Government & Organizations

Equitable Opportunity Radio – weekly conversations with visionary leaders who are building a more inclusive economy

Mike Hancox CEO of Skeo Solutions | Sustainability | Local Wealth | Thriving Workers | Food Security | Food Waste | Local Food | Food Deserts | Presidio Graduate School

Equitable Opportunity Radio is a weekly podcast produced by Skeo Alliance and hosted by Mike Hancox and his co-hosts Vernice Miller-Travis of Skeo Solutions and Carl Schneebeck of the Presidio Graduate School. Each week they interview visionary leaders, savvy businesses (from international brands like Starbucks to small local businesses like Bar Marco), and forward thinking individuals who are working to build a more just, sustainable, and prosperous future by building a more inclusive economy that values work and seeks meaningful employment for everyone. You will discover new leading edge strategies for lifting up workers and building great 21st century businesses, along with cutting edge strategies for revitalizing under resourced communities and empowering excluded populations. Prosperity and sustainability are not possible without an inclusive economy. An inclusive economy is not possible without innovation, economic growth, socially responsible business people, and engaged citizens. And you, as a consumer, play a pivotal role in creating an inclusive economy.

Episodes

027: To Infinity and Beyond
12:04
2017-09-27 09:24:24 UTC 12:04
027: To Infinity and Beyond

Topic: Introducing Infinite Earth Radio

In This Episode:0:19 Special announcement about the future of Equitable Opportunity Radio2:18 Introduction of Vernice Miller-Travis and Carl Schneebeck3:12 Carl reflects on the highlight moments of Equitable Opportunity Radio4:26 Carl and Michael discuss their new podcast project6:38 Vernice shares her insights on the last 6 months of Equitable Opportunity Radio8:50 Michael and Vernice discuss the vision and purpose of Infinite Earth Radio10:30 Michael discusses the important role of the Local Government Commission10:44 How you can switch over to Infinite Earth Radio

Take Away Quotes: “I think we’re on the cusp of another evolution of the potential of human organizations and how we can work together to bring really great things to our societies, to our communities, to the planet. Our podcast is going to explore how people are doing that. What are the techniques that great managers and great leaders are doing to tap that potential and to bring organizations to the next level?”

“We have had the opportunity to talk to some true visionaries who are just doing incredible work, but who are so generous about sharing the work that they’re doing and the learnings that they are experiencing, with as broad a cross section of folks as possible so that other communities can learn from the good things that are happening out there and they can be replicated in other places. This is a moment when we need a lot of inspiration and we have the privilege and will continue to talk to folk who can provide that inspiration.”

Resources:Infinite Earth Radio Website

Infinite Earth Radio iTunes

026: What Would it Look Like if We Started Over?
20:52
2017-09-27 09:24:24 UTC 20:52
026: What Would it Look Like if We Started Over?

Organization:When it comes to our current food system, Hampton Creek believes it is time to start over and ask what it is that you really want to eat. They believe eating right shouldn't be so hard; that good food should be good for your body, good for your budget, easy on the earth, and insanely delicious. They believe you shouldn't have to compromise on anything and that it should be available for everyone everywhere.

Topic:Food That’s Just Better

Guest:Udi Lazimy is the Global Plant Sourcing Specialist at Hampton Creek, a quickly-growing food company based in San Francisco, where he works with farmers to drive Hampton Creek’s innovative plant-based food research and product development. Prior to this, Udi served as the National Grassroots Advocacy Director at the Organic Farming Research Foundation.

Hampton Creek Twitterhttps://twitter.com/hamptoncreek

Take Away Quotes:

“We are growing quickly as a food company, and because of that fact, we’re creating opportunities all over the country for people to help us market our product and help us get it out there into stores, etc. But I think in general it’s about continuing to talk about how we can change things, how can we make things better, not believing in the status quo, and in so doing a lot of new people are emerging with wonderful, brilliant ideas that are challenging our model and creating more competition in the food marketplace, and that’s something that we really highly encourage.”

“We focus on plant-based food not because we believe people shouldn’t eat meat and not because we want to directly challenge the meat industry. It’s because we don’t believe that a highly resource intensive, highly polluting, greenhouse gas emitting, land consuming industry such as the animal food industry on a large scale, is one that should continue and should be supported. So plant-based is really the alternative to that and we’ve found that we can make better food with plants.”

“I do believe is the leading, most environmentally destructive practice we have in the world, is the food system in many ways. And so I think down the line 30 years from now you’re going to see a system that really does utilize the power of plants, celebrate soil and soil quality, water, cleanliness, community, food systems, and isn’t just about the absolute cheapest thing we can produce, it’s going to be more about providing good food that’s sustainable and healthy for the environment and for people, and that will be the status quo.”

Resources:Hampton Creekhttps://www.hamptoncreek.com/

Presidio Graduate Schoolhttp://www.presidio.edu

025: Groceries as if People Mattered
28:44
2017-09-27 09:24:24 UTC 28:44
025: Groceries as if People Mattered

Organization:People’s Community Market is a new business that is emerging from and building on the ten years of experience, track record and social relations of its sister organization, People’s Grocery, which is a non-profit that has operated numerous food projects (including the Mobile Market and the Grub Box), urban gardens and nutrition education programs. Their purpose is to create and operate a small-format, full-service grocery store in West Oakland, which is a community that has not had a full-service grocer for several decades. In addition to retailing fresh foods and groceries, the business will offer information, resources and services to support customers in improving their health and provide a community venue in support of community building.

Topic:Building a Stronger Community Through Food & Business

Guest:Brahm Ahmadi is a social entrepreneur working to build healthier and more equitable inner city communities by creating change to the food system. In 2003, he co-founded People’s Grocery, a nonprofit organization that has attracted national attention for its effort to transform inner city food systems through projects in food enterprise, urban agriculture, and nutrition education that include the nation’s first Mobile Market. In 2010, Brahm founded People’s Community Market to create a fresh food retail business model that fosters health and social interaction in low-income communities. He’s also piloting a model for enabling the general public to invest in mission-driven companies and local communities. Brahm has a B.A. in Sociology from the University of California and an MBA from the Presidio Graduate School. He is a Food and Community Fellow at the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy and a Fellow at Food First: Institute for Food and Development Policy.

People’s Community Market Twitterhttps://twitter.com/peoplesmrkt

Take Away Quotes:

“People’s Community Market essentially is intended to be a full-service grocery store, community serving market, in West Oakland, with the goal of making it convenient for residents to buy nutritious and fresh foods as well as prepared foods and traditional groceries, at affordable prices in their own neighborhood. And also using the store as a resource center and a platform for community engagement and offering a variety of educational and incentive programs that introduce our future customers to healthier food options.”

“I think it’s also important that people are included from the very beginning so it’s not just that you’ve opened your doors and you’re welcoming everyone to come in and you’re employing locally, but from the day one of conception, planning, and design of the business, community residents are engaged. And that’s partly to make sure that the store and the products and the store environment does truly reflect and appeal to the community, but it’s also to create that sense of ownership from the very beginning.”

Resources:People’s Community Markethttp://peoplescommunitymarket.com/

Presidio Graduate Schoolhttp://www.presidio.edu

024: Thinking Outside the Food Pantry
30:47
2017-09-27 09:24:24 UTC 30:47
024: Thinking Outside the Food Pantry

Organization:Oregon Food Bank collects and distributes food through a network of four Oregon Food Bank branches and 17 independent regional food banks serving Oregon and Clark County, Washington.  Along with approximately 970 partner agencies, they help nearly one in five households fend off hunger. They work to address the root causes of hunger by offering nutrition education, strengthening local food systems, collaborating with community groups, and advocating for hunger relief at the local and federal level.

Topic:Taking a Look at Food Insecurity

Guest:Sharon Thornberry is the Community Food Systems Manager at the Oregon Food Bank. Sharon has been a grassroots organizer, trainer and advocate for community food systems, rural communities, and anti-hunger work in Oregon since 1986. She grew up on farms, was very active in 4-H and Girl Scouts, and was one of the first female members of Future Farmers of America. In 1979, she was a homeless mom with two small children. Sharon has served on the Oregon Hunger Task Force for 16 years, the board of the Community Food Security Coalition for six years (three as President), and the board of Bread for the World and Bread for the World Institute for six years. The sum of her experiences have come together to make her a passionate and knowledgeable community food security and anti-hunger advocate. She is the 2009 recipient of the Billi Odegard Public Health Genius Award from the Community Health Partnership of Oregon. She has worked for Oregon Food Bank for the past 16 years focusing on rural food systems and is the creator of “FEAST”, the nationally recognized community food systems organizing program. She has been a resident of Philomath, Oregon for 30 years. She is an avid gardener and loves to share the cooking traditions learned in the farm kitchens of her youth with friends and family.

Sharon Thornberry Twitterhttps://twitter.com/ofb_sharont

Take Away Quotes:

“The statistics say that rural hunger is not as bad as urban hunger, I think people in rural communities are less likely to admit they’re hungry too. There’s a lot of pride that goes with living in rural communities.”

“There aren’t equal opportunities for everybody and there’s a lot of deniers that say that all of this stuff is made up. But I’m here to tell you it’s not made up. We don’t think about the challenges of access. People with small children are the most financially insecure. Salaries have not kept up with the cost of living in this country.”

“We’re leaving a lot of kids in a really bad place because it’s impossible for their parents to have a living wage, especially in rural communities. There’s a whole systemic thing that we need to look at and figure out how we solve it as a country.”

“Just think: the food banks across this country, there are hundreds of feeding american food banks, there are thens of thousands of food pantries across this country, they all have volunteers. If those folks had taken even a fraction of the hours they’ve taken handing out food and been saying to the powers that be: to congress, to their state senators, to their state legislators, even to their county commissioners, “This is wrong, we have to do this differently,” what do you think the picture would be? I think we’d be in a different space?”

“It’s about keeping the discussion going, and people having success, and supporting small farmers. You can’t do enough to do that. Go out there and get to know your small farmer, find out what their issues are, and find out how you can help them stay in business.”

Resources:Oregon Food Bankhttp://www.oregonfoodbank.org

Presidio Graduate Schoolhttp://www.presidio.edu

023: The People Behind the Food
18:59
2017-09-27 09:24:24 UTC 18:59
023: The People Behind the Food

Organization:Bom Dia Market is an inviting corner market offering local and international beer and wine, freshly prepared foods, and thoughtfully sourced grocery and household staples. Bom Dia Market is setting a new standard in the service industry. Bom Dia Market is committed to valuing work-life balance, providing a living wage at all levels of the company, offering competitive benefits (including vacation time), and immersing employees in the intersection of local food lovers and food makers.

Topic:Creating Success by Focusing on Employees

Guest:Shivani Ganguly is the Proprietor of Bom Dia Market and the Principal at Friday Consulting. Previously, she led human resources, operations, and finance for startups and nonprofits. Shivani holds a BA from Stanford University, and an MBA from Presidio Graduate School.

Shivani Ganguly Twitterhttps://twitter.com/shivaniganguly

Take Away Quotes: “We think that great work places are really critical to the success of businesses overall. And we also, just at a base human level, want to make sure that the people we’re working with enjoy their work and are being paid equitably for it, and also have opportunities for growth and development.”

“There’s a real interest for our employees getting to know our customers. We have many, many regular customers; that’s a real cornerstone of our business. People who come in one or two times a day, and we’re a real regular part of their daily life. I think that a big part of that is not just our fantastic food, but it’s that personal connection with the employees who work there.”

“I think one of the biggest problems in the food industry is the culture that we see in kitchens, and that’s been something we’ve honestly struggled with over the past year or so. It’s often a very male dominated culture where people are expected to work for less than a living wage in a relatively unpleasant environment. We want to create this beautiful sustainably produced food and we’re not running our kitchens in that way. And I think that’s something that we as an organization are really tying to change.”

Resources:Bom Dia Markethttp://www.bomdiamarket.com/

Presidio Graduate Schoolhttp://www.presidio.edu

022: Valuing Food Artisans
25:30
2017-09-27 09:24:24 UTC 25:30
022: Valuing Food Artisans

Organization:Maker’s Common is a new eatery and market brought to you by the people of Mission Cheese. Imagine Mission Cheese but bigger, with an expanded menu and an attached, highly-curated market. It will feature America’s best cheese, beer, wine, charcuterie, and more in a space that is well-designed but casual, that pays homage to the makers of delicious food and beverage.

Maker’s Common is offering up to $600,000 in notes to pay for the buildout of a cheese and charcuterie bar and retail market. Any California resident can invest through our Direct Public Offering — it’s like crowdfunding but all grown up because investors earn a return on their investment. The minimum investment is $1,000 and investors earn 4% annual interest plus additional perks.

Topic:Taking an Artisan Approach to Financing

In This Episode:1:04 Mike and Carl discuss the current landscape for small businesses to acquire capital.2:55 Introduction to the episode3:49 Oliver gives the origin story of Mission Cheese.6:38 Oliver shares the vision and purpose for Mission Common.9:50 Mike asks Oliver why he chose to go the DPO route for financing Mission Common.15:04 How does Oliver’s values show up in the way he runs Mission Cheese?17:05 How does open book work and how has it been successful for Mission Cheese?21:28 Who can invest in Makers Common and how can they do so?

Guest:Oliver Dameron is the co-founder of Mission Cheese, which opened in 2011. Oliver has followed an interesting path to the good food industry. This path has included years as a coral reef scientist, where he managed multi-million dollar budgets and large teams of scientists, and work as a responsible investment analyst, vetting public companies for their social and environmental performance. After receiving his MBA from the Presidio Graduate School, Oliver joined a startup solar technology company, where he engaged in financial planning, fundraising, budget management, and business development. Currently, he operates as the chief financial officer and beer director at Mission Cheese, having earned his Certified Cicerone (equivalent to a beer sommelier) certification in 2013. He is also working to launch Maker’s Common, a new eatery and market. Imagine Mission Cheese but bigger, with an expanded menu and an attached, highly-curated market. Maker’s Common will feature America’s best cheese, beer, wine, charcuterie, and more in a space that is well-designed but casual, that pays homage to the makers of delicious food and beverage.

Mission Cheese Twitterhttps://twitter.com/missioncheese

Take Away Quotes: “It’s this great learning, you sort of start to understand the relationships of a variety of different things that influence your business and with all this you can imagine this white board of rows and different people in our company own different rows. And so I would say the ownership piece has really shined through because of that fact.”

“It really took, I would say, I year and a half for this system to kick in, which is probably about a year longer than most people would try. But because at the end of the day I want our staff to be able to say, “we” when they’re thinking about our business, and also because it allows Sarah and I to step away from the business a little bit more and think more about the future.”

“So it’s about five times as good as the best savings account, and that’s what I feel good about is allowing someone to invest where literally most people don’t have the opportunity to invest in a restaurant because people can’t advertise for that investment. So I feel like that’s a really great part of it is that it gives people an opportunity to invest in Main Street.”

Resources:Mission Cheesehttp://missioncheese.net/

Oliver Dameron Twitterhttps://twitter.com/oliverdameron

Presidio Graduate Schoolhttp://www.presidio.edu

 

021: Is This Working for You?
27:15
2017-09-27 09:24:24 UTC 27:15
021: Is This Working for You?

Organization:The Local Mission Market was founded on a truly revolutionary idea. All markets--from big boxes to tiny boutiques--have always been and still are aggregators: They distinguish themselves by the products they buy, whether industrial or artisanal production. Either way, the food you buy is not made there and not by people you know. At Local Mission Market, we are the producers. We are the makers. Every day, on-site, in view of every customer and in conversation with you, we craft granola, pasta, crackers, jams, pickles, sausages, soups, side salads, dips, dressing, popcorn, oat bars, marshmallows, and more and more.

Topic:An Exploration of Local Food Systems

In This Episode:1:46 Introduction to this episode.2:17 Introduction of Yaron Milgrom.2:43 Yaron describes San Francisco’s Mission District.4:21 Yaron shares his story that lead him to the food industry.6:08 Yaron talks about why local is important to Local Mission Group.9:36 How does Yaron make sure that their system works for their employees?11:42 Yaron discusses the disparity in our food economy. 13:16 Yaron gives advice on how businesses can work with local residents in a way that benefits all parties. 19:10 Can the Local Mission Group model be replicated in other climate areas?22:44 How can listeners learn more about Local Mission Group and support the work they do?

Guests:Yaron Milgrom is the owner of Local Mission Group and operates Local Mission Eatery, Local Mission Market, and Local Cellar. In 2010, with Chef Jake Des Voignes, Yaron opened Local Mission Eatery. Dedicated to rigorously local sourcing, from-scratch cooking, and transparency with our customers, the Eatery launched as a sandwich shop with two employees. Now, Local Mission Group owns and operates a full-service restaurant (another, Local’s Corner, a local seafood restaurant opened in 2012 and closed in 2014), a local and handmade market (Local Mission Market, which opened in November 2013), and a California wine, craft-beer, and spirits bottle shop (Local Cellar in February 2014). Local Mission Group has over 40 employees and supports dozens local of farmers, ranchers, fishermen, and winemakers. Prior to opening Local Mission Eatery, Yaron received a MA in Medieval Jewish Mysticism at New York University. With his wife and three kids, he lives in the Mission District of San Francisco, just blocks from his businesses.

Local Mission Market Twitterhttps://twitter.com/LocalMarketSF

 

Take Away Quotes: “Local for us is something very different. Always it’s going to ask the people involved in the food that we serve, from the farmer who’s growing it, the farm workers who are picking it and putting it in the ground and maybe bringing it to market, to the people that we employ, and also really to those who are coming into the shop- asking all of them if it’s working for them.”

“I think one of the weirdest parts about the food industry is when you have employees who are really committed, love the food that they’re serving, committed to the valley’s excellence in food, but can’t afford to actually eat that way themselves. So at the baseline when you speak of the humanity in the industry, it has to start, I think, at…at least that they’r eating well.”

“We have an employee base that is representative of the diversity of the mission and that’s neighborly so you see the people that you’re serving, you see the people you’re cooking for, and they live next to you. This is part of it being personal. To build care for the people, and the reason why you may be spending more, to build care is about the faces attached to them and be able to see them. So it’s one thing when you see them across the counter or across the butcher counter in the kitchen, and it’s another thing when you see them walking down the street.”

Resources:Local Mission Eateryhttp://www.localmissioneatery.com/

Local Mission Markethttp://www.localmissionmarket.com/

Local Cellarhttp://www.localcellarsf.com/

Presidio Graduate Schoolhttp://www.presidio.edu

 

 

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit at eosummit.com

020: Portland is a Movable Side Yard Feast
25:36
2017-09-27 09:24:24 UTC 25:36
020: Portland is a Movable Side Yard Feast

Organization:The Side Yard is an urban farm, supper club and catering company located in the NE Cully Neighborhood in Portland, Oregon. Since 2009 they have provided local restaurants with creative organic produce and the community with food, education and opportunity. The farm is largely operated by volunteers and interns who gain hands on experience with the urban seed to plate movement. The Side Yard offers urban farm suppers & brunches, private catering, nomadic pop-ups, educational DIY workshops, farm tours and grief groups. Their focus is to provide local food for the local community, from the seeds they sow, animals they raise, and to the craftsmanship they embrace.

Topic:Providing local food to the local community

In This Episode:1:34 Introduction to this episode.2:36 Introduction of Stacey Givens.3:26 Stacey describes how their farm works.4:43 Stacey talks about the amount of produce that The Side Yard grows.5:32 Stacey explains how they are staffed and how they depend on volunteers.6:15 What specifically does The Side Yard grow and how is that unique?7:41 What is the Nomadic Supper Club?11:20 How did Stacey end up being a farmer, chef, and innovative entrepreneur?13:48 How does community play a role in supporting the work of The Side Yard?15:44 What educational opportunities does The Side Yard provide?18:19 How does The Side Yard care for its employees?19:25 What does local mean in context of their operation?21:14 How can listeners learn more about The Side Yard and support the work?22:03 If Stacey could sit down with her future self, what would the future Stacey say about the importance and impact of the work she’s doing?

Guest:Stacey Givens is the farmer, chef and owner of The Side Yard Farm & Kitchen in Northeast Portland, Oregon’s Cully Neighborhood. Givens grows diverse organic produce for Portland’s top restaurants and provides food, education and opportunity to her community. Givens was raised the youngest of seven children in a large Greek family in Redondo Beach, California where she was instilled with do-it-yourself values from a young age, farming in their backyard garden and small orchard, foraging with her mom, picking and brining olives and helping prepare large Greek family-style suppers. Givens has been in the food industry since age 15. She worked her way up the West Coast, including at the nationally acclaimed Millennium in San Francisco, before landing in Portland in 2006. Givens established The Side Yard Farm in 2009. The Side Yard Farm & Kitchen currently consists of several urban farm lots maintained by Givens and her team, a farm-to-table private catering company, and the ‘Nomadic Chef’ supper club where she features her urban-grown goods. Givens also organizes invaluable community services at The Side Yard like DIY workshops, grief support groups and kids camps. While The Side Yard has a hyperlocal focus, Givens’ drive to build a strong community and make lasting connections with talented and passionate people is globally-minded, traveling around the world to meet fellow organic farmers and chefs. In 2014, Givens was the recipient of Portland’s Local Hero award in the chef category, and continues to give back to the community she loves through volunteerism and her indispensable work at The Side Yard. In 2015, she competed on the Foodnetwork’s ‘Chopped’ and brought home the win for Portland.

Stacey Givens Twitterhttps://twitter.com/thesideyardpdx

Take Away Quotes:“It’s all about the experience of seed to plate. All of that was harvested the day before, the day of. You can just taste the freshness and that connection of hyper local.”

“After I lost my father I decided I’m done with going to grief groups in hospitals- why not have one at the farm. It’s such a beautiful place and I think it’d be easier for people to share the loss of their loved one…and we just become this big ole family.”

“I hope that what we’re doing is we’re teaching people that being local is really important, being organic is extremely important, and I guess that’s what I would hope for is that we’re doing our job educating people and bringing them closer to their food.”

Resources:The Side Yardhttp://www.thesideyardpdx.com/

Presidio Graduate Schoolhttp://www.presidio.edu

 

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit at eosummit.com

 

 

 

019: Making Healthy Food Available to All with The Food Trust
20:23
2017-09-27 09:24:24 UTC 20:23
019: Making Healthy Food Available to All with The Food Trust

Organization:The Food Trust is a nationally recognized nonprofit dedicated to ensuring that everyone has access to affordable, nutritious food and information to make healthy decisions. Headquartered in Philadelphia, The Food Trust works with neighborhoods, schools, grocers, farmers and policymakers in the city and across the country to develop a comprehensive approach to improved food access that combines nutrition education and greater availability of affordable, healthy food.

Topic:How the Food Trust brings healthy food options to underserved communities

In This Episode:1:33 Introduction to this episode.2:05 Introduction of Kamaryn Norris.3:03 What does the Food Trust do, and what is Kamaryn’s role?4:50 What is the Food Trust’s origin story?7:09 What impact is the Food Trust having?9:15 How can others make something like the Food Trust happen in their community?10:40 What are the biggest food challenges that our country faces, and how is the Food Trust helping overcome those?12:26 Kamaryn shares her work with healthy food finance programs.15:50 How can people find out more about the Food Trust and get involved with the work of the Food Trust?17:12 What would the future Kamaryn say about the work that is being done now?

Guest:Kamaryn Norris is a Project Associate for the National Campaign for Healthy Food Access at the Food Trust, a Philadelphia-based, national non-profit with the mission of ensuring everyone has access to affordable, nutritious foods and information to make healthy decisions. Kamaryn advocates for policies that support the development of grocery stores across the country in areas that lack access to healthy foods and facilitates the National Working Group, which ensures that access is equitable and reaching the most vulnerable populations. She also works on The Healthy Food Access Portal, an online resource that connects community members, retailers, and advocates to an array of news, strategies, and ideas to promote access to healthy food. Kamaryn believes that it is a basic human right to be able to have a healthy diet that is good for you, no matter where you live. An Atlanta native, Kamaryn earned dual bachelor’s degrees in Sociology and Rhetoric & Public Advocacy from Temple University. She enjoys playing and watching tennis, traveling, and has a love for the snow and all things cold weather.Kamaryn Norris LinkedIn-https://www.linkedin.com/in/Kamaryn

Take Away Quotes:“We work with adult nutrition education, we also work in schools with youth to help them be leaders around healthy food eating, we also have a farmers market program, we put nutritious into corner stores because for a lot of people that’s the only place where they can get food at all, and we work on local, state, and federal policy change to encourage grocery store development.”

“I really think of this as it’s a human right to be able to eat real food so you can live a happy life. It’s a social justice issue really and it’s something that is very complex and very complicated and we’re always learning.”

“What we’ve been seeing from this is that we’re reaching people that are often hard to get to in the current health system. We’re seeing largely black men that are coming and frequenting these events and they’re bringing their families and people they know. So it’s really all about meeting people where they are for access.”

“There’s shorter term impact that you can see and you can measure but then there’s much longer terms and those are the health impacts and that’s our ultimate goal and what drives us.”

Resources:The Food Trustwww.thefoodtrust.org

The Healthy Food Access Portalwww.healthyfoodaccess.org

Presidio Graduate Schoolhttp://www.presidio.edu

 

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit at eosummit.com

 

 

 

018: Changing Lives One Clairesquare at a Time with La Cocina
20:25
2017-09-27 09:24:24 UTC 20:25
018: Changing Lives One Clairesquare at a Time with La Cocina

La Cocina is a non-profit incubator kitchen based in San Francisco, CA that prides itself on cultivating food entrepreneurs. La Cocina provides affordable commercial kitchen space and hands on technical assistance to low income and immigrant entrepreneurs who are launching, growing, and formalizing food businesses. La Cocina prioritizes women entrepreneurs with a special focus on immigrant women and women of color. Their vision is for entrepreneurs to gain financial security by doing what they love to do, thereby creating an innovative, vibrant, and inclusive economic landscape.

Topic:Changing Lives and Communities by Equipping Food Entrepreneurs with La Cocina

In This Episode:1:38 Introduction to this episode.2:05 Introduction of Jessica Mataka.2:57 Jessica shares the work and mission of La Cocina.5:29 How did La Cocina get started and how did it get connected with entrepreneurs?6:27 Jessica shares her role at La Cocina.8:00 Why does La Cocina focus on helping women entrepreneurs?8:29 How is the work of the graduates of La Cocina impacting their lives, the lives of their families, and their communities?11:07 What has been the economic impact of La Cocina?11:40 Jessica shares stories of success from graduates of La Cocina.14:05 How can listeners get involved with and support the work of La Cocina?17:21 If future Jessica could talk with current Jessica, what will she have to say about the work the La Cocina team is doing?

Guests:Jessica Mataka is a California-born, human rights and environmental activist. She’s organized on behalf of mission-based non-profit Global Exchange, designed and implemented a curriculum focusing on anti-human trafficking efforts throughout high schools in the Bay Area and recently returned from Huaycán, Peru, where she taught an original program focusing on the intersection of art and activism. She is now happily employed as the Communications and Development Associate at La Cocina.Jessica Mataka Twitter- https://twitter.com/jesmatakaJessica Mataka LinkedIn- https://www.linkedin.com/in/jessicamataka

Organization:La Cocina is a non-profit incubator kitchen providing affordable commercial kitchen space and hands-on technical assistance to low-income and immigrant entrepreneurs who are launching, growing and formalizing food businesses. La Cocina prioritizes women entrepreneurs with a special focus on immigrant women and women of color. Their vision is that entrepreneurs gain financial security by doing what they love to do, creating an innovative, vibrant and inclusive economic landscape.

