Tonkatsu Ramen Favorite is somewhere in San Francisco or Santa Clara Advice for going into graduate school: Don’t be discouraged and look beyond the United States If you were to tell your 18 year old self something: Don’t worry too much about grades. Live life. Make friends

What We Talk About

Wageningen Univeristy - Only focus: Healthy food Neatherlands IFT Website Cal Poly San Luis Obispo Biochemistry Nestle Research Bakersfield California Icyness Dr. Jimenez – Ohio State 3D Printing Netherlands made the lab grown meat burger Make a puree out of a carrot into a carrot (find link) Enzymes to create food Non-GMO Steak Korean Barbaque Beyond Meat

Ep. 037 - [Graduate Student Series] From India to the United States with Deepak Kumar, Graduate Student at Oklahoma State
31:44
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 31:44
Ep. 037 - [Graduate Student Series] From India to the United States with Deepak Kumar, Graduate Student at Oklahoma State

Alright guys, I hope you enjoyed Ireland, now let’s go to India… and then back to the United States.

For our graduate student series, we have Deepak Kumar, who came from India to do graduate school. I really wanted to get an international student who came from a foreign country to the United States because, well, you see them a lot. Deepak is also just getting a masters degree which might interest some of you guys who don’t want to  go all in for a PhD.

In this episode, we really hone in on what makes a United States education valuable, and the really cool tips Deepak used to find information from across the oceans. I’ll give you a hint, it involves facebook.

On Wednesday, we pack our bags and head to the Neatherlands where my college friend Fiona decided to go. If you’re interested in actually going to a different country for graduate school, this is the episode for you.

If you enjoyed this episode, please, sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com, like us on facebook,  rate and review on itunes, and share with your friends. If you show interest in being interviewed, know someone who would be a great interviewer, or would like to join our team of volunteers, make sure to email us at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com.

Key Takeaways

- Why Deepak decided to get a Masters in the United States - Our discussion about algae proteins and spirulina - How to use Facebook groups to ask students about professors

Summary of Questions

Why did you want to go to Graduate School: Improve my knowledge and English and meet people from different background. Why did you choose your university?: Prior connections through India. What are you researching right now?: Algae protein and spirulina. Encapsulation. Funniest research stories: Giving people green colored cookies Best advice for the application process: Ask people like the student advisor How did you find these people: facebook groups Are you funded? : Yes, not the first year, but we have a research fund. Food Trends and Technologies: 3D Food Printing The biggest challenge food industry needs to face: Balance between nutrition and taste Who Inspired You to Get Into Food?: From a lecture in undergraduate. Gum technology Favorite Quote: There is no love more sincere than the love of food - George Brenard Shaw Favorite Book: Food Chemistry by Etree Beliez Favorite Food: Eggs. Hard boiled egg, scrambled, any Indian Omelets: Green chilies and onions Best part about being a graduate student: Getting funded, get free passes for conferences Worst Part: The Pressure. A lot of deadlines Anything inspiring you’d like to say?: It’s a great experience and this industry will go forever

What We Talk About

Brian Chau Texas Tech Urbana Champaign Ionic gelation Sodium Alginate Calcium Chloride Reverse Specification 3D Printing clubs IFT16 SQF Conference

Ep. 036 - [Graduate Student Series] A European Perspective with John Gleeson, Graduate Student at the University College Dublin
43:17
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 43:17
Ep. 036 - [Graduate Student Series] A European Perspective with John Gleeson, Graduate Student at the University College Dublin

Very jolly guest we have this time. John Gleeson lives and studies in Dublin, Ireland and has been all his life. What I found amazing about his accomplishments is his involvement in the IFTSA board.

I think it’s important to get a perspective on how other graduate schools work, especially out side of the United States and John explains the differences very well.

Throughout this interview, we have a great discussion about communicating what we do as food scientists and John does an amazing job discussing the difference between how European universities work.

Key Takeaways

- How John Gleeson got into the IFTSA board - How Europe works differently from the US Graduate School - How superheroes are related to superfoods (they save lives) - How food safety and quality in Europe works - Using the science to talk about flipping burgers on the grill

Question Summaries

Why did you decide to go to graduate school?: I got bored, I love science What are you studying?: Food derived peptides Strangest lab stories: I broke my finger and also all of the reagents The application process: Know what you want Interview Question: Do you like Failing? Get used to it Funding: It’s tough competition in Europe Food Trends and Technologies: Lab Grown Meat The Challenge is the biggest thing people have to face: Consumer Regulations and the Consumer perception How to solve Consumer Perception: Have the scientists talk (well) Who inspired you to get into Food (nutraceuticals): The people I wanted to hang out with Favorite Quote: Wish beyond measure is man’s greatest treasure – Harry Potter Favorite Book: Harry Potter Favorite Kitchen item: Kitchen Aid Favorite Food: Soup, Tomato and Basil Soup Anything Inspiring: Fail fast, Researchers like to talk to researchers

What We Talk About

Nicole’s New Food Magazine Article Play with hamsters, Guinea pigs, cute animals Dublin Institute of Technology Communications Development Nutraceuticals Operational Excellence Analysts Fatty Acid Alginate Cytoxan Royal Society of Chemistry Antioxidants Green Tea Extract EFSA – European Food Safety Authority Beta Glucans Find A PhD website Lab grown collagen Lab grown milk Food is the ultimate emotive thing Harry Potter: The Cursed Child

Ep. 035 - [Graduate Student Series] Why Work Experience Matters Here with Audrey Girard,
29:17
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 29:17
Ep. 035 - [Graduate Student Series] Why Work Experience Matters Here with Audrey Girard,

Another episode of our graduate student series and this week, we are featuring Audrey Girard, who is doing her PhD at Texas A and M.

Audrey does an amazing job talking about her prior experiences and she had three different internships before deciding to go to graduate school.

Also, she gives awesome book recommendations like Lab Girl and The Man Who Fed the World. These are definenelty on my ever growing book list.

Enjoy another graduate student’s perspective. Do you see a trend so far? Just let me know.

The next four episodes will take you around the world and back again. We are interviewing someone in Europe on Wednesday, someone who traveled from the US to the Netherlands and two people who left their home countries to come to the United States to study what they love. You don’t want to miss these.

If you enjoyed this episode, please, sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com, like us on facebook,  rate and review on itunes, and share with your friends. If you show interest in being interviewed, know someone who would be a great interviewer, or would like to join our team of volunteers, make sure to email us at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com.

About Audrey

Audrey is a 4th year PhD student in Food Science & Technology at Texas A&M University. Her research focuses on the chemistry of cereal grains; specifically, she is working to alter cereal proteins using tannins to enhance and increase the applications for said proteins. Audrey graduated from Kansas State University in 2013 with her BS in Bakery Science & Management. During her undergraduate, Audrey completed three internships in food science and worked part-time in research labs on campus, which helped inform her decision to pursue her PhD. Audrey is a member of AACCI (American Association of Cereal Chemists International) and IFT. Audrey can be found semi-regularly Instagramming (@abiteofscience) and infrequently blogging (abiteofscience.wordpress.com).