Take Away Quotes:“I think giving someone the tools to be economically self-sufficient is an extremely important point in and of itself. Women are change makers. They are innovators and their equality is so essential to both the social and economic development of human kind. In a report I recently read from the world bank, it stated that women usually reinvest a much higher portion of their income back into their families and communities than men, and turn their spreading wealth beyond just themselves.”

“My hope is that San Francisco will continue to be a city that values diversity and values inclusive food economies and is a place where people from all walks of life can make a living doing what they love to do, especially if that includes starting a food business.”

“Nationally only 28.7% of businesses are owned by women. In an effort to counterbalance that, 98% of La Cocina’s businesses are run by women. So we’re just trying to level the playing field a little bit.”

“One of the most important things you can do on a daily basis is to eat thoughtfully and advocate for good food policies, and use your purchasing power to support owner operated restaurants.”

“My hope is that in 20 years I’ll be able to look around the city of San Francisco and see these businesses that were started through La Cocina and see them continue to thrive and see their family take over their business and continue to operate it once they’ve passed their working years.”

Resources:La Concina: Cultivating Food Entrepreneurshttp://www.lacocinasf.org

La Cocina Facebook Pagehttps://www.facebook.com/lacocinasforg

The Story Exchangehttp://thestoryexchange.org/la-cocina/

Presidio Graduate Schoolhttp://www.presidio.edu

 

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit at eosummit.com

017: Extreme Makeover: Ugly Produce Edition with Raley’s Family of Fine Stores
19:54
2017-09-27 09:24:24 UTC 19:54
017: Extreme Makeover: Ugly Produce Edition with Raley’s Family of Fine Stores

As much as 40 percent of all the food produced in the United States never gets eaten and typically ends up in landfills or goes unharvested in the field, according to the Natural Resources Defense Council. Megan Burritt, Aspen Institute First Mover Fellow and director of sustainability and wellness at Raley’s Family of Fine Stores, saw an opportunity to address this issue, developing pathways that connect fresh food waste in the supply chain with food insecure consumers. This led the company to design a new program, dubbed “Real Good” produce, to sell imperfect fruits and vegetables to food insecure customers, at a highly discounted price. Learn more about this program here: http://www.aspeninstitute.org/about/blog/aspen-first-mover-fellow-tackles-food-waste-while-feeding-food-insecure#sthash.a2q39kN1.dpuf

Topic:Decreasing Food Waste Through the Real Good Produce Program

In This Episode:0:27 Introduction to this episode.2:44 Introduction of Meg Burritt.3:14 Meg shares her background and role as the Director of Wellness and Sustainability at Raley’s.5:04 What is Raley’s and how many stores are there?5:50 What is the Aspen Institute’s First Movers Fellowship Program and how does that fit into Meg’s work?7:02 What is the Real Good Produce program and how is it linked to the ugly food movement?8:10 How does Raley’s deal with internal food waste?9:35 How does Raley’s food program impact prices for their customers?11:37 What type of environmental impact does the program have?14:58 What were the risks that Raley’s had to consider before starting the Real Good Produce program?15:51 How can people learn more and get involved with this program?17:05 What does Meg hope will be the impact of her work 30 years from now?

Guests:Megan Burritt is Raley’s Supermarkets Director of Wellness and Sustainability. Passionate about creating sustainable food systems and bringing good, clean food to the everyday American, Meg has lived every link in the food chain, from working on the farm to line cooking to category management. Meg attended Stanford as an undergrad, majoring in Human Biology, and is a graduate of Presidio Graduate School where she obtained an MBA in Sustainable Management. As a 2014 First Movers Fellow with the Aspen Institute Business and Society Program, Meg continues to learn and grow as an innovator. First Movers is a group of exceptional innovators in business who are creating new products, services and management practices that achieve greater profitability and positive social and environmental impacts. Meg lives in beautiful Curtis Park, Sacramento where she enjoys baking, riding bikes and spending time with her veterinarian wife, Amanda, and their family of rescue animals. Twitter - https://twitter.com/misskeen LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/meganburritt

Organization:Raley's Supermarkets (also known as Raley's Family of Fine Stores) is a privately held, family-owned, regional grocery chain that operates stores under the Raley's, Bel Air Markets, Nob Hill Foods, and Food Source names in northern California and Nevada. Raley’s operates 128 stores, 40 of them in the Greater Sacramento area and employs around 13,400 workers today. Headquartered in West Sacramento, California, Raley's is the dominant supermarket operator in the Sacramento metropolitan area.

Take Away Quotes:“Up to 40% of the food that we grow here in America is often wasted before it gets to the consumer. That’s the high end of the statistic, but it really is mind boggling when you think about that much food that we’re putting resources into growing, that isn’t getting into the hands of people who would like to eat it.”

“At Raley’s we do still have some produce waste because some of it just goes off while it’s waiting to be purchased at the grocery store. And we actually divert from the landfill. We send all of our produce waste to an anaerobic bio-digester where it becomes essentially compost and then natural gas energy.”

“We are used to selling only one type of very perfectly shaped, sized, and colored fruits and vegetables in conventional grocery stores. So to go out here with this what people sometime call “ugly produce” we were taking a little bit of a risk. But we did see a really positive reception with our consumers that they understand that every fruit and vegetable is unique and it’s still nutritious and delicious no matter what it looks like.”

“People don’t realize that the food sector is the largest producer of greenhouse gasses of all our sectors, including transportation. So if you have an industry that’s wasting 40% of its effort, there’s this huge opportunity to reduce waste, to reduce environmental impacts, to reduce greenhouse gas impacts, at the same time reduce food costs [and] deal with issues of food insecurity. So across the board it’s just vitally important work.” Resources:Aspen Institute http://www.aspeninstitute.org

Aspen Institute - First Movers Fellowship Program http://www.aspeninstitute.org/policy-work/business-society/corporate-programs/first-movers-fellowship-program

Raley’s Supermarkets http://www.raleys.com/www/home.jsp

PBS News Hour Video on Food Waste http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/almost-half-americas-food-go-waste/

Presidio Graduate Schoolhttp://www.presidio.edu

 

 

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit at eosummit.com

016: Sustainable Food (and Management Education) with Presidio Graduate School
32:35
2017-09-27 09:24:24 UTC 32:35
016: Sustainable Food (and Management Education) with Presidio Graduate School

In this episode of Equitable Opportunity Radio, we begin a new series on the relationship between food and equitable opportunity. In today’s food culture, we’re seeing a rising number of individuals, businesses and communities that are rethinking how we grow, process, and consume our food. In this series we partner with Presidio Graduate School to bring you a series of stories about the pioneers who are working to innovate and transform our food system into one that promotes better health for people, the planet, and the economy.

Topic: The Relationship Between Food and Equitable Opportunity

In This Episode:0:29 Introduction to Food and Equitable Opportunity Series1:46 Introduction of guests4:30 What is Presidio Graduate School?6:55 Karen shares her background and passion for sustainable food systems.8:38 Dan shares his background and tells the story of his company, Regrained.10:48 For Karen, how do her passions for food and sustainability intersect?12:19 What is the future of food and sustainability?13:30 For Dan, how did his passion for food and sustainability come together?14:38 What is the future of Regrained?17:52 How is the sustainability field addressing equity?20:33 What are the implications of a more sustainable food system?22:12 How does a sustainable food system impact quality of life and earning a living wage?28:05 What should the food production system look like 30 years from now?

Guests: Dr. Steven Crane, Associate Dean of the MBA program at Presidio Graduate School.Karen Williams is the co-chair of the Presidio Sustainable Food Club and works at the Nexus of Urban Sustainability and Food.Dan Kurzrock is the co-chair of the Presidio Sustainable Food Club, as well as the Executive Grain Officer of ReGrained, a company that repurposes “spent” beer grain to create healthy, delicious, and sustainable products.

Organization: Presidio Graduate School is a school driven to educate leaders and transform the world. Presidio has a diverse student body and delivers education courses in virtual and in-person modes. Presidio offers an MBA and MPA program, as well as a dual MBA and MPA program. Karen and Dan are examples of the quality leadership that Presidio is growing and fostering with their degree programs.

Karen and Dan bring their passion for economics, social justice, healthy food, and easy access to food to their respective roles. They each understand that everything is connected. How we grow and distribute food, and reduce the amount of waste involved in it will provide enormous economic opportunity. If we help create ownership on how to grow the food, develop the market, and deliver it to market, we’ve created a way that addresses economic opportunity with those who have not previously had it.

Take Away Quotes:“We want our business to be something that creates jobs and we want it to be a really active player in our sustainable economy.”

“It is a holistic system so if you’re not addressing the social equity piece, then long term you can’t be totally sustainable.”

“It’s not just access to good food, but that also drives ability to maintain good health. So it really is all connected and that’s what I find so fascinating and exciting about it.”

“Food is such a massive industry and it has such a huge impact on our communities and our planet. The needs of today and our food system are are largely being prioritized over those of tomorrow and I became interested in ways that I could use business to counter balance that.”

Resources:http://www.regrained.com/https://www.facebook.com/Presidio-Sustainable-Food-Club-271823156176366/timeline/http://www.presidio.edu/

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit at eosummit.com

015: Broadening Women’s Roles in Hollywood, a Camp Reel Stories participant’s pursuit of diversity in the film industry
18:28
2017-09-27 09:24:24 UTC 18:28
015: Broadening Women’s Roles in Hollywood, a Camp Reel Stories participant’s pursuit of diversity in the film industry

In this episode of Equitable Opportunity Radio, Sydney Torrens, a high school student and participant in Camp Reel Stories joins the conversation to share her perspective on the media’s role in shaping people’s perception of world. Even as a young adult, Sydney understands the huge impact the media has on women’s ability to participate equally in the workplace and in the economy. She explains how Camp Reel Stories has provided her with the inside scoop on Hollywood and guidance on how women are successfully navigating the famously male-dominated film industry.

Topic: Broadening Women’s Roles in Hollywood and Pursuing Diversity in the Film Industry

Guest: Sydney Torrens is a student from Saratoga High School in San Jose, California. Sydney attended Camp Reel Stories during the summers of 2014 and 2015.

Organization: Camp Reel Stories is a one-week media camp for girls who want to learn how to make movies in the new digital media era. The camp has a powerful team of women active in the industry who will teach the “secret language” of media – the skills, tools and technologies. Working in small, collaborative groups, this camp gives the campers the opportunity to make and broadcast their own short films through:

  1. Production Classes
  2. Media Literacy Lessons
  3. Leadership Workshops

Film and Television is a multi-billion dollar industry and it can seem very secretive and exclusive, but the industry is going through a process of great transformation right now. Anyone can tell their story and distribute it to the world via online and social media platforms like youtube, vimeo, etc… Girls are still famously underrepresented, both behind the scenes and on screen, but Camp Reel Stories intends to teach our campers that, with the right tools and training, they hold the key to a revolution in the media industry. Their dreams are within reach.

Website - http://campreelstories.com

Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/CampReelStories

Twitter -  https://twitter.com/CampReelStories

Take Away Quotes:

“Esther took all of our films and distributed them to a bunch of different film festivals... It was just the coolest thing… They played our film with several other young filmmakers… It was just great to be there amongst other young filmmakers and also filmmakers who have been in the business for a while.”

“It was really eye-opening to see how the film industry runs, and see how these women have made their way through it. It’s such a tough business, so it was really inspiring to see people who have made it successfully.”

“It got me excited… It exposed me to the issues of gender inequality in film and media… It opened up a door, and the door just kind of said, ‘This is for you, you should come in and be a part of this movement to get women in film.’”

“I met so many incredible women, and I just learned that there is a need for diversity in Hollywood, and I definitely want to be someone who brings that to the table.”

“When you look up to these women who are so interesting and have such awesome lives, like Esther, she has an incredible life, she’s had this awesome career, and it definitely showed me I can have something similar to that if I go down this path.”

Additional Resources:

Watch Sydney’s latest Camp Reel Stories film: http://campreelstories.com/films/sleepy-house/

Watch Sydney’s film from Summer 2014: http://campreelstories.com/films/filtered-eyespot-films/

Hear Sydney’s thoughts about being part of the Portland Oregon Women’s Film Festival (POWFest): http://campreelstories.com/a-powfest-recap/

Learn more about the Portland Oregon Women’s Film Festival (POWFest): http://powfest.com/

Be a part of creating a more inclusive media landscape by supporting Camp Reel Stories’ efforts to empower and train young women for careers in the film industry: http://campreelstories.com/donate/

Do you know a girl who might benefit from Camp Reel Stories? Apply to be part of Camp Reel Stories: http://campreelstories.com/2015-application/

Does your favorite movie pass the Bechdel Test? Check out the Bechdel Test Movie List: http://bechdeltest.com/

 

 

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit at eosummit.com

014: Training young women for employment in film careers—how Esther Pearl and Camp Reel Stories are creating a more inclusive media landscape
22:09
2017-09-27 09:24:24 UTC 22:09
014: Training young women for employment in film careers—how Esther Pearl and Camp Reel Stories are creating a more inclusive media landscape

In this episode of Equitable Opportunity Radio, we talk with Esther Pearl, the Founder and Executive Director of Camp Reel Stories, a media camp for young women. Esther joins the conversation to share with us about the under-representation of women both in front of and behind the camera in the film industry and the profound effect this has on our society and our economy.

Camp Reel Stories teaches young women how to make movies in the new digital media era. The camp has a powerful team of women active in the industry who teach the “secret language” of media – the skills, tools and technologies. Working in small, collaborative groups, the camp gives the campers the opportunity to make and broadcast their own short films through: Production Classes, Media Literacy Lessons, Leadership Workshops.

The Film and Television Industry is a multi-billion dollar industry and it can seem very secretive and exclusive. However, it is going through a process of great transformation right now. Anyone can tell their story and distribute it to the world via online and social media platforms like Youtube, Vimeo, and so one. Girls are still famously underrepresented, both behind the scenes and on screen, but Camp Reel Stories intends to teach their campers that, with the right tools and training, they hold the key to a revolution in the media industry. Their dreams are within reach.

Topic: Women in the Media and Gender Equity in our Society

Guest: Esther Pearl is the founder and Executive Director of Camp Reel Stories. She received her Bachelor's in Visual Arts from University of California, San Diego and her M.B.A. in Sustainable Management from The Presidio Graduate School. She has spent 15 years working in Production Management in the Entertainment Industry. The majority of her career was spent at Pixar Animation Studios where her feature film credits include Academy Award winning films The Incredibles and Wall-e, as well as Monsters, Inc. Her other credits include; Titanic, Starship Troopers, Armageddon and What Dreams May Come. She was also a founding board member and the former President of the Board of Bay Area Girls Rock Camp (BAGRC). Esther believes in the power of great storytelling to create social change.

Organization: Camp Reel Stories is a one-week media camp for girls who want to learn how to make movies in the new digital media era. The camp has a powerful team of women active in the industry who will teach the “secret language” of media – the skills, tools and technologies. Working in small, collaborative groups, this camp gives the campers the opportunity to make and broadcast their own short films through:

  1. Production Classes
  2. Media Literacy Lessons
  3. Leadership Workshops

Film and Television is a multi-billion dollar industry and it can seem very secretive and exclusive, but the industry is going through a process of great transformation right now. Anyone can tell their story and distribute it to the world via online and social media platforms like youtube, vimeo, etc… Girls are still famously underrepresented, both behind the scenes and on screen, but Camp Reel Stories intends to teach our campers that, with the right tools and training, they hold the key to a revolution in the media industry. Their dreams are within reach.

Website - http://campreelstories.com

Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/CampReelStories

Twitter -  https://twitter.com/CampReelStories

Take Away Quotes:

“When women and girls are better represented behind the scenes in the media, they’ll be better reflected on the screen.”

“Right now whenever you turn on the television or watch a movie, for every girl you see on screen, you see four to five boys. And that has actually been the same since 1948.”

“I’ve been working in the media since I was 16... I’ve had a great career, but I’ve certainly known the feeling of being one of the only women in the room.”

“The media is the most prevalent and pervasive industry that we have at the moment… until we change the way media presents both women and people of color, we’re not going to have more women in the C-suite, in political office, because until girls are starting to see the possibilities and roles presented to them at a very young age, they’re not going to even start thinking about those as possibilities for their career. What we’re seeing, even with 15 and 16 year old girls, they’re taking themselves out of the game of life before they even know the rules. They’re pulling back their hopes, dreams, and aspirations because they don’t see it as a possibility for them. And it’s 2015.”

“By the end of the week the girls understand how to nurture their own unique voice, how to create their own media and understand the technology… and they also understand how to view media more critically and more thoughtfully.”

Additional Resources:

Be a part of creating a more inclusive media landscape by supporting Camp Reel Stories’ efforts to empower and train young women for careers in the film industry: http://campreelstories.com/donate/

Watch all the Camp Reel Stories films here: http://campreelstories.com/films/

Do you know a girl who might benefit from Camp Reel Stories? Apply to be part of Camp Reel Stories: http://campreelstories.com/2015-application/

 

 

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit at eosummit.com

013: From Unemployed Berkeley Dropout to Climate Change Warrior the Tyi Johnson and Rising Sun Energy Center Story
15:25
2017-09-27 09:24:24 UTC 15:25
013: From Unemployed Berkeley Dropout to Climate Change Warrior the Tyi Johnson and Rising Sun Energy Center Story

In this episode of Equitable Opportunity Radio, we talk with Tyi Johnson a graduate of the Green Energy Training Services (GETS) program at Rising Sun Energy Center. Tyi shares her personal journey from dropping out of UC Berkeley because she could not afford the tuition to working full-time in a green job as part of the Smart Lights Program at Community Energy Services Corporation.

Topic: The Green Economy and Workforce Development

Guest: Tyi Johnson is a graduate of the Green Energy Training Services program at Rising Sun Energy Center and an employee of Community Energy Services Corporation. She also serves on Rising Sun Energy Center’s Board of Directors.

Organization: The Smart Lights Program at Community Energy Services Corporation is designed to help small businesses become more energy-efficient. The program offers free start-to-finish technical assistance and instant rebates to help defray the cost of upgrading and/or repairing existing equipment. SmartLights helps with comprehensive lighting retrofits, refrigeration tune-ups, controls, and seals replacement, and referrals to appropriate HVAC programs. Their services include: a no cost and no obligation energy-efficiency assessment, instant rebates (typically range from 25%-75% of total project costs), negotiated volume pricing with qualified installation contractors, free start-to-finish project management and quality control, rebates paid directly to contractors to help defray out-of-pocket costs, and referrals to other energy efficiency programs as needed. Take a look at some of Community Energy Services Coporation's work on cafes,auto repair shops,facilities, and retail stores.

Website - http://ebenergy.org/commercial-services/smart-lights-program/

Facebook -https://www.facebook.com/Community-Energy-Services-Corporation-610255012322031

Take Away Quotes:

“After the internship ended, it was hard-going for me. This is when unemployment was at an all-time high... I stayed the course, I was meeting with my case-manager week after week. I really appreciate the fact that Rising Sun continued to collaborate with me and to encourage me and work with me until I was gainfully employed.”

“I feel like Rising Sun and the GETS program have put me in the prime position to be doing what I’m doing right now... I had three reasons why I joined GETS program: to learn about the green field, to learn about the energy efficiency field and by extension sustainability, and to learn how to save on my PG&E bill. And they did all three of those things for me. So it’s really great that I got all of those things, and got employed in the green energy efficiency field.”

“If I can empower others to be good stewards of this one great beautiful planet called Earth that we have, then I’ll do so, and I’m so appreciative of Rising Sun for setting me on that path.”

 

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit at eosummit.com

012: Green Job Training and Workforce Development, Jodi Pincus, Rising Sun Energy Center
22:50
2017-09-27 09:24:24 UTC 22:50
012: Green Job Training and Workforce Development, Jodi Pincus, Rising Sun Energy Center

This episode of Equitable Opportunity Radio explores what one leading workforce development organization is doing to simultaneously address climate change, water shortages, youth employment and obstacles to employment for low income adults. Rising Sun Energy Center, a green workforce development and energy retrofit services organization, works throughout the San Francisco Bay area to develop a green workforce while reducing environmental impacts and saving low income families money on their utilities.  Rising Sun Energy Center’s Executive Director Jodi Pincus is our guest. Jodi is a recognized expert in the green economy, youth employment, social enterprise and workforce development.

Topic:  The Green Economy, Youth Employment and Workforce Development

Guest:  Jodi Pincus is the Executive Director of Rising Sun Energy Center and a recognized expert in the green economy, youth employment, social enterprise and workforce development.

Organization:  Rising Sun Energy Center is a green workforce development and energy retrofit services organization working throughout the San Francisco Bay area. Their mission is to empower individuals to achieve environmental and economic sustainability for themselves and their communities. Rising Sun Energy Center runs three programs, which include the California Youth Energy Services (CYES), Leaders-in-Field-Training (LIFT) and Green Energy Training Services (GETS). The CYES program includes summer and after-school programs that train and employ young adults ages 15 to 22 to provide no-cost Green House Calls (energy efficiency and water conservation upgrades) to homes in their community. The LIFT program gives top employees in Rising Sun's CYES program peer leadership roles and teaches business and leadership skills. The GETS program is a pre-apprenticeship training program that prepares adults for careers in construction, energy efficiency, and the solar industry.

Website - http://www.risingsunenergy.org/

Blog - https://risingsunenergy.wordpress.com/

Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/risingsunenergycenter

Twitter -  https://twitter.com/RisingSunEC

Take Away Quotes:

“We believe that you can’t solve climate change without addressing unemployment.”

“Our youth, not only are they earning money and feeling a sense of purpose by doing the work but they’re gaining a lot of self-confidence, self-esteem; they’re going on to careers in business, social service, and environmental science.”

“This wonderful young man… he was in the foster care system… he came out of prison and into our job training program, and he had never graduated from anything in his life, and he graduated from our program.”

Additional Resources:

Rising Sun Energy Center’s Best Green Resources - http://www.risingsunenergy.org/content/links.html

Rising Sun Energy Center’s California Youth Energy Services (CYES) - http://www.risingsunenergy.org/content/cyes.html

Rising Sun Energy Center’s Green Energy Training Services (GETS) - http://www.risingsunenergy.org/content/gets.html

Rising Sun Bright Night 2015 (Participants of the California Youth Energy Services and Green Energy Training Services programs explain what Rising Sun means to them, and how it has affected their lives.) - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m26oP0NUs4Q

 

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit at eosummit.com

 

011: Equity: The Neglected Pillar of Sustainability, Bob Willard, Sustainability Advantage
24:44
2017-09-27 09:24:24 UTC 24:44
011: Equity: The Neglected Pillar of Sustainability, Bob Willard, Sustainability Advantage

This episode of Equitable Opportunity Radio covers the role equity has played in the sustainability movement to date and the future of equity as a measure of sustainability in the future. Our guest, Bob Willard, is a best-selling author and a globally recognized thought leader on the topics of making the business case for sustainability and measuring an organization's sustainability.

Bob shares with us his thoughts on the biggest global challenges (carbon, water, and poverty) we face. He also discusses why, to date, equity has not been as important of a part of the sustainability conversation as it should be and what he thinks the major measures of equity are for corporations (hint...employee compensation and paying fair taxes in the appropriate location).

Bob also explains the details of his latest project, the Future-Fit Business Benchmark, which when complete will be a more definitive set of metrics that can be used to measure the sustainability of businesses, government, and households.

Topic: Equity: The Neglected Third Pillar of Sustainability

Guest: Bob Willard is a leading expert on quantifying and selling the business value of corporate sustainability strategies and has given hundreds of keynote presentations to corporate, government, university, and NGO audiences. He has authored four books on sustainability including : The Sustainability Advantage (2002), The Next Sustainability Wave (2005), and The New Sustainability Advantage (2012).

Organization: Sustainability Advantage

Website - http://sustainabilityadvantage.com/

Twitter - https://twitter.com/bob_willard

LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/bobwillardsustainabilityguy

Take Away Quotes:

“Companies get a lot of good PR from being helpful in the community... but it’s nowhere close to the investment that they are not making when they duck paying their taxes.”On companies paying a living wage: “The turnover of employees is reduced dramatically… When people start to make a little bit more money, they are more empowered consumers… it’s better for the economy, it’s better for the government… and they become known as a company that really cares.”“The myth around this being a bad business proposition is hard to overcome, but it’s a myth, it’s not true. It really does pay to pay more.”

Additional Resources:

Future-Fit Business Benchmark - http://futurefitbusiness.org/

Future-Fit Business Benchmark Wiki - http://wiki.futurefitbusiness.org/Welcome

Future-Fit Business on Twitter - https://twitter.com/futurefitbiz

 

 

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit at eosummit.com

 

010: Revitalization in Baltimore after Freddie Gray, Mel Freeman, Citizens Planning & Housing Association
20:12
2017-09-27 09:24:24 UTC 20:12
010: Revitalization in Baltimore after Freddie Gray, Mel Freeman, Citizens Planning & Housing Association

On this episode of Equitable Opportunity Radio, we explore the revitalization challenges facing neighborhoods in West Baltimore before and after the tragic death of Freddie Gray. Our guest, Mel Freeman,  is a long-time community development activist and consultant and the former Executive Director of Citizens Planning & Housing Association in Baltimore, Maryland. Mel shares how inadequate access to quality infrastructure, services, and employment opportunities acts as a major barrier to community revitalization and economic participation for many residents of Baltimore. He stresses how vitally important it is to engage directly with residents in these neighborhoods to empower them and to work with them to build enduring solutions. Public resources are not adequate to shift the dynamic in many of these neighborhoods so Mel is focused on how to create conditions that will stimulate private investment in these neighborhoods while simultaneously lifting up and not displacing the majority of current residents. One particular focus of Mel’s work is to help members of these communities have hope, believe in themselves, empower themselves and become a force for change.

Topic: Revitalization in Baltimore after Freddie Gray

Guest: Mel Freeman is the former Executive Director of Citizens Planning & Housing Association, a regional organization whose mission envisions a well-planned Baltimore region with equity among jurisdictions, where citizens respect diversity and have access to responsive government and quality housing in vibrant neighborhoods. Currently, Mel is leading his own consulting firm, Freeman Consulting Group, where he continues to work to advance community-led planning processes that provide residents and organizations with the tools to self-manage change within their own communities. His approach is grounded in the belief that people change neighborhoods themselves not by waiting on others to lead the way.

Organization: The Citizens Planning & Housing Association (CPHA) is the catalyst for civic action to bring about a healthy, inclusive Baltimore, with economically vibrant communities and opportunities for all people. The organization does this by bringing together people and neighborhoods to create innovative solutions to challenging, community-wide problems; empowering citizens with information and skills for advocacy and organizing; and championing solutions through legislative and policy reforms. Their programs include Community Association Support and Leadership Training, Policy Research and Legislative Pressure, Citizen Outreach and Organizing, and more.

Website - http://www.cphabaltimore.org/

Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/bmorecpha

Twitter - https://twitter.com/bmorecpha

Take Away Quotes:

“There is a big fear of the word gentrification, do we have to have other folks who don’t look like us in our neighborhoods to increase the value of our communities?”

“There is never enough public money, ever! So private investment needs to happen in these communities.”

“We do need change in communities, but we also need to secure the families that are there.”

“You can’t get anything done unless you’re out there talking to people, and trying to really understand what their needs are.”

“Nobody in their neighborhood uses this train, hundreds of cars drive to this train station and then those people go to work, and those jobs are for them, not for us.”