Key Takeaways

- How Audrey’s three internships influenced her graduate school studies - Audrey’s unusual unofficial lab job - Audrey’s and Mine’s discussion of Holistic Health

Summary of Questions

Best thing about Texas A and M: The tradition Why did you want to go into graduate school: I liked research and I liked to go further in product development. Why did you want to get your PhD?: I really liked teaching Research: how Tannins interact with Gluten In layman’s term: How we can use gluten in other applications using an antioxidant called tannins Best hint about the application process: Make sure you have connections Food Trends and Technology: Holistic Health Approach Biggest Challenge the food industry has to face: Consumer trust Favorite Book: The Man Who Fed the World - Norman Borlaug Who inspired you to go into food?: My mom Advice for Graduate School: Get experience any way you can Something inspiring: Don’t just go to graduate school because you don’t have a plan: It’s a lot of work Favorite Quote: Everyone you meet knows something you don’t –Bill Nye, If you can’t explain it simply, you don’t understand it enough - Albert Einstein Favorite Food: Steak and Potatoes, Medium-Rare, Mashed potatoes, I like Steak Fries

What We Talk About

Slaughterhouse Story Kellogg’s Internship Dansico internship Flowers Foods internship Grain Science Emailing professors Texas A and M Kansas State Purdue Rutgers Bakery Science Edible films Modified Starch Tortilla Ovens HPLC Wheat Mill Lab Girl-Hope Jarren – Important book Teaching Assistantships Research Assistantships Science Communication Perceptions of fat Cowboy beans and rice

Ep. 034 - [Graduate Student Series] Escaping Monotony with Caroline Campbell, Graduate Student at NC State
38:22
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 38:22
Ep. 034 - [Graduate Student Series] Escaping Monotony with Caroline Campbell, Graduate Student at NC State

This is our second interview for our Graduate Series and we bring you another great graduate student who is in her final year of graduate school. Caroline Campbell’s interview gives some great, actionable tips on how to start your graduate process and this can be found on our new writing project, the Weekly Stew. The title is “Actionable tips on researching graduate school”.

Caroline also does an amazing job talking about why she went to graduate school and this might resonate you in that if you are finding your job a bit boring, maybe it’s time for a change.

Key Takeaways

- How Graduate school can escape the boring, repetitive jobs - How modified Starches are made - The crazy method Caroline uses to measure and visualize how people chew - How Caroline benefitted from graduate school

Question Summary

 

Why did you decide to go to Graduate School?: I didn’t want to get stuck with Quality Assurance Favorite thing about North Carolina State: The Community and Family Feel Advice for researching graduate school: Talk to your professors in your current school, and find what you love PhD thesis: Looking at food texture on how we eat and how much we eat. Funnest research subject: Gluing a magnet to people’s tongue The biggest advice for the application process: Funding is harder to find than you think Trends and Technologies: Fake Meat and Whey Protein functionality Biggest Challenge the food industry has to face: Communication and Food Safety Who Inspired You to get into food?: Alton Brown Favorite Book: On Food and Cooking Harold McGee Favorite Kitchen Utensil: Food Processor Favorite Food: Eggs Advice for going to graduate School: Be open minded. Also, graduate school is hard. It’s like a full time job

What We Talk About

Raleigh- great beer, great brew, microbrewries Southern Barbeque Year off study abroad/ couple of internships Cargill – texturizing division Modified Starches- All Natural Modified Starches University of Idaho Start emailing interesting professors Software that monitors people chewing Biomarkers Pickle fermentation Plant Protein Alton Brown’s Live Shows Eggs on burgers IFTSA Chapter President Chair of IFT Relations

Ep. 033 - [Graduate Student Series] The Amazing Graduate Race with Amy DeJong, Graduate Student from University of Wisconsin - Madison
37:43
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 37:43
Ep. 033 - [Graduate Student Series] The Amazing Graduate Race with Amy DeJong, Graduate Student from University of Wisconsin - Madison

Thank you for joining me for the first episode of the Graduate Student series and we’re kicking it off with a bang with a friend of mine that I kinda knew at my time in undergraduate.

About Amy DeJong

Amy DeJong is a PhD candidate in food science at the University of Wisconsin- Madison.  Her work focuses on understanding phase transitions of sugar –free sweeteners in confections. Amy earned a BS in Food Science from the University of Wisconsin in 2012 and has been an active member of IFTSA since 2009, where she has served in both chapter and institute leadership positions.  Currently, she is the Immediate Past President of IFTSA with roles on the IFT Board, IFTSA Board, and Feeding Tomorrow Board of Trustees. She has also been an intern with the Wm. Wrigley Jr. Company since 2010.

In addition to her work in food science, Amy loves to travel.  You may recognize her from the CBS reality show, The Amazing Race, where she and her lab mate, Maya, beat out 10 other teams in a race around the world to win its 25th season. 

Key Takeaways

- The most amazing reason how Amy and her lab partner got into the Amazing Race and the impact it had - Figure out what you’re interested in, or have someone help you (like Amy’s company) - How IFTSA enhanced Amy’s graduate school experience and career track

Question Summary

Why Amy Decided to Go to Graduate School: While working, Amy loved research rather than product development Advice on Application Process: You HAVE to reach out to a professor and have them interested before applying How to research: ask professors and ask students in the lab Favorite Food Technology: 3D food printing What the food industry should be focusing on: Transparency between consumer and producer Inspired you to get Into Food: Amy’s journey in choosing food science Favorite Kitchen Item: Spiralizers Advice getting into graduate school: Really think about it. Graduate School is completely different from Undergraduate School Anything inspiring: If you can put your mind to it, you can do anything

What We Talk About

The Amazing Race Doctorate in ice cream PhD Student University of Wisconsin Madison Wisconsin Graduate School Company Funded Wrigley Graduate students get funded by either grants or sponsored by industry IFTSA Institute of Food Technologists Student Association Sorbitol crystallization (this is actually Amy's publish paper. Congrats Amy!) Structure-Function relationships Sugar crystallization GM Technology Zoodles President of IFTSA You need to have something else as a graduate student

Ep. 032 - The Power of Plants with Ken Botts, Food Policy Manager for the Humane Society
46:28
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 46:28
Ep. 032 - The Power of Plants with Ken Botts, Food Policy Manager for the Humane Society

Today’s guest is Ken Botts, the Food Policy Manager at the…Humane Society?

So I believe that Ken’s job title is very misleading. I would call him more like a food service plant protein expert. He lead a a team and travels all over the United States implementing plant based proteins into food institutions.

For example, his team works with chefs in schools, amusement parks, and even the military to educate and create amazing menus that use plants.

In this episode, you’re going to learn everything about the hot topics of plants. This includes why eating plants is important not only health wise, and sustainability wise, but also learn the latest companies innovating with plant proteins, really cool recipes like non-dairy cheeses, and even about urban farming.

Again, we wanted to remind you about the graduate school series next week. We'll be pushing hard on this initiative. In fact, we even a have freebie to give you. In exchange for an email address, you can get a nice, polished, graduate school post which will tell you what and when to prepare for applying to graduate school.

About Ken Botts

Ken Botts is a food service consultant, speaker, and blogger. In 2009 he designed and developed the nations first all vegan dining hall at the University of North Texas. His ideas and insights have appeared in media outlets including; USA Today, The Dallas Morning News, Green Source DFW, ABC news, Food Service Director Magazine and VegNews. Ken uses his 35+ years of food service experience to help restaurants and food service organizations implement plant-based menus and concepts. His mission in life is to help make the world a better place one plate at a time.

Key Takeaways

- Millennial’s push to know what’s in their food and why they care about food and the future - The challenges of opening a Vegan Restaurant - Amazing advice on how to network really well - The hottest plant food trends - How plants can potentially save the world - Why the Military loves plants - Why Urban Farming might be the solution

Summary Answers

When you’re introduced to someone, what do you tell them you do?: Teach chefs how to work with plant protein Most exciting part of the job: I get to travel all over the world to help food service professionals Millennials are driving the demand of plant proteins Most Important Skill You Can Have: Long term connecting with people Tips to be a connector: Never meet a stranger. Have the mindset that you can help someone when you meet them. My Food Job Rocks: Make the world a better place through food The Biggest Challenge the Food Industry as to Face: How are we going to feed the future without destroying the planet? Who Inspired you to Get Into Food: My mom: if you get a job in the food service, you’ll always have a job Favorite Quote: If somebody offers you an amazing opportunity and you don’t know how to do it, say yes. – Richard Brandson Favorite Book: Diet for a Small Planet Favorite Piece of Equipment: Vitamix – You can heat soup! Favorite Food: Bean Burritos Advice to get into your industry: Strive to learn something new every day. Find yourself a mentor. And think as big as you can How does the Humane Society get clients?: Schools first, other things follow. It’s free too.

What We Talk About

Global Conference for Amino Acids James Beard Foundation Humane Society Paul Shapiro Josh Balk – Cofounder Hampton Creek Kristie Middleton Vegan Dining Hall Men’s Journal about Plant Based Proteins “Clean Meat” Feed 9 billion people in 2050 Beyond Meat Tyson Food buys a stake in Beyond Meat Kite Hill Almond Cheese Treeline Vegan Cheese Myoko Vegan Cheese – Has a book Chickpeas World Health Organization Year of the Pulses Changing the culture of the culinary world through Chefs Department of Defense Urban Farming Northeastern University Herbavore festival in Riverside Pumpkin Mac and Cheese – recipe posted at kenbotts.com Humbolt State University Sea World Parks Ken Botts.com Twitter kbotts@humanesociety.com

Ep. 031 - Food Safety Auditing with Tiffany Lau, Retail Food Safety Auditor for the NSF
43:55
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 43:55
Ep. 031 - Food Safety Auditing with Tiffany Lau, Retail Food Safety Auditor for the NSF

I’m so happy to introduce Tiffany Lau, a friend I knew from Cal Poly. We actually graduated together, and from time to time, we catch up. Though before this interview, it’s been a while.

Anyways, very excited to have Tiffany on the show because she has experience with a very important, but not really well talked about part of the industry.

She is the first guest to focuses on a very important part of the industry: food safety.

Working as an Auditor for the NSF, she goes and does audits for retail food stores. This mainly involves correcting and teaching workers about food safety habits.

If you’re interested in learning about audits, this is really for you. You’ll learn a ton of things such as what tests to take, what it’s like to work at home, and why this job might resonate with you.

This is also a pretty nice interview if you’re interested in sales

Let’s begin

Key Takeaways
  • The difference between a health inspector and 3rd Party Auditing
  • Why a Food Safety position might be for you
  • Retail Safety versus Manufacturing Safety
  • Pros and cons of being Home-based
  • The payoff for being a food safety auditor
Summary

Most common problem in audits: There is no one specific problem Why Does Your Food Job Rocks: It feels like I can help people Where do you see yourself in 5 years?: I want to try Regulatory. Quality, Food Safety, or Regulatory What do you look for most in a job?: A job should make you happy Food Trends and Technology: Rolled ice cream Biggest Challenge to Food Industry needs to face: Food Labeling Who Inspired you to Get into food: Alton Brown, my mom Favorite Kitchen Equipment: Kitchen Aid Favorite Food: Korean Food – buckwheat in cold broth Advice: If you’re studying to be an auditor: focus on microbiology and food safety Deleting your goal or purpose on your resume People Skills, interacting with clients, make them not afraid of you When looking into the future: ask if this is right for you Something inspiring: “Lucky Breaks don’t happen, they’ll only happen when you find something you love”

What We Talk About (Links)

3rd Party Food Safety Auditor Unannounced Audits Explaining food safety aspects Recruiting via linkedin CPFS Certified Professional Food Safety Credential Bad bug chart (coming next year) Food Defense Shelf-life 626 Night Market Korean fried chicken Koreatown – Kyochan Chicken- best Korean fried chicken Taylor Swift Song (Haters gonna hate) Smart Label Initiative Non-GMO Gluten-free French Macarons Macarons vs Macaroons Jajangmyeon REHS - Registered Environmental health specialist

Ep. 030 - Should You Go To Graduate School?
23:23
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 23:23
Ep. 030 - Should You Go To Graduate School?

Some housekeeping items:

- We're going 2 times a week! Check out a new episode every Monday and Wednesday starting January 2nd! - On January 2nd, we will be creating an awesome new series called the Graduate Series. You can check it out at myfoodjobrocks.com/graduate

Key Takeaways
  • Hear me pronounce words wrong like existential crisis
  • My story about applying to graduate school
  • 5 reasons why you should apply to graduate school anyways
  • See what we're launching in January
Is Graduate School For You?

 

I wanted to tell you my story on graduate school, which isn’t very exciting, but whatever.

I think everyone has this weird thing, like an existential crisis, that happens in your senior year of college where you have absolutely no idea what to do after graduating. I think it’s very common to have graduate school cross your mind once or twice during your final year in college. The school I went to to be honest, has a slight disadvantage when it comes to applying for graduate school. Though some people in my university do get in, the skill set in the food science program at Cal Poly was definitely geared more towards industry preparation. For example, I only had to take one Organic Chemistry course, where most master’s programs require like 3 courses on it. There are exceptions.

But anyways, applying to graduate school is really tough, I found it extremely stressful and overall, I turned in my application late and didn’t get in. Actually, I only applied to Penn State for graduate school. I got so angry at UC Davis’ process that I didn’t even finish it.

First of all, you have to take this dumb test where you stare at a computer screen for 6 hours, then you have to ask 3 people why you’re the best and either have them take the time to write a letter, or they ask you to write it for them, and then you have to not only request a transcript, but in some cases, you have to type it all in the application process as well! It was extremely frustrating for me.

I was also applying to jobs and if you looked back at like, episode 10, then you might remember how much time that consumed out of my day.

Overall, I had a cheesy revelation that there are plenty of people who are successful without a Ph.D. and I’ve heard a lot of stories about the pros and cons of graduate school, and then I realized I really didn’t want to deal with the stress of long hours and bite sized paychecks.

With a job, I could get money and spend it on cool projects, like this one!

Note: these are my opinions for people with a Food Scientist background. There are many people who major in things that might as well have an advanced degree, though if you think hard enough, you can actually get around it.

For example, a chemist might need a Masters but I know a handful of people who get into project management fresh out of college with a BS.

But the 7 people we will be interviewing do understand the value of a higher education and they will tell you all of their trials and tribulations, their hints and short cuts, and their undying passion to make the world a better place.

But anyways, I wanted to give you five distinct pieces of advice about graduate school and reasons why you should at least apply, or not apply. Sometimes it might be worth it, sometimes not.