“What we have to do is get out in these communities and talk about what is for them, and not have them constantly thinking that the next thing that happens in their community is not for them, it is for them and they need to know that.”

 

 

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit at eosummit.com

 

009: Anchor Institutions and Worker Cooperatives: Domenic Fatica, Evergreen Energy Solutions
17:39
2017-09-27 09:24:24 UTC 17:39
009: Anchor Institutions and Worker Cooperatives: Domenic Fatica, Evergreen Energy Solutions

Domenic has spent most of his adult life working in the construction industry and now, in his 60s, he is working the best job he has ever had and never wants to retire.  In fact, he loves the job so much he recruited his 88-year-old father to help train his co-workers.

On this week’s episode of Equitable Opportunity Radio, we interview Domenic Fatica, the General Manager of Evergreen Energy Solutions (E2S) worker cooperative in Cleveland. E2S hires individuals who have life experiences that make it hard for them to find employment. The cooperative then trains them in the construction and energy retrofit trades. E2S gives these men and women an opportunity to further transform their lives and become worker/owners of the cooperative, as well as homeowners with accessible transportation. Domenic and E2S are transforming lives, building local community wealth, and helping change the face of Cleveland. Tune in to learn why this is the most meaningful and important job Domenic has ever had.

Topic: Anchor Institutions and Worker Cooperatives

Guest: Domenic Fatica is general manager of Evergreen Energy Solutions (E2S), an Evergreen Cooperatives portfolio company that designs, installs, and develops PV solar panel arrays for institutional, governmental, and commercial markets. Incorporated in 2008, E2S also provides energy efficiency and home performance services to make residential and commercial buildings more energy efficient.

Organization: Evergreen Cooperatives of Cleveland, Ohio are pioneering innovative models of job creation, wealth building, and sustainability. Evergreen’s employee-owned, for-profit companies are based locally and hire locally. They create meaningful green jobs and keep precious financial resources within the Greater University Circle neighborhoods. Worker-owners at Evergreen Cooperatives earn a living wage and build equity in the firms as owners of the business.

Website - http://evergreencooperatives.com

Facebook -https://www.facebook.com/evergreencoop

Twitter - https://twitter.com/evgohcoop

Additional Resources:

Evergreen Cooperatives - http://evergreencooperatives.com

The Cleveland Foundation - http://www.clevelandfoundation.org

The Democracy Collaborative - http://democracycollaborative.org

 

 

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit at eosummit.com

008: Anchor Institutions and Community Wealth Building: Ted Howard, The Democracy Collaborative
28:33
2017-09-27 09:24:24 UTC 28:33
008: Anchor Institutions and Community Wealth Building: Ted Howard, The Democracy Collaborative

On this episode of Equitable Opportunity radio, host Mike Hancox and co-host Vernice Miller Travis interview Ted Howard, the Co-founder and Executive Director of The Democracy Collaborative at the University of Maryland. Ted explains the role anchor institutions and worker collaboratives play in building a more inclusive economy. Anchor institutions are large, placed-based, nonprofit organizations that tend not to relocate. Anchor institutions can have a major impact on local economies and tend to be major employers. According to community-wealth.org, “If the economic power of these anchor institutions were more effectively harnessed, they could contribute greatly to community wealth building. The largest and most numerous of such nonprofit anchors are universities and non-profit hospitals (often called "eds and meds").” In Cleveland, The Democracy Collaborative has worked with anchor institutions like The Cleveland Clinic to create the Evergreen Cooperatives. The Evergreen Cooperatives seek to create community wealth and thriving businesses by giving workers an ownership stake in the businesses that they are creating. The three existing Evergreen Cooperatives focus on local food production, solar energy retrofits, and laundry services. Tune in to learn about the impact this work has had in Cleveland and what the future of community wealth building might look like.

Topic: Anchor Institutions and Community Wealth Building

Guest: Ted Howard is the co-founder and Executive Director of The Democracy Collaborative at the University of Maryland. In July 2010, Mr. Howard was appointed the Steven Minter Senior Fellow for Social Justice at The Cleveland Foundation where he was a member of a team that developed the comprehensive job creation and wealth building strategy, which resulted in the Evergreen Cooperatives Initiative.  

Full Bio - http://democracycollaborative.org/content/ted-howard

Organization: The Democracy Collaborative is a national leader in equitable, inclusive and sustainable development through their Community Wealth Building Initiative. This initiative sustains a wide range of Advisory, Research and Field Building activities designed to transform the practice of community/economic development in the United States.

Website - http://democracycollaborative.org

Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/democracycollaborative

Twitter - https://twitter.com/democracycollab

Take Away Quotes:

“Rooting wealth in communities is the future of economic development in America”

“Ownership and control of capital is a key determinant of power in any economic system”

“There are 50 million or more people living in poverty in the US.”

“For profit with a social mission and a broadly shared ownership structure – that is what community wealth building is about.”

“A job alone is not enough…how do you create assets in addition to income.”

Additional Resources:

Evergreen Cooperatives - http://evergreencooperatives.com

The Cleveland Foundation - http://www.clevelandfoundation.org

The Cleveland Clinic - http://my.clevelandclinic.org

 

 

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit at eosummit.com

007: Eliminating Tips and Paying a Salary with Benefits: Bobby Fry, Bar Marco
21:29
2017-09-27 09:24:24 UTC 21:29
007: Eliminating Tips and Paying a Salary with Benefits: Bobby Fry, Bar Marco

On this episode, we talk with restaurateur Bobby Fry of Bar Marco in Pittsburgh. Bobby and his restaurant, Bar Marco, are on the leading edge of revolutionizing food service by eliminating tips and paying wait staff a salary with benefits and bonuses. Bobby is a successful and thoughtful business person who made the decision to shift his business model after a thorough analysis of his business and the restaurant industry. By valuing his workers and providing his wait staff and back of house staff with stable incomes and  benefits, Fry was able to triple the restaurant's bottom line. Bobby came to the decision to shift Bar Marco’s business model after determining there are 3 main reasons 90% of all restaurants fail in their first 3 to 5 years. He wanted Bar Marco to avoid a similar fate. The shift has motivated employees, increased teamwork, and reduced waste, which has resulted in huge bottom line results. Tune in to find out how a forward thinking business person sees his business and the opportunity taking care of his people creates.

Topic: Eliminating Tips and Paying a Salary with Benefits

Guest: Bobby Fry is the co founder/owner of Bar Marco in Pittsburgh.  

Organization: Bar Marco is a highly successful restaurant in Pittsburgh that recently has taken a radical new approach to how their staff is compensated. They describe themselves as restaurant with “The attention to detail of fine dining but with Hall & Oates and Wu-Tang Clan.”

Website - http://www.barmarcopgh.com/

Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Bar-Marco/167136583366244

Twitter -  https://twitter.com/BarMarcoPGH

Instagram - https://instagram.com/barmarcopgh/

Take Away Quotes:

“I wanted to proactively solve three problems restaurants face in the years 3-5 that result in 90% of restaurants failing”

“You need to do this for the right business reasons – this is not about hippies and free love”

“This is what happens when you have a minimum wage that is so low – you incentivize big companies to undervalue certain assets – they categorize their people as something they don’t take care of because there are other more expensive things you have to take care of.”

Additional Resources:

http://www.nextpittsburgh.com/next-wave/bar-marco-trailblazes-no-tipping-policy/

http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/246972

Michael Lynn – Cornell Professor and Hospitality Industry Researcher – https://www.hotelschool.cornell.edu/app/facultydb/instructors/wml3

Tipping Expert Website – http://tippingresearch.com/index.html

Food Revolution Pittsburgh Cooking Club – http://www.foodrevpgh.com/ and https://www.facebook.com/FRPCC

 

 

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit at eosummit.com

006: Infrastructure, Workforce Development, and Shared Regional Prosperity: Nathaniel Q. Smith, The Partnership for Southern Equity
34:00
2017-09-27 09:24:24 UTC 34:00
006: Infrastructure, Workforce Development, and Shared Regional Prosperity: Nathaniel Q. Smith, The Partnership for Southern Equity

On this episode, we talk with Nathaniel Q. Smith, the founder and convener of The Partnership for Southern Equity (PSE). PSE is working to bring together common and uncommon allies to develop public policies that will increase access and opportunity for vulnerable populations in the southeastern United States. They train everyday heroes in the art of community organizing and grow coalitions that realize equity in the areas of transportation, energy, growth, and health. Under Nathaniel’s leadership, PSE is currently working to bring public transportation back to Clayton County, Georgia, an area that lost its public transportation system four years ago. Nathaniel and PSE are also working to organize a collaborative that will work in metro Atlanta to realize the goal of a balanced distribution of energy benefits and burdens (energy equity). Their accomplishments to date include increased voting from vulnerable populations in T-SPLOST decision of 2011, creation of the Equitable Target Area Index and Social Equity Advisory Committee at the Atlanta Regional Commission, development of the Metro Atlanta Equity Atlas, institution of the American south’s first Equity Mapping and Framing tool, and highlighting the elevation of equity as the superior growth model for metro Atlanta.

Topic: Infrastructure, Workforce Development, and Shared Regional Prosperity

Guest: Nathaniel Q. Smith who is the founder/convener of The Partnership for Southern Equity.

LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/pub/nathaniel-smith/6/115/958

Organization: The Partnership for Southern Equity is working to bring together common and uncommon allies to develop public policies that will increase access and opportunity for vulnerable populations in the southeastern United States

Website - http://partnershipforsouthernequity.org

Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/PSEquity

Twitter - https://twitter.com/psequitymatters

Take Away Quotes:

“Our Interdependence as a region is what will dictate whether we will be competitive and sustainable.”

“The communities that have not answered the equity are left with a serious disadvantage.”

“What is economic development in the 21st century?"

“If we do not focus on people now as we move into an economy that requires (more skilled labor) then we will not be able to make profits (in the future).”

“Economic development is attracted to good infrastructure.”

“How can we leverage infrastructure and transportation in some of the communities that have been forgotten by the market in order to jump start local economies?”

Additional Resources:

Metro Atlanta Equity Atlas - http://partnershipforsouthernequity.org/index.php/issue-areas/maea

The Equity of Opportunity - http://partnershipforsouthernequity.org/index.php/issue-areas/equity-of-opportunity

 

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit at eosummit.com

005: Starbucks College Achievement Plan: Markelle Cullom-Herbison, Starbucks Barista
22:30
2017-09-27 09:24:24 UTC 22:30
005: Starbucks College Achievement Plan: Markelle Cullom-Herbison, Starbucks Barista

On this episode, Starbucks’ Barista and Tempe, Arizona native, Markelle Cullom-Herbison shares what it is like to participate in the Starbucks College Achievement Plan. She works at Starbuck’s while receiving her Bachelor’s degree in Psychology online from Arizona State University. Markelle talks about the challenges of working and going to school full-time; the challenge and burden Millennials face when dealing with the enormous cost and debt associated with college; and the huge financial and confidence boost she has gotten from Starbucks’ College Achievement Plan.

Topic:  Starbucks College Achievement Plan

Guest: Markelle Cullom-Herbison is an Assistant Manager at Starbucks

Organization: Starbucks

Website - http://www.starbucks.com

Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/Starbucks

Twitter - https://twitter.com/starbucksstore

Take Away Quotes:

“I know people that are Juniors in college that are 50 – 60 - $70,000 in debt from 2-3 years of school….that is crazy.”

“I would have been drowning in debt.”

“This partnership means so much more than a free education…..I truly believe we are changing the future and it is really cool to be a part of that.”

“I can’t imagine myself (working) any place other than Starbucks……”

Additional Resources:

Starbucks College Achievement Plan - http://www.starbucks.com/careers/college-plan

Arizona State University Online Degree Programs - http://asuonline.asu.edu

004: Starbucks College Achievement Plan and Opportunity for Youth Program: Lacey All, Starbucks Director of Strategy
22:53
2017-09-27 09:24:24 UTC 22:53
004: Starbucks College Achievement Plan and Opportunity for Youth Program: Lacey All, Starbucks Director of Strategy

On this episode, Starbucks’ Director of Strategy Lacey All talks about Starbucks’ ground breaking College Achievement Plan and Opportunity Youth Program. The College Achievement Plan pays full tuition to Arizona State University’s online 4-year degree program for any Starbucks’s employee who is benefits eligible (meaning they work on average 20 hours per week). The Opportunity Youth Program is focused on finding employment for the estimate 6 million “disconnected” young Americans between the ages of 16 and 24 who are neither in school nor employed full-time. This revolutionary commitment to engaging and advancing the lives of its employees is part of Starbucks’ strategy and commitment to build an outstanding 21st century brand and company.

Topic: Starbucks College Achievement Plan and Opportunity for Youth Program

Guest: Lacey All is Starbucks Director of Strategy

Twitter – https://twitter.com/laceynall

LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/pub/lacey-all/1/506/83a

Organization: Starbucks - they sell coffee – heard of them?

Website - http://www.starbucks.com

Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/Starbucks

Twitter - https://twitter.com/starbucksstore

Take Away Quotes:

“We can work differently to take big swings at big problems.”

“Our mission and values are fueled by the notion of individual opportunity.”

“Our goal is to inspire and nurture the human spirit.”

“We are trying to achieve the balance between profitability and social impact.”

“We ultimately want to be one of the most respected and trusted brands and to do that we have to make bold moves.”

“By 2025 we hope to have 25,000 partners graduate college.”

“As a company we are a collection of individuals who are all trying to do more good in the world and use our scale in the right way.”

Additional Resources:

Starbucks College Achievement Plan - http://www.starbucks.com/careers/college-plan

Opportunity for Youth - http://www.starbucks.com/responsibility/community/opportunity-youth

 

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit at eosummit.com

003: Knowing Together, Growing Together: Dr. Chris Benner
28:35
2017-09-27 09:24:24 UTC 28:35
003: Knowing Together, Growing Together: Dr. Chris Benner

Our topic this week is Knowing Together, Growing Together, how metropolitan regions that achieve a high degree of communication and collaboration among diverse stakeholder groups grow faster than other metropolitan areas. Our guest is Dr. Chris Benner, a Professor of Environmental Studies at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and the Executive Director of the Everett Program. On the show we discuss what places like Salt Lake City and Oklahoma City have done to grow their economies, reduce inequity, and create a more inclusive economy and community. Dr. Benner’s research focuses on the relationships between technological change, regional development, and structures of economic opportunity, focusing on regional labor markets and the transformation of work and employment patterns. Dr. Benner’s recent book, co-authored with Manuel Pastor, is Just Growth: Inclusion and Prosperity in America’s Metropolitan Regions, helps uncover the processes, policies and institutional arrangements that help explain how certain regions around the country have been able to consistently link prosperity and inclusion. Benner’s work has also included providing research assistance to a range of organizations promoting equity and expanded opportunity, including the Coalition on Regional Equity (Sacramento), Working Partnerships USA (San Jose), the California Labor Federation, and the Congress of South African Trade Unions, among others.

Topic: Knowing Together – Growing Together

Guest: Dr. Chris Benner is the Dorothy E. Everett Chair in Global Information and Social Entrepreneurship and Director of the Everett Program for Digital Tools for Social Innovation at the University of California, Santa Cruz.

Full Bio - https://ccrec.ucsc.edu/profile/chris-benner-phd

Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/chris.benner.395

Twitter – https://twitter.com/chrisbenner

LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/drchrisbenner

Organization: The Everett Program merges the enthusiasm of student leaders with information technology to promote structural social change by building social networking capacity across non-governmental and community-based organizations.

Website - http://www.everettprogram.org

Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/everettprogram

Twitter - https://twitter.com/everettprogram

Youtube- https://www.youtube.com/user/EverettProgram

Take Away Quotes:

“Those metropolitan regions that are more equitable in fact grow faster.”

Additional Resources:

Dr. Chris Benner TED talk: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VB1WqEV7miY

Just Growth Website – http://justgrowth.org

Envision Utah - http://envisionutah.org

Publications:

Just Growth: Inclusion and Prosperity in America's Metropolitan Regions – Find it on Amazon: Just Growth: Inclusion and Prosperity in America's Metropolitan Regions (Regions and Cities)

Knowing Together, Growing Together – Coming Soon

 

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit, at eosummit.com

002: Investing in Opportunity: Alan Jenkins, The Opportunity Agenda
27:41
2017-09-27 09:24:24 UTC 27:41
002: Investing in Opportunity: Alan Jenkins, The Opportunity Agenda

Our topic this week is Investing in Opportunity and our guest is Alan Jenkins the Executive Director of The Opportunity Agenda, a communications, research, and policy organization dedicated to building the national will to expand opportunity in America. The Opportunity Agenda launched in 2006 with the mission of building the national will to expand opportunity in America. Focused on moving hearts, minds, and policy over time, the organization works with social justice groups, leaders, and movements to advance solutions that expand opportunity for everyone. Through active partnerships, The Opportunity Agenda synthesizes and translates research on barriers to opportunity and corresponding solutions; uses communications and media to understand and influence public opinion; and identifies and advocates for policies that improve people’s lives. To achieve their mission, they focus on racial equity, immigration, economic opportunity, reproductive health and rights, and African-American men and boys.

Topic:  Investing in Opportunity

Guest: Alan Jenkins is Executive Director of The Opportunity Agenda. a communications, research, and policy organization dedicated to building the national will to expand opportunity in America.

Full Bio - http://opportunityagenda.org/alan_jenkins_extended_biography

LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/pub/alan-jenkins/5/634/570

Organization:  The Opportunity Agenda. Is a communications, research, and policy organization dedicated to building the national will to expand opportunity in America.

Website - http://opportunityagenda.org

Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/opportunityagenda

Twitter - https://twitter.com/oppagenda

LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/company/the-opportunity-agenda

Take Away Quotes:

“The ideal of opportunity is the notion that everyone deserves a fair chance to achieve his or her full potential.”

“Where the door of opportunity was cracked open a bit, Americans of all backgrounds have always rushed to get in the door.”

“Ultimately it’s up to all of us to make sure that we move from concern, to action, to solutions and that those solutions are lasting.”

Additional Resources:

American Opportunity Communication Toolkit: http://opportunityagenda.org/american-opportunity-communications-toolkit

Compact for Home Opportunity: https://opportunityagenda.org/compact_home_opp

Opportunity for Black Men and Boys:  http://opportunityagenda.org/black_male

 

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit, at eosummit.com

001: What Is Equitable Opportunity Radio
18:58
2017-09-27 09:24:24 UTC 18:58
001: What Is Equitable Opportunity Radio

On this first episode of Equitable Opportunity Radio, show host Mike Hancox the CEO of Skeo Solutions, introduces his co-hosts community development activist and consultant Vernice Miller-Travis and Carl Schneebeck, professor of leadership and communications at Presidio Graduate School. The show’s hosts share that the podcast will look at what businesses, organizations, communities, and individuals are doing to create a more inclusive economy.  Topics will include such things as: collaboration, compensation, corporate social responsibility, diversity, economic growth, employee empowerment, equitable access, equitable development, equitable opportunity, fair labor practices, green jobs, housing, innovation, job training, living wages, public-private partnerships, sustainability, thriving businesses, transportation equity.

 

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit, at eosummit.com

027: To Infinity and Beyond
12:04
2017-10-07 15:18:48 UTC 12:04
027: To Infinity and Beyond

Topic: Introducing Infinite Earth Radio

In This Episode:0:19 Special announcement about the future of Equitable Opportunity Radio2:18 Introduction of Vernice Miller-Travis and Carl Schneebeck3:12 Carl reflects on the highlight moments of Equitable Opportunity Radio4:26 Carl and Michael discuss their new podcast project6:38 Vernice shares her insights on the last 6 months of Equitable Opportunity Radio8:50 Michael and Vernice discuss the vision and purpose of Infinite Earth Radio10:30 Michael discusses the important role of the Local Government Commission10:44 How you can switch over to Infinite Earth Radio

Take Away Quotes: “I think we’re on the cusp of another evolution of the potential of human organizations and how we can work together to bring really great things to our societies, to our communities, to the planet. Our podcast is going to explore how people are doing that. What are the techniques that great managers and great leaders are doing to tap that potential and to bring organizations to the next level?”

“We have had the opportunity to talk to some true visionaries who are just doing incredible work, but who are so generous about sharing the work that they’re doing and the learnings that they are experiencing, with as broad a cross section of folks as possible so that other communities can learn from the good things that are happening out there and they can be replicated in other places. This is a moment when we need a lot of inspiration and we have the privilege and will continue to talk to folk who can provide that inspiration.”

Resources:Infinite Earth Radio Website

Infinite Earth Radio iTunes

026: What Would it Look Like if We Started Over?
20:52
2017-10-07 15:18:48 UTC 20:52
026: What Would it Look Like if We Started Over?

Organization:When it comes to our current food system, Hampton Creek believes it is time to start over and ask what it is that you really want to eat. They believe eating right shouldn't be so hard; that good food should be good for your body, good for your budget, easy on the earth, and insanely delicious. They believe you shouldn't have to compromise on anything and that it should be available for everyone everywhere.

Topic:Food That’s Just Better

Guest:Udi Lazimy is the Global Plant Sourcing Specialist at Hampton Creek, a quickly-growing food company based in San Francisco, where he works with farmers to drive Hampton Creek’s innovative plant-based food research and product development. Prior to this, Udi served as the National Grassroots Advocacy Director at the Organic Farming Research Foundation.

Hampton Creek Twitterhttps://twitter.com/hamptoncreek

Take Away Quotes:

“We are growing quickly as a food company, and because of that fact, we’re creating opportunities all over the country for people to help us market our product and help us get it out there into stores, etc. But I think in general it’s about continuing to talk about how we can change things, how can we make things better, not believing in the status quo, and in so doing a lot of new people are emerging with wonderful, brilliant ideas that are challenging our model and creating more competition in the food marketplace, and that’s something that we really highly encourage.”

“We focus on plant-based food not because we believe people shouldn’t eat meat and not because we want to directly challenge the meat industry. It’s because we don’t believe that a highly resource intensive, highly polluting, greenhouse gas emitting, land consuming industry such as the animal food industry on a large scale, is one that should continue and should be supported. So plant-based is really the alternative to that and we’ve found that we can make better food with plants.”

“I do believe is the leading, most environmentally destructive practice we have in the world, is the food system in many ways. And so I think down the line 30 years from now you’re going to see a system that really does utilize the power of plants, celebrate soil and soil quality, water, cleanliness, community, food systems, and isn’t just about the absolute cheapest thing we can produce, it’s going to be more about providing good food that’s sustainable and healthy for the environment and for people, and that will be the status quo.”

Resources:Hampton Creekhttps://www.hamptoncreek.com/

Presidio Graduate Schoolhttp://www.presidio.edu

025: Groceries as if People Mattered
28:44
2017-10-07 15:18:48 UTC 28:44
025: Groceries as if People Mattered

Organization:People’s Community Market is a new business that is emerging from and building on the ten years of experience, track record and social relations of its sister organization, People’s Grocery, which is a non-profit that has operated numerous food projects (including the Mobile Market and the Grub Box), urban gardens and nutrition education programs. Their purpose is to create and operate a small-format, full-service grocery store in West Oakland, which is a community that has not had a full-service grocer for several decades. In addition to retailing fresh foods and groceries, the business will offer information, resources and services to support customers in improving their health and provide a community venue in support of community building.

Topic:Building a Stronger Community Through Food & Business

Guest:Brahm Ahmadi is a social entrepreneur working to build healthier and more equitable inner city communities by creating change to the food system. In 2003, he co-founded People’s Grocery, a nonprofit organization that has attracted national attention for its effort to transform inner city food systems through projects in food enterprise, urban agriculture, and nutrition education that include the nation’s first Mobile Market. In 2010, Brahm founded People’s Community Market to create a fresh food retail business model that fosters health and social interaction in low-income communities. He’s also piloting a model for enabling the general public to invest in mission-driven companies and local communities. Brahm has a B.A. in Sociology from the University of California and an MBA from the Presidio Graduate School. He is a Food and Community Fellow at the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy and a Fellow at Food First: Institute for Food and Development Policy.

People’s Community Market Twitterhttps://twitter.com/peoplesmrkt

Take Away Quotes:

“People’s Community Market essentially is intended to be a full-service grocery store, community serving market, in West Oakland, with the goal of making it convenient for residents to buy nutritious and fresh foods as well as prepared foods and traditional groceries, at affordable prices in their own neighborhood. And also using the store as a resource center and a platform for community engagement and offering a variety of educational and incentive programs that introduce our future customers to healthier food options.”

“I think it’s also important that people are included from the very beginning so it’s not just that you’ve opened your doors and you’re welcoming everyone to come in and you’re employing locally, but from the day one of conception, planning, and design of the business, community residents are engaged. And that’s partly to make sure that the store and the products and the store environment does truly reflect and appeal to the community, but it’s also to create that sense of ownership from the very beginning.”

Resources:People’s Community Markethttp://peoplescommunitymarket.com/

Presidio Graduate Schoolhttp://www.presidio.edu

024: Thinking Outside the Food Pantry
30:47
2017-10-07 15:18:48 UTC 30:47
024: Thinking Outside the Food Pantry

Organization:Oregon Food Bank collects and distributes food through a network of four Oregon Food Bank branches and 17 independent regional food banks serving Oregon and Clark County, Washington.  Along with approximately 970 partner agencies, they help nearly one in five households fend off hunger. They work to address the root causes of hunger by offering nutrition education, strengthening local food systems, collaborating with community groups, and advocating for hunger relief at the local and federal level.

Topic:Taking a Look at Food Insecurity

Guest:Sharon Thornberry is the Community Food Systems Manager at the Oregon Food Bank. Sharon has been a grassroots organizer, trainer and advocate for community food systems, rural communities, and anti-hunger work in Oregon since 1986. She grew up on farms, was very active in 4-H and Girl Scouts, and was one of the first female members of Future Farmers of America. In 1979, she was a homeless mom with two small children. Sharon has served on the Oregon Hunger Task Force for 16 years, the board of the Community Food Security Coalition for six years (three as President), and the board of Bread for the World and Bread for the World Institute for six years. The sum of her experiences have come together to make her a passionate and knowledgeable community food security and anti-hunger advocate. She is the 2009 recipient of the Billi Odegard Public Health Genius Award from the Community Health Partnership of Oregon. She has worked for Oregon Food Bank for the past 16 years focusing on rural food systems and is the creator of “FEAST”, the nationally recognized community food systems organizing program. She has been a resident of Philomath, Oregon for 30 years. She is an avid gardener and loves to share the cooking traditions learned in the farm kitchens of her youth with friends and family.

Sharon Thornberry Twitterhttps://twitter.com/ofb_sharont

Take Away Quotes:

“The statistics say that rural hunger is not as bad as urban hunger, I think people in rural communities are less likely to admit they’re hungry too. There’s a lot of pride that goes with living in rural communities.”

“There aren’t equal opportunities for everybody and there’s a lot of deniers that say that all of this stuff is made up. But I’m here to tell you it’s not made up. We don’t think about the challenges of access. People with small children are the most financially insecure. Salaries have not kept up with the cost of living in this country.”

“We’re leaving a lot of kids in a really bad place because it’s impossible for their parents to have a living wage, especially in rural communities. There’s a whole systemic thing that we need to look at and figure out how we solve it as a country.”

“Just think: the food banks across this country, there are hundreds of feeding american food banks, there are thens of thousands of food pantries across this country, they all have volunteers. If those folks had taken even a fraction of the hours they’ve taken handing out food and been saying to the powers that be: to congress, to their state senators, to their state legislators, even to their county commissioners, “This is wrong, we have to do this differently,” what do you think the picture would be? I think we’d be in a different space?”