5 Tips for deciding if Graduate School is for you.
  1. Decide what you want to do with your life

Most directors for rich companies have PhDs because they have the ability and drive to tell people confidently that they’re wrong.

The company I work at specifically have a lot of people at the director level that are doctorates.

So when it comes to mapping out your life, this is really, really hard. It is actually very rare for someone to follow their life in one straight line.

A masters will open doors, but so will starting a podcast about the food industry. Well, that was a bit tongue in cheek, but the fact remains, graduate school is a very nice, structured, accomplishable task and you can do great things in a narrow field when you get that masters or phd. If you want an unconventional method, get a job, and spend money on fun projects.

Some people don’t want to find the “truth of tomatoes” and that’s fine too. I think if you’re passionate and actually like what you studied, you can definitely do graduate school.

The cool thing with food science, however, is that there is a lot more incentive to enter the work force right away. This is mainly because having a science degree means two things:

  • You think you can tell lesser educated people they’re wrong (which is why you can be a supervisor straight out of college)
  • You can weigh and record in a little book your cookie recipe over and over again

Well, with a  masters degree, it adds a bit of a layer of complexity:

  • You think you can tell lesser educated people they’re wrong (which is why you can be a manager straight out of college)
  • You can weigh and record in a little book your cookie recipe over and over again, but now you can write a plan to make better cookies before you record your data.

So I am basically giving you the philosophy that a degree and work experience are pretty much equal, and the only thing that separates is the value and initiative YOU have to take to be successful.

Also, I can guarantee you that working at a 12 hour shift in a factory for a month is equal to a month in graduate school. I did this, it sucked, but I got a job that I love because of it.

Guys, to do great things, you must do something challenging, I can’t stress this enough. A good life is hard, if life was easy, it’d be too boring, right?

  1. Do you have good grades and accomplishments? Go For It!

Our friend Heather McCain is an amazing student, was our chapter IFT president, did a lot of stuff for IFTSA, and got stuff done. It would be a shame for her NOT to apply for graduate school.

I did some cool stuff too, so I decided to not let this go to waste and applied to graduate school.

This is the same experience I had going into college for my Bachelors. I wanted to be a chef, but my grades were pretty good so I decided to apply to college. But graduate school, I realized… I’m not an academic. I’m still not sure what I’m good at. But I have a good idea on what I’m bad at.

In my opinion, it’s extremely painful to apply to graduate school but you should give it a shot. When I say painful, it’s going to take time and it’s going to take effort. The experience has some tangible takeaways, like knowing math… and knowing words…

So I have a bias about applying to graduate school because the process was absolutely terrible in my mind but I think with the interviews this month, you’ll have a much better strategy than I had. Who knows, I might actually change my mind.

Again, if you have the prerequisites, at least try applying. There is no harm to. I mean I did, and failed horribly at it! The point is, you’re going to regret not trying, more than you’ll regret trying.

And this statement is true for all decisions in life.

  1. Do you know a professor? Go for it!

If you have a professor’s digits on your phone, you can probably get funding. At least much more easier than everyone who doesn’t?

Most strategies I’ve learned from the interviews is that it is MUCH easier to contact professors, and set up a relationship and then apply to graduate school. The professor is going to OK you anyways so as long as you don’t have glaringly bad GPA or exam score.

Within the 7 interviews in the coming week, you’ll realize that a handful of them contacted professors and secured funding before even doing the application process. However, some were long time connections, and some didn’t even have to worry about it.

If this helps, Graduate school is not undergraduate school. It’s a low paying job with high returns in value and you have to treat it as such. You can get a job via connections and you can go to graduate school via connects. This is because you’re going to work with this professor for a very long time. He or she has to like working with you.

  1. Do you just not want to deal with the “real world”? Don’t Do It.

Everyone is scared about the real world and everyone has considered graduate school to be another two to 10 years of academic limbo. I would know, I’ve had it and I I’ve also heard graduate students that “I’m not ready to face the real world yet”

In my personal experience, that’s the worst, most cringe-worthy excuse I’ve ever heard.

In fact, you should deal with the real world first before deciding to go to graduate school. Get some industry experience, do an internship, work at a slaughterhouse. These experiences might actually give you more of a drive to get into graduate school.

The real world isn’t that bad, I mean you make money, right? And you can spend it on whatever you want. When you’re a graduate student, you have to be very frugal…well, unless your parents are paying for it. Then go for it!

  1. Do you want a higher pay grade? Don’t Do It… yet
    1. This questions depends on your major, but I’m going to assume the people listening are trying to get into the food industry.

Depending on the company, they will pay for your education. And you’ll also get paid for work! What a steal. If that ever gets offered, you should do it.

However, if you meticulously plan your life like a lot of my friends, you’re probably going to be disappointed.

My friends are like “oh in 5 years after I get my masters I’ll make this, then I’ll get married, have 2.5 kids and  nothing else will go wrong. I mean, maybe I dunno, but you can’t predict the future and even with that mindset, if one thing doesn’t go your way, your life will be very unhappy, which is just not necessary.

So does a graduate degree generally means more pay? Depends where you end up. Industry? Academia? Entrepreneurship? The possibilities are indeed endless.

With my discussions with Katie Lanfranki, we both discussed the fact that in this industry, having an advanced degree does not necessarily mean you’ll be paid higher. There are starting salaries in food science that make more than professors, who have made less than 10,000 dollars in the past 4 to 10 years.

Point being, don’t get your graduate degree for the money. DO it because you are interested in a specific subject, and want to be a MASTERS of it.

But again, mastery can come from anywhere. I would concider Deya from Beyond Meat (episode 24)is considered an expert in Extrusion with just a bachelors, and Darryl the ice cream consultant(episode 21) gained from entrepreneurship.

Either way, DO NOT GET YOUR ADVANCED DEGREE FOR THE MONEY. Having this mindset is very toxic. You have to do it because you love what you do. You have to do what will make you happy.

Anyways, those are my 5 reasons to go (or not go) to graduate school. But please, listen to all seven interviews so you can get multiple perspectives, multiple pieces of advice from people all over the world. This is extremely important. I would have killed for this if I was in graduate school.

Ep. 029 – Owning a Restraurant and Empowering Women for Culinary Leadership with Rohini Dey
29:13
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 29:13
Ep. 029 – Owning a Restraurant and Empowering Women for Culinary Leadership with Rohini Dey

We have an amazing guest today, Rohini Dey is an inspiring woman, who not only owns a very successful restaurant in New York and Chicago, but also spearheads a great scholarship program for aspiring women in the culinary field.

We are also proud to announce the Women in Culinary Leadership Scholarship and encourage you to apply. Click here for the link.

About Rohini Dey, Ph.d. 

A leading restaurateur, proponent of Indian cuisine with her unique Latin twist across Vermilion Chicago and NYC, an avid supporter of women, former World Bank economist and McKinsey management consultant, Rohini Dey straddles the worlds of business and philanthropy across the US and India.

Rohini was inspired to break away from her management consulting career by a desire to go entrepreneurial and a conviction that Indian cuisine in the United States was either confined to stereotypes, or timid and washed out. Rohini created and developed the Vermilion Indian-Latin concept and cuisine. She led the spectrum of entrepreneurial activities across her NYC & Chicago entities. As founder, owner and culinary director of Vermilion, Rohini oversees the operations and culinary evolution of her restaurants.

As a woman restaurateur, Rohini is a staunch supporter of women in business and mentorship and education of girls on a global level. A member of the Board of Trustees and the National Advisory Board of the James Beard Foundation, she co-founded the James Beard Foundation Vermilion Women in Culinary Leadership Program (WICL), backed by a roster of incredible restaurateur-mentors and celebrity (CFW) “Chefs for Women.”

About Vermilion

Since inception, Vermilion has been acclaimed as “Best New Restaurant” by Chicago Magazine, Travel & Leisure, Town & Country, USA Today, and Bon Appetit, among others. For its pioneering cuisine, woman-led team and Rohini’s entrepreneurial journey, she and Vermilion have been profiled in The Financial Times, Time, Oprah Magazine, Fortune, Esquire, Crain’s, Chicago Tribune, Wall Street Journal, New York Times, BBC World, CBS News, and NBC, among others.

Key Takeaways

- How Rohini took advantage in the rise of Ethnic Food - How Rohini planned her research to make her restaurant (she gets very intense! Like interviewing 40 people) - Why Rohini is also very passionate about Women in Culinary Leadership (there’s a scholarship at the end) - Tips on what they look for as a candidate for a scholarship

What We Talk About

Previous Job: World Bank and McKinsey Indian Cuisine Passion: to feed the world Latin Cuisine Tandoori Skirtsteak (It’s fusion) Play with food anything south of the US What makes a good Chef?: Taste-minded, Cost-minded, Team –oriented, Vision-minded, Why Does Your Food Job Rock?: "Because I can create an amazing new cuisine and surprise people by how delicious it is." Women in Culinary Leadership – (Jamesbeard.com) James Beard Foundation Women in Culinary Scholarship Tip: Go Above and Beyond and Ask For More New Trends and Techologies: Exotic flavors and spices getting utilized Stiff upper-lipped Upscale Dining Favorite Meal: Home cooking and street dining Grilled Peruvian food in Cuzco Tempura in Japan What’s the one thing you’d like to know more about: Someone to catapult Rohini’s business (I pitch here about food science) Advice on how to start your own restaurant: Do your research. Especially the cost. Vermilion in New York and Chicago New York is more competitive and jaded than Chicago eaters

 

Ep. 028 - Expert Part-Time Food Blogging with Jessica Gavin, Sr. Research Scientist from Nutralite
53:10
2017-10-07 15:41:53 UTC 53:10
Ep. 028 - Expert Part-Time Food Blogging with Jessica Gavin, Sr. Research Scientist from Nutralite

Enter to win $500 dollars at Jessica Gavin's contest. Click Here!

Today we have an amazingly bubbly guest. Jessica Gavin is a Sr. Research Scientist for Nutralite, which is a division of Amway. She’s been there for about 9 years which I find absolutely amazing.

What’s also super cool is that Jessica has her own food blog at jessicagavin.com which has amazing pictures and recipes. Her blog is one of the most professional food blogs I’ve seen as someone who is a food scientist.

More importantly, Jessica has decided to showcase a scholarship for aspiring food scientists and this is the first thing on our show notes at myfoodjobrocks.com/028jessica . We definently encourage any student listening to apply.

Keeping this short, because this interview is jam packed with great information just about how to be a good product developer, communicator, and mother.

Note: Though Jessica and I work for direct sales companies, we cannot sell our own products! However, I hope through our conversation, you can tell they treat us quite well.

Key Takeaways

- Why Jessica stayed in her company for 9 years - How to use a culinary mindset in a product development aspect - Why Nutralite grows their own Botanicals - Jessica’s blogging skills and why she did it, and what she does (around 42:00 minutes in) - Why Jessica wants to give you money

What We Talk About

Nutralite- Amway Botanicals Flintstones Vitamins Probiotics Direct Sales Cal Poly San Luis Obispo Taryn Yee The Most Important Skills in your job: Learning to build trust Every failure is an opportunity to learn Stages (pronounced: Stauge)- volunteering at a restaurant Culinary Science Ali Bouzari What’s your dream job: Culin-neer? Own company What do you look for in a job?: Your company values you Most exciting food technologies: Clean Label, Gluten-free, GMO-free what you don’t put in Soybeans Pea Protein Supply Side West What’s the biggest problem the food industry has to face?: Pseudoscience and communication Uber communication Millennials What’s your beat? Who inspired you to get into food?: Jessica’s Grandfathers (crazy story) Favorite thing you like to cook: Home made dumplings Butternut squash macaroni and cheese Tofu Favorite Quote: Wayne Gretski: Miss 100% shots you don’t take Favorite Book: Science of Good Cooking Favorite Kitchen Utensil: Spiralizer What would you eat for a month?: Croissants French Polynesia Advice for the Food Industry: What is your Passion? What energizes you? Advice for your freshman self: Study abroad or take interational lessons Take internship opportunities Cargill Slaughterhouse in Texas Jessica Gavin’s Blog Reddit Consistency is key Income Report Trolls Scholarship

Ep. 027 - The Macaroon Buisness with Pina Romolo, CEO of Piccola Cucina
29:05
2017-10-07 15:41:54 UTC 29:05
Ep. 027 - The Macaroon Buisness with Pina Romolo, CEO of Piccola Cucina

 

We have another great small business this episode. Piccola Cucina is an Italian bakery that focuses on Italian baked goods such as macarons and focus on using almonds in their mix.

In this episode, you’ll learn about the different varieties of Macarons, how important it is to maneuver and adapt in the food industry as a small player, and some amazingly good resources and advice from the CEO herself.

I always appreciate having small businesses on the podcast and we have a few more coming up in the pipeline. I admire their tenacity and thinking in the long term. This interview is no exception.

About Pina Romolo

An entrepreneurial, international trade, sales, and relationship management executive, delivering the highest level of client service with keen attention and acuteness to cultural and political sensitivities with valuable contacts in a number of worldwide regions; expert knowledge and proficiency in English, Spanish, Italian, French and basic German.

Specialties: BA in languages, Specialty Food Manufacturing, Strategic Business Planning, Channel Sales, Web presence, Business Development, Event Management, Public Relations, Relationship Management

About Piccola Cucina

Piccola Cucina is the premier manufacturer of gourmet, handcrafted, almond based foods. These artisan products use almonds as the first ingredient and are made with the utmost of care and attention, manufactured in a dedicated gluten free facility. Products include a line of Italian macaroons, 6 flavours in all. Flavours include Amaretti, Chocoretti, Pistachioretti, Limonetti, Coconutt & Walnutti.

Products also include almond based pie & tart shells. The sweet shells are free from gluten, dairy, grains, soy, corn & yeast, low in sodium & vegetarian. And the unsweetened shells are a multipurpose, vegan free from gluten, dairy, soy, corn & yeast & low in sodium. These shells are dense, won't get soggy, can withstand and hold any filling, from sweet to savoury, to quiches & meat pies, to deep dish pizza and anything in between.