“It’s about keeping the discussion going, and people having success, and supporting small farmers. You can’t do enough to do that. Go out there and get to know your small farmer, find out what their issues are, and find out how you can help them stay in business.”

Resources:Oregon Food Bankhttp://www.oregonfoodbank.org

Presidio Graduate Schoolhttp://www.presidio.edu

023: The People Behind the Food
18:59
2017-10-07 15:18:48 UTC 18:59
023: The People Behind the Food

Organization:Bom Dia Market is an inviting corner market offering local and international beer and wine, freshly prepared foods, and thoughtfully sourced grocery and household staples. Bom Dia Market is setting a new standard in the service industry. Bom Dia Market is committed to valuing work-life balance, providing a living wage at all levels of the company, offering competitive benefits (including vacation time), and immersing employees in the intersection of local food lovers and food makers.

Topic:Creating Success by Focusing on Employees

Guest:Shivani Ganguly is the Proprietor of Bom Dia Market and the Principal at Friday Consulting. Previously, she led human resources, operations, and finance for startups and nonprofits. Shivani holds a BA from Stanford University, and an MBA from Presidio Graduate School.

Shivani Ganguly Twitterhttps://twitter.com/shivaniganguly

Take Away Quotes: “We think that great work places are really critical to the success of businesses overall. And we also, just at a base human level, want to make sure that the people we’re working with enjoy their work and are being paid equitably for it, and also have opportunities for growth and development.”

“There’s a real interest for our employees getting to know our customers. We have many, many regular customers; that’s a real cornerstone of our business. People who come in one or two times a day, and we’re a real regular part of their daily life. I think that a big part of that is not just our fantastic food, but it’s that personal connection with the employees who work there.”

“I think one of the biggest problems in the food industry is the culture that we see in kitchens, and that’s been something we’ve honestly struggled with over the past year or so. It’s often a very male dominated culture where people are expected to work for less than a living wage in a relatively unpleasant environment. We want to create this beautiful sustainably produced food and we’re not running our kitchens in that way. And I think that’s something that we as an organization are really tying to change.”

Resources:Bom Dia Markethttp://www.bomdiamarket.com/

Presidio Graduate Schoolhttp://www.presidio.edu

022: Valuing Food Artisans
25:30
2017-10-07 15:18:48 UTC 25:30
022: Valuing Food Artisans

Organization:Maker’s Common is a new eatery and market brought to you by the people of Mission Cheese. Imagine Mission Cheese but bigger, with an expanded menu and an attached, highly-curated market. It will feature America’s best cheese, beer, wine, charcuterie, and more in a space that is well-designed but casual, that pays homage to the makers of delicious food and beverage.

Maker’s Common is offering up to $600,000 in notes to pay for the buildout of a cheese and charcuterie bar and retail market. Any California resident can invest through our Direct Public Offering — it’s like crowdfunding but all grown up because investors earn a return on their investment. The minimum investment is $1,000 and investors earn 4% annual interest plus additional perks.

Topic:Taking an Artisan Approach to Financing

In This Episode:1:04 Mike and Carl discuss the current landscape for small businesses to acquire capital.2:55 Introduction to the episode3:49 Oliver gives the origin story of Mission Cheese.6:38 Oliver shares the vision and purpose for Mission Common.9:50 Mike asks Oliver why he chose to go the DPO route for financing Mission Common.15:04 How does Oliver’s values show up in the way he runs Mission Cheese?17:05 How does open book work and how has it been successful for Mission Cheese?21:28 Who can invest in Makers Common and how can they do so?

Guest:Oliver Dameron is the co-founder of Mission Cheese, which opened in 2011. Oliver has followed an interesting path to the good food industry. This path has included years as a coral reef scientist, where he managed multi-million dollar budgets and large teams of scientists, and work as a responsible investment analyst, vetting public companies for their social and environmental performance. After receiving his MBA from the Presidio Graduate School, Oliver joined a startup solar technology company, where he engaged in financial planning, fundraising, budget management, and business development. Currently, he operates as the chief financial officer and beer director at Mission Cheese, having earned his Certified Cicerone (equivalent to a beer sommelier) certification in 2013. He is also working to launch Maker’s Common, a new eatery and market. Imagine Mission Cheese but bigger, with an expanded menu and an attached, highly-curated market. Maker’s Common will feature America’s best cheese, beer, wine, charcuterie, and more in a space that is well-designed but casual, that pays homage to the makers of delicious food and beverage.

Mission Cheese Twitterhttps://twitter.com/missioncheese

Take Away Quotes: “It’s this great learning, you sort of start to understand the relationships of a variety of different things that influence your business and with all this you can imagine this white board of rows and different people in our company own different rows. And so I would say the ownership piece has really shined through because of that fact.”

“It really took, I would say, I year and a half for this system to kick in, which is probably about a year longer than most people would try. But because at the end of the day I want our staff to be able to say, “we” when they’re thinking about our business, and also because it allows Sarah and I to step away from the business a little bit more and think more about the future.”

“So it’s about five times as good as the best savings account, and that’s what I feel good about is allowing someone to invest where literally most people don’t have the opportunity to invest in a restaurant because people can’t advertise for that investment. So I feel like that’s a really great part of it is that it gives people an opportunity to invest in Main Street.”

Resources:Mission Cheesehttp://missioncheese.net/

Oliver Dameron Twitterhttps://twitter.com/oliverdameron

Presidio Graduate Schoolhttp://www.presidio.edu

 

021: Is This Working for You?
27:15
2017-10-07 15:18:49 UTC 27:15
021: Is This Working for You?

Organization:The Local Mission Market was founded on a truly revolutionary idea. All markets--from big boxes to tiny boutiques--have always been and still are aggregators: They distinguish themselves by the products they buy, whether industrial or artisanal production. Either way, the food you buy is not made there and not by people you know. At Local Mission Market, we are the producers. We are the makers. Every day, on-site, in view of every customer and in conversation with you, we craft granola, pasta, crackers, jams, pickles, sausages, soups, side salads, dips, dressing, popcorn, oat bars, marshmallows, and more and more.

Topic:An Exploration of Local Food Systems

In This Episode:1:46 Introduction to this episode.2:17 Introduction of Yaron Milgrom.2:43 Yaron describes San Francisco’s Mission District.4:21 Yaron shares his story that lead him to the food industry.6:08 Yaron talks about why local is important to Local Mission Group.9:36 How does Yaron make sure that their system works for their employees?11:42 Yaron discusses the disparity in our food economy. 13:16 Yaron gives advice on how businesses can work with local residents in a way that benefits all parties. 19:10 Can the Local Mission Group model be replicated in other climate areas?22:44 How can listeners learn more about Local Mission Group and support the work they do?

Guests:Yaron Milgrom is the owner of Local Mission Group and operates Local Mission Eatery, Local Mission Market, and Local Cellar. In 2010, with Chef Jake Des Voignes, Yaron opened Local Mission Eatery. Dedicated to rigorously local sourcing, from-scratch cooking, and transparency with our customers, the Eatery launched as a sandwich shop with two employees. Now, Local Mission Group owns and operates a full-service restaurant (another, Local’s Corner, a local seafood restaurant opened in 2012 and closed in 2014), a local and handmade market (Local Mission Market, which opened in November 2013), and a California wine, craft-beer, and spirits bottle shop (Local Cellar in February 2014). Local Mission Group has over 40 employees and supports dozens local of farmers, ranchers, fishermen, and winemakers. Prior to opening Local Mission Eatery, Yaron received a MA in Medieval Jewish Mysticism at New York University. With his wife and three kids, he lives in the Mission District of San Francisco, just blocks from his businesses.

Local Mission Market Twitterhttps://twitter.com/LocalMarketSF

 

Take Away Quotes: “Local for us is something very different. Always it’s going to ask the people involved in the food that we serve, from the farmer who’s growing it, the farm workers who are picking it and putting it in the ground and maybe bringing it to market, to the people that we employ, and also really to those who are coming into the shop- asking all of them if it’s working for them.”

“I think one of the weirdest parts about the food industry is when you have employees who are really committed, love the food that they’re serving, committed to the valley’s excellence in food, but can’t afford to actually eat that way themselves. So at the baseline when you speak of the humanity in the industry, it has to start, I think, at…at least that they’r eating well.”

“We have an employee base that is representative of the diversity of the mission and that’s neighborly so you see the people that you’re serving, you see the people you’re cooking for, and they live next to you. This is part of it being personal. To build care for the people, and the reason why you may be spending more, to build care is about the faces attached to them and be able to see them. So it’s one thing when you see them across the counter or across the butcher counter in the kitchen, and it’s another thing when you see them walking down the street.”

Resources:Local Mission Eateryhttp://www.localmissioneatery.com/

Local Mission Markethttp://www.localmissionmarket.com/

Local Cellarhttp://www.localcellarsf.com/

Presidio Graduate Schoolhttp://www.presidio.edu

 

 

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit at eosummit.com

020: Portland is a Movable Side Yard Feast
25:36
2017-10-07 15:18:49 UTC 25:36
020: Portland is a Movable Side Yard Feast

Organization:The Side Yard is an urban farm, supper club and catering company located in the NE Cully Neighborhood in Portland, Oregon. Since 2009 they have provided local restaurants with creative organic produce and the community with food, education and opportunity. The farm is largely operated by volunteers and interns who gain hands on experience with the urban seed to plate movement. The Side Yard offers urban farm suppers & brunches, private catering, nomadic pop-ups, educational DIY workshops, farm tours and grief groups. Their focus is to provide local food for the local community, from the seeds they sow, animals they raise, and to the craftsmanship they embrace.

Topic:Providing local food to the local community

In This Episode:1:34 Introduction to this episode.2:36 Introduction of Stacey Givens.3:26 Stacey describes how their farm works.4:43 Stacey talks about the amount of produce that The Side Yard grows.5:32 Stacey explains how they are staffed and how they depend on volunteers.6:15 What specifically does The Side Yard grow and how is that unique?7:41 What is the Nomadic Supper Club?11:20 How did Stacey end up being a farmer, chef, and innovative entrepreneur?13:48 How does community play a role in supporting the work of The Side Yard?15:44 What educational opportunities does The Side Yard provide?18:19 How does The Side Yard care for its employees?19:25 What does local mean in context of their operation?21:14 How can listeners learn more about The Side Yard and support the work?22:03 If Stacey could sit down with her future self, what would the future Stacey say about the importance and impact of the work she’s doing?

Guest:Stacey Givens is the farmer, chef and owner of The Side Yard Farm & Kitchen in Northeast Portland, Oregon’s Cully Neighborhood. Givens grows diverse organic produce for Portland’s top restaurants and provides food, education and opportunity to her community. Givens was raised the youngest of seven children in a large Greek family in Redondo Beach, California where she was instilled with do-it-yourself values from a young age, farming in their backyard garden and small orchard, foraging with her mom, picking and brining olives and helping prepare large Greek family-style suppers. Givens has been in the food industry since age 15. She worked her way up the West Coast, including at the nationally acclaimed Millennium in San Francisco, before landing in Portland in 2006. Givens established The Side Yard Farm in 2009. The Side Yard Farm & Kitchen currently consists of several urban farm lots maintained by Givens and her team, a farm-to-table private catering company, and the ‘Nomadic Chef’ supper club where she features her urban-grown goods. Givens also organizes invaluable community services at The Side Yard like DIY workshops, grief support groups and kids camps. While The Side Yard has a hyperlocal focus, Givens’ drive to build a strong community and make lasting connections with talented and passionate people is globally-minded, traveling around the world to meet fellow organic farmers and chefs. In 2014, Givens was the recipient of Portland’s Local Hero award in the chef category, and continues to give back to the community she loves through volunteerism and her indispensable work at The Side Yard. In 2015, she competed on the Foodnetwork’s ‘Chopped’ and brought home the win for Portland.

Stacey Givens Twitterhttps://twitter.com/thesideyardpdx

Take Away Quotes:“It’s all about the experience of seed to plate. All of that was harvested the day before, the day of. You can just taste the freshness and that connection of hyper local.”

“After I lost my father I decided I’m done with going to grief groups in hospitals- why not have one at the farm. It’s such a beautiful place and I think it’d be easier for people to share the loss of their loved one…and we just become this big ole family.”

“I hope that what we’re doing is we’re teaching people that being local is really important, being organic is extremely important, and I guess that’s what I would hope for is that we’re doing our job educating people and bringing them closer to their food.”

Resources:The Side Yardhttp://www.thesideyardpdx.com/

Presidio Graduate Schoolhttp://www.presidio.edu

 

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit at eosummit.com

 

 

 

019: Making Healthy Food Available to All with The Food Trust
20:23
2017-10-07 15:18:49 UTC 20:23
019: Making Healthy Food Available to All with The Food Trust

Organization:The Food Trust is a nationally recognized nonprofit dedicated to ensuring that everyone has access to affordable, nutritious food and information to make healthy decisions. Headquartered in Philadelphia, The Food Trust works with neighborhoods, schools, grocers, farmers and policymakers in the city and across the country to develop a comprehensive approach to improved food access that combines nutrition education and greater availability of affordable, healthy food.

Topic:How the Food Trust brings healthy food options to underserved communities

In This Episode:1:33 Introduction to this episode.2:05 Introduction of Kamaryn Norris.3:03 What does the Food Trust do, and what is Kamaryn’s role?4:50 What is the Food Trust’s origin story?7:09 What impact is the Food Trust having?9:15 How can others make something like the Food Trust happen in their community?10:40 What are the biggest food challenges that our country faces, and how is the Food Trust helping overcome those?12:26 Kamaryn shares her work with healthy food finance programs.15:50 How can people find out more about the Food Trust and get involved with the work of the Food Trust?17:12 What would the future Kamaryn say about the work that is being done now?

Guest:Kamaryn Norris is a Project Associate for the National Campaign for Healthy Food Access at the Food Trust, a Philadelphia-based, national non-profit with the mission of ensuring everyone has access to affordable, nutritious foods and information to make healthy decisions. Kamaryn advocates for policies that support the development of grocery stores across the country in areas that lack access to healthy foods and facilitates the National Working Group, which ensures that access is equitable and reaching the most vulnerable populations. She also works on The Healthy Food Access Portal, an online resource that connects community members, retailers, and advocates to an array of news, strategies, and ideas to promote access to healthy food. Kamaryn believes that it is a basic human right to be able to have a healthy diet that is good for you, no matter where you live. An Atlanta native, Kamaryn earned dual bachelor’s degrees in Sociology and Rhetoric & Public Advocacy from Temple University. She enjoys playing and watching tennis, traveling, and has a love for the snow and all things cold weather.Kamaryn Norris LinkedIn-https://www.linkedin.com/in/Kamaryn

Take Away Quotes:“We work with adult nutrition education, we also work in schools with youth to help them be leaders around healthy food eating, we also have a farmers market program, we put nutritious into corner stores because for a lot of people that’s the only place where they can get food at all, and we work on local, state, and federal policy change to encourage grocery store development.”

“I really think of this as it’s a human right to be able to eat real food so you can live a happy life. It’s a social justice issue really and it’s something that is very complex and very complicated and we’re always learning.”

“What we’ve been seeing from this is that we’re reaching people that are often hard to get to in the current health system. We’re seeing largely black men that are coming and frequenting these events and they’re bringing their families and people they know. So it’s really all about meeting people where they are for access.”

“There’s shorter term impact that you can see and you can measure but then there’s much longer terms and those are the health impacts and that’s our ultimate goal and what drives us.”

Resources:The Food Trustwww.thefoodtrust.org

The Healthy Food Access Portalwww.healthyfoodaccess.org

Presidio Graduate Schoolhttp://www.presidio.edu

 

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit at eosummit.com

 

 

 

018: Changing Lives One Clairesquare at a Time with La Cocina
20:25
2017-10-07 15:18:49 UTC 20:25
018: Changing Lives One Clairesquare at a Time with La Cocina

La Cocina is a non-profit incubator kitchen based in San Francisco, CA that prides itself on cultivating food entrepreneurs. La Cocina provides affordable commercial kitchen space and hands on technical assistance to low income and immigrant entrepreneurs who are launching, growing, and formalizing food businesses. La Cocina prioritizes women entrepreneurs with a special focus on immigrant women and women of color. Their vision is for entrepreneurs to gain financial security by doing what they love to do, thereby creating an innovative, vibrant, and inclusive economic landscape.

Topic:Changing Lives and Communities by Equipping Food Entrepreneurs with La Cocina

In This Episode:1:38 Introduction to this episode.2:05 Introduction of Jessica Mataka.2:57 Jessica shares the work and mission of La Cocina.5:29 How did La Cocina get started and how did it get connected with entrepreneurs?6:27 Jessica shares her role at La Cocina.8:00 Why does La Cocina focus on helping women entrepreneurs?8:29 How is the work of the graduates of La Cocina impacting their lives, the lives of their families, and their communities?11:07 What has been the economic impact of La Cocina?11:40 Jessica shares stories of success from graduates of La Cocina.14:05 How can listeners get involved with and support the work of La Cocina?17:21 If future Jessica could talk with current Jessica, what will she have to say about the work the La Cocina team is doing?

Guests:Jessica Mataka is a California-born, human rights and environmental activist. She’s organized on behalf of mission-based non-profit Global Exchange, designed and implemented a curriculum focusing on anti-human trafficking efforts throughout high schools in the Bay Area and recently returned from Huaycán, Peru, where she taught an original program focusing on the intersection of art and activism. She is now happily employed as the Communications and Development Associate at La Cocina.Jessica Mataka Twitter- https://twitter.com/jesmatakaJessica Mataka LinkedIn- https://www.linkedin.com/in/jessicamataka

Organization:La Cocina is a non-profit incubator kitchen providing affordable commercial kitchen space and hands-on technical assistance to low-income and immigrant entrepreneurs who are launching, growing and formalizing food businesses. La Cocina prioritizes women entrepreneurs with a special focus on immigrant women and women of color. Their vision is that entrepreneurs gain financial security by doing what they love to do, creating an innovative, vibrant and inclusive economic landscape.

Take Away Quotes:“I think giving someone the tools to be economically self-sufficient is an extremely important point in and of itself. Women are change makers. They are innovators and their equality is so essential to both the social and economic development of human kind. In a report I recently read from the world bank, it stated that women usually reinvest a much higher portion of their income back into their families and communities than men, and turn their spreading wealth beyond just themselves.”

“My hope is that San Francisco will continue to be a city that values diversity and values inclusive food economies and is a place where people from all walks of life can make a living doing what they love to do, especially if that includes starting a food business.”

“Nationally only 28.7% of businesses are owned by women. In an effort to counterbalance that, 98% of La Cocina’s businesses are run by women. So we’re just trying to level the playing field a little bit.”

“One of the most important things you can do on a daily basis is to eat thoughtfully and advocate for good food policies, and use your purchasing power to support owner operated restaurants.”

“My hope is that in 20 years I’ll be able to look around the city of San Francisco and see these businesses that were started through La Cocina and see them continue to thrive and see their family take over their business and continue to operate it once they’ve passed their working years.”

Resources:La Concina: Cultivating Food Entrepreneurshttp://www.lacocinasf.org

La Cocina Facebook Pagehttps://www.facebook.com/lacocinasforg

The Story Exchangehttp://thestoryexchange.org/la-cocina/

Presidio Graduate Schoolhttp://www.presidio.edu

 

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit at eosummit.com

017: Extreme Makeover: Ugly Produce Edition with Raley’s Family of Fine Stores
19:54
2017-10-07 15:18:49 UTC 19:54
017: Extreme Makeover: Ugly Produce Edition with Raley’s Family of Fine Stores

As much as 40 percent of all the food produced in the United States never gets eaten and typically ends up in landfills or goes unharvested in the field, according to the Natural Resources Defense Council. Megan Burritt, Aspen Institute First Mover Fellow and director of sustainability and wellness at Raley’s Family of Fine Stores, saw an opportunity to address this issue, developing pathways that connect fresh food waste in the supply chain with food insecure consumers. This led the company to design a new program, dubbed “Real Good” produce, to sell imperfect fruits and vegetables to food insecure customers, at a highly discounted price. Learn more about this program here: http://www.aspeninstitute.org/about/blog/aspen-first-mover-fellow-tackles-food-waste-while-feeding-food-insecure#sthash.a2q39kN1.dpuf

Topic:Decreasing Food Waste Through the Real Good Produce Program

In This Episode:0:27 Introduction to this episode.2:44 Introduction of Meg Burritt.3:14 Meg shares her background and role as the Director of Wellness and Sustainability at Raley’s.5:04 What is Raley’s and how many stores are there?5:50 What is the Aspen Institute’s First Movers Fellowship Program and how does that fit into Meg’s work?7:02 What is the Real Good Produce program and how is it linked to the ugly food movement?8:10 How does Raley’s deal with internal food waste?9:35 How does Raley’s food program impact prices for their customers?11:37 What type of environmental impact does the program have?14:58 What were the risks that Raley’s had to consider before starting the Real Good Produce program?15:51 How can people learn more and get involved with this program?17:05 What does Meg hope will be the impact of her work 30 years from now?

Guests:Megan Burritt is Raley’s Supermarkets Director of Wellness and Sustainability. Passionate about creating sustainable food systems and bringing good, clean food to the everyday American, Meg has lived every link in the food chain, from working on the farm to line cooking to category management. Meg attended Stanford as an undergrad, majoring in Human Biology, and is a graduate of Presidio Graduate School where she obtained an MBA in Sustainable Management. As a 2014 First Movers Fellow with the Aspen Institute Business and Society Program, Meg continues to learn and grow as an innovator. First Movers is a group of exceptional innovators in business who are creating new products, services and management practices that achieve greater profitability and positive social and environmental impacts. Meg lives in beautiful Curtis Park, Sacramento where she enjoys baking, riding bikes and spending time with her veterinarian wife, Amanda, and their family of rescue animals. Twitter - https://twitter.com/misskeen LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/meganburritt

Organization:Raley's Supermarkets (also known as Raley's Family of Fine Stores) is a privately held, family-owned, regional grocery chain that operates stores under the Raley's, Bel Air Markets, Nob Hill Foods, and Food Source names in northern California and Nevada. Raley’s operates 128 stores, 40 of them in the Greater Sacramento area and employs around 13,400 workers today. Headquartered in West Sacramento, California, Raley's is the dominant supermarket operator in the Sacramento metropolitan area.

Take Away Quotes:“Up to 40% of the food that we grow here in America is often wasted before it gets to the consumer. That’s the high end of the statistic, but it really is mind boggling when you think about that much food that we’re putting resources into growing, that isn’t getting into the hands of people who would like to eat it.”

“At Raley’s we do still have some produce waste because some of it just goes off while it’s waiting to be purchased at the grocery store. And we actually divert from the landfill. We send all of our produce waste to an anaerobic bio-digester where it becomes essentially compost and then natural gas energy.”

“We are used to selling only one type of very perfectly shaped, sized, and colored fruits and vegetables in conventional grocery stores. So to go out here with this what people sometime call “ugly produce” we were taking a little bit of a risk. But we did see a really positive reception with our consumers that they understand that every fruit and vegetable is unique and it’s still nutritious and delicious no matter what it looks like.”

“People don’t realize that the food sector is the largest producer of greenhouse gasses of all our sectors, including transportation. So if you have an industry that’s wasting 40% of its effort, there’s this huge opportunity to reduce waste, to reduce environmental impacts, to reduce greenhouse gas impacts, at the same time reduce food costs [and] deal with issues of food insecurity. So across the board it’s just vitally important work.” Resources:Aspen Institute http://www.aspeninstitute.org

Aspen Institute - First Movers Fellowship Program http://www.aspeninstitute.org/policy-work/business-society/corporate-programs/first-movers-fellowship-program

Raley’s Supermarkets http://www.raleys.com/www/home.jsp

PBS News Hour Video on Food Waste http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/almost-half-americas-food-go-waste/

Presidio Graduate Schoolhttp://www.presidio.edu

 

 

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit at eosummit.com

016: Sustainable Food (and Management Education) with Presidio Graduate School
32:35
2017-10-07 15:18:49 UTC 32:35
016: Sustainable Food (and Management Education) with Presidio Graduate School

In this episode of Equitable Opportunity Radio, we begin a new series on the relationship between food and equitable opportunity. In today’s food culture, we’re seeing a rising number of individuals, businesses and communities that are rethinking how we grow, process, and consume our food. In this series we partner with Presidio Graduate School to bring you a series of stories about the pioneers who are working to innovate and transform our food system into one that promotes better health for people, the planet, and the economy.

Topic: The Relationship Between Food and Equitable Opportunity

In This Episode:0:29 Introduction to Food and Equitable Opportunity Series1:46 Introduction of guests4:30 What is Presidio Graduate School?6:55 Karen shares her background and passion for sustainable food systems.8:38 Dan shares his background and tells the story of his company, Regrained.10:48 For Karen, how do her passions for food and sustainability intersect?12:19 What is the future of food and sustainability?13:30 For Dan, how did his passion for food and sustainability come together?14:38 What is the future of Regrained?17:52 How is the sustainability field addressing equity?20:33 What are the implications of a more sustainable food system?22:12 How does a sustainable food system impact quality of life and earning a living wage?28:05 What should the food production system look like 30 years from now?

Guests: Dr. Steven Crane, Associate Dean of the MBA program at Presidio Graduate School.Karen Williams is the co-chair of the Presidio Sustainable Food Club and works at the Nexus of Urban Sustainability and Food.Dan Kurzrock is the co-chair of the Presidio Sustainable Food Club, as well as the Executive Grain Officer of ReGrained, a company that repurposes “spent” beer grain to create healthy, delicious, and sustainable products.

Organization: Presidio Graduate School is a school driven to educate leaders and transform the world. Presidio has a diverse student body and delivers education courses in virtual and in-person modes. Presidio offers an MBA and MPA program, as well as a dual MBA and MPA program. Karen and Dan are examples of the quality leadership that Presidio is growing and fostering with their degree programs.

Karen and Dan bring their passion for economics, social justice, healthy food, and easy access to food to their respective roles. They each understand that everything is connected. How we grow and distribute food, and reduce the amount of waste involved in it will provide enormous economic opportunity. If we help create ownership on how to grow the food, develop the market, and deliver it to market, we’ve created a way that addresses economic opportunity with those who have not previously had it.

Take Away Quotes:“We want our business to be something that creates jobs and we want it to be a really active player in our sustainable economy.”

“It is a holistic system so if you’re not addressing the social equity piece, then long term you can’t be totally sustainable.”

“It’s not just access to good food, but that also drives ability to maintain good health. So it really is all connected and that’s what I find so fascinating and exciting about it.”

“Food is such a massive industry and it has such a huge impact on our communities and our planet. The needs of today and our food system are are largely being prioritized over those of tomorrow and I became interested in ways that I could use business to counter balance that.”

Resources:http://www.regrained.com/https://www.facebook.com/Presidio-Sustainable-Food-Club-271823156176366/timeline/http://www.presidio.edu/

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit at eosummit.com

015: Broadening Women’s Roles in Hollywood, a Camp Reel Stories participant’s pursuit of diversity in the film industry
18:28
2017-10-07 15:18:49 UTC 18:28
015: Broadening Women’s Roles in Hollywood, a Camp Reel Stories participant’s pursuit of diversity in the film industry

In this episode of Equitable Opportunity Radio, Sydney Torrens, a high school student and participant in Camp Reel Stories joins the conversation to share her perspective on the media’s role in shaping people’s perception of world. Even as a young adult, Sydney understands the huge impact the media has on women’s ability to participate equally in the workplace and in the economy. She explains how Camp Reel Stories has provided her with the inside scoop on Hollywood and guidance on how women are successfully navigating the famously male-dominated film industry.