Key Take Aways

- The history and diversification of macaroons (macarons) - Amazing specialty food industry resources - The ability to listen to customers and pivot - How do small businesses compete against the bigger guys? - Why family is everything

What We Talk About

Italian Family Recipes Italian Macaroons Amoretti cookie Almond flour French Macaroons, America Macaroons Brazil Macaroons Tip for making macaroons: Ask my mother Vegan Pie shells Listening to customers Food and Beverage Mannitoba (Board of Directors) Ciao Specialty Food Show Fancy Food Show in San Francisco Specialty food association newsletter Biscotti Gluten-Free My Food Job Rocks: I’m surrounded by good people, I get to be my own boss, I can build a legacy Food Technologies: Non-GMO As a business, what would you like to know more about?: I am learning every day District Ventures- Armine Dickinson’s Incubators Who inspired you to get into food?: My family, my mom Favorite Book: Arlene Dickinsons: All In Favorite Kitchen Item: A good knife Freezing basil Favorite Food: Pasta, Spaghetti Carbonata Advice to Start a Food Company: Be prepared to be in it for the long haul Don’t cut corners piccolacucina.com twitter linkedin

Ep. 026 - Tis' the Seasoning with Stephanie Ronquillo, Food Scientist at Newly Weds Foods
43:16
2017-10-07 15:41:54 UTC 43:16
Ep. 026 - Tis' the Seasoning with Stephanie Ronquillo, Food Scientist at Newly Weds Foods

Stephanie Ronquillo is a Cal Poly alumni, and perhaps she could be described as one of my first influences in getting me involved in college. She was the ideal academic student. With the 4.0 GPA, president of the food science club, she’s smart.

After college, she went straight into industry and works at Newly Weds Foods as a food scientist where her focus is on seasoning blends.

In this interview, we focus a good chunk on strategies to make your college experience meaningful, childhood heroes, and interview tips.

 

Ep. 025 - A Food Career Around the USA with Russ Nishikawa, VP Business Development at SPI Group
36:46
2017-10-07 15:41:54 UTC 36:46
Ep. 025 - A Food Career Around the USA with Russ Nishikawa, VP Business Development at SPI Group

Today’s guest is the Vice President of Business Development for a distributor/ supplier, SPI Group, Russ Nishikawa.

What SPI Group does is brokers deals with lesser known ingredients and markets them to customers. A specialized ingredient producer will make deals with distributors for them to market or sell their product. For example, I would have never known about a pea protein from Belgium if it wasn’t for the SPI Group.

You don’t hear much about these types of businesses in school, but they are all the rage in industry, especially if you deal with highly functional and trendy ingredients.

Anyways, I’ve known Russ Nishikawa for a couple of years in Northern California. He reminds me of my uncle to be honest.

About Russ Nishikawa

Russ has been involed in the growth of SPI Group for 25 years. He is involved in new ingredient business development with key customers and targeted market segments, working with new ingredient from new and existing suppliers and determining how applicable the product benefits are to each end product and customer, and maintaining a very technical approach to understanding the value of each ingredient to our customer's needs.

About SPI Group

SPI Group is a distributor of specialty ingredients to food, nutritional, and nutraceutical manufacturers in the Western United States and Canada.

Quality Ingredients Personal Service Logistical Solutions Technical Personnel

Key Takeaways
  • How Russ got his first job in Hawaii
  • Why learning about people is more important than process and equipment
  • How tricky it is to substitute cleaner ingredients
What We Talk About

Humble Pie NCIFT New Professionals SPI Group Colorado Utah Clean Label Sodium Benzoate Lactic Acid Social Media MSG UC Davis Food Science Hawaii- Maui Papayas Punaynay IslandCommerce Wisconsin Learning more about People Formosa Food Ingredients New Zealand Milk Products New York Most Important Skill in the Industry: Empathy How to improve empathy: it’s about character, you’re trying to do the best for yourself and others Why Does Your Food Job Rock: It’s Part of Commerce Food Trends and Technologies: Clean Label GMO, Non-GMO Phosphates Spices and Extracts The Biggest Challenge the Food Industry needs to Face: Trust in the consumer and transparency We’re on the same side What’s one thing in the food industry you want to know more about?: How food interacts with each other Understanding process Inspiration: My Sister got me to look at food science Pilot Plant Most important ingredient: The people. Quote: Be The Light –Buddha Don’t be a downer Favorite Food: Poco Loco (might actually be El pollo loco) Poke QSR Advice for the Food Industry: Match your personality to the career you like For the Future: I’d like to build process lines to Food Banks

Ep. 024 - A Passion For Extrusion with Deya Suarez Trujillo, Extrusion Engineer at Beyond Meat
41:30
2017-10-07 15:41:54 UTC 41:30
Ep. 024 - A Passion For Extrusion with Deya Suarez Trujillo, Extrusion Engineer at Beyond Meat

First off, I am loving the diversity of our guests recently. From different ages and genders from all over the world!

The person we are interviewing today fits into this category. Deya is from Mexico and now works for the ever-trending Beyond Meat, where they produce meat substitutes that actually taste like real meat. If you do some research, their process making it (which is proprietary, and won’t be discussed too much here, sorry folks) is pretty fascinating.

You’re going to learn a ton about an interesting process called extrusion, which is a very scientifically complex process that creates really cool products. Basically, you take raw materials, put them into a machine and it pops out a product… that was a horrible description… but if you just google the process on how hot dogs, protein bars, or even how puffed cereal is made, you’ll know what I’m talking about.

I used to do some extrusion work in college and at my old job so it was nice to talk to somewhat of a kindred spirit.

However, I think Deya takes it to the next level, she is probably one of the most passionate people I’ve ever seen in a particularly specific subject and you will find out exactly why in this episode

About Deya Suarez Trujillo

Deya was born in Monterrey, Mexico to parents with engineering and food science masters degrees. Their influence and understanding of the teaching method and her mother’s strong belief in leading by example and learn by doing, challenged Deya early in life to take risks and not be afraid to fail, as well as her dad always pushing her to be limitless creative.  Together with her passion for creating yummy food allowed her to excel as a fearless, young engineer, working with heavy machinery, and integrating her work with scientists.

Deya attended university at Tecnologico de Monterrey known for their expertise and innovation with food science, particularly food engineering using extrusion technology.  Additionally, Deya spent a year as an exchange student at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver.  A food protein extrusion program at Texas A&M exposed her to the versatility of combining food and engineering machinery to create a wider range of food products.

This lead Deya to Beyond Meat, a company focused on improving human health, positively impacting climate change, conserving natural resources and respecting animal welfare through the innovation of plant based meat products. There, she leads the extrusion team developing, designing and communicating scale-up technology transfer for manufacturing in the extrusion team. On any given day she can be found working the drill press, creating and testing new die models for product improvement and functionality or testing new sustainable ingredients to help make the Beyond Meat products better. She gets messy, takes chances, develops early proof of concept designs, and executes on time.

Deya rides her bike to work along the beach and enjoys the beach with friends. She loves hiking in the hills above the ocean, painting, watching football, doing yoga and cooking with friends and family (specially Mexican food).

Key Takeaways
  • How Deya got into extrusion technology
  • Why Deya and I love Steve Jobs
  • Why you should be involved in something specific
What We Talk About

IFT16 IFT App Uber Extrusion Engineer Meat Replacements Extruder Clextral Twin Screw Extruder Buhler Extruder Extrusion functionality and reminiscing problems How to recreate extrusion during the bench sample process Texas A and M Extrusion Course Food Science Engineer Easy-Bake Oven Techologico De Monterey (College) Cereal Science My Food Job Rocks: I do what I love Beyond Meat Why Plant protein is the future Extrusion By Products such as Whey, Fruit Skins, etc Reducing Food Waste Favorite Quote:

Here's to the crazy ones, the misfits, the rebels, the troublemakers, the round pegs in the square holes... the ones who see things differently -- they're not fond of rules... You can quote them, disagree with them, glorify or vilify them, but the only thing you can't do is ignore them because they change things... they push the human race forward, and while some may see them as the crazy ones, we see genius, because the ones who are crazy enough to think that they can change the world, are the ones who do. (I have this on my cubicle)

Steve Job’s Autobiography Favorite Book: The Happiness Track Emma Seppoa Life’s too Short to Be Stressful Favorite Food: Mexican Food (Salsa) Advice for anyone who wants to go in the food industry: Get Ready. Find something unusal that you’re passionate about Find the experts and go out to find the experts Invest in your future: You might not have all the knowledge right now, but if you’re surrounded with people who know things but you don’t, learn from them. Appreciate what you know, and share what you know, and learn other things from other people My Linkedin Video about Extrusion Processing

Ep. 023 - From Military Chef to Industry Chef with Michael Bunn, Sr. Manager of Product Dev. and QA at Sam's Club
27:16
2017-10-07 15:41:54 UTC 27:16
Ep. 023 - From Military Chef to Industry Chef with Michael Bunn, Sr. Manager of Product Dev. and QA at Sam's Club

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Ep. 022 - Canadian Academia to Australian Industry with Bo Wang, Sr. Technologist From Nu-Mega Ingredients
42:20
2017-10-07 15:41:54 UTC 42:20
Ep. 022 - Canadian Academia to Australian Industry with Bo Wang, Sr. Technologist From Nu-Mega Ingredients

Today we have a special guest who came all the way from Australia. Bo Wang was born in China, moved to Canada for academia, and now lives in Australia working for the industry. His focus is microencapsulation and works to encapsulate fish oil at Nu-Mega Technologies.

Within this episode, he not only talks about his amazing opportunities living in difference contries, but also really digs deep on the difference between academia and industry.

Also, let me know if the audio is good or not, it’s a bit fuzzy this time and I would love your feedback. I recommend you listen without headphones this time if you can.

The first section of this episode is a segment of Peas on Moss' episode. You can find the full article here.

About Bo Wang

Dr. Bo Wang is a Senior Food Technologist at Nu-Mega Ingredients, Queensland, Australia where he is leading the development of novel microencapsulation delivery systems for various bioactive ingredients. He is also an adjunct Senior Lecturer at The University of Queensland and an Adjunct Senior Research Fellow at Deakin University.

Dr. Bo Wang has a Ph.D. in Food Chemistry and Engineering from China Agriculture University and completed his fellowships at Agricultural and Agri-Food Canada and Deakin University before starting his career in the industry. His current research interests include a broad spectrum of natural products extraction and characterization, analytical chemistry, food biotechnology and omega-3 oil technology with expertise in the nano-/micro-encapsulation technologies.

About Nu-Mega Ingredients

NU-MEGA Ingredients Pty Ltd. develops, produces, and supplies omega-3 DHA as an ingredient to the food industry. The company offers a range of microencapsulated Hi-DHA tuna fish oils for addition to various products in dry powder form. It offers its products for various applications, such as infant nutrition products, including infant formulas and moist solid preparations; bread and bakery products; cereals, which include muesli bars and breakfast products; dairy products, such as frozen confection, yoghurts, fromage frais, and milk; supplements, including capsules and dietary products; beverages and juices; animal feeds; and fruit preparations. The company was founded in 2002 and is based in Melbourne, Australia. NU-MEGA Ingredients Pty Ltd. operates as a subsidiary of Clover Corporation Limited.

Key Takeaways

- Bo’s AMAZING traveling opportunities - Why Microencapsulation is pretty important - Different Cultural Ways of thinking between culture, academic and industry - When Bo said he was a Food Engineer and people thought he was a Chef - The big difference between Industry and Academia

What We Talk About

Australia China Agricultural Engineer Canada Lycopene Food Engineer Ph.D Microencapsulation Fish Oil Cultural Way of Thinking Most Important Skill: The consumer don’t really need a perfect product. Fulfill their needs, not yours Food By-products My Food Job Rocks: I love it! I can serve people Biggest Challenge: Food Industry focuses more on money than research What’s one thing you’d like to know more about?: How to process raw materials into extracts Did anyone inspire you to get into food? : My Supervisors and connections Favorite Food: Chinese people can eat anything Scorpions Insects (why he doesn’t like the trend) Advice for anyone who wants to go to the food industry: The connection between academia and industry is close. Do not stay in the lab, keep on making connections and asking questions IFT Expo Retail Euro VitaEuro AIFST – Austrlia IFT AOCS – Chemistry Society Agricultural Engineering Conference

Ep. 021 - All About Ice Cream with Darryl David, Consultant at Darryl's Ice Cream Solutions
50:33
2017-10-07 15:41:54 UTC 50:33
Ep. 021 - All About Ice Cream with Darryl David, Consultant at Darryl's Ice Cream Solutions

    Have you ever wanted to start your own Ice Cream Buisness? Daryl David is the man for you! His life is 100% ice cream. From starting his own business, to now helping people grow their own, there is no man I know who knows more about ice cream than Darryl David If you want more information on Darryl, check out his website on www.icecreamprivatelabel.com This episode is full of everything ice cream. Ice cream history, ice cream business, ice cream science, and ice cream innovation. Key Takeaways

  • The history of ice cream and its renaissance
  • How to contact a co-manufacturer for business
  • Rich, young entrepreneurs who want to make pot ice cream
  • Why ice cream is the perfect food science experiment
What We Talk About Dairy or Non-Dairy Frozen Buisness Such as: Ice Cream,Popsicles, Mom and Pop Ice Cream Shop, Gelato icecreamprivatelabel.com Private Label CoPacker SEO friendly Soda Fountain Steve’s Ice Cream (Harryl’s Ice Cream) Batch freezer Coldstone Creamery Electrofreeze White Mountain Freezer Quote: “What people see today is the fast moving train, not the wheels struggling at the beginning” Golden Age of Ice Cream: Chunks of Cookies, Artificial turned Natural, adding nuts Startups for Ice Cream What you need to talk to a Manufacturer: Ingredients, products, capacity, formula The difference between making things at home versus manufacturing Maltomeal Enough information to know everything, or over confidence THC-infused ice cream Mantra: Let’s make a product professionally, consistently, and good! Good Experience versus Bad Experience in product development Momenti – high end alcohol ice cream Who inspired you to get into ice cream?: Me People eat ice cream to feel good The perfect food example Liquid Nitrogen Shops The process of Dippin’ Dots Advice about Getting into a Food Buisness: Call Darryl I mean, if you think you can’t hire a professional, wait till you hire an amateur Quote: I may lay the canvas out, but they will paint the picture

Ep. 020 - Making College Worth It
29:13
2017-10-07 15:41:54 UTC 29:13
Ep. 020 - Making College Worth It