Topic: Broadening Women’s Roles in Hollywood and Pursuing Diversity in the Film Industry

Guest: Sydney Torrens is a student from Saratoga High School in San Jose, California. Sydney attended Camp Reel Stories during the summers of 2014 and 2015.

Organization: Camp Reel Stories is a one-week media camp for girls who want to learn how to make movies in the new digital media era. The camp has a powerful team of women active in the industry who will teach the “secret language” of media – the skills, tools and technologies. Working in small, collaborative groups, this camp gives the campers the opportunity to make and broadcast their own short films through:

  1. Production Classes
  2. Media Literacy Lessons
  3. Leadership Workshops

Film and Television is a multi-billion dollar industry and it can seem very secretive and exclusive, but the industry is going through a process of great transformation right now. Anyone can tell their story and distribute it to the world via online and social media platforms like youtube, vimeo, etc… Girls are still famously underrepresented, both behind the scenes and on screen, but Camp Reel Stories intends to teach our campers that, with the right tools and training, they hold the key to a revolution in the media industry. Their dreams are within reach.

Website - http://campreelstories.com

Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/CampReelStories

Twitter -  https://twitter.com/CampReelStories

Take Away Quotes:

“Esther took all of our films and distributed them to a bunch of different film festivals... It was just the coolest thing… They played our film with several other young filmmakers… It was just great to be there amongst other young filmmakers and also filmmakers who have been in the business for a while.”

“It was really eye-opening to see how the film industry runs, and see how these women have made their way through it. It’s such a tough business, so it was really inspiring to see people who have made it successfully.”

“It got me excited… It exposed me to the issues of gender inequality in film and media… It opened up a door, and the door just kind of said, ‘This is for you, you should come in and be a part of this movement to get women in film.’”

“I met so many incredible women, and I just learned that there is a need for diversity in Hollywood, and I definitely want to be someone who brings that to the table.”

“When you look up to these women who are so interesting and have such awesome lives, like Esther, she has an incredible life, she’s had this awesome career, and it definitely showed me I can have something similar to that if I go down this path.”

Additional Resources:

Watch Sydney’s latest Camp Reel Stories film: http://campreelstories.com/films/sleepy-house/

Watch Sydney’s film from Summer 2014: http://campreelstories.com/films/filtered-eyespot-films/

Hear Sydney’s thoughts about being part of the Portland Oregon Women’s Film Festival (POWFest): http://campreelstories.com/a-powfest-recap/

Learn more about the Portland Oregon Women’s Film Festival (POWFest): http://powfest.com/

Be a part of creating a more inclusive media landscape by supporting Camp Reel Stories’ efforts to empower and train young women for careers in the film industry: http://campreelstories.com/donate/

Do you know a girl who might benefit from Camp Reel Stories? Apply to be part of Camp Reel Stories: http://campreelstories.com/2015-application/

Does your favorite movie pass the Bechdel Test? Check out the Bechdel Test Movie List: http://bechdeltest.com/

 

 

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit at eosummit.com

014: Training young women for employment in film careers—how Esther Pearl and Camp Reel Stories are creating a more inclusive media landscape
22:09
2017-10-07 15:18:49 UTC 22:09
014: Training young women for employment in film careers—how Esther Pearl and Camp Reel Stories are creating a more inclusive media landscape

In this episode of Equitable Opportunity Radio, we talk with Esther Pearl, the Founder and Executive Director of Camp Reel Stories, a media camp for young women. Esther joins the conversation to share with us about the under-representation of women both in front of and behind the camera in the film industry and the profound effect this has on our society and our economy.

Camp Reel Stories teaches young women how to make movies in the new digital media era. The camp has a powerful team of women active in the industry who teach the “secret language” of media – the skills, tools and technologies. Working in small, collaborative groups, the camp gives the campers the opportunity to make and broadcast their own short films through: Production Classes, Media Literacy Lessons, Leadership Workshops.

The Film and Television Industry is a multi-billion dollar industry and it can seem very secretive and exclusive. However, it is going through a process of great transformation right now. Anyone can tell their story and distribute it to the world via online and social media platforms like Youtube, Vimeo, and so one. Girls are still famously underrepresented, both behind the scenes and on screen, but Camp Reel Stories intends to teach their campers that, with the right tools and training, they hold the key to a revolution in the media industry. Their dreams are within reach.

Topic: Women in the Media and Gender Equity in our Society

Guest: Esther Pearl is the founder and Executive Director of Camp Reel Stories. She received her Bachelor's in Visual Arts from University of California, San Diego and her M.B.A. in Sustainable Management from The Presidio Graduate School. She has spent 15 years working in Production Management in the Entertainment Industry. The majority of her career was spent at Pixar Animation Studios where her feature film credits include Academy Award winning films The Incredibles and Wall-e, as well as Monsters, Inc. Her other credits include; Titanic, Starship Troopers, Armageddon and What Dreams May Come. She was also a founding board member and the former President of the Board of Bay Area Girls Rock Camp (BAGRC). Esther believes in the power of great storytelling to create social change.

Organization: Camp Reel Stories is a one-week media camp for girls who want to learn how to make movies in the new digital media era. The camp has a powerful team of women active in the industry who will teach the “secret language” of media – the skills, tools and technologies. Working in small, collaborative groups, this camp gives the campers the opportunity to make and broadcast their own short films through:

  1. Production Classes
  2. Media Literacy Lessons
  3. Leadership Workshops

Film and Television is a multi-billion dollar industry and it can seem very secretive and exclusive, but the industry is going through a process of great transformation right now. Anyone can tell their story and distribute it to the world via online and social media platforms like youtube, vimeo, etc… Girls are still famously underrepresented, both behind the scenes and on screen, but Camp Reel Stories intends to teach our campers that, with the right tools and training, they hold the key to a revolution in the media industry. Their dreams are within reach.

Website - http://campreelstories.com

Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/CampReelStories

Twitter -  https://twitter.com/CampReelStories

Take Away Quotes:

“When women and girls are better represented behind the scenes in the media, they’ll be better reflected on the screen.”

“Right now whenever you turn on the television or watch a movie, for every girl you see on screen, you see four to five boys. And that has actually been the same since 1948.”

“I’ve been working in the media since I was 16... I’ve had a great career, but I’ve certainly known the feeling of being one of the only women in the room.”

“The media is the most prevalent and pervasive industry that we have at the moment… until we change the way media presents both women and people of color, we’re not going to have more women in the C-suite, in political office, because until girls are starting to see the possibilities and roles presented to them at a very young age, they’re not going to even start thinking about those as possibilities for their career. What we’re seeing, even with 15 and 16 year old girls, they’re taking themselves out of the game of life before they even know the rules. They’re pulling back their hopes, dreams, and aspirations because they don’t see it as a possibility for them. And it’s 2015.”

“By the end of the week the girls understand how to nurture their own unique voice, how to create their own media and understand the technology… and they also understand how to view media more critically and more thoughtfully.”

Additional Resources:

Be a part of creating a more inclusive media landscape by supporting Camp Reel Stories’ efforts to empower and train young women for careers in the film industry: http://campreelstories.com/donate/

Watch all the Camp Reel Stories films here: http://campreelstories.com/films/

Do you know a girl who might benefit from Camp Reel Stories? Apply to be part of Camp Reel Stories: http://campreelstories.com/2015-application/

 

 

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit at eosummit.com

013: From Unemployed Berkeley Dropout to Climate Change Warrior the Tyi Johnson and Rising Sun Energy Center Story
15:25
2017-10-07 15:18:49 UTC 15:25
013: From Unemployed Berkeley Dropout to Climate Change Warrior the Tyi Johnson and Rising Sun Energy Center Story

In this episode of Equitable Opportunity Radio, we talk with Tyi Johnson a graduate of the Green Energy Training Services (GETS) program at Rising Sun Energy Center. Tyi shares her personal journey from dropping out of UC Berkeley because she could not afford the tuition to working full-time in a green job as part of the Smart Lights Program at Community Energy Services Corporation.

Topic: The Green Economy and Workforce Development

Guest: Tyi Johnson is a graduate of the Green Energy Training Services program at Rising Sun Energy Center and an employee of Community Energy Services Corporation. She also serves on Rising Sun Energy Center’s Board of Directors.

Organization: The Smart Lights Program at Community Energy Services Corporation is designed to help small businesses become more energy-efficient. The program offers free start-to-finish technical assistance and instant rebates to help defray the cost of upgrading and/or repairing existing equipment. SmartLights helps with comprehensive lighting retrofits, refrigeration tune-ups, controls, and seals replacement, and referrals to appropriate HVAC programs. Their services include: a no cost and no obligation energy-efficiency assessment, instant rebates (typically range from 25%-75% of total project costs), negotiated volume pricing with qualified installation contractors, free start-to-finish project management and quality control, rebates paid directly to contractors to help defray out-of-pocket costs, and referrals to other energy efficiency programs as needed. Take a look at some of Community Energy Services Coporation's work on cafes,auto repair shops,facilities, and retail stores.

Website - http://ebenergy.org/commercial-services/smart-lights-program/

Facebook -https://www.facebook.com/Community-Energy-Services-Corporation-610255012322031

Take Away Quotes:

“After the internship ended, it was hard-going for me. This is when unemployment was at an all-time high... I stayed the course, I was meeting with my case-manager week after week. I really appreciate the fact that Rising Sun continued to collaborate with me and to encourage me and work with me until I was gainfully employed.”

“I feel like Rising Sun and the GETS program have put me in the prime position to be doing what I’m doing right now... I had three reasons why I joined GETS program: to learn about the green field, to learn about the energy efficiency field and by extension sustainability, and to learn how to save on my PG&E bill. And they did all three of those things for me. So it’s really great that I got all of those things, and got employed in the green energy efficiency field.”

“If I can empower others to be good stewards of this one great beautiful planet called Earth that we have, then I’ll do so, and I’m so appreciative of Rising Sun for setting me on that path.”

 

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit at eosummit.com

012: Green Job Training and Workforce Development, Jodi Pincus, Rising Sun Energy Center
22:50
2017-10-07 15:18:49 UTC 22:50
012: Green Job Training and Workforce Development, Jodi Pincus, Rising Sun Energy Center

This episode of Equitable Opportunity Radio explores what one leading workforce development organization is doing to simultaneously address climate change, water shortages, youth employment and obstacles to employment for low income adults. Rising Sun Energy Center, a green workforce development and energy retrofit services organization, works throughout the San Francisco Bay area to develop a green workforce while reducing environmental impacts and saving low income families money on their utilities.  Rising Sun Energy Center’s Executive Director Jodi Pincus is our guest. Jodi is a recognized expert in the green economy, youth employment, social enterprise and workforce development.

Topic:  The Green Economy, Youth Employment and Workforce Development

Guest:  Jodi Pincus is the Executive Director of Rising Sun Energy Center and a recognized expert in the green economy, youth employment, social enterprise and workforce development.

Organization:  Rising Sun Energy Center is a green workforce development and energy retrofit services organization working throughout the San Francisco Bay area. Their mission is to empower individuals to achieve environmental and economic sustainability for themselves and their communities. Rising Sun Energy Center runs three programs, which include the California Youth Energy Services (CYES), Leaders-in-Field-Training (LIFT) and Green Energy Training Services (GETS). The CYES program includes summer and after-school programs that train and employ young adults ages 15 to 22 to provide no-cost Green House Calls (energy efficiency and water conservation upgrades) to homes in their community. The LIFT program gives top employees in Rising Sun's CYES program peer leadership roles and teaches business and leadership skills. The GETS program is a pre-apprenticeship training program that prepares adults for careers in construction, energy efficiency, and the solar industry.

Website - http://www.risingsunenergy.org/

Blog - https://risingsunenergy.wordpress.com/

Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/risingsunenergycenter

Twitter -  https://twitter.com/RisingSunEC

Take Away Quotes:

“We believe that you can’t solve climate change without addressing unemployment.”

“Our youth, not only are they earning money and feeling a sense of purpose by doing the work but they’re gaining a lot of self-confidence, self-esteem; they’re going on to careers in business, social service, and environmental science.”

“This wonderful young man… he was in the foster care system… he came out of prison and into our job training program, and he had never graduated from anything in his life, and he graduated from our program.”

Additional Resources:

Rising Sun Energy Center’s Best Green Resources - http://www.risingsunenergy.org/content/links.html

Rising Sun Energy Center’s California Youth Energy Services (CYES) - http://www.risingsunenergy.org/content/cyes.html

Rising Sun Energy Center’s Green Energy Training Services (GETS) - http://www.risingsunenergy.org/content/gets.html

Rising Sun Bright Night 2015 (Participants of the California Youth Energy Services and Green Energy Training Services programs explain what Rising Sun means to them, and how it has affected their lives.) - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m26oP0NUs4Q

 

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit at eosummit.com

 

011: Equity: The Neglected Pillar of Sustainability, Bob Willard, Sustainability Advantage
24:44
2017-10-07 15:18:49 UTC 24:44
011: Equity: The Neglected Pillar of Sustainability, Bob Willard, Sustainability Advantage

This episode of Equitable Opportunity Radio covers the role equity has played in the sustainability movement to date and the future of equity as a measure of sustainability in the future. Our guest, Bob Willard, is a best-selling author and a globally recognized thought leader on the topics of making the business case for sustainability and measuring an organization's sustainability.

Bob shares with us his thoughts on the biggest global challenges (carbon, water, and poverty) we face. He also discusses why, to date, equity has not been as important of a part of the sustainability conversation as it should be and what he thinks the major measures of equity are for corporations (hint...employee compensation and paying fair taxes in the appropriate location).

Bob also explains the details of his latest project, the Future-Fit Business Benchmark, which when complete will be a more definitive set of metrics that can be used to measure the sustainability of businesses, government, and households.

Topic: Equity: The Neglected Third Pillar of Sustainability

Guest: Bob Willard is a leading expert on quantifying and selling the business value of corporate sustainability strategies and has given hundreds of keynote presentations to corporate, government, university, and NGO audiences. He has authored four books on sustainability including : The Sustainability Advantage (2002), The Next Sustainability Wave (2005), and The New Sustainability Advantage (2012).

Organization: Sustainability Advantage

Website - http://sustainabilityadvantage.com/

Twitter - https://twitter.com/bob_willard

LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/bobwillardsustainabilityguy

Take Away Quotes:

“Companies get a lot of good PR from being helpful in the community... but it’s nowhere close to the investment that they are not making when they duck paying their taxes.”On companies paying a living wage: “The turnover of employees is reduced dramatically… When people start to make a little bit more money, they are more empowered consumers… it’s better for the economy, it’s better for the government… and they become known as a company that really cares.”“The myth around this being a bad business proposition is hard to overcome, but it’s a myth, it’s not true. It really does pay to pay more.”

Additional Resources:

Future-Fit Business Benchmark - http://futurefitbusiness.org/

Future-Fit Business Benchmark Wiki - http://wiki.futurefitbusiness.org/Welcome

Future-Fit Business on Twitter - https://twitter.com/futurefitbiz

 

 

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit at eosummit.com

 

010: Revitalization in Baltimore after Freddie Gray, Mel Freeman, Citizens Planning & Housing Association
20:12
2017-10-07 15:18:49 UTC 20:12
010: Revitalization in Baltimore after Freddie Gray, Mel Freeman, Citizens Planning & Housing Association

On this episode of Equitable Opportunity Radio, we explore the revitalization challenges facing neighborhoods in West Baltimore before and after the tragic death of Freddie Gray. Our guest, Mel Freeman,  is a long-time community development activist and consultant and the former Executive Director of Citizens Planning & Housing Association in Baltimore, Maryland. Mel shares how inadequate access to quality infrastructure, services, and employment opportunities acts as a major barrier to community revitalization and economic participation for many residents of Baltimore. He stresses how vitally important it is to engage directly with residents in these neighborhoods to empower them and to work with them to build enduring solutions. Public resources are not adequate to shift the dynamic in many of these neighborhoods so Mel is focused on how to create conditions that will stimulate private investment in these neighborhoods while simultaneously lifting up and not displacing the majority of current residents. One particular focus of Mel’s work is to help members of these communities have hope, believe in themselves, empower themselves and become a force for change.

Topic: Revitalization in Baltimore after Freddie Gray

Guest: Mel Freeman is the former Executive Director of Citizens Planning & Housing Association, a regional organization whose mission envisions a well-planned Baltimore region with equity among jurisdictions, where citizens respect diversity and have access to responsive government and quality housing in vibrant neighborhoods. Currently, Mel is leading his own consulting firm, Freeman Consulting Group, where he continues to work to advance community-led planning processes that provide residents and organizations with the tools to self-manage change within their own communities. His approach is grounded in the belief that people change neighborhoods themselves not by waiting on others to lead the way.

Organization: The Citizens Planning & Housing Association (CPHA) is the catalyst for civic action to bring about a healthy, inclusive Baltimore, with economically vibrant communities and opportunities for all people. The organization does this by bringing together people and neighborhoods to create innovative solutions to challenging, community-wide problems; empowering citizens with information and skills for advocacy and organizing; and championing solutions through legislative and policy reforms. Their programs include Community Association Support and Leadership Training, Policy Research and Legislative Pressure, Citizen Outreach and Organizing, and more.

Website - http://www.cphabaltimore.org/

Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/bmorecpha

Twitter - https://twitter.com/bmorecpha

Take Away Quotes:

“There is a big fear of the word gentrification, do we have to have other folks who don’t look like us in our neighborhoods to increase the value of our communities?”

“There is never enough public money, ever! So private investment needs to happen in these communities.”

“We do need change in communities, but we also need to secure the families that are there.”

“You can’t get anything done unless you’re out there talking to people, and trying to really understand what their needs are.”

“Nobody in their neighborhood uses this train, hundreds of cars drive to this train station and then those people go to work, and those jobs are for them, not for us.”

“What we have to do is get out in these communities and talk about what is for them, and not have them constantly thinking that the next thing that happens in their community is not for them, it is for them and they need to know that.”

 

 

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit at eosummit.com

 

009: Anchor Institutions and Worker Cooperatives: Domenic Fatica, Evergreen Energy Solutions
17:39
2017-10-07 15:18:49 UTC 17:39
009: Anchor Institutions and Worker Cooperatives: Domenic Fatica, Evergreen Energy Solutions

Domenic has spent most of his adult life working in the construction industry and now, in his 60s, he is working the best job he has ever had and never wants to retire.  In fact, he loves the job so much he recruited his 88-year-old father to help train his co-workers.

On this week’s episode of Equitable Opportunity Radio, we interview Domenic Fatica, the General Manager of Evergreen Energy Solutions (E2S) worker cooperative in Cleveland. E2S hires individuals who have life experiences that make it hard for them to find employment. The cooperative then trains them in the construction and energy retrofit trades. E2S gives these men and women an opportunity to further transform their lives and become worker/owners of the cooperative, as well as homeowners with accessible transportation. Domenic and E2S are transforming lives, building local community wealth, and helping change the face of Cleveland. Tune in to learn why this is the most meaningful and important job Domenic has ever had.

Topic: Anchor Institutions and Worker Cooperatives

Guest: Domenic Fatica is general manager of Evergreen Energy Solutions (E2S), an Evergreen Cooperatives portfolio company that designs, installs, and develops PV solar panel arrays for institutional, governmental, and commercial markets. Incorporated in 2008, E2S also provides energy efficiency and home performance services to make residential and commercial buildings more energy efficient.

Organization: Evergreen Cooperatives of Cleveland, Ohio are pioneering innovative models of job creation, wealth building, and sustainability. Evergreen’s employee-owned, for-profit companies are based locally and hire locally. They create meaningful green jobs and keep precious financial resources within the Greater University Circle neighborhoods. Worker-owners at Evergreen Cooperatives earn a living wage and build equity in the firms as owners of the business.

Website - http://evergreencooperatives.com

Facebook -https://www.facebook.com/evergreencoop

Twitter - https://twitter.com/evgohcoop

Additional Resources:

Evergreen Cooperatives - http://evergreencooperatives.com

The Cleveland Foundation - http://www.clevelandfoundation.org

The Democracy Collaborative - http://democracycollaborative.org

 

 

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit at eosummit.com

008: Anchor Institutions and Community Wealth Building: Ted Howard, The Democracy Collaborative
28:33
2017-10-07 15:18:49 UTC 28:33
008: Anchor Institutions and Community Wealth Building: Ted Howard, The Democracy Collaborative

On this episode of Equitable Opportunity radio, host Mike Hancox and co-host Vernice Miller Travis interview Ted Howard, the Co-founder and Executive Director of The Democracy Collaborative at the University of Maryland. Ted explains the role anchor institutions and worker collaboratives play in building a more inclusive economy. Anchor institutions are large, placed-based, nonprofit organizations that tend not to relocate. Anchor institutions can have a major impact on local economies and tend to be major employers. According to community-wealth.org, “If the economic power of these anchor institutions were more effectively harnessed, they could contribute greatly to community wealth building. The largest and most numerous of such nonprofit anchors are universities and non-profit hospitals (often called "eds and meds").” In Cleveland, The Democracy Collaborative has worked with anchor institutions like The Cleveland Clinic to create the Evergreen Cooperatives. The Evergreen Cooperatives seek to create community wealth and thriving businesses by giving workers an ownership stake in the businesses that they are creating. The three existing Evergreen Cooperatives focus on local food production, solar energy retrofits, and laundry services. Tune in to learn about the impact this work has had in Cleveland and what the future of community wealth building might look like.

Topic: Anchor Institutions and Community Wealth Building

Guest: Ted Howard is the co-founder and Executive Director of The Democracy Collaborative at the University of Maryland. In July 2010, Mr. Howard was appointed the Steven Minter Senior Fellow for Social Justice at The Cleveland Foundation where he was a member of a team that developed the comprehensive job creation and wealth building strategy, which resulted in the Evergreen Cooperatives Initiative.  

Full Bio - http://democracycollaborative.org/content/ted-howard

Organization: The Democracy Collaborative is a national leader in equitable, inclusive and sustainable development through their Community Wealth Building Initiative. This initiative sustains a wide range of Advisory, Research and Field Building activities designed to transform the practice of community/economic development in the United States.

Website - http://democracycollaborative.org

Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/democracycollaborative

Twitter - https://twitter.com/democracycollab

Take Away Quotes:

“Rooting wealth in communities is the future of economic development in America”

“Ownership and control of capital is a key determinant of power in any economic system”

“There are 50 million or more people living in poverty in the US.”

“For profit with a social mission and a broadly shared ownership structure – that is what community wealth building is about.”

“A job alone is not enough…how do you create assets in addition to income.”

Additional Resources:

Evergreen Cooperatives - http://evergreencooperatives.com

The Cleveland Foundation - http://www.clevelandfoundation.org

The Cleveland Clinic - http://my.clevelandclinic.org

 

 

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit at eosummit.com

007: Eliminating Tips and Paying a Salary with Benefits: Bobby Fry, Bar Marco
21:29
2017-10-07 15:18:49 UTC 21:29
007: Eliminating Tips and Paying a Salary with Benefits: Bobby Fry, Bar Marco

On this episode, we talk with restaurateur Bobby Fry of Bar Marco in Pittsburgh. Bobby and his restaurant, Bar Marco, are on the leading edge of revolutionizing food service by eliminating tips and paying wait staff a salary with benefits and bonuses. Bobby is a successful and thoughtful business person who made the decision to shift his business model after a thorough analysis of his business and the restaurant industry. By valuing his workers and providing his wait staff and back of house staff with stable incomes and  benefits, Fry was able to triple the restaurant's bottom line. Bobby came to the decision to shift Bar Marco’s business model after determining there are 3 main reasons 90% of all restaurants fail in their first 3 to 5 years. He wanted Bar Marco to avoid a similar fate. The shift has motivated employees, increased teamwork, and reduced waste, which has resulted in huge bottom line results. Tune in to find out how a forward thinking business person sees his business and the opportunity taking care of his people creates.

Topic: Eliminating Tips and Paying a Salary with Benefits

Guest: Bobby Fry is the co founder/owner of Bar Marco in Pittsburgh.  

Organization: Bar Marco is a highly successful restaurant in Pittsburgh that recently has taken a radical new approach to how their staff is compensated. They describe themselves as restaurant with “The attention to detail of fine dining but with Hall & Oates and Wu-Tang Clan.”

Website - http://www.barmarcopgh.com/

Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Bar-Marco/167136583366244

Twitter -  https://twitter.com/BarMarcoPGH

Instagram - https://instagram.com/barmarcopgh/

Take Away Quotes:

“I wanted to proactively solve three problems restaurants face in the years 3-5 that result in 90% of restaurants failing”

“You need to do this for the right business reasons – this is not about hippies and free love”

“This is what happens when you have a minimum wage that is so low – you incentivize big companies to undervalue certain assets – they categorize their people as something they don’t take care of because there are other more expensive things you have to take care of.”

Additional Resources:

http://www.nextpittsburgh.com/next-wave/bar-marco-trailblazes-no-tipping-policy/

http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/246972

Michael Lynn – Cornell Professor and Hospitality Industry Researcher – https://www.hotelschool.cornell.edu/app/facultydb/instructors/wml3

Tipping Expert Website – http://tippingresearch.com/index.html

Food Revolution Pittsburgh Cooking Club – http://www.foodrevpgh.com/ and https://www.facebook.com/FRPCC

 

 

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit at eosummit.com

006: Infrastructure, Workforce Development, and Shared Regional Prosperity: Nathaniel Q. Smith, The Partnership for Southern Equity
34:00
2017-10-07 15:18:49 UTC 34:00
006: Infrastructure, Workforce Development, and Shared Regional Prosperity: Nathaniel Q. Smith, The Partnership for Southern Equity

On this episode, we talk with Nathaniel Q. Smith, the founder and convener of The Partnership for Southern Equity (PSE). PSE is working to bring together common and uncommon allies to develop public policies that will increase access and opportunity for vulnerable populations in the southeastern United States. They train everyday heroes in the art of community organizing and grow coalitions that realize equity in the areas of transportation, energy, growth, and health. Under Nathaniel’s leadership, PSE is currently working to bring public transportation back to Clayton County, Georgia, an area that lost its public transportation system four years ago. Nathaniel and PSE are also working to organize a collaborative that will work in metro Atlanta to realize the goal of a balanced distribution of energy benefits and burdens (energy equity). Their accomplishments to date include increased voting from vulnerable populations in T-SPLOST decision of 2011, creation of the Equitable Target Area Index and Social Equity Advisory Committee at the Atlanta Regional Commission, development of the Metro Atlanta Equity Atlas, institution of the American south’s first Equity Mapping and Framing tool, and highlighting the elevation of equity as the superior growth model for metro Atlanta.

Topic: Infrastructure, Workforce Development, and Shared Regional Prosperity

Guest: Nathaniel Q. Smith who is the founder/convener of The Partnership for Southern Equity.

LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/pub/nathaniel-smith/6/115/958

Organization: The Partnership for Southern Equity is working to bring together common and uncommon allies to develop public policies that will increase access and opportunity for vulnerable populations in the southeastern United States

Website - http://partnershipforsouthernequity.org

Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/PSEquity

Twitter - https://twitter.com/psequitymatters

Take Away Quotes:

“Our Interdependence as a region is what will dictate whether we will be competitive and sustainable.”

“The communities that have not answered the equity are left with a serious disadvantage.”

“What is economic development in the 21st century?"

“If we do not focus on people now as we move into an economy that requires (more skilled labor) then we will not be able to make profits (in the future).”

“Economic development is attracted to good infrastructure.”

“How can we leverage infrastructure and transportation in some of the communities that have been forgotten by the market in order to jump start local economies?”

Additional Resources:

Metro Atlanta Equity Atlas - http://partnershipforsouthernequity.org/index.php/issue-areas/maea

The Equity of Opportunity - http://partnershipforsouthernequity.org/index.php/issue-areas/equity-of-opportunity

 

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit at eosummit.com

005: Starbucks College Achievement Plan: Markelle Cullom-Herbison, Starbucks Barista
22:30
2017-10-07 15:18:49 UTC 22:30
005: Starbucks College Achievement Plan: Markelle Cullom-Herbison, Starbucks Barista

On this episode, Starbucks’ Barista and Tempe, Arizona native, Markelle Cullom-Herbison shares what it is like to participate in the Starbucks College Achievement Plan. She works at Starbuck’s while receiving her Bachelor’s degree in Psychology online from Arizona State University. Markelle talks about the challenges of working and going to school full-time; the challenge and burden Millennials face when dealing with the enormous cost and debt associated with college; and the huge financial and confidence boost she has gotten from Starbucks’ College Achievement Plan.

Topic:  Starbucks College Achievement Plan

Guest: Markelle Cullom-Herbison is an Assistant Manager at Starbucks

Organization: Starbucks

Website - http://www.starbucks.com

Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/Starbucks

Twitter - https://twitter.com/starbucksstore

Take Away Quotes:

“I know people that are Juniors in college that are 50 – 60 - $70,000 in debt from 2-3 years of school….that is crazy.”

“I would have been drowning in debt.”

“This partnership means so much more than a free education…..I truly believe we are changing the future and it is really cool to be a part of that.”

“I can’t imagine myself (working) any place other than Starbucks……”

Additional Resources:

Starbucks College Achievement Plan - http://www.starbucks.com/careers/college-plan

Arizona State University Online Degree Programs - http://asuonline.asu.edu

004: Starbucks College Achievement Plan and Opportunity for Youth Program: Lacey All, Starbucks Director of Strategy
22:53
2017-10-07 15:18:49 UTC 22:53
004: Starbucks College Achievement Plan and Opportunity for Youth Program: Lacey All, Starbucks Director of Strategy

On this episode, Starbucks’ Director of Strategy Lacey All talks about Starbucks’ ground breaking College Achievement Plan and Opportunity Youth Program. The College Achievement Plan pays full tuition to Arizona State University’s online 4-year degree program for any Starbucks’s employee who is benefits eligible (meaning they work on average 20 hours per week). The Opportunity Youth Program is focused on finding employment for the estimate 6 million “disconnected” young Americans between the ages of 16 and 24 who are neither in school nor employed full-time. This revolutionary commitment to engaging and advancing the lives of its employees is part of Starbucks’ strategy and commitment to build an outstanding 21st century brand and company.

Topic: Starbucks College Achievement Plan and Opportunity for Youth Program

Guest: Lacey All is Starbucks Director of Strategy

Twitter – https://twitter.com/laceynall

LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/pub/lacey-all/1/506/83a

Organization: Starbucks - they sell coffee – heard of them?

Website - http://www.starbucks.com

Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/Starbucks

Twitter - https://twitter.com/starbucksstore

Take Away Quotes:

“We can work differently to take big swings at big problems.”

“Our mission and values are fueled by the notion of individual opportunity.”

“Our goal is to inspire and nurture the human spirit.”

“We are trying to achieve the balance between profitability and social impact.”

“We ultimately want to be one of the most respected and trusted brands and to do that we have to make bold moves.”

“By 2025 we hope to have 25,000 partners graduate college.”

“As a company we are a collection of individuals who are all trying to do more good in the world and use our scale in the right way.”

Additional Resources:

Starbucks College Achievement Plan - http://www.starbucks.com/careers/college-plan

Opportunity for Youth - http://www.starbucks.com/responsibility/community/opportunity-youth

 

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit at eosummit.com

003: Knowing Together, Growing Together: Dr. Chris Benner
28:35
2017-10-07 15:18:49 UTC 28:35
003: Knowing Together, Growing Together: Dr. Chris Benner

Our topic this week is Knowing Together, Growing Together, how metropolitan regions that achieve a high degree of communication and collaboration among diverse stakeholder groups grow faster than other metropolitan areas. Our guest is Dr. Chris Benner, a Professor of Environmental Studies at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and the Executive Director of the Everett Program. On the show we discuss what places like Salt Lake City and Oklahoma City have done to grow their economies, reduce inequity, and create a more inclusive economy and community. Dr. Benner’s research focuses on the relationships between technological change, regional development, and structures of economic opportunity, focusing on regional labor markets and the transformation of work and employment patterns. Dr. Benner’s recent book, co-authored with Manuel Pastor, is Just Growth: Inclusion and Prosperity in America’s Metropolitan Regions, helps uncover the processes, policies and institutional arrangements that help explain how certain regions around the country have been able to consistently link prosperity and inclusion. Benner’s work has also included providing research assistance to a range of organizations promoting equity and expanded opportunity, including the Coalition on Regional Equity (Sacramento), Working Partnerships USA (San Jose), the California Labor Federation, and the Congress of South African Trade Unions, among others.

Topic: Knowing Together – Growing Together

Guest: Dr. Chris Benner is the Dorothy E. Everett Chair in Global Information and Social Entrepreneurship and Director of the Everett Program for Digital Tools for Social Innovation at the University of California, Santa Cruz.

Full Bio - https://ccrec.ucsc.edu/profile/chris-benner-phd

Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/chris.benner.395

Twitter – https://twitter.com/chrisbenner

LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/drchrisbenner

Organization: The Everett Program merges the enthusiasm of student leaders with information technology to promote structural social change by building social networking capacity across non-governmental and community-based organizations.

Website - http://www.everettprogram.org

Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/everettprogram

Twitter - https://twitter.com/everettprogram

Youtube- https://www.youtube.com/user/EverettProgram

Take Away Quotes:

“Those metropolitan regions that are more equitable in fact grow faster.”

Additional Resources:

Dr. Chris Benner TED talk: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VB1WqEV7miY

Just Growth Website – http://justgrowth.org

Envision Utah - http://envisionutah.org

Publications:

Just Growth: Inclusion and Prosperity in America's Metropolitan Regions – Find it on Amazon: Just Growth: Inclusion and Prosperity in America's Metropolitan Regions (Regions and Cities)

Knowing Together, Growing Together – Coming Soon

 

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit, at eosummit.com

002: Investing in Opportunity: Alan Jenkins, The Opportunity Agenda
27:41
2017-10-07 15:18:49 UTC 27:41
002: Investing in Opportunity: Alan Jenkins, The Opportunity Agenda

Our topic this week is Investing in Opportunity and our guest is Alan Jenkins the Executive Director of The Opportunity Agenda, a communications, research, and policy organization dedicated to building the national will to expand opportunity in America. The Opportunity Agenda launched in 2006 with the mission of building the national will to expand opportunity in America. Focused on moving hearts, minds, and policy over time, the organization works with social justice groups, leaders, and movements to advance solutions that expand opportunity for everyone. Through active partnerships, The Opportunity Agenda synthesizes and translates research on barriers to opportunity and corresponding solutions; uses communications and media to understand and influence public opinion; and identifies and advocates for policies that improve people’s lives. To achieve their mission, they focus on racial equity, immigration, economic opportunity, reproductive health and rights, and African-American men and boys.

Topic:  Investing in Opportunity

Guest: Alan Jenkins is Executive Director of The Opportunity Agenda. a communications, research, and policy organization dedicated to building the national will to expand opportunity in America.

Full Bio - http://opportunityagenda.org/alan_jenkins_extended_biography

LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/pub/alan-jenkins/5/634/570

Organization:  The Opportunity Agenda. Is a communications, research, and policy organization dedicated to building the national will to expand opportunity in America.

Website - http://opportunityagenda.org

Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/opportunityagenda

Twitter - https://twitter.com/oppagenda

LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/company/the-opportunity-agenda

Take Away Quotes:

“The ideal of opportunity is the notion that everyone deserves a fair chance to achieve his or her full potential.”

“Where the door of opportunity was cracked open a bit, Americans of all backgrounds have always rushed to get in the door.”

“Ultimately it’s up to all of us to make sure that we move from concern, to action, to solutions and that those solutions are lasting.”

Additional Resources:

American Opportunity Communication Toolkit: http://opportunityagenda.org/american-opportunity-communications-toolkit

Compact for Home Opportunity: https://opportunityagenda.org/compact_home_opp

Opportunity for Black Men and Boys:  http://opportunityagenda.org/black_male

 

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit, at eosummit.com

001: What Is Equitable Opportunity Radio
18:58
2017-10-07 15:18:49 UTC 18:58
001: What Is Equitable Opportunity Radio

On this first episode of Equitable Opportunity Radio, show host Mike Hancox the CEO of Skeo Solutions, introduces his co-hosts community development activist and consultant Vernice Miller-Travis and Carl Schneebeck, professor of leadership and communications at Presidio Graduate School. The show’s hosts share that the podcast will look at what businesses, organizations, communities, and individuals are doing to create a more inclusive economy.  Topics will include such things as: collaboration, compensation, corporate social responsibility, diversity, economic growth, employee empowerment, equitable access, equitable development, equitable opportunity, fair labor practices, green jobs, housing, innovation, job training, living wages, public-private partnerships, sustainability, thriving businesses, transportation equity.

 

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit, at eosummit.com

027: To Infinity and Beyond
12:04
2017-12-15 20:33:52 UTC 12:04
027: To Infinity and Beyond

Topic: Introducing Infinite Earth Radio

In This Episode:0:19 Special announcement about the future of Equitable Opportunity Radio2:18 Introduction of Vernice Miller-Travis and Carl Schneebeck3:12 Carl reflects on the highlight moments of Equitable Opportunity Radio4:26 Carl and Michael discuss their new podcast project6:38 Vernice shares her insights on the last 6 months of Equitable Opportunity Radio8:50 Michael and Vernice discuss the vision and purpose of Infinite Earth Radio10:30 Michael discusses the important role of the Local Government Commission10:44 How you can switch over to Infinite Earth Radio

Take Away Quotes: “I think we’re on the cusp of another evolution of the potential of human organizations and how we can work together to bring really great things to our societies, to our communities, to the planet. Our podcast is going to explore how people are doing that. What are the techniques that great managers and great leaders are doing to tap that potential and to bring organizations to the next level?”

“We have had the opportunity to talk to some true visionaries who are just doing incredible work, but who are so generous about sharing the work that they’re doing and the learnings that they are experiencing, with as broad a cross section of folks as possible so that other communities can learn from the good things that are happening out there and they can be replicated in other places. This is a moment when we need a lot of inspiration and we have the privilege and will continue to talk to folk who can provide that inspiration.”

Resources:Infinite Earth Radio Website

Infinite Earth Radio iTunes

026: What Would it Look Like if We Started Over?
20:52
2017-12-15 20:33:52 UTC 20:52
026: What Would it Look Like if We Started Over?

Organization:When it comes to our current food system, Hampton Creek believes it is time to start over and ask what it is that you really want to eat. They believe eating right shouldn't be so hard; that good food should be good for your body, good for your budget, easy on the earth, and insanely delicious. They believe you shouldn't have to compromise on anything and that it should be available for everyone everywhere.

Topic:Food That’s Just Better

Guest:Udi Lazimy is the Global Plant Sourcing Specialist at Hampton Creek, a quickly-growing food company based in San Francisco, where he works with farmers to drive Hampton Creek’s innovative plant-based food research and product development. Prior to this, Udi served as the National Grassroots Advocacy Director at the Organic Farming Research Foundation.

Hampton Creek Twitterhttps://twitter.com/hamptoncreek

Take Away Quotes:

“We are growing quickly as a food company, and because of that fact, we’re creating opportunities all over the country for people to help us market our product and help us get it out there into stores, etc. But I think in general it’s about continuing to talk about how we can change things, how can we make things better, not believing in the status quo, and in so doing a lot of new people are emerging with wonderful, brilliant ideas that are challenging our model and creating more competition in the food marketplace, and that’s something that we really highly encourage.”

“We focus on plant-based food not because we believe people shouldn’t eat meat and not because we want to directly challenge the meat industry. It’s because we don’t believe that a highly resource intensive, highly polluting, greenhouse gas emitting, land consuming industry such as the animal food industry on a large scale, is one that should continue and should be supported. So plant-based is really the alternative to that and we’ve found that we can make better food with plants.”

“I do believe is the leading, most environmentally destructive practice we have in the world, is the food system in many ways. And so I think down the line 30 years from now you’re going to see a system that really does utilize the power of plants, celebrate soil and soil quality, water, cleanliness, community, food systems, and isn’t just about the absolute cheapest thing we can produce, it’s going to be more about providing good food that’s sustainable and healthy for the environment and for people, and that will be the status quo.”

Resources:Hampton Creekhttps://www.hamptoncreek.com/

Presidio Graduate Schoolhttp://www.presidio.edu

025: Groceries as if People Mattered
28:44
2017-12-15 20:33:52 UTC 28:44
025: Groceries as if People Mattered

Organization:People’s Community Market is a new business that is emerging from and building on the ten years of experience, track record and social relations of its sister organization, People’s Grocery, which is a non-profit that has operated numerous food projects (including the Mobile Market and the Grub Box), urban gardens and nutrition education programs. Their purpose is to create and operate a small-format, full-service grocery store in West Oakland, which is a community that has not had a full-service grocer for several decades. In addition to retailing fresh foods and groceries, the business will offer information, resources and services to support customers in improving their health and provide a community venue in support of community building.

Topic:Building a Stronger Community Through Food & Business

Guest:Brahm Ahmadi is a social entrepreneur working to build healthier and more equitable inner city communities by creating change to the food system. In 2003, he co-founded People’s Grocery, a nonprofit organization that has attracted national attention for its effort to transform inner city food systems through projects in food enterprise, urban agriculture, and nutrition education that include the nation’s first Mobile Market. In 2010, Brahm founded People’s Community Market to create a fresh food retail business model that fosters health and social interaction in low-income communities. He’s also piloting a model for enabling the general public to invest in mission-driven companies and local communities. Brahm has a B.A. in Sociology from the University of California and an MBA from the Presidio Graduate School. He is a Food and Community Fellow at the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy and a Fellow at Food First: Institute for Food and Development Policy.

People’s Community Market Twitterhttps://twitter.com/peoplesmrkt

Take Away Quotes:

“People’s Community Market essentially is intended to be a full-service grocery store, community serving market, in West Oakland, with the goal of making it convenient for residents to buy nutritious and fresh foods as well as prepared foods and traditional groceries, at affordable prices in their own neighborhood. And also using the store as a resource center and a platform for community engagement and offering a variety of educational and incentive programs that introduce our future customers to healthier food options.”

“I think it’s also important that people are included from the very beginning so it’s not just that you’ve opened your doors and you’re welcoming everyone to come in and you’re employing locally, but from the day one of conception, planning, and design of the business, community residents are engaged. And that’s partly to make sure that the store and the products and the store environment does truly reflect and appeal to the community, but it’s also to create that sense of ownership from the very beginning.”

Resources:People’s Community Markethttp://peoplescommunitymarket.com/

Presidio Graduate Schoolhttp://www.presidio.edu

024: Thinking Outside the Food Pantry
30:47
2017-12-15 20:33:52 UTC 30:47
024: Thinking Outside the Food Pantry

Organization:Oregon Food Bank collects and distributes food through a network of four Oregon Food Bank branches and 17 independent regional food banks serving Oregon and Clark County, Washington.  Along with approximately 970 partner agencies, they help nearly one in five households fend off hunger. They work to address the root causes of hunger by offering nutrition education, strengthening local food systems, collaborating with community groups, and advocating for hunger relief at the local and federal level.

Topic:Taking a Look at Food Insecurity

Guest:Sharon Thornberry is the Community Food Systems Manager at the Oregon Food Bank. Sharon has been a grassroots organizer, trainer and advocate for community food systems, rural communities, and anti-hunger work in Oregon since 1986. She grew up on farms, was very active in 4-H and Girl Scouts, and was one of the first female members of Future Farmers of America. In 1979, she was a homeless mom with two small children. Sharon has served on the Oregon Hunger Task Force for 16 years, the board of the Community Food Security Coalition for six years (three as President), and the board of Bread for the World and Bread for the World Institute for six years. The sum of her experiences have come together to make her a passionate and knowledgeable community food security and anti-hunger advocate. She is the 2009 recipient of the Billi Odegard Public Health Genius Award from the Community Health Partnership of Oregon. She has worked for Oregon Food Bank for the past 16 years focusing on rural food systems and is the creator of “FEAST”, the nationally recognized community food systems organizing program. She has been a resident of Philomath, Oregon for 30 years. She is an avid gardener and loves to share the cooking traditions learned in the farm kitchens of her youth with friends and family.

Sharon Thornberry Twitterhttps://twitter.com/ofb_sharont

Take Away Quotes:

“The statistics say that rural hunger is not as bad as urban hunger, I think people in rural communities are less likely to admit they’re hungry too. There’s a lot of pride that goes with living in rural communities.”

“There aren’t equal opportunities for everybody and there’s a lot of deniers that say that all of this stuff is made up. But I’m here to tell you it’s not made up. We don’t think about the challenges of access. People with small children are the most financially insecure. Salaries have not kept up with the cost of living in this country.”

“We’re leaving a lot of kids in a really bad place because it’s impossible for their parents to have a living wage, especially in rural communities. There’s a whole systemic thing that we need to look at and figure out how we solve it as a country.”

“Just think: the food banks across this country, there are hundreds of feeding american food banks, there are thens of thousands of food pantries across this country, they all have volunteers. If those folks had taken even a fraction of the hours they’ve taken handing out food and been saying to the powers that be: to congress, to their state senators, to their state legislators, even to their county commissioners, “This is wrong, we have to do this differently,” what do you think the picture would be? I think we’d be in a different space?”

“It’s about keeping the discussion going, and people having success, and supporting small farmers. You can’t do enough to do that. Go out there and get to know your small farmer, find out what their issues are, and find out how you can help them stay in business.”

Resources:Oregon Food Bankhttp://www.oregonfoodbank.org

Presidio Graduate Schoolhttp://www.presidio.edu

023: The People Behind the Food
18:59
2017-12-15 20:33:52 UTC 18:59
023: The People Behind the Food

Organization:Bom Dia Market is an inviting corner market offering local and international beer and wine, freshly prepared foods, and thoughtfully sourced grocery and household staples. Bom Dia Market is setting a new standard in the service industry. Bom Dia Market is committed to valuing work-life balance, providing a living wage at all levels of the company, offering competitive benefits (including vacation time), and immersing employees in the intersection of local food lovers and food makers.

Topic:Creating Success by Focusing on Employees

Guest:Shivani Ganguly is the Proprietor of Bom Dia Market and the Principal at Friday Consulting. Previously, she led human resources, operations, and finance for startups and nonprofits. Shivani holds a BA from Stanford University, and an MBA from Presidio Graduate School.

Shivani Ganguly Twitterhttps://twitter.com/shivaniganguly

Take Away Quotes: “We think that great work places are really critical to the success of businesses overall. And we also, just at a base human level, want to make sure that the people we’re working with enjoy their work and are being paid equitably for it, and also have opportunities for growth and development.”

“There’s a real interest for our employees getting to know our customers. We have many, many regular customers; that’s a real cornerstone of our business. People who come in one or two times a day, and we’re a real regular part of their daily life. I think that a big part of that is not just our fantastic food, but it’s that personal connection with the employees who work there.”

“I think one of the biggest problems in the food industry is the culture that we see in kitchens, and that’s been something we’ve honestly struggled with over the past year or so. It’s often a very male dominated culture where people are expected to work for less than a living wage in a relatively unpleasant environment. We want to create this beautiful sustainably produced food and we’re not running our kitchens in that way. And I think that’s something that we as an organization are really tying to change.”

Resources:Bom Dia Markethttp://www.bomdiamarket.com/

Presidio Graduate Schoolhttp://www.presidio.edu

022: Valuing Food Artisans
25:30
2017-12-15 20:33:52 UTC 25:30
022: Valuing Food Artisans

Organization:Maker’s Common is a new eatery and market brought to you by the people of Mission Cheese. Imagine Mission Cheese but bigger, with an expanded menu and an attached, highly-curated market. It will feature America’s best cheese, beer, wine, charcuterie, and more in a space that is well-designed but casual, that pays homage to the makers of delicious food and beverage.

Maker’s Common is offering up to $600,000 in notes to pay for the buildout of a cheese and charcuterie bar and retail market. Any California resident can invest through our Direct Public Offering — it’s like crowdfunding but all grown up because investors earn a return on their investment. The minimum investment is $1,000 and investors earn 4% annual interest plus additional perks.

Topic:Taking an Artisan Approach to Financing

In This Episode:1:04 Mike and Carl discuss the current landscape for small businesses to acquire capital.2:55 Introduction to the episode3:49 Oliver gives the origin story of Mission Cheese.6:38 Oliver shares the vision and purpose for Mission Common.9:50 Mike asks Oliver why he chose to go the DPO route for financing Mission Common.15:04 How does Oliver’s values show up in the way he runs Mission Cheese?17:05 How does open book work and how has it been successful for Mission Cheese?21:28 Who can invest in Makers Common and how can they do so?

Guest:Oliver Dameron is the co-founder of Mission Cheese, which opened in 2011. Oliver has followed an interesting path to the good food industry. This path has included years as a coral reef scientist, where he managed multi-million dollar budgets and large teams of scientists, and work as a responsible investment analyst, vetting public companies for their social and environmental performance. After receiving his MBA from the Presidio Graduate School, Oliver joined a startup solar technology company, where he engaged in financial planning, fundraising, budget management, and business development. Currently, he operates as the chief financial officer and beer director at Mission Cheese, having earned his Certified Cicerone (equivalent to a beer sommelier) certification in 2013. He is also working to launch Maker’s Common, a new eatery and market. Imagine Mission Cheese but bigger, with an expanded menu and an attached, highly-curated market. Maker’s Common will feature America’s best cheese, beer, wine, charcuterie, and more in a space that is well-designed but casual, that pays homage to the makers of delicious food and beverage.

Mission Cheese Twitterhttps://twitter.com/missioncheese

Take Away Quotes: “It’s this great learning, you sort of start to understand the relationships of a variety of different things that influence your business and with all this you can imagine this white board of rows and different people in our company own different rows. And so I would say the ownership piece has really shined through because of that fact.”

“It really took, I would say, I year and a half for this system to kick in, which is probably about a year longer than most people would try. But because at the end of the day I want our staff to be able to say, “we” when they’re thinking about our business, and also because it allows Sarah and I to step away from the business a little bit more and think more about the future.”

“So it’s about five times as good as the best savings account, and that’s what I feel good about is allowing someone to invest where literally most people don’t have the opportunity to invest in a restaurant because people can’t advertise for that investment. So I feel like that’s a really great part of it is that it gives people an opportunity to invest in Main Street.”

Resources:Mission Cheesehttp://missioncheese.net/

Oliver Dameron Twitterhttps://twitter.com/oliverdameron

Presidio Graduate Schoolhttp://www.presidio.edu

 

021: Is This Working for You?
27:15
2017-12-15 20:33:52 UTC 27:15
021: Is This Working for You?

Organization:The Local Mission Market was founded on a truly revolutionary idea. All markets--from big boxes to tiny boutiques--have always been and still are aggregators: They distinguish themselves by the products they buy, whether industrial or artisanal production. Either way, the food you buy is not made there and not by people you know. At Local Mission Market, we are the producers. We are the makers. Every day, on-site, in view of every customer and in conversation with you, we craft granola, pasta, crackers, jams, pickles, sausages, soups, side salads, dips, dressing, popcorn, oat bars, marshmallows, and more and more.

Topic:An Exploration of Local Food Systems

In This Episode:1:46 Introduction to this episode.2:17 Introduction of Yaron Milgrom.2:43 Yaron describes San Francisco’s Mission District.4:21 Yaron shares his story that lead him to the food industry.6:08 Yaron talks about why local is important to Local Mission Group.9:36 How does Yaron make sure that their system works for their employees?11:42 Yaron discusses the disparity in our food economy. 13:16 Yaron gives advice on how businesses can work with local residents in a way that benefits all parties. 19:10 Can the Local Mission Group model be replicated in other climate areas?22:44 How can listeners learn more about Local Mission Group and support the work they do?

Guests:Yaron Milgrom is the owner of Local Mission Group and operates Local Mission Eatery, Local Mission Market, and Local Cellar. In 2010, with Chef Jake Des Voignes, Yaron opened Local Mission Eatery. Dedicated to rigorously local sourcing, from-scratch cooking, and transparency with our customers, the Eatery launched as a sandwich shop with two employees. Now, Local Mission Group owns and operates a full-service restaurant (another, Local’s Corner, a local seafood restaurant opened in 2012 and closed in 2014), a local and handmade market (Local Mission Market, which opened in November 2013), and a California wine, craft-beer, and spirits bottle shop (Local Cellar in February 2014). Local Mission Group has over 40 employees and supports dozens local of farmers, ranchers, fishermen, and winemakers. Prior to opening Local Mission Eatery, Yaron received a MA in Medieval Jewish Mysticism at New York University. With his wife and three kids, he lives in the Mission District of San Francisco, just blocks from his businesses.

Local Mission Market Twitterhttps://twitter.com/LocalMarketSF

 

Take Away Quotes: “Local for us is something very different. Always it’s going to ask the people involved in the food that we serve, from the farmer who’s growing it, the farm workers who are picking it and putting it in the ground and maybe bringing it to market, to the people that we employ, and also really to those who are coming into the shop- asking all of them if it’s working for them.”

“I think one of the weirdest parts about the food industry is when you have employees who are really committed, love the food that they’re serving, committed to the valley’s excellence in food, but can’t afford to actually eat that way themselves. So at the baseline when you speak of the humanity in the industry, it has to start, I think, at…at least that they’r eating well.”

“We have an employee base that is representative of the diversity of the mission and that’s neighborly so you see the people that you’re serving, you see the people you’re cooking for, and they live next to you. This is part of it being personal. To build care for the people, and the reason why you may be spending more, to build care is about the faces attached to them and be able to see them. So it’s one thing when you see them across the counter or across the butcher counter in the kitchen, and it’s another thing when you see them walking down the street.”

Resources:Local Mission Eateryhttp://www.localmissioneatery.com/

Local Mission Markethttp://www.localmissionmarket.com/

Local Cellarhttp://www.localcellarsf.com/

Presidio Graduate Schoolhttp://www.presidio.edu

 

 

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit at eosummit.com

020: Portland is a Movable Side Yard Feast
25:36
2017-12-15 20:33:52 UTC 25:36
020: Portland is a Movable Side Yard Feast

Organization:The Side Yard is an urban farm, supper club and catering company located in the NE Cully Neighborhood in Portland, Oregon. Since 2009 they have provided local restaurants with creative organic produce and the community with food, education and opportunity. The farm is largely operated by volunteers and interns who gain hands on experience with the urban seed to plate movement. The Side Yard offers urban farm suppers & brunches, private catering, nomadic pop-ups, educational DIY workshops, farm tours and grief groups. Their focus is to provide local food for the local community, from the seeds they sow, animals they raise, and to the craftsmanship they embrace.