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Ep. 019 - From Dietetics to Chocolate with Sarabeth Yeli Marshall, owner of Yellibelly Chocolates
36:44
2017-10-07 15:41:54 UTC 36:44
Ep. 019 - From Dietetics to Chocolate with Sarabeth Yeli Marshall, owner of Yellibelly Chocolates

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Ep. 018 Part 2 - The Power of Culinary Science with Ali Bouzari, Author of Ingredient
39:41
2017-10-07 15:41:54 UTC 39:41
Ep. 018 Part 2 - The Power of Culinary Science with Ali Bouzari, Author of Ingredient

  This is part two of Ali Bouzari's amazing interview. Find part 1 here: http://myfoodjobrocks.com/018ali/ And don't forget about our giveaway at www.myfoodjobrocks.com About Ali Bouzari As an Iranian Texan, Ali Bouzari grew up with exposure to different cuisines, but most notably, beef over an open flame. His affinity for food and science lead him to become the guy where all the top chefs call him for help on the science of food. After waking up from a nightmare, he googled on his phone, “food chemistry PhD” and found himself at the University of California, Davis for Food Biochemistry. Strategically located near Napa and Sonoma’s food scene and San Francisco’s thriving entrepreneurial food and tech hub, Davis was his master plan to be the guy where chefs call him. Between being an instructor for the Culinary Institute of America and a graduate student at Davis, he juggled being a freelance consultant for chefs, tapping into the new market of research chefs. Later, he co-founded a consulting firm with top research chefs and a stealthy food lawyer to help make his dream of becoming the go to people for solving food problems. About Ingredient If you want to pre-order Ali’s book, Ingredient, you can go on Amazon. The book is expected to release September 27, 2016. For the price of two mouthwatering sandwiches, the ones similar to what Joey Tribbiani savor, you can learn the essentials of food and cooking through colorful artwork and the translation of esoteric scientific theories into practical at home cooking. You can learn a little more about Ali by reaching out to him on Twitter with his account, Alibouzari. You can also find out more information on his website. The website includes media coverage on Ali, his works in writing, media and Pilot R + D. What We Learn About

  • Read a ton of books; books help you recognize what is really great and between the lines, it helps you understand why something is great
  • Eating can be constituted as research
  • Savory applications in food is trending
  • Ingredient by Ali Bouzari is the Rosetta Stone to cooking
What We Talk About Research: Eating the best Austin BBQ as tax certified Favorite food: Texas BBQ Brisket Beef is a huge thing in Iran and Texas Umami Human breastmilk has 20x more glutamate than cow milk MSG EXO bars Fermentation and Food Industry Favorite Books: Harold McGee’s On Food and Cooking and Sandor Katz’s Art of Fermentation Favorite Kitchen item: Deep Welled-Spoon and Rubber Spatula Advice: Hire a food person when starting a food company. CDO: Chief Deliciousness Officer (this is a mde up term) Ingredient book presale Rosetta Stone of Cooking Website: alibouzari.com Twitter: AliBouzari

Ep. 018 Part 1 - The Power of Culinary Science with Ali Bouzari, CSO of Pilot R+D
28:12
2017-10-07 15:41:54 UTC 28:12
Ep. 018 Part 1 - The Power of Culinary Science with Ali Bouzari, CSO of Pilot R+D

Forbes named him 30 Under 30. Zagat did the same. UC Davis wrote an article about him. HIC The Useful Tool and The Culinologist interviewed him. He gave two TED talks and is about to roll out a book. He will now be interviewed for this podcast. His name is Bouzari, Ali Bouzari. He is a Culinary Scientist at Pilot R + D, holding a doctoracte in food biochemistry and having served as a research chef for the Thomas Keller Restaurant Group. His interview with Adam Yee not only inspires many food industry members to strive for a better tasting and more creative food product, but also brings to light humble beginnings of how a man, a dream and a passion can make the world a better place to cook, eat and understand the impact science has on both. For culinary science! About Ali Bouzari As an Iranian Texan, Ali Bouzari grew up with exposure to different cuisines, but most notably, beef over an open flame. His affinity for food and science lead him to become the guy where all the top chefs call him for help on the science of food. After waking up from a nightmare, he googled on his phone, “food chemistry PhD” and found himself at the University of California, Davis for Food Biochemistry. Strategically located near Napa and Sonoma’s food scene and San Francisco’s thriving entrepreneurial food and tech hub, Davis was his master plan to be the guy where chefs call him. Between being an instructor for the Culinary Institute of America and a graduate student at Davis, he juggled being a freelance consultant for chefs, tapping into the new market of research chefs. Later, he co-founded a consulting firm with top research chefs and a stealthy food lawyer to help make his dream of becoming the go to people for solving food problems. Pilot R + D The genesis of Pilot R + D came through by recognizing collaboration between chefs with diverse research and development backgrounds is much better than independent work. As a special operations delta force, the band of chefs, Kyle Connaughton, Ali Bouzari, Dan Felder and Dana Peck (part lawyer and part chef), became the founding members of an innovation and development firm. Who you gonna call when you’re in need of help as a food and tech entrepreneur? Pilot R + D. Who acts as the hotline during the 11th hour as a fast casual service advisor? Pilot R + D. Research starts with eating a load of good food as a business expense. That’s a job worthwhile where one gets paid to eat food because of science and research! Aside from research, Ali and his colleagues solve problems with a hybrid ideology of product development/food science and culinary/chef mindset. With the approach of flavor being important and ingredient functionality in the context of the whole food, the team tries to figure out their limitations on each project to develop to their clients’ expectations. At times, they think about how pragmatic some projects are and aren’t afraid to admit the impractical demand of the project. That is not to say they are highly selective with their clients. They equally accept any range of proposals. To learn more about Pilot R + D, you can find more information here. Key Takeaways (this episode only)

  • Read Harold McGee’s On Food and Cooking
  • Culinary Science
  • Food ingredients in the context of chefs is to look at the whole ingredient, not the purified form
What we talk about (this episode only) TED Talk Culinary Science Harold McGee UC Davis Biochemistry PhD Culinary Institute of America French Laundry Alton Brown Good Eats Pilot R&D Kyle Connaughton (Fat Duck) Dan Felder (Momofuku) Dana (Morrison Foerster) Grassroots consultancy for chefs Chef scientist Trend forecasting Ingredient Functionality Advice: Learn how to say I can’t do that or it can’t be done Flavor and Taste

Ep. 017 - Why Phil believes in the RCA, with Philip Saneski, President of the RCA Student Committee
36:14
2017-10-07 15:41:54 UTC 36:14
Ep. 017 - Why Phil believes in the RCA, with Philip Saneski, President of the RCA Student Committee

Today we have Philip Saneski, an inspiring, young, proactive, dude who has recently been working hard to build up the Research Chefs Association Student section. Philip works in an innovative consulting company in San Francisco as an intern, has experience as a pastry chef and, as a student, during the school year, he is involved quite heavily in the Research Chef’s Association (RCA). You might remember the Research Chefs Association or Culinology program in episode 12, where Kim Schaub talks about her experiences. Her podcast features culinologists from the RCA. Enjoy the interview! Phil really shines a light on everything the RCA has to offer. About Philip Saneski Philip has culinary experience working in San Francisco Chronic