Topic:Providing local food to the local community

In This Episode:1:34 Introduction to this episode.2:36 Introduction of Stacey Givens.3:26 Stacey describes how their farm works.4:43 Stacey talks about the amount of produce that The Side Yard grows.5:32 Stacey explains how they are staffed and how they depend on volunteers.6:15 What specifically does The Side Yard grow and how is that unique?7:41 What is the Nomadic Supper Club?11:20 How did Stacey end up being a farmer, chef, and innovative entrepreneur?13:48 How does community play a role in supporting the work of The Side Yard?15:44 What educational opportunities does The Side Yard provide?18:19 How does The Side Yard care for its employees?19:25 What does local mean in context of their operation?21:14 How can listeners learn more about The Side Yard and support the work?22:03 If Stacey could sit down with her future self, what would the future Stacey say about the importance and impact of the work she’s doing?

Guest:Stacey Givens is the farmer, chef and owner of The Side Yard Farm & Kitchen in Northeast Portland, Oregon’s Cully Neighborhood. Givens grows diverse organic produce for Portland’s top restaurants and provides food, education and opportunity to her community. Givens was raised the youngest of seven children in a large Greek family in Redondo Beach, California where she was instilled with do-it-yourself values from a young age, farming in their backyard garden and small orchard, foraging with her mom, picking and brining olives and helping prepare large Greek family-style suppers. Givens has been in the food industry since age 15. She worked her way up the West Coast, including at the nationally acclaimed Millennium in San Francisco, before landing in Portland in 2006. Givens established The Side Yard Farm in 2009. The Side Yard Farm & Kitchen currently consists of several urban farm lots maintained by Givens and her team, a farm-to-table private catering company, and the ‘Nomadic Chef’ supper club where she features her urban-grown goods. Givens also organizes invaluable community services at The Side Yard like DIY workshops, grief support groups and kids camps. While The Side Yard has a hyperlocal focus, Givens’ drive to build a strong community and make lasting connections with talented and passionate people is globally-minded, traveling around the world to meet fellow organic farmers and chefs. In 2014, Givens was the recipient of Portland’s Local Hero award in the chef category, and continues to give back to the community she loves through volunteerism and her indispensable work at The Side Yard. In 2015, she competed on the Foodnetwork’s ‘Chopped’ and brought home the win for Portland.

Stacey Givens Twitterhttps://twitter.com/thesideyardpdx

Take Away Quotes:“It’s all about the experience of seed to plate. All of that was harvested the day before, the day of. You can just taste the freshness and that connection of hyper local.”

“After I lost my father I decided I’m done with going to grief groups in hospitals- why not have one at the farm. It’s such a beautiful place and I think it’d be easier for people to share the loss of their loved one…and we just become this big ole family.”

“I hope that what we’re doing is we’re teaching people that being local is really important, being organic is extremely important, and I guess that’s what I would hope for is that we’re doing our job educating people and bringing them closer to their food.”

Resources:The Side Yardhttp://www.thesideyardpdx.com/

Presidio Graduate Schoolhttp://www.presidio.edu

 

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit at eosummit.com

 

 

 

019: Making Healthy Food Available to All with The Food Trust
20:23
2017-12-15 20:33:52 UTC 20:23
019: Making Healthy Food Available to All with The Food Trust

Organization:The Food Trust is a nationally recognized nonprofit dedicated to ensuring that everyone has access to affordable, nutritious food and information to make healthy decisions. Headquartered in Philadelphia, The Food Trust works with neighborhoods, schools, grocers, farmers and policymakers in the city and across the country to develop a comprehensive approach to improved food access that combines nutrition education and greater availability of affordable, healthy food.

Topic:How the Food Trust brings healthy food options to underserved communities

In This Episode:1:33 Introduction to this episode.2:05 Introduction of Kamaryn Norris.3:03 What does the Food Trust do, and what is Kamaryn’s role?4:50 What is the Food Trust’s origin story?7:09 What impact is the Food Trust having?9:15 How can others make something like the Food Trust happen in their community?10:40 What are the biggest food challenges that our country faces, and how is the Food Trust helping overcome those?12:26 Kamaryn shares her work with healthy food finance programs.15:50 How can people find out more about the Food Trust and get involved with the work of the Food Trust?17:12 What would the future Kamaryn say about the work that is being done now?

Guest:Kamaryn Norris is a Project Associate for the National Campaign for Healthy Food Access at the Food Trust, a Philadelphia-based, national non-profit with the mission of ensuring everyone has access to affordable, nutritious foods and information to make healthy decisions. Kamaryn advocates for policies that support the development of grocery stores across the country in areas that lack access to healthy foods and facilitates the National Working Group, which ensures that access is equitable and reaching the most vulnerable populations. She also works on The Healthy Food Access Portal, an online resource that connects community members, retailers, and advocates to an array of news, strategies, and ideas to promote access to healthy food. Kamaryn believes that it is a basic human right to be able to have a healthy diet that is good for you, no matter where you live. An Atlanta native, Kamaryn earned dual bachelor’s degrees in Sociology and Rhetoric & Public Advocacy from Temple University. She enjoys playing and watching tennis, traveling, and has a love for the snow and all things cold weather.Kamaryn Norris LinkedIn-https://www.linkedin.com/in/Kamaryn

Take Away Quotes:“We work with adult nutrition education, we also work in schools with youth to help them be leaders around healthy food eating, we also have a farmers market program, we put nutritious into corner stores because for a lot of people that’s the only place where they can get food at all, and we work on local, state, and federal policy change to encourage grocery store development.”

“I really think of this as it’s a human right to be able to eat real food so you can live a happy life. It’s a social justice issue really and it’s something that is very complex and very complicated and we’re always learning.”

“What we’ve been seeing from this is that we’re reaching people that are often hard to get to in the current health system. We’re seeing largely black men that are coming and frequenting these events and they’re bringing their families and people they know. So it’s really all about meeting people where they are for access.”

“There’s shorter term impact that you can see and you can measure but then there’s much longer terms and those are the health impacts and that’s our ultimate goal and what drives us.”

Resources:The Food Trustwww.thefoodtrust.org

The Healthy Food Access Portalwww.healthyfoodaccess.org

Presidio Graduate Schoolhttp://www.presidio.edu

 

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit at eosummit.com

 

 

 

018: Changing Lives One Clairesquare at a Time with La Cocina
20:25
2017-12-15 20:33:52 UTC 20:25
018: Changing Lives One Clairesquare at a Time with La Cocina

La Cocina is a non-profit incubator kitchen based in San Francisco, CA that prides itself on cultivating food entrepreneurs. La Cocina provides affordable commercial kitchen space and hands on technical assistance to low income and immigrant entrepreneurs who are launching, growing, and formalizing food businesses. La Cocina prioritizes women entrepreneurs with a special focus on immigrant women and women of color. Their vision is for entrepreneurs to gain financial security by doing what they love to do, thereby creating an innovative, vibrant, and inclusive economic landscape.

Topic:Changing Lives and Communities by Equipping Food Entrepreneurs with La Cocina

In This Episode:1:38 Introduction to this episode.2:05 Introduction of Jessica Mataka.2:57 Jessica shares the work and mission of La Cocina.5:29 How did La Cocina get started and how did it get connected with entrepreneurs?6:27 Jessica shares her role at La Cocina.8:00 Why does La Cocina focus on helping women entrepreneurs?8:29 How is the work of the graduates of La Cocina impacting their lives, the lives of their families, and their communities?11:07 What has been the economic impact of La Cocina?11:40 Jessica shares stories of success from graduates of La Cocina.14:05 How can listeners get involved with and support the work of La Cocina?17:21 If future Jessica could talk with current Jessica, what will she have to say about the work the La Cocina team is doing?

Guests:Jessica Mataka is a California-born, human rights and environmental activist. She’s organized on behalf of mission-based non-profit Global Exchange, designed and implemented a curriculum focusing on anti-human trafficking efforts throughout high schools in the Bay Area and recently returned from Huaycán, Peru, where she taught an original program focusing on the intersection of art and activism. She is now happily employed as the Communications and Development Associate at La Cocina.Jessica Mataka Twitter- https://twitter.com/jesmatakaJessica Mataka LinkedIn- https://www.linkedin.com/in/jessicamataka

Organization:La Cocina is a non-profit incubator kitchen providing affordable commercial kitchen space and hands-on technical assistance to low-income and immigrant entrepreneurs who are launching, growing and formalizing food businesses. La Cocina prioritizes women entrepreneurs with a special focus on immigrant women and women of color. Their vision is that entrepreneurs gain financial security by doing what they love to do, creating an innovative, vibrant and inclusive economic landscape.

Take Away Quotes:“I think giving someone the tools to be economically self-sufficient is an extremely important point in and of itself. Women are change makers. They are innovators and their equality is so essential to both the social and economic development of human kind. In a report I recently read from the world bank, it stated that women usually reinvest a much higher portion of their income back into their families and communities than men, and turn their spreading wealth beyond just themselves.”

“My hope is that San Francisco will continue to be a city that values diversity and values inclusive food economies and is a place where people from all walks of life can make a living doing what they love to do, especially if that includes starting a food business.”

“Nationally only 28.7% of businesses are owned by women. In an effort to counterbalance that, 98% of La Cocina’s businesses are run by women. So we’re just trying to level the playing field a little bit.”

“One of the most important things you can do on a daily basis is to eat thoughtfully and advocate for good food policies, and use your purchasing power to support owner operated restaurants.”

“My hope is that in 20 years I’ll be able to look around the city of San Francisco and see these businesses that were started through La Cocina and see them continue to thrive and see their family take over their business and continue to operate it once they’ve passed their working years.”

Resources:La Concina: Cultivating Food Entrepreneurshttp://www.lacocinasf.org

La Cocina Facebook Pagehttps://www.facebook.com/lacocinasforg

The Story Exchangehttp://thestoryexchange.org/la-cocina/

Presidio Graduate Schoolhttp://www.presidio.edu

 

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit at eosummit.com

017: Extreme Makeover: Ugly Produce Edition with Raley’s Family of Fine Stores
19:54
2017-12-15 20:33:52 UTC 19:54
017: Extreme Makeover: Ugly Produce Edition with Raley’s Family of Fine Stores

As much as 40 percent of all the food produced in the United States never gets eaten and typically ends up in landfills or goes unharvested in the field, according to the Natural Resources Defense Council. Megan Burritt, Aspen Institute First Mover Fellow and director of sustainability and wellness at Raley’s Family of Fine Stores, saw an opportunity to address this issue, developing pathways that connect fresh food waste in the supply chain with food insecure consumers. This led the company to design a new program, dubbed “Real Good” produce, to sell imperfect fruits and vegetables to food insecure customers, at a highly discounted price. Learn more about this program here: http://www.aspeninstitute.org/about/blog/aspen-first-mover-fellow-tackles-food-waste-while-feeding-food-insecure#sthash.a2q39kN1.dpuf

Topic:Decreasing Food Waste Through the Real Good Produce Program

In This Episode:0:27 Introduction to this episode.2:44 Introduction of Meg Burritt.3:14 Meg shares her background and role as the Director of Wellness and Sustainability at Raley’s.5:04 What is Raley’s and how many stores are there?5:50 What is the Aspen Institute’s First Movers Fellowship Program and how does that fit into Meg’s work?7:02 What is the Real Good Produce program and how is it linked to the ugly food movement?8:10 How does Raley’s deal with internal food waste?9:35 How does Raley’s food program impact prices for their customers?11:37 What type of environmental impact does the program have?14:58 What were the risks that Raley’s had to consider before starting the Real Good Produce program?15:51 How can people learn more and get involved with this program?17:05 What does Meg hope will be the impact of her work 30 years from now?

Guests:Megan Burritt is Raley’s Supermarkets Director of Wellness and Sustainability. Passionate about creating sustainable food systems and bringing good, clean food to the everyday American, Meg has lived every link in the food chain, from working on the farm to line cooking to category management. Meg attended Stanford as an undergrad, majoring in Human Biology, and is a graduate of Presidio Graduate School where she obtained an MBA in Sustainable Management. As a 2014 First Movers Fellow with the Aspen Institute Business and Society Program, Meg continues to learn and grow as an innovator. First Movers is a group of exceptional innovators in business who are creating new products, services and management practices that achieve greater profitability and positive social and environmental impacts. Meg lives in beautiful Curtis Park, Sacramento where she enjoys baking, riding bikes and spending time with her veterinarian wife, Amanda, and their family of rescue animals. Twitter - https://twitter.com/misskeen LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/meganburritt

Organization:Raley's Supermarkets (also known as Raley's Family of Fine Stores) is a privately held, family-owned, regional grocery chain that operates stores under the Raley's, Bel Air Markets, Nob Hill Foods, and Food Source names in northern California and Nevada. Raley’s operates 128 stores, 40 of them in the Greater Sacramento area and employs around 13,400 workers today. Headquartered in West Sacramento, California, Raley's is the dominant supermarket operator in the Sacramento metropolitan area.

Take Away Quotes:“Up to 40% of the food that we grow here in America is often wasted before it gets to the consumer. That’s the high end of the statistic, but it really is mind boggling when you think about that much food that we’re putting resources into growing, that isn’t getting into the hands of people who would like to eat it.”

“At Raley’s we do still have some produce waste because some of it just goes off while it’s waiting to be purchased at the grocery store. And we actually divert from the landfill. We send all of our produce waste to an anaerobic bio-digester where it becomes essentially compost and then natural gas energy.”

“We are used to selling only one type of very perfectly shaped, sized, and colored fruits and vegetables in conventional grocery stores. So to go out here with this what people sometime call “ugly produce” we were taking a little bit of a risk. But we did see a really positive reception with our consumers that they understand that every fruit and vegetable is unique and it’s still nutritious and delicious no matter what it looks like.”

“People don’t realize that the food sector is the largest producer of greenhouse gasses of all our sectors, including transportation. So if you have an industry that’s wasting 40% of its effort, there’s this huge opportunity to reduce waste, to reduce environmental impacts, to reduce greenhouse gas impacts, at the same time reduce food costs [and] deal with issues of food insecurity. So across the board it’s just vitally important work.” Resources:Aspen Institute http://www.aspeninstitute.org

Aspen Institute - First Movers Fellowship Program http://www.aspeninstitute.org/policy-work/business-society/corporate-programs/first-movers-fellowship-program

Raley’s Supermarkets http://www.raleys.com/www/home.jsp

PBS News Hour Video on Food Waste http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/almost-half-americas-food-go-waste/

Presidio Graduate Schoolhttp://www.presidio.edu

 

 

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit at eosummit.com

016: Sustainable Food (and Management Education) with Presidio Graduate School
32:35
2017-12-15 20:33:52 UTC 32:35
016: Sustainable Food (and Management Education) with Presidio Graduate School

In this episode of Equitable Opportunity Radio, we begin a new series on the relationship between food and equitable opportunity. In today’s food culture, we’re seeing a rising number of individuals, businesses and communities that are rethinking how we grow, process, and consume our food. In this series we partner with Presidio Graduate School to bring you a series of stories about the pioneers who are working to innovate and transform our food system into one that promotes better health for people, the planet, and the economy.

Topic: The Relationship Between Food and Equitable Opportunity

In This Episode:0:29 Introduction to Food and Equitable Opportunity Series1:46 Introduction of guests4:30 What is Presidio Graduate School?6:55 Karen shares her background and passion for sustainable food systems.8:38 Dan shares his background and tells the story of his company, Regrained.10:48 For Karen, how do her passions for food and sustainability intersect?12:19 What is the future of food and sustainability?13:30 For Dan, how did his passion for food and sustainability come together?14:38 What is the future of Regrained?17:52 How is the sustainability field addressing equity?20:33 What are the implications of a more sustainable food system?22:12 How does a sustainable food system impact quality of life and earning a living wage?28:05 What should the food production system look like 30 years from now?

Guests: Dr. Steven Crane, Associate Dean of the MBA program at Presidio Graduate School.Karen Williams is the co-chair of the Presidio Sustainable Food Club and works at the Nexus of Urban Sustainability and Food.Dan Kurzrock is the co-chair of the Presidio Sustainable Food Club, as well as the Executive Grain Officer of ReGrained, a company that repurposes “spent” beer grain to create healthy, delicious, and sustainable products.

Organization: Presidio Graduate School is a school driven to educate leaders and transform the world. Presidio has a diverse student body and delivers education courses in virtual and in-person modes. Presidio offers an MBA and MPA program, as well as a dual MBA and MPA program. Karen and Dan are examples of the quality leadership that Presidio is growing and fostering with their degree programs.

Karen and Dan bring their passion for economics, social justice, healthy food, and easy access to food to their respective roles. They each understand that everything is connected. How we grow and distribute food, and reduce the amount of waste involved in it will provide enormous economic opportunity. If we help create ownership on how to grow the food, develop the market, and deliver it to market, we’ve created a way that addresses economic opportunity with those who have not previously had it.

Take Away Quotes:“We want our business to be something that creates jobs and we want it to be a really active player in our sustainable economy.”

“It is a holistic system so if you’re not addressing the social equity piece, then long term you can’t be totally sustainable.”

“It’s not just access to good food, but that also drives ability to maintain good health. So it really is all connected and that’s what I find so fascinating and exciting about it.”

“Food is such a massive industry and it has such a huge impact on our communities and our planet. The needs of today and our food system are are largely being prioritized over those of tomorrow and I became interested in ways that I could use business to counter balance that.”

Resources:http://www.regrained.com/https://www.facebook.com/Presidio-Sustainable-Food-Club-271823156176366/timeline/http://www.presidio.edu/

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit at eosummit.com

015: Broadening Women’s Roles in Hollywood, a Camp Reel Stories participant’s pursuit of diversity in the film industry
18:28
2017-12-15 20:33:52 UTC 18:28
015: Broadening Women’s Roles in Hollywood, a Camp Reel Stories participant’s pursuit of diversity in the film industry

In this episode of Equitable Opportunity Radio, Sydney Torrens, a high school student and participant in Camp Reel Stories joins the conversation to share her perspective on the media’s role in shaping people’s perception of world. Even as a young adult, Sydney understands the huge impact the media has on women’s ability to participate equally in the workplace and in the economy. She explains how Camp Reel Stories has provided her with the inside scoop on Hollywood and guidance on how women are successfully navigating the famously male-dominated film industry.

Topic: Broadening Women’s Roles in Hollywood and Pursuing Diversity in the Film Industry

Guest: Sydney Torrens is a student from Saratoga High School in San Jose, California. Sydney attended Camp Reel Stories during the summers of 2014 and 2015.

Organization: Camp Reel Stories is a one-week media camp for girls who want to learn how to make movies in the new digital media era. The camp has a powerful team of women active in the industry who will teach the “secret language” of media – the skills, tools and technologies. Working in small, collaborative groups, this camp gives the campers the opportunity to make and broadcast their own short films through:

  1. Production Classes
  2. Media Literacy Lessons
  3. Leadership Workshops

Film and Television is a multi-billion dollar industry and it can seem very secretive and exclusive, but the industry is going through a process of great transformation right now. Anyone can tell their story and distribute it to the world via online and social media platforms like youtube, vimeo, etc… Girls are still famously underrepresented, both behind the scenes and on screen, but Camp Reel Stories intends to teach our campers that, with the right tools and training, they hold the key to a revolution in the media industry. Their dreams are within reach.

Website - http://campreelstories.com

Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/CampReelStories

Twitter -  https://twitter.com/CampReelStories

Take Away Quotes:

“Esther took all of our films and distributed them to a bunch of different film festivals... It was just the coolest thing… They played our film with several other young filmmakers… It was just great to be there amongst other young filmmakers and also filmmakers who have been in the business for a while.”

“It was really eye-opening to see how the film industry runs, and see how these women have made their way through it. It’s such a tough business, so it was really inspiring to see people who have made it successfully.”

“It got me excited… It exposed me to the issues of gender inequality in film and media… It opened up a door, and the door just kind of said, ‘This is for you, you should come in and be a part of this movement to get women in film.’”

“I met so many incredible women, and I just learned that there is a need for diversity in Hollywood, and I definitely want to be someone who brings that to the table.”

“When you look up to these women who are so interesting and have such awesome lives, like Esther, she has an incredible life, she’s had this awesome career, and it definitely showed me I can have something similar to that if I go down this path.”

Additional Resources:

Watch Sydney’s latest Camp Reel Stories film: http://campreelstories.com/films/sleepy-house/

Watch Sydney’s film from Summer 2014: http://campreelstories.com/films/filtered-eyespot-films/

Hear Sydney’s thoughts about being part of the Portland Oregon Women’s Film Festival (POWFest): http://campreelstories.com/a-powfest-recap/

Learn more about the Portland Oregon Women’s Film Festival (POWFest): http://powfest.com/

Be a part of creating a more inclusive media landscape by supporting Camp Reel Stories’ efforts to empower and train young women for careers in the film industry: http://campreelstories.com/donate/

Do you know a girl who might benefit from Camp Reel Stories? Apply to be part of Camp Reel Stories: http://campreelstories.com/2015-application/

Does your favorite movie pass the Bechdel Test? Check out the Bechdel Test Movie List: http://bechdeltest.com/

 

 

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit at eosummit.com

014: Training young women for employment in film careers—how Esther Pearl and Camp Reel Stories are creating a more inclusive media landscape
22:09
2017-12-15 20:33:52 UTC 22:09
014: Training young women for employment in film careers—how Esther Pearl and Camp Reel Stories are creating a more inclusive media landscape

In this episode of Equitable Opportunity Radio, we talk with Esther Pearl, the Founder and Executive Director of Camp Reel Stories, a media camp for young women. Esther joins the conversation to share with us about the under-representation of women both in front of and behind the camera in the film industry and the profound effect this has on our society and our economy.

Camp Reel Stories teaches young women how to make movies in the new digital media era. The camp has a powerful team of women active in the industry who teach the “secret language” of media – the skills, tools and technologies. Working in small, collaborative groups, the camp gives the campers the opportunity to make and broadcast their own short films through: Production Classes, Media Literacy Lessons, Leadership Workshops.

The Film and Television Industry is a multi-billion dollar industry and it can seem very secretive and exclusive. However, it is going through a process of great transformation right now. Anyone can tell their story and distribute it to the world via online and social media platforms like Youtube, Vimeo, and so one. Girls are still famously underrepresented, both behind the scenes and on screen, but Camp Reel Stories intends to teach their campers that, with the right tools and training, they hold the key to a revolution in the media industry. Their dreams are within reach.

Topic: Women in the Media and Gender Equity in our Society

Guest: Esther Pearl is the founder and Executive Director of Camp Reel Stories. She received her Bachelor's in Visual Arts from University of California, San Diego and her M.B.A. in Sustainable Management from The Presidio Graduate School. She has spent 15 years working in Production Management in the Entertainment Industry. The majority of her career was spent at Pixar Animation Studios where her feature film credits include Academy Award winning films The Incredibles and Wall-e, as well as Monsters, Inc. Her other credits include; Titanic, Starship Troopers, Armageddon and What Dreams May Come. She was also a founding board member and the former President of the Board of Bay Area Girls Rock Camp (BAGRC). Esther believes in the power of great storytelling to create social change.

Organization: Camp Reel Stories is a one-week media camp for girls who want to learn how to make movies in the new digital media era. The camp has a powerful team of women active in the industry who will teach the “secret language” of media – the skills, tools and technologies. Working in small, collaborative groups, this camp gives the campers the opportunity to make and broadcast their own short films through:

  1. Production Classes
  2. Media Literacy Lessons
  3. Leadership Workshops

Film and Television is a multi-billion dollar industry and it can seem very secretive and exclusive, but the industry is going through a process of great transformation right now. Anyone can tell their story and distribute it to the world via online and social media platforms like youtube, vimeo, etc… Girls are still famously underrepresented, both behind the scenes and on screen, but Camp Reel Stories intends to teach our campers that, with the right tools and training, they hold the key to a revolution in the media industry. Their dreams are within reach.

Website - http://campreelstories.com

Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/CampReelStories

Twitter -  https://twitter.com/CampReelStories

Take Away Quotes:

“When women and girls are better represented behind the scenes in the media, they’ll be better reflected on the screen.”

“Right now whenever you turn on the television or watch a movie, for every girl you see on screen, you see four to five boys. And that has actually been the same since 1948.”

“I’ve been working in the media since I was 16... I’ve had a great career, but I’ve certainly known the feeling of being one of the only women in the room.”

“The media is the most prevalent and pervasive industry that we have at the moment… until we change the way media presents both women and people of color, we’re not going to have more women in the C-suite, in political office, because until girls are starting to see the possibilities and roles presented to them at a very young age, they’re not going to even start thinking about those as possibilities for their career. What we’re seeing, even with 15 and 16 year old girls, they’re taking themselves out of the game of life before they even know the rules. They’re pulling back their hopes, dreams, and aspirations because they don’t see it as a possibility for them. And it’s 2015.”

“By the end of the week the girls understand how to nurture their own unique voice, how to create their own media and understand the technology… and they also understand how to view media more critically and more thoughtfully.”

Additional Resources:

Be a part of creating a more inclusive media landscape by supporting Camp Reel Stories’ efforts to empower and train young women for careers in the film industry: http://campreelstories.com/donate/

Watch all the Camp Reel Stories films here: http://campreelstories.com/films/

Do you know a girl who might benefit from Camp Reel Stories? Apply to be part of Camp Reel Stories: http://campreelstories.com/2015-application/

 

 

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit at eosummit.com

013: From Unemployed Berkeley Dropout to Climate Change Warrior the Tyi Johnson and Rising Sun Energy Center Story
15:25
2017-12-15 20:33:52 UTC 15:25
013: From Unemployed Berkeley Dropout to Climate Change Warrior the Tyi Johnson and Rising Sun Energy Center Story

In this episode of Equitable Opportunity Radio, we talk with Tyi Johnson a graduate of the Green Energy Training Services (GETS) program at Rising Sun Energy Center. Tyi shares her personal journey from dropping out of UC Berkeley because she could not afford the tuition to working full-time in a green job as part of the Smart Lights Program at Community Energy Services Corporation.

Topic: The Green Economy and Workforce Development

Guest: Tyi Johnson is a graduate of the Green Energy Training Services program at Rising Sun Energy Center and an employee of Community Energy Services Corporation. She also serves on Rising Sun Energy Center’s Board of Directors.

Organization: The Smart Lights Program at Community Energy Services Corporation is designed to help small businesses become more energy-efficient. The program offers free start-to-finish technical assistance and instant rebates to help defray the cost of upgrading and/or repairing existing equipment. SmartLights helps with comprehensive lighting retrofits, refrigeration tune-ups, controls, and seals replacement, and referrals to appropriate HVAC programs. Their services include: a no cost and no obligation energy-efficiency assessment, instant rebates (typically range from 25%-75% of total project costs), negotiated volume pricing with qualified installation contractors, free start-to-finish project management and quality control, rebates paid directly to contractors to help defray out-of-pocket costs, and referrals to other energy efficiency programs as needed. Take a look at some of Community Energy Services Coporation's work on cafes,auto repair shops,facilities, and retail stores.

Website - http://ebenergy.org/commercial-services/smart-lights-program/

Facebook -https://www.facebook.com/Community-Energy-Services-Corporation-610255012322031

Take Away Quotes:

“After the internship ended, it was hard-going for me. This is when unemployment was at an all-time high... I stayed the course, I was meeting with my case-manager week after week. I really appreciate the fact that Rising Sun continued to collaborate with me and to encourage me and work with me until I was gainfully employed.”

“I feel like Rising Sun and the GETS program have put me in the prime position to be doing what I’m doing right now... I had three reasons why I joined GETS program: to learn about the green field, to learn about the energy efficiency field and by extension sustainability, and to learn how to save on my PG&E bill. And they did all three of those things for me. So it’s really great that I got all of those things, and got employed in the green energy efficiency field.”

“If I can empower others to be good stewards of this one great beautiful planet called Earth that we have, then I’ll do so, and I’m so appreciative of Rising Sun for setting me on that path.”

 

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit at eosummit.com

012: Green Job Training and Workforce Development, Jodi Pincus, Rising Sun Energy Center
22:50
2017-12-15 20:33:52 UTC 22:50
012: Green Job Training and Workforce Development, Jodi Pincus, Rising Sun Energy Center

This episode of Equitable Opportunity Radio explores what one leading workforce development organization is doing to simultaneously address climate change, water shortages, youth employment and obstacles to employment for low income adults. Rising Sun Energy Center, a green workforce development and energy retrofit services organization, works throughout the San Francisco Bay area to develop a green workforce while reducing environmental impacts and saving low income families money on their utilities.  Rising Sun Energy Center’s Executive Director Jodi Pincus is our guest. Jodi is a recognized expert in the green economy, youth employment, social enterprise and workforce development.

Topic:  The Green Economy, Youth Employment and Workforce Development

Guest:  Jodi Pincus is the Executive Director of Rising Sun Energy Center and a recognized expert in the green economy, youth employment, social enterprise and workforce development.

Organization:  Rising Sun Energy Center is a green workforce development and energy retrofit services organization working throughout the San Francisco Bay area. Their mission is to empower individuals to achieve environmental and economic sustainability for themselves and their communities. Rising Sun Energy Center runs three programs, which include the California Youth Energy Services (CYES), Leaders-in-Field-Training (LIFT) and Green Energy Training Services (GETS). The CYES program includes summer and after-school programs that train and employ young adults ages 15 to 22 to provide no-cost Green House Calls (energy efficiency and water conservation upgrades) to homes in their community. The LIFT program gives top employees in Rising Sun's CYES program peer leadership roles and teaches business and leadership skills. The GETS program is a pre-apprenticeship training program that prepares adults for careers in construction, energy efficiency, and the solar industry.

Website - http://www.risingsunenergy.org/

Blog - https://risingsunenergy.wordpress.com/

Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/risingsunenergycenter

Twitter -  https://twitter.com/RisingSunEC

Take Away Quotes:

“We believe that you can’t solve climate change without addressing unemployment.”

“Our youth, not only are they earning money and feeling a sense of purpose by doing the work but they’re gaining a lot of self-confidence, self-esteem; they’re going on to careers in business, social service, and environmental science.”

“This wonderful young man… he was in the foster care system… he came out of prison and into our job training program, and he had never graduated from anything in his life, and he graduated from our program.”

Additional Resources:

Rising Sun Energy Center’s Best Green Resources - http://www.risingsunenergy.org/content/links.html

Rising Sun Energy Center’s California Youth Energy Services (CYES) - http://www.risingsunenergy.org/content/cyes.html

Rising Sun Energy Center’s Green Energy Training Services (GETS) - http://www.risingsunenergy.org/content/gets.html

Rising Sun Bright Night 2015 (Participants of the California Youth Energy Services and Green Energy Training Services programs explain what Rising Sun means to them, and how it has affected their lives.) - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m26oP0NUs4Q

 

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit at eosummit.com

 

011: Equity: The Neglected Pillar of Sustainability, Bob Willard, Sustainability Advantage
24:44
2017-12-15 20:33:52 UTC 24:44
011: Equity: The Neglected Pillar of Sustainability, Bob Willard, Sustainability Advantage

This episode of Equitable Opportunity Radio covers the role equity has played in the sustainability movement to date and the future of equity as a measure of sustainability in the future. Our guest, Bob Willard, is a best-selling author and a globally recognized thought leader on the topics of making the business case for sustainability and measuring an organization's sustainability.

Bob shares with us his thoughts on the biggest global challenges (carbon, water, and poverty) we face. He also discusses why, to date, equity has not been as important of a part of the sustainability conversation as it should be and what he thinks the major measures of equity are for corporations (hint...employee compensation and paying fair taxes in the appropriate location).

Bob also explains the details of his latest project, the Future-Fit Business Benchmark, which when complete will be a more definitive set of metrics that can be used to measure the sustainability of businesses, government, and households.

Topic: Equity: The Neglected Third Pillar of Sustainability

Guest: Bob Willard is a leading expert on quantifying and selling the business value of corporate sustainability strategies and has given hundreds of keynote presentations to corporate, government, university, and NGO audiences. He has authored four books on sustainability including : The Sustainability Advantage (2002), The Next Sustainability Wave (2005), and The New Sustainability Advantage (2012).

Organization: Sustainability Advantage

Website - http://sustainabilityadvantage.com/

Twitter - https://twitter.com/bob_willard

LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/bobwillardsustainabilityguy

Take Away Quotes:

“Companies get a lot of good PR from being helpful in the community... but it’s nowhere close to the investment that they are not making when they duck paying their taxes.”On companies paying a living wage: “The turnover of employees is reduced dramatically… When people start to make a little bit more money, they are more empowered consumers… it’s better for the economy, it’s better for the government… and they become known as a company that really cares.”“The myth around this being a bad business proposition is hard to overcome, but it’s a myth, it’s not true. It really does pay to pay more.”

Additional Resources:

Future-Fit Business Benchmark - http://futurefitbusiness.org/

Future-Fit Business Benchmark Wiki - http://wiki.futurefitbusiness.org/Welcome

Future-Fit Business on Twitter - https://twitter.com/futurefitbiz

 

 

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit at eosummit.com

 

010: Revitalization in Baltimore after Freddie Gray, Mel Freeman, Citizens Planning & Housing Association
20:12
2017-12-15 20:33:52 UTC 20:12
010: Revitalization in Baltimore after Freddie Gray, Mel Freeman, Citizens Planning & Housing Association

On this episode of Equitable Opportunity Radio, we explore the revitalization challenges facing neighborhoods in West Baltimore before and after the tragic death of Freddie Gray. Our guest, Mel Freeman,  is a long-time community development activist and consultant and the former Executive Director of Citizens Planning & Housing Association in Baltimore, Maryland. Mel shares how inadequate access to quality infrastructure, services, and employment opportunities acts as a major barrier to community revitalization and economic participation for many residents of Baltimore. He stresses how vitally important it is to engage directly with residents in these neighborhoods to empower them and to work with them to build enduring solutions. Public resources are not adequate to shift the dynamic in many of these neighborhoods so Mel is focused on how to create conditions that will stimulate private investment in these neighborhoods while simultaneously lifting up and not displacing the majority of current residents. One particular focus of Mel’s work is to help members of these communities have hope, believe in themselves, empower themselves and become a force for change.

Topic: Revitalization in Baltimore after Freddie Gray

Guest: Mel Freeman is the former Executive Director of Citizens Planning & Housing Association, a regional organization whose mission envisions a well-planned Baltimore region with equity among jurisdictions, where citizens respect diversity and have access to responsive government and quality housing in vibrant neighborhoods. Currently, Mel is leading his own consulting firm, Freeman Consulting Group, where he continues to work to advance community-led planning processes that provide residents and organizations with the tools to self-manage change within their own communities. His approach is grounded in the belief that people change neighborhoods themselves not by waiting on others to lead the way.

Organization: The Citizens Planning & Housing Association (CPHA) is the catalyst for civic action to bring about a healthy, inclusive Baltimore, with economically vibrant communities and opportunities for all people. The organization does this by bringing together people and neighborhoods to create innovative solutions to challenging, community-wide problems; empowering citizens with information and skills for advocacy and organizing; and championing solutions through legislative and policy reforms. Their programs include Community Association Support and Leadership Training, Policy Research and Legislative Pressure, Citizen Outreach and Organizing, and more.

Website - http://www.cphabaltimore.org/

Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/bmorecpha

Twitter - https://twitter.com/bmorecpha

Take Away Quotes:

“There is a big fear of the word gentrification, do we have to have other folks who don’t look like us in our neighborhoods to increase the value of our communities?”

“There is never enough public money, ever! So private investment needs to happen in these communities.”

“We do need change in communities, but we also need to secure the families that are there.”

“You can’t get anything done unless you’re out there talking to people, and trying to really understand what their needs are.”

“Nobody in their neighborhood uses this train, hundreds of cars drive to this train station and then those people go to work, and those jobs are for them, not for us.”

“What we have to do is get out in these communities and talk about what is for them, and not have them constantly thinking that the next thing that happens in their community is not for them, it is for them and they need to know that.”

 

 

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit at eosummit.com

 

009: Anchor Institutions and Worker Cooperatives: Domenic Fatica, Evergreen Energy Solutions
17:39
2017-12-15 20:33:52 UTC 17:39
009: Anchor Institutions and Worker Cooperatives: Domenic Fatica, Evergreen Energy Solutions

Domenic has spent most of his adult life working in the construction industry and now, in his 60s, he is working the best job he has ever had and never wants to retire.  In fact, he loves the job so much he recruited his 88-year-old father to help train his co-workers.

On this week’s episode of Equitable Opportunity Radio, we interview Domenic Fatica, the General Manager of Evergreen Energy Solutions (E2S) worker cooperative in Cleveland. E2S hires individuals who have life experiences that make it hard for them to find employment. The cooperative then trains them in the construction and energy retrofit trades. E2S gives these men and women an opportunity to further transform their lives and become worker/owners of the cooperative, as well as homeowners with accessible transportation. Domenic and E2S are transforming lives, building local community wealth, and helping change the face of Cleveland. Tune in to learn why this is the most meaningful and important job Domenic has ever had.

Topic: Anchor Institutions and Worker Cooperatives

Guest: Domenic Fatica is general manager of Evergreen Energy Solutions (E2S), an Evergreen Cooperatives portfolio company that designs, installs, and develops PV solar panel arrays for institutional, governmental, and commercial markets. Incorporated in 2008, E2S also provides energy efficiency and home performance services to make residential and commercial buildings more energy efficient.

Organization: Evergreen Cooperatives of Cleveland, Ohio are pioneering innovative models of job creation, wealth building, and sustainability. Evergreen’s employee-owned, for-profit companies are based locally and hire locally. They create meaningful green jobs and keep precious financial resources within the Greater University Circle neighborhoods. Worker-owners at Evergreen Cooperatives earn a living wage and build equity in the firms as owners of the business.

Website - http://evergreencooperatives.com

Facebook -https://www.facebook.com/evergreencoop

Twitter - https://twitter.com/evgohcoop

Additional Resources:

Evergreen Cooperatives - http://evergreencooperatives.com

The Cleveland Foundation - http://www.clevelandfoundation.org

The Democracy Collaborative - http://democracycollaborative.org

 

 

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit at eosummit.com

008: Anchor Institutions and Community Wealth Building: Ted Howard, The Democracy Collaborative
28:33
2017-12-15 20:33:52 UTC 28:33
008: Anchor Institutions and Community Wealth Building: Ted Howard, The Democracy Collaborative

On this episode of Equitable Opportunity radio, host Mike Hancox and co-host Vernice Miller Travis interview Ted Howard, the Co-founder and Executive Director of The Democracy Collaborative at the University of Maryland. Ted explains the role anchor institutions and worker collaboratives play in building a more inclusive economy. Anchor institutions are large, placed-based, nonprofit organizations that tend not to relocate. Anchor institutions can have a major impact on local economies and tend to be major employers. According to community-wealth.org, “If the economic power of these anchor institutions were more effectively harnessed, they could contribute greatly to community wealth building. The largest and most numerous of such nonprofit anchors are universities and non-profit hospitals (often called "eds and meds").” In Cleveland, The Democracy Collaborative has worked with anchor institutions like The Cleveland Clinic to create the Evergreen Cooperatives. The Evergreen Cooperatives seek to create community wealth and thriving businesses by giving workers an ownership stake in the businesses that they are creating. The three existing Evergreen Cooperatives focus on local food production, solar energy retrofits, and laundry services. Tune in to learn about the impact this work has had in Cleveland and what the future of community wealth building might look like.

Topic: Anchor Institutions and Community Wealth Building

Guest: Ted Howard is the co-founder and Executive Director of The Democracy Collaborative at the University of Maryland. In July 2010, Mr. Howard was appointed the Steven Minter Senior Fellow for Social Justice at The Cleveland Foundation where he was a member of a team that developed the comprehensive job creation and wealth building strategy, which resulted in the Evergreen Cooperatives Initiative.  

Full Bio - http://democracycollaborative.org/content/ted-howard

Organization: The Democracy Collaborative is a national leader in equitable, inclusive and sustainable development through their Community Wealth Building Initiative. This initiative sustains a wide range of Advisory, Research and Field Building activities designed to transform the practice of community/economic development in the United States.

Website - http://democracycollaborative.org

Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/democracycollaborative

Twitter - https://twitter.com/democracycollab

Take Away Quotes:

“Rooting wealth in communities is the future of economic development in America”

“Ownership and control of capital is a key determinant of power in any economic system”

“There are 50 million or more people living in poverty in the US.”

“For profit with a social mission and a broadly shared ownership structure – that is what community wealth building is about.”

“A job alone is not enough…how do you create assets in addition to income.”

Additional Resources:

Evergreen Cooperatives - http://evergreencooperatives.com

The Cleveland Foundation - http://www.clevelandfoundation.org

The Cleveland Clinic - http://my.clevelandclinic.org

 

 

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit at eosummit.com

007: Eliminating Tips and Paying a Salary with Benefits: Bobby Fry, Bar Marco
21:29
2017-12-15 20:33:52 UTC 21:29
007: Eliminating Tips and Paying a Salary with Benefits: Bobby Fry, Bar Marco

On this episode, we talk with restaurateur Bobby Fry of Bar Marco in Pittsburgh. Bobby and his restaurant, Bar Marco, are on the leading edge of revolutionizing food service by eliminating tips and paying wait staff a salary with benefits and bonuses. Bobby is a successful and thoughtful business person who made the decision to shift his business model after a thorough analysis of his business and the restaurant industry. By valuing his workers and providing his wait staff and back of house staff with stable incomes and  benefits, Fry was able to triple the restaurant's bottom line. Bobby came to the decision to shift Bar Marco’s business model after determining there are 3 main reasons 90% of all restaurants fail in their first 3 to 5 years. He wanted Bar Marco to avoid a similar fate. The shift has motivated employees, increased teamwork, and reduced waste, which has resulted in huge bottom line results. Tune in to find out how a forward thinking business person sees his business and the opportunity taking care of his people creates.

Topic: Eliminating Tips and Paying a Salary with Benefits

Guest: Bobby Fry is the co founder/owner of Bar Marco in Pittsburgh.  

Organization: Bar Marco is a highly successful restaurant in Pittsburgh that recently has taken a radical new approach to how their staff is compensated. They describe themselves as restaurant with “The attention to detail of fine dining but with Hall & Oates and Wu-Tang Clan.”

Website - http://www.barmarcopgh.com/

Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Bar-Marco/167136583366244

Twitter -  https://twitter.com/BarMarcoPGH

Instagram - https://instagram.com/barmarcopgh/

Take Away Quotes:

“I wanted to proactively solve three problems restaurants face in the years 3-5 that result in 90% of restaurants failing”

“You need to do this for the right business reasons – this is not about hippies and free love”

“This is what happens when you have a minimum wage that is so low – you incentivize big companies to undervalue certain assets – they categorize their people as something they don’t take care of because there are other more expensive things you have to take care of.”

Additional Resources:

http://www.nextpittsburgh.com/next-wave/bar-marco-trailblazes-no-tipping-policy/

http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/246972

Michael Lynn – Cornell Professor and Hospitality Industry Researcher – https://www.hotelschool.cornell.edu/app/facultydb/instructors/wml3

Tipping Expert Website – http://tippingresearch.com/index.html

Food Revolution Pittsburgh Cooking Club – http://www.foodrevpgh.com/ and https://www.facebook.com/FRPCC

 

 

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit at eosummit.com

006: Infrastructure, Workforce Development, and Shared Regional Prosperity: Nathaniel Q. Smith, The Partnership for Southern Equity
34:00
2017-12-15 20:33:52 UTC 34:00
006: Infrastructure, Workforce Development, and Shared Regional Prosperity: Nathaniel Q. Smith, The Partnership for Southern Equity

On this episode, we talk with Nathaniel Q. Smith, the founder and convener of The Partnership for Southern Equity (PSE). PSE is working to bring together common and uncommon allies to develop public policies that will increase access and opportunity for vulnerable populations in the southeastern United States. They train everyday heroes in the art of community organizing and grow coalitions that realize equity in the areas of transportation, energy, growth, and health. Under Nathaniel’s leadership, PSE is currently working to bring public transportation back to Clayton County, Georgia, an area that lost its public transportation system four years ago. Nathaniel and PSE are also working to organize a collaborative that will work in metro Atlanta to realize the goal of a balanced distribution of energy benefits and burdens (energy equity). Their accomplishments to date include increased voting from vulnerable populations in T-SPLOST decision of 2011, creation of the Equitable Target Area Index and Social Equity Advisory Committee at the Atlanta Regional Commission, development of the Metro Atlanta Equity Atlas, institution of the American south’s first Equity Mapping and Framing tool, and highlighting the elevation of equity as the superior growth model for metro Atlanta.

Topic: Infrastructure, Workforce Development, and Shared Regional Prosperity

Guest: Nathaniel Q. Smith who is the founder/convener of The Partnership for Southern Equity.

LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/pub/nathaniel-smith/6/115/958

Organization: The Partnership for Southern Equity is working to bring together common and uncommon allies to develop public policies that will increase access and opportunity for vulnerable populations in the southeastern United States

Website - http://partnershipforsouthernequity.org

Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/PSEquity

Twitter - https://twitter.com/psequitymatters

Take Away Quotes:

“Our Interdependence as a region is what will dictate whether we will be competitive and sustainable.”

“The communities that have not answered the equity are left with a serious disadvantage.”

“What is economic development in the 21st century?"

“If we do not focus on people now as we move into an economy that requires (more skilled labor) then we will not be able to make profits (in the future).”

“Economic development is attracted to good infrastructure.”

“How can we leverage infrastructure and transportation in some of the communities that have been forgotten by the market in order to jump start local economies?”

Additional Resources:

Metro Atlanta Equity Atlas - http://partnershipforsouthernequity.org/index.php/issue-areas/maea

The Equity of Opportunity - http://partnershipforsouthernequity.org/index.php/issue-areas/equity-of-opportunity

 

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit at eosummit.com

005: Starbucks College Achievement Plan: Markelle Cullom-Herbison, Starbucks Barista
22:30
2017-12-15 20:33:52 UTC 22:30
005: Starbucks College Achievement Plan: Markelle Cullom-Herbison, Starbucks Barista

On this episode, Starbucks’ Barista and Tempe, Arizona native, Markelle Cullom-Herbison shares what it is like to participate in the Starbucks College Achievement Plan. She works at Starbuck’s while receiving her Bachelor’s degree in Psychology online from Arizona State University. Markelle talks about the challenges of working and going to school full-time; the challenge and burden Millennials face when dealing with the enormous cost and debt associated with college; and the huge financial and confidence boost she has gotten from Starbucks’ College Achievement Plan.

Topic:  Starbucks College Achievement Plan

Guest: Markelle Cullom-Herbison is an Assistant Manager at Starbucks

Organization: Starbucks

Website - http://www.starbucks.com

Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/Starbucks

Twitter - https://twitter.com/starbucksstore

Take Away Quotes:

“I know people that are Juniors in college that are 50 – 60 - $70,000 in debt from 2-3 years of school….that is crazy.”

“I would have been drowning in debt.”

“This partnership means so much more than a free education…..I truly believe we are changing the future and it is really cool to be a part of that.”

“I can’t imagine myself (working) any place other than Starbucks……”

Additional Resources:

Starbucks College Achievement Plan - http://www.starbucks.com/careers/college-plan

Arizona State University Online Degree Programs - http://asuonline.asu.edu

004: Starbucks College Achievement Plan and Opportunity for Youth Program: Lacey All, Starbucks Director of Strategy
22:53
2017-12-15 20:33:52 UTC 22:53
004: Starbucks College Achievement Plan and Opportunity for Youth Program: Lacey All, Starbucks Director of Strategy

On this episode, Starbucks’ Director of Strategy Lacey All talks about Starbucks’ ground breaking College Achievement Plan and Opportunity Youth Program. The College Achievement Plan pays full tuition to Arizona State University’s online 4-year degree program for any Starbucks’s employee who is benefits eligible (meaning they work on average 20 hours per week). The Opportunity Youth Program is focused on finding employment for the estimate 6 million “disconnected” young Americans between the ages of 16 and 24 who are neither in school nor employed full-time. This revolutionary commitment to engaging and advancing the lives of its employees is part of Starbucks’ strategy and commitment to build an outstanding 21st century brand and company.

Topic: Starbucks College Achievement Plan and Opportunity for Youth Program

Guest: Lacey All is Starbucks Director of Strategy

Twitter – https://twitter.com/laceynall

LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/pub/lacey-all/1/506/83a

Organization: Starbucks - they sell coffee – heard of them?

Website - http://www.starbucks.com

Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/Starbucks

Twitter - https://twitter.com/starbucksstore

Take Away Quotes:

“We can work differently to take big swings at big problems.”

“Our mission and values are fueled by the notion of individual opportunity.”

“Our goal is to inspire and nurture the human spirit.”

“We are trying to achieve the balance between profitability and social impact.”

“We ultimately want to be one of the most respected and trusted brands and to do that we have to make bold moves.”

“By 2025 we hope to have 25,000 partners graduate college.”

“As a company we are a collection of individuals who are all trying to do more good in the world and use our scale in the right way.”

Additional Resources:

Starbucks College Achievement Plan - http://www.starbucks.com/careers/college-plan

Opportunity for Youth - http://www.starbucks.com/responsibility/community/opportunity-youth

 

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit at eosummit.com

003: Knowing Together, Growing Together: Dr. Chris Benner
28:35
2017-12-15 20:33:52 UTC 28:35
003: Knowing Together, Growing Together: Dr. Chris Benner

Our topic this week is Knowing Together, Growing Together, how metropolitan regions that achieve a high degree of communication and collaboration among diverse stakeholder groups grow faster than other metropolitan areas. Our guest is Dr. Chris Benner, a Professor of Environmental Studies at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and the Executive Director of the Everett Program. On the show we discuss what places like Salt Lake City and Oklahoma City have done to grow their economies, reduce inequity, and create a more inclusive economy and community. Dr. Benner’s research focuses on the relationships between technological change, regional development, and structures of economic opportunity, focusing on regional labor markets and the transformation of work and employment patterns. Dr. Benner’s recent book, co-authored with Manuel Pastor, is Just Growth: Inclusion and Prosperity in America’s Metropolitan Regions, helps uncover the processes, policies and institutional arrangements that help explain how certain regions around the country have been able to consistently link prosperity and inclusion. Benner’s work has also included providing research assistance to a range of organizations promoting equity and expanded opportunity, including the Coalition on Regional Equity (Sacramento), Working Partnerships USA (San Jose), the California Labor Federation, and the Congress of South African Trade Unions, among others.

Topic: Knowing Together – Growing Together

Guest: Dr. Chris Benner is the Dorothy E. Everett Chair in Global Information and Social Entrepreneurship and Director of the Everett Program for Digital Tools for Social Innovation at the University of California, Santa Cruz.

Full Bio - https://ccrec.ucsc.edu/profile/chris-benner-phd

Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/chris.benner.395

Twitter – https://twitter.com/chrisbenner

LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/drchrisbenner

Organization: The Everett Program merges the enthusiasm of student leaders with information technology to promote structural social change by building social networking capacity across non-governmental and community-based organizations.

Website - http://www.everettprogram.org

Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/everettprogram

Twitter - https://twitter.com/everettprogram

Youtube- https://www.youtube.com/user/EverettProgram

Take Away Quotes:

“Those metropolitan regions that are more equitable in fact grow faster.”

Additional Resources:

Dr. Chris Benner TED talk: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VB1WqEV7miY

Just Growth Website – http://justgrowth.org

Envision Utah - http://envisionutah.org

Publications:

Just Growth: Inclusion and Prosperity in America's Metropolitan Regions – Find it on Amazon: Just Growth: Inclusion and Prosperity in America's Metropolitan Regions (Regions and Cities)

Knowing Together, Growing Together – Coming Soon

 

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit, at eosummit.com

002: Investing in Opportunity: Alan Jenkins, The Opportunity Agenda
27:41
2017-12-15 20:33:52 UTC 27:41
002: Investing in Opportunity: Alan Jenkins, The Opportunity Agenda

Our topic this week is Investing in Opportunity and our guest is Alan Jenkins the Executive Director of The Opportunity Agenda, a communications, research, and policy organization dedicated to building the national will to expand opportunity in America. The Opportunity Agenda launched in 2006 with the mission of building the national will to expand opportunity in America. Focused on moving hearts, minds, and policy over time, the organization works with social justice groups, leaders, and movements to advance solutions that expand opportunity for everyone. Through active partnerships, The Opportunity Agenda synthesizes and translates research on barriers to opportunity and corresponding solutions; uses communications and media to understand and influence public opinion; and identifies and advocates for policies that improve people’s lives. To achieve their mission, they focus on racial equity, immigration, economic opportunity, reproductive health and rights, and African-American men and boys.

Topic:  Investing in Opportunity

Guest: Alan Jenkins is Executive Director of The Opportunity Agenda. a communications, research, and policy organization dedicated to building the national will to expand opportunity in America.

Full Bio - http://opportunityagenda.org/alan_jenkins_extended_biography

LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/pub/alan-jenkins/5/634/570

Organization:  The Opportunity Agenda. Is a communications, research, and policy organization dedicated to building the national will to expand opportunity in America.

Website - http://opportunityagenda.org

Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/opportunityagenda

Twitter - https://twitter.com/oppagenda

LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/company/the-opportunity-agenda

Take Away Quotes:

“The ideal of opportunity is the notion that everyone deserves a fair chance to achieve his or her full potential.”

“Where the door of opportunity was cracked open a bit, Americans of all backgrounds have always rushed to get in the door.”

“Ultimately it’s up to all of us to make sure that we move from concern, to action, to solutions and that those solutions are lasting.”

Additional Resources:

American Opportunity Communication Toolkit: http://opportunityagenda.org/american-opportunity-communications-toolkit

Compact for Home Opportunity: https://opportunityagenda.org/compact_home_opp

Opportunity for Black Men and Boys:  http://opportunityagenda.org/black_male

 

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit, at eosummit.com

001: What Is Equitable Opportunity Radio
18:58
2017-12-15 20:33:52 UTC 18:58
001: What Is Equitable Opportunity Radio

On this first episode of Equitable Opportunity Radio, show host Mike Hancox the CEO of Skeo Solutions, introduces his co-hosts community development activist and consultant Vernice Miller-Travis and Carl Schneebeck, professor of leadership and communications at Presidio Graduate School. The show’s hosts share that the podcast will look at what businesses, organizations, communities, and individuals are doing to create a more inclusive economy.  Topics will include such things as: collaboration, compensation, corporate social responsibility, diversity, economic growth, employee empowerment, equitable access, equitable development, equitable opportunity, fair labor practices, green jobs, housing, innovation, job training, living wages, public-private partnerships, sustainability, thriving businesses, transportation equity.

 

For more information about Equitable Opportunity Radio and to join the conversation, visit our webiste, Equitable Opportunity Summit, at eosummit.